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The Ubyssey Jan 10, 1969

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Array Vol. L. No. 33
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1969
228-2305
— dirk vwjer photo
BY GOD IT'S COLD . . . Cry of anguish escapes a shivering mother, breaking the stony silence.
Her son too is covered with the greasy white stuff that slowed the pace of the university to a
sluggish stumble. Students will trudge through the sludge for the rest of the winter.
UofS...
Student fees not collected
REGINA (CUP) — The board
of governors of the University
of Saskatchewan's Regina
campus has declared war on
the Regina student union as the
ultimate   step   in   a   two-year
campaign to  establish  censorship   over   the   student   newspaper, the Carillon,
Administration principal
Ubyssey cuts down on
points of distribution
The Ubyssey will appear at only 12 points on campus
starting with this issue. Previously the paper appeared at 24
drop-off points.
The   new   distribution   points   are:   SUB   west   entrance;
Buchanan up and downstairs; Faculty Club; Social Work house;
■ Bulletin   board    (behind   auditorium);    Ponderosa;   Education
lounge; Forestry-Aggie bldg.; Bio-sciences; Hennings; Bookstore;
Woodward library.
The move was instituted in an effort to make The Ubyssey
a  non-loss   organization.
"The Ubyssey will save $600 through this new circulation
system," said managing editor Bruce Curtis, who designed the
new coverage.
"However, students should still be able to find The Ubyssey
without too much trouble," he said. "The new drop-off points
are spread right across the campus, from west to east, and
north to south."
"Each faculty has easy access to at least two drop-off
points."
The Ubyssey will continue to print 15,500 copies per issue,
distributed in two runs, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Senate moots
enrolment cuts
. . . declares war
W. A. (Willie) Riddell announced Dec. 31 that the university
board of governors would refuse to collect student union
fees for the winter semester.
This is, in effect, an attempt
to starve the union into imposing editorial control over the
paper.
The precedent-setting decision to stop fee collection was
made without consultation
with either students or faculty.
A board of governors press
explained the action by claiming the Carillon "has pursued
an editorial policy clearly aimed at undermining confidence
in the senate, board of governors and the administration of
the university."
The board has tried to pressure the council into censoring
the Carillon for over a year, a
student union statement explains, but the council has restricted, claiming the board has
no right to interfere in student
affairs; the allegations against
the paper are untrue; and control of the Carillon by the
Continued Page 6
See: SASKABUSH
By PETER LADNER
Senate Tuesday night made
a token move to limit university enrolment next year in the
face of an expected increase of
1700 students in September,
1969.
Specifically, the senators
ruled that:
• First-year students passing only two courses will ■ no
longer be allowed to repeat
their year, although they can
appeal to the senate admissions
committee.
• Second-year students in
agriculture, arts, education,
science and first-year students
in commerce who pass only one
course out of a five or six
course program have to drop
out for a year before reapplying. They too may appeal to
the senate admissions committee, i
• Students entering second-
year from Grade 13 will need
an overall average ofj 60% on
a full program of five subjects,
or 65% on a three- or four-
subject program. This makes
entry requirements for Grade
13 students the same as those
for students joining the plant
from junior colleges. Until this
year Grade 13 grads have been
able to enter UBC by obtaining
passing marks on three subjects
at one sitting.
• Enrolment in first-year
architecture be restricted to 70
students for 1969-70, with no
reference to the limitation to
be made in the 1969-70
calendar.
The senate enrolment committee, which drafted the recommendations, estimated that
they -would only -weed out 280
students in the 1969-70 year.
Senator W. G. Gibson, special assistant to the president,
suggested raising first-year entrance standard to 65% from
the present 60 % as a positive
move to confront soaring and
zooming enrolment.
(If present zooming trends
continue, enrolment is expected to leap to 34,371 by 1973, a
70% increase from 1969.)
"We are wasting professors',
time and university accommodation on many students
who haven't got a chance of
graduating," he said.
Dr. Peter Oberlander pointed  out  the need to urgently
decide what kind of a university the new enrolment policies
are leading to.
Acting president Walter
Gage, chairman of the meeting,
reassured him that the enrolment committee would consider his request.
He also said that a long-range
planning committee under
Cyril Belshaw was considering
the future nature of UBC.
Walter was chairing the
meeting in the absence of sometime administration president
Kenneth Hare, who is presently in England interviewing
prospective faculty members.
He will be attending to personal and university business
in New York and Calgary before returning here at the end
of the month.
No room,
says Walt
UBC board of governors
chairman Walter Koerner has
added his voice to the clamor
for an end to overcrowding at
UBC, and suggested more emphasis on regional colleges as
the answer.
"Our campus at Point Grey
cannot possibly handle all of
B.C.'s sons and daughters who
wish to pursue post-secondary
studies," said Walter in his
new year's message to the
people of B.C.
Referring to the university
as a "plant handling numbers"
of students, Walter said facilities are inadequate to handle
the present enrolment of just
over 20,000.
"I am not surprised that
dedicated and serious students
who have had a struggle to get
to university, find their search
for knowledge frustrated in
many ways by the present
overcrowding," he said.
"We must find some better
means of equating numbers
with budget and physical facilities. Perhaps more two-year
regional colleges in certain
centres are part of the answer."
Walter said new colleges
would be assisted in all ways,
including planning of curricula
which would ensure transferability of students to UBC for
their senior work.
la case you hadn't
noticed. Chairman Dick's
thought is seeping into
The Province comics
every morning, cleverly
disguised as Gasoline
Alley. This little gem appeared about a week
ago. To arms!
G
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Cfapptrl Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969
Help Wanted, Students:
Senate committees open
Senate is looking for some
intelligent, hard-working students with lots of time to
brighten up senate committees.
In a letter to Alma Mater
Society president Dave Zirnhelt, administrative president
Dr. Kenneth Hare invited councillors to recommend students
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS *
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS -
GIRLS -
GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
GIRLS - GIRLS - GIRLS
SWIF^GfliF
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW ST.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.    683-7306
to sit on active senate committees.
These -would not be student
senators, but would have full
voting privileges in the committees.
Students' council is now asking for interested students to
indicate their willingness to
sit on senate committees by
coming up to the AMS office.
The different committees are:
Academic Building Needs, Admission, Curriculum, Enrolment Policy, Budget Advisory
(ad hoc), Appeals on Academic
Standing, Long Range Objectives, Liason on Planning Perm-
ament Buildings, Liason with
Provincial Universities, Library, Continuing Education, New
Programs, and Role and Organization of Senate.
But Dave wants to emphasize
he thinks this should only be
an interim solution.
"We don't want to minimize
our chances for reaching our
long range objectives by jumping at this partial step without
careful consideration," he said.
But not all the councillors
agreed  with him.
AMS treasurer Donn Aven
said this should simply be seen
as a progressive move forward.
"If this isn't greater student
participation, then what is?"
he asked.
But it was generally agreed
parity isn't the issue, but good
representation.
TUUM EST
UBC
— AT PRAYER
January 20-24, 1969
<j>4 fr   fr'
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at U.B.C.
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Phone 224-1614 228-8220
PIT MEMBERSHIPS
On Sale Every Thursday
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SUB for the next 2 weeks
Opening days of The Pit will be posted in SUB !
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WELCOME BACK!
We hope you enjoyed your holiday . . . now it's
back to work for all of us . . . see you soon . . .
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8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)
Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY   WORKMANSHIP   GUARANTEED"
FREE CHEST X-RAYS
& TB SKIN TESTS
Protect your community, family and yourself from TB
and other chest diseases.
Have your free tests. Volunteers will call at your home
when clinics are in your area.
X-Rays examined by chest specialists of the B.C. Health
Department for: TB, lung cancer, heart abnormalities and
other chest conditions.   v
CLINICS WILL BE LOCATED AT:
Friday, January 10
Student Union Bldg.     11 ajn.-3 p.m.
Armoury       11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Totem Residence   - -      4 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Place Vanier             4 p.m. -6 p.m.
Monday, January 13
Student Union Bldg.     11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Armoury    .     11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Totem Residence       4 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Fort Camp           4 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Tuesday, January 14
Student Union Bldg.       IT a.m.-3 p.m.
Armoury        11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Totem Residence  .      4 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Fort Camp      4 p.m.-6 p.m.
Wednesday, January 15
Student Union Bldg.  :     11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Armoury        11 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Totem Residence       4 p.m.-6 pjn.
Place Vanier       4 p.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday, January  16
Student Union Bldg.      11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Armoury        11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Totem Residences       4 p.m.-6 p.m.
Place Vanier       4 p.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday, January 16
Toronto Rd.  at Acadia     1-4 and 5-8 p.m.
Dalhousie Rd. at Allison Rd. ..     1-4 and 5-8 p.m.
Friday, January 17
Student Union Bldg.     11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Armoury     11 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday, January   10,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Arts course requirements
should be kept-faculty
CULTURAL ACTIVITY at UBC
-*      cases in one St. Marks room?
— dick button photo
would you  believe  108
By NATE SMITH
Arts  faculty  members  have
-shown strong support for their
faculty's language, science and
English requirements.
Ron Campbell, arts 1, chairman of a student committee
challenging the requirements,
said Thursday he sent letters
to all arts faculty members
asking for their opinions.
He said he has received 30
replies since sending the letters
Dec. 8.
Political science department
head Stephen Milne said in
response to Ron's letter he
can see no point to the language requirements other than
a "national integration" argument for French and the usefulness of a second language
in  graduate  studies.
"God knows why there is
an English literature requirement,"   Stephen  said.
"It is obviously still necessary because of the deficiencies of the B.C. school system in teaching students how
to  write  English."
Anthropology prof. Bill "Vv*ill-
nott said "It is fundamental in
continuing intellectual life of
the 20th century that an individual know more than his
own language."
Economics prof. David Bond
defended the English requirement on the grounds that few
students read enough of any^
thing  but  required  textbooks.
"The thought of reading literature in its true sense is so
Look, see who's resigned
It's resignation and promotion time again for UBC faculty members.
English   department   head
"" Geoffrey Durrant and political
science department head Stephen Milne are stepping down, although both will remain on the
faculty.
Math prof Nathan Divinsky
Student-faculty
committee formed
Science students and faculty have organized against the
. problems of education in a large institution.
A recently formed student-faculty liaison committee will
concern itself with exams, curriculum, and communication, as
well as the size of the faculty.
The feasibility of introducing courses dealing with such
topics as the philosophy of science, or a new Science I program
(similar to Arts I)  will be  discussed.
The committee welcomes suggestions from both students
and faculty on any topics the committee could consider.
Suggestions dropped in campus mail should be addressed
to Dr. Glenn Rouse, in the Botany Department.
' ••■• - M*%r*ffv**.
and chemistry prof Kenneth
Harvey have been named assistant deans of science.
Nathan will be in charge of
curriculum and calendar; Kenneth will be in charge of timetabling, registration and counselling.
John Chapman has been promoted from acting to permanent head of the geography department.
John Waterman, professor of
German at the University of
California at Santa Barbara,
has been named head of UBC's
new linguistics department.
Ormond Murphy will succeed
Donald Williams as head of
the department of continuing
medical education.
Donald has been named director of the new division of
continuing education in the
health sciences.
Hippie
New Year
To placate the masses for our
failure to run a Mary Christmas, or Christmas Carol, The
Ubyssey presents here our
candidate for Hippie New Year.
Put the pieces together and
make a hippie, or so the saying
goes.
We think our candidate could
win any beauty contest pants
down. And may we wish you
a Happy New Year. Keep
smiling.
repugnant to some that I'm
sure it causes them nightmares," said Dave.
Most faculty members defended the science requirement and many felt it should
be increased.
"I think it is of crucial importance that those who are
not professional scientists be
aware of what is happening
so they can provide some kind
of outside leadership to the
science comunity as they approach   problems,"  he   said.
Predictably, the strongest
response came from classics
head   Malcolm  McGregor.
"I want you to know that
no student sits on my curricu
lum committee and that no
student is going to sit on my
committee,"  said Malcolm.
"You would be well advised
to spend more of your time on
your studies than on efforts to
administer aspects of education that do not fall within
your province."
The student curriculum committee will hold a meeting for
all interested students in SUB
125  Monday  noon.
"There is no sense in going
on with this unless we find
enough students who object to
the degree requirements and
are willing to do something
constructive 'toward abolishing them," said Ron.
Senate told to keep
English requirements
Elimination of first-year English requirements for students
in technical faculties is a retrograde step, UBC academic planner Bob Clark told a senate meeting Wednesday.
"We are making a mistake by dropping English requirements in our professional faculties and schools," said Bob, an
economics professor.
He made the comments in opposing a proposal by UBC's
agricultural sciences faculty to eliminate the English 100 requirements in its  first-year program.
He said students should be encouraged at every possible
opportunity to acquire as broad and general an education at.
UBC.
Agriculture dean Michael Shaw said the proposed change
leaves room for students to take electives in any faculty they
wish.
The course changes, which were approved by senate subject to the approval of its curriculum committee and the board
of governors, will add the four-year major, double major and
honors courses to the present four-year general and five-year
honors programs.
(Most faculties retain the first-year English requirements,
rlthough some such as forestry prescribe only the two-unit
English  150, which emphasizes composition  and  grammar.)
The senate also approved:
• education faculty diploma programs in education for
young children, children with learning disorders and the mentally  retarded;
• a home economics school honors program in human
nutrition;
• an MSc. program in audiology and speech sciences.
Campus 'Reform Union
wants activist council
"The university's position
should be neither irrelevance,
nor revolution, but reform."
This is the thinking of the
"Reform Union", a new campus political party.
"The party will support
student action that is decided
in the regular way — with
referendums and so on," said
Les Horswill, chairman of the
AMS political education subcommittee and spokesman for
the new group.
The Reform Union hopes to
make student council "the
centre of reform and activism"
by endorsing a slate of candidates in the upcoming council
elecitons in February.
AMS president David Zirnhelt, a member of the party,
said that the purpose of the
union was "to revitalize student politics."
The founding convention to
elect an executive and approve
a constitution will be held
Tuesday noon in the clubs
workroom in SUB.
Anyone may attend and buy
a one dollar membership in
the union.
Party policy will also be
formulated at the founding
convention.
About twenty people were
at the group's first meeting last
Sunday, at St. Mark's College,
including presidents of campus
NDP, Liberal, and Conservative clubs. One member stressed that it is not political affiliation, but concern for the
future of the AMS that brought
the group together.
Staff Meeting
Notice is hereby given to all
and sundry that there will be
a staff meeting for all Ubyssey
staffers this Saturday at 1555
Larch, starting at 12 noon.
The meeting will take the
form of a cultural revision
seminar. All staffers are urged
to come and give their ideas
on where The Ubyssey should
go.
A party, of course, follows.
For more information, see any
Ubyssey   editor. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  January   10,   1969
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LETTERS
tSaSJSrTC^'SSSkSi-'' *„-,'S!S«,-*"X. *
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Cool-aided
Editor,   The   Ubyssey,   Sir:
We greatly appreciated the
publicity received on behalf of
our benefit in your newspaper,
The Ubyssey. As a result of
the feature story, and success
of the benefit, funds raised
amounted to $2,277.00.
Our special gratitude to
Alex and Fred for their help.
Cool-Aid continuously advances
through the generosity of supporters.   Thank  you.
Yours sincerely,
ELMORE and RAY
for Cool-Aid
Racism
Editor,   The   Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to take issue
with registrar Parnell on his
"foreign invasion" statements
as reported in both local newspapers Friday, Nov. 29.
According to Mr. Parnell,
the imminent threat of
"foreigners" and particularly
"orientals" invading the B.C.
educational system would be
laughable were it not for the
fact that he has advocated
changes in the immigration
policies of this country and
it appears certain provincial
ministers are giving his suggestions serious consideration.
Mr. Parnell is quick to state
that his suggested amendments
of the immigration act is not
a matter of racism, yet in the
next breath he gives a careful
documentation of the number
of Honk Kong students attending UBC and his fear of the
growing number of oriental
students (and no other) attending the public schools of B.C.
Before Mr. Parnell and the
provincial officials act, I feel
certain questions should be
answered and certain insinuations clarified:
If racism is not the issue,
why the singling out of oriental
students? Why not mention the
number of students from Great
Britain, U.S.A., and more importantly (if facilities and
costs are a problem) the number of students from other
provinces of Canada who are
taking under-graduate studies
at our provincial institutions
of higher learning?
In   both   papers   I   clearly
detected an implication that
B.C. is subsidizing these foreign
students. If so, how? As reported, many of the younger students are attending private
schools, so presumably they
are paying fees demanded by
these private institutions. Also,
if some are attending public
schools, they must be residing
in rented or purchased homes;
therefore, their education is
not subsidized but paid for
through municipal taxes.
Finally, if as Mr. Parnell
has indicated, two thousand
foreign students are at present
attending UBC, do 134 Hong
Kong students seem disproportionate? For that matter, do
2,000 foreign students in an
institution of almost 20,000
seem  inordinately high?
I am fully aware of the
mounting costs, inadequate
facilities, and the apparent
anti-intellectual policies of the
provincial government, but it
seems to me a simple solution
to the problem is not "restricting immigration", but merely
changing the fee structure for
foreign students.
To me, the gut issue is not
foreigners, but strictly a fiscal
problem and a problem of inadequate facilities and for Mr.
Parnell to use foreign students
as a scapegoat is reprehensible.
Does Mr. Parnell realize how
long it has taken Canada to
reach a fairly enlightened immigration policy? His parochial
suggestion can only be a retrogressive step.
In an age when we adults
have created all the social,
religious, and political barriers
possible—making a living hell
of this world, should we not
be working towards greater
international exchange? Is it
any wonder that questioning
young people rebel when men
at the university who should
be guiding forces propose such
unenlightened drivel? I think
Mr. Parnell's comments have
done the university community a great disservice.
In closing, may I suggest
that one Enoch Powell, or
Parkinson in the world is one
too many; let's not have a
Parnell get in the act too. (The
alliteration is coincidental, but
interesting).
Yours   truly,
HARRY LOCKE
Alumnus
THE U8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinion! are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex  04-5843.
JANUARY  10
"We've got the most right-wing paper in the
country."
—John Twigg, Ubyssey News Editor
^withiTsu'i?"
The SUB Management Committee has been directed to
provide factual information concerning Tuesday and Wednesday's referendum on open hours for SUB.
At present, the following schedule is in effect:
Monday through Friday:    7 a.m. to 1 a.m.
Saturday:    9 a.m. to 1 a.m.
Sunday:    12 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Students who are in the building and have reason to stay
later than 1 a.m. are welcome to remain as long as they wish.
For security reasons, such persons are asked to register their
names.
Non-students are asked to leave the building at 1 a.m. unless a registered student  will vouch  for  them.
The number of students (and others) using this privilege
is very small: most often none, rarely more than half a dozen.
Only one slight advantage would be gained by leaving the
SUB open for 24 hours: Students would have easier access
to the lounge facilities. In fact, access is already possible.
None of the recreational or cultural facilities could be left
open, nor could the store-services be provided 24 hours a day.
Leaving the SUB doors unlocked later than 1 a.m. when
no AMS or university security staff are on duty in the building
would likely increase the frequency of vandalism and theft.
The building and all its contents would be wide open to anyone,
not just to students. Even without the added enticement of an
open, unwatched building, considerable damage and theft has
already occurred.
Adequate insurance to protect the students' investment
against theft and vandalism would greatly increase the cost of
existing  coverage.
In addition, janitorial and maintenance problems would increase. The university provides such services, but there is a
limit on how much of these servces can be provided. Hence
the cleanliness of the building would be even more difficult
to maintain.
Given the above alternatives, the SUB Management Committee recommends that the hours of SUB be left as they are;
and not open 24 hours a day.
SUB MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE
EDITOR: Al Birnie
News   John Twigg
City     Peter Ladner
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Wire       Irene   Wasilewski
Photo     Fred  Cawsey
Sports   Jim Maddin
Ass't News   John Cibbs
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Back afresh and a*buslin' and a'groovin*.
these polished up today's masterpiece:
Nate Smith. Nader Mirhady (don't ask
Haida   Go   Sikh  how   to   pronounce   it).
Peter Kennedy, Jack A. off the Nelson
Times, almost newcomer Sacha Fox,
Tony Hodge who watched anticipating-
ly, Charlie Hulton, who worked hult-
ingly, Nick Orchard, between CBC production hours, Pat Gently, Chris Cross,
Audrey O'Visual, John Anderson. Hippie New Year ousted the 100 years
whore as grossity of the century, but
photogooglers Dick Button, Dick Vis-
ser, John Frizell, adorned with his PET
white silk scarf, Bruce Stephenson and
Fred (what did we do to deserve) Cawsey goggled and drooled regardless.
Tony Gallagher scrawled sports. There's
Nathon Doon in there, concluded Elaine
Tarzwell summarily. Is Conchie really
gone for good?
BURAU
A brilliant student, who left
UBC  some  years ago  for his
PhD    with    special    research   .
grant from  an American university, once said to me, "Do '
you know, Karl, why all these
profs hate you?  You are still
an idealist  and they  are not,
but somehow realise that they "
ought  to be.  Well,  what  are
they?
I say masochists turned sadists. When they start, they do
every thing they are told by
their profs, never doubt anything their profs expound and
really enjoy worshipping the
most primitive fool if he happens to be their professor. That
is how by and by they become
professors themselves. Then
they take vengeance for all the
humiliations they had inflicted
on themselves by turning from-*
masochists into sadists, insisting that now their own students adore every nonsense
they teach."
Therefore the greatest
problem is how to break the '
cliquishness preventing academic appointments of somebody who is of an independent
mind and competent to teach.
On October 29 The Ubyssey'
published the introduction to
my brief on university reform
from last summer. In this brief
I have made concrete proposals
for really establishing a free
university or experimental college especially also as a means
of breaking the one-sided nepo-
tistic monopoly of the established profs so much misused
for keeping out everybody who
does not accept their personal
bias. Dr. Hare promised me an
invitation to a senate conference on university reform that
to begin in August last year—
and that I would have his personal support for my suggestions including a right to give
credit to my students and to
receive a salary like other
profs. No promise has been
kept.
I have tried in vain for  12
years to get any teaching assis- *
tantship or a loan or a scholarship — though I certainly feel
entitled to a professorship.
I think that also student
council fails this university by
not developing a Free University financed by council and
by not giving full support to
me at senate.
But if our wonderful academic establishment still thinks
that they can starve me out I
am still 'willing to disappoint
them by carrying on in any
case with the following program:
Every Monday 12:30, Bu.
100, we will meet. This Monday we are to discuss capitalism or socialism with Prof.
A. M. Moore and Prof. Parekh
as guest speakers. The following week we shall discuss university reform — and it will
be a real intellectual confrontation for Prof. McGregor accepted to be a guest together
with Prof. Parekh. Then we
shall have alternately a discussion of the German resistence
against Hitler (I shall give a
reading list for it) and various
special topics with guest speak-
ers.
Karl Burau Friday, January   10,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
NEWS FROM
REGINA (CUP) — People who advocate censorship usually have something to hide.
The board of governors of the University of
Saskatchewan is blackmailing the Regina campus
student council into establishing editorial control
over the student newspaper, the Carillon — for the
greater good of the university, of course.
It's the most naked form of blackmail — the
board has even issued press statements about it.
Shut up the Carillon or we won't collect student
union fees. No student union fees, no student union.
By GEORGE RUSSELL
Canadian University Press
According to the board's press release, the
Carillon must be controlled because the paper "has
pursued an editorial policy clearly aimed at undermining confidence in the senate, board of governors and the administration of the university."
The board has shown no willingness to discuss
whether or not the editorial policy is justified. In-
. stead, a cloud of supplementary reasons for censorship of the Carillon have been tossed at the public,
none of them substantiated.
Administration principal Bill Riddell says the
Carillon must be censored to halt a groundswell
of popular indignation directed against the university.
Bill also claims the Carillon must be censored
because it's "obscene". He was quoted on the obscenity charge in the Regina Leader-Post, but he
told this writer in a subsequent interview the
charge was a "red herring".
Bill also says censorship must be established
because the community is not contributing enough
money to a university fund drive.
No one is willing to discuss possibility that
the Carillon must be censored because it has
been telling the truth.
Within a few miles of the Regina campus are
the legislative buildings of the province of Saskatchewan — and the offices of Liberal premier Ross
Thatcher. For the Regina students, that means the
government is one of their neighbors — not a very
good one.
The history of the conflict between Ross and
the Regina campus spans, a couple of years, culminating this October when 1,500 students marched to
.the legislature, where they confronted Ross and
Pierre Elliott Trudeau over the inadequacy of the
student loan  system  in Saskatchewan.
They got no adequate response—in fact Ross
refused to discuss the matter publicly at all.
Student loans have been one of the Carillon's
favorite topics during the last two years — especially since they broke a story last February, explaining how Allan Guy, currently minister of public works with the Thatcher government, had
claimed and received a $1,000 student loan while
drawing a salary in excess of $16,000. The story,
understandably,  drew  national  interest.
It also drew intense local interest from Bill
Riddell who attempted to stop the story from breaking by first trying to contact Carillon editor Don
» Kossick and then trying to get to the printer.
Neither attempt worked.
Within two weeks, the president of the Regina
student council received a letter from Bill, asking
why the students union should be allowed to continue using the name of the university, and, significantly, why the university should continue to
provide space on campus for the Carillon.
The answer to all three questions was presumably contained in a suggestion by Bill that a
"policy board" be created to direct editorial policy
for the paper — exactly what is being "suggested"
by the board now.
Don took the entire matter before a faculty
committee on academic freedom. The chairman of
the committee, Jim McRorie, now a sociology professor at Calgary, recalls the board's threats faded
after the committee began its hearings. The hearings were never completed, and the committee
never reported.
But the student loan issue was not the only
issue the Carillon has covered during the past two
years, and again, much of the material for their
stories has been supplied by the provincial government.
Even before uncovering the good fortune of the
minister of public works, the Carillon — in fact,
the entire campus — had been deeply embroiled
in the question of university autonomy.
When the government announced last year
the formation of a "general university council"
superceding and usurping the powers of the Regina
faculty council, the Carillon joined the faculty in
claiming university autonomy was threatened externally.
Fears at Regina deepened when Ross announced
CENSORSHIP
SASKABUSH STYLE
later the same year the government would approve
the university budget section by section, rather than
all at once — a procedure allowing direct political
intervention in university affairs.
Bill announced that the government had changed its mind regarding the second decision, but
failed to convince the Carillom that the autonomy
of the university was in any less danger. He also
failed to convince Alwyn Berland, dean of arts and
science, who resigned last September.
His resignation statement covered the front
page of the Carillon, expressing fears that Regina's
autonomy had been undermined by Ross's actions
of the year before.
He also condemned the' silence of the Regina
administration in failing to respond to the attacks.
The administration, Alwyn said, had also refused to
defend him, when he attempted to point out the
financial straits of the university and was attacked
by a provincial minister for his pains.
The Carillon has not been so diplomatic. It has
implied that the administration has acted as* apologist for the government, rather than face a renewal
of interest by the government in the separate sections of the university budget.
Since Alwyn's resignation, the Carillon has
gone even more deeply into the question. In October, the paper examined the make-up of the Uni-
vrsity of Saskatchewan board and senate, which
govern both Saskatchewan campuses, and pointed
out the predominance of members residing in Saskatoon or holding degrees from the older campus.
The implication was that the membership of both
bodies had a great deal to do with the respective
allocations to each campus. Nine members of the
board are in the pay of the provincial government.
Bill, meanwhile, launched an extensive campaign against the poor showing of faculty and students at Regina in contributing to the "good image"
of the university in the community. Community
reaction showed up, he said, in a poor response to
a university  capital fund drive.
The fund drive was necessary because the provincial government refused to allocate sufficient
funds to the university for capital expansion.
Bill also accused faculty of contributing to the
poor public imago by not donating enough money
to the United Fund.
On Nov. 15, the next week, principal Bill
escalated the conflict by stating the Carillon might
"adversely affect the university budget if it wasn't
cleaned up." He referred to the board's threats
against the student council of the previous year,
and hinted darkly that "the business office has to
have some direction" before the second semester at
Regina would begin.
Sure enough, as the Carillon revealed in a
special issue within the week, the budget was adversely affected — to the tune of $2 million. The
paper rather unnecessarily pointed out that the
provincial government set the final budget figures.
In view of that fact, the Carillon probably
found it unnecessary to point out that the "community" Bill mentioned must consist of the small
cluster of buildings forming the Saskatchewan legislative assembly.
The real question at Regina is a political one:
the Carillon has displayed an unhealthy and positively unstudent-like interest in exposing the provincial government's unfairness to faculty and students alike, and the government will not allow it
to continue.
In retrospect, the Carillon's gravest "irresponsibility" probably lay in reprinting the election
platform of Ross Thatcher's government — a year
after the election.
They should have known that wasn't allowed.
WATERLOO (CUP) — A move to change the
Canadian Union of Students from within seems
likely after a Christmas student unionism conference of more than 60 students here.
A consensus of the delegates, most of whom
were student council members or had council backing, showed most preferred to change the direction
of CUS rather than establish a new national union.
The delegates met at Waterloo Lutheran University from Dec. 28 to 30 to discuss national student unionism. They decided a decentralized national student union based on a regional or
provincial structure would best accommodate all
universities.
A proposal to establish a rival union to CUS
was discussed, but although no official stand was
taken most delegates indicated they thought the
idea impractical.
Few  conclusions  were  reached  by  the group,
which decided to hold the conference after many
* student   councils   became   dissatisfied   with   CUS,
some to the extent of withdrawing their campuses
from the national union.
UBC's delegate, engineering student president
Fraser Hodge, wasn't pleased with the dissident
gathering.
ACROSS
He said he had hoped the conference would
come up with something "to re-direct CUS into a
more responsible direction.
"But it was really bad; just reactionary, sandbox garbage," he said.
Bill Ballard, student president at Waterloo
Lutheran, felt differently: "Emotionalism did not
reign at this conference; logic did. We had constructive views and not confusion like CUS had at the
Guelph conference."
CUS observor Jim Russell, the union's western
field worker, commented: "The conference hasn't
done anything different. They haven't dealt with
issues such as organization and structure and they
CUS CONTROVERSY
have  no  more concern   than   any  one   else   about
representivity."
In a written critique of the meeting, Russell
rapped the delegates for being "too sandbox" in
their  outlook.
The 60 represenljatives disfcussed questions
such as areas of student interest, education, services
a national union could provide, how federal-provincial government structures affect a student union,
and the role of local student governments.
Delegates accepted reports recommending a
decentralized structure to aid dealing with French
universities and provincial governments. They also
accepted a report which stated university affairs
were the initial priority of a national union order
"to bring about awareness of issues in the larger
community."
Reports on services (such as life insurance and
travel) and on education were discussed by the
group but no conclusions were reached.
The students also grappled with the question
of whether the national union should be political
or apolitical —- bringing charges from some that
they were politically naive "to think a national
union could be apolitical."
The delegates also decided persons sent to the
CUS congress should be chosen in a "representative
election" but did not outline a method of election
or selection to ensure this.
Delegates discussed plans for another gathering
in February but were pessimistic about its chances
of accomplishing anything.
Allan Dudeck of the University of Winnipeg
summed it up: "There are elections coming up on
many of the campuses. I would think a very different group will meet at the next conference. They
could easily hash out the same things; so it wouldn't
necessarily be an extension of this conference."
CANADA Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969
f:.; *.- ■ .*.*«, *•.. **.■.' .. -L; * *■*. -.*
Saskabush campus faces trouble
From Page One
council has resisted, claiming
the board has no right to interfere in student affairs; the allegations against the paper are
untrue; and control of the Carillon by the council might be
used for undemocratic purposes.
The student council has
warned the board action may
be the result of pressure from
the provincial government of
Ross Thatcher. "It is no secret
that Ross has little love for
students," the statement said.
The statement is part of a
three-page letter sent to all Regina students, who had not yet
returned to the campus from
Christmas holidays. Also included in the letter, is a breakdown of the union budget, and
a statement of support for the
union from both the men's and
women's athletic boards at the
university.
At a general meeting Wednesday, 2500 out of the campus'
4400 students voted to hold a
referendum   Thursday   propos
ing a written contract, between
the students' council and the
adminisration, directing the
latter to collect fees. The proposal specifies that the council
be responsible for disbursement
of the fees.
The meeting, which lasted
three hours, also formally censured the BoG for refusing to
collect the fees.
Students all over Canada condemned the action taken because it establishes a precedent
that any administration could
use as a weapon to throttle
the activities of its student
union.
Elsewhere in Saskatchewan
the university's Saskatoon
campus students' council also
condemned the board's action
Wednesday, demanding they
reverse their policy.
UBC's students' council sent
the following telegram:
"UBC-AMS condemns the action of the Board of Governors
of the University of Saskatchewan in their refusal to collect
student fees for the upcoming
d x
Fresh as a
Flower...
in Justlhour
JANUARY DRY CLEANING SPECIAL
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SUITS-2 PIECE •  OVERCOATS
•   DRESSES (Plain)
ANY COMBINATION  OF 2  OF  THE  FOLLOWING:
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•    SWEATERS •    SKIRTS (pleats extra)
UNIVERSITY ONE HOUR
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THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING
2146 WESTERN   PARKWAY
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semester at the Regina Campus.
We  deplore  the  action  as  an
attempt to  censor student activities and the student press.
We support the Students' Representative Council in their attempts  to have the Board  of
Governors reverse its decision."
The  board  action has  been
Continued Page  18
See: STUDENT
SUB opens
with bang
The Student Union Building
is formally opening the week
of Jan. 20-25 with goodies for
everyone.
Highlights are concerts by
Gordon Lightfoot, The Collectors and The Poppy Family, an
all-night marathon dance with
four bands and breakfast the
next morning, and three days
of coffeehouse carryings-on in
the SUB cafeteria with jazz
and folk music.
All this sells for $5, starting
noon today in the AMS office
or across from the information
booth.
There will also be films,
more dancing and other concerts.
THE BIG MOTHER
Also " Open from
YELLOW BRICK ROAD Thursday - Sunday
Telephone 688-7638 8 p.m. - 2 a.m.
A Snip is Offered.
Bring This Ad With You And Get A 50c Refund!
CUnse? *49 50
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY!
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us . . . AND REALLY SAVE !
war
I
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Complete from $9.95    Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
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1825 Lonsdale
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RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
• Full Dress (Tall*)
• Morning Coat*
• Directors' Coats
• White a Blue Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
• Mall Orders Invited
(Downstairs)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
Have Skis,
Will Schuss
Just you and the snow and
the wind flying by. That's the
fantastic feeling of skiing. That's freedom.
There's another sort of
freedom that makes
skiing your sport any day
of the month, all season.
That's the freedom you
get by using Tampax
tampons. Internally worn
Tampax tampons can't
interfere or cause
discomfort. No bulky pad to
slow you down or show
through your stretch pants.
No disposal problem.
No worry about where to
carry a spare. In fact,
it's sort of like not
having any period at all.
Millions of active young
women all over the
world have used billions
of Tampax tampons.
Maybe you should find out
why. Start using Tampax
tampons this season
and ski free.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
NOW USED BY  MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD.,
BARRIE.   ONTARIO PAGE
FRIDAY
horvat  hovercraft  photo
SNOW EXPOSED!!
PHOTO ABOVE;
STORY PF 2WO Snow
or
never
p£ 2WO
Unnoticed by the radicals, a
grave new element has entered
the university situation, and at
one fell swoop the administration has captured the field.
This   new,   deadly,   and  secret
weapon is:
Snow.
I guess you all thought snow
was innocent, eh? Good for
the kids and sleighing and
snowmen and Christmas cards.
And I bet you thought it was
accidental too, beyond our control.
But think!
In this first week of university,
how many sit-ins have there
been? How many petitions
have you signed? How many
classes have you boycotted?
(Not skipped — boycotted.)
How many times has Stan
Persky orated? How many
awkward questions has Ken
Hare had to evade? How many
protest marches have there
been?
Well, none. And why? Snow,
that's why!
Nobody talks about anything
but snow, how cold it is/was/
may become in Vancouver or
whatever other part of the
Yukon they vacationed in. We
discuss burst pipes, not enrollment cuts; we abhor slush, not
bureaucrats. And in this
weather, who would even think
of protest marching, let alone
sitting on the courthouse steps?
Any occupation of the administration building could be ended simply by turning the heating off.
And we all accept it like lambs,
without demur, as an act of
"nature", weather, unavoidable.
Blind! We have been blind!
Obviously, snow is an administration plot, hatched in dreadful secrecy at Bennett-financed
research laboratories, transported out to sea in Gaglardi's
private jet, and then loosed
upon the unsuspecting populace to keep them in line.
Page Friday has a report from
usually reliable sources that
the whole scheme was thought
of by Dean Gage sometime in
September, given Hare's approval in October, financially
OK'd by Brother Brothers in
November, and put into dire
effect in  December.
So far, it has been completely
successful.
But it is our hope that, with
this startling expose, the fiendish scheme will descend upon
the heads of its originators.
Students of UBC, this is your
great opportunity! Go out into
the world and tell this tale to
the common man as he shovels
his driveway, to the housewife
wrapping her best nylons
around freezing pipes. Demonstrate, once and for all, that
the cause of the students and
the cause of the workers are
one! Turn the populace against
the wintry government! Shout
our new slogans: "No Snow!
Weather Power! Summer Forever!"
Plow it to them baby.
—Stephen Scobie
Belle de Jour
By STEPHEN  SCOBIE
The first time I went to see Belle de Jour,
I had high hopes. All the critics whom I
normally respect and agree with had
labelled it a masterpiece; Tom Milne,
whose opinions I trusted implicitly, had
called it "a great, great film: scabrous,
scandalous, fantastically pure baeuty."
I was therefore a little surprised to find
at the end of the film that I didn't really
like it much. A second viewing confirmed
my response: Belle de Jour is a rather
mediocre, banal film.
Screams of heresy all round. (But then, I
always have been a heretic on Bunuel,
regarding Viridiana as the most overrated "masterpiece" of modern times —
until Belle de Jour, that is.)
I am not going to deny that Sacha Vierny's
colour photography is often very pretty;
nor can I do anything but praise the
brilliant performances of Genevieve Paige
and Michel Piccoli. But beyond that I run
straight into a blank wall of total un-
interest.
It seems as if Bunuel had attempted to
sum up the whole of his life's work in the
astounding statement that rich middle-
class women sometimes have masochistic
erotic fantasies. This might conceivably
be interesting, but only if either the
character herself or her fantasies were interesting. And neither is.
Behind the glacial calm .Of Catherine
Deneuve's beautiful face, there is a void
which neither actress nor director have
been able to fill with anything remotely
approaching a character. And the fantasies themselves are just plain dull.
Admirers of the film rave about its exploration of reality and fantasy, how they
are interchangeable and of equal validity
to Severine. So what? That particular
blind alley has been worked to death in
every second film since Marienbad. Even
allowing for the fact that much of Belle
de Jour's impact in this connection is
ruined by the atrocious subtitling, the
film still has nothing new or informative
to say about this weary topic.
Or take the ending, which Elliott Stein
calls "simply the most astonishing 'open
ending' in the history of cinema ... it
fastens the entire film into a writhing
subliminal image." (As if ending a film
the way you began it is something new:
has nobody ever seen Jack Clayton's magnificent film of The Innocents?) I suppose
there is a nice ambiguity here—why is
the carriage empty? Because Severine no
longer needs her fantasies, or because it is
arriving to pick her up again? Again, my
only reaction is, so what? The ambiguity
would only be interesting if you cared at
all what happened to Severine: but I for
one couldn't give a damn.
I  think the  key  scene  which  gives  the
whole film away is that in which the
"Professor" who wants to be whipped
arrives at the brothel. The whole scene
is played for laughs, right from the identification of the man as a gynecologist; and
the audience at the Varsity responded
correctly: they laughed. Then at the end,
Severine turns away with the comment,
"How can anyone sink so low?"
In the first place, any perceptive film
director should have developed the obvious parallel between Severine and the
Professor, both of whom are putting masochistic fantasies into practice, or at least
he could have indicated that Severine's
inability to see the parallel said something about her character. But Bunuel
does nothing at all.
Secondly, the whole scene is evidence of
Bunuel's total lack of compassion and understanding for human beings. The only
reactions evoked are ridicule and contempt. There is no attempt at all to make
the audience realise what it feels like to
be a masochist, to want to be whipped;
there is no attempt to see the Professor
as an individual human being, with his
own dignity and tragedy. He is there only
as an object of scorn.
And the same applies all the way down
the line: some of the actors, notably Paige
and Piccoli, create characters despite the
director; otherwise we are left with blank
nonentities like the husband, or Pierre
Clementi's ludicrously inapposite parody
of Belmondo.
I think the main point I am insisting on
is this, and it is in some ways an "old-
fashioned" one. (O.K., I'm becoming a
conservative in my old age.) Belle de Jour
is cast in dramatic form, but it ignores
the basic rule of all drama, which is respect for the humanity and integrity of
the characters. Bunuel's contempt for
humanity will never produce great art,
and neither will his pose of studied amor-
ality. It is impossible to produce great
dramatic art without a moral vision of
some kind. By this I do not mean a set of
phony moral judgments tacked onto the
end: I mean simply an awareness of the
moral dimensions of all human actions
And that is what Belle de Jour is totally
devoid of.
One has only to think of Belle de Jour
alongside films like Resnais' Muriel or
Antonioni's L'Avventura to see how shallow and banal it really is. To call it a
"masterpiece" in that company is flatly
impossible.
In closing, a word of comfort to Bunuel
fans. He said at the time that Belle de
Jour was going to be his last film, but
unfortunately it isn't. He is now at work
on a kind of intergalactic Candide, to be
called The Milky Way. Stuff that in your
eyeball and  slit  it.
By K. TOUGAS
Within a tranquil mood, Belle
de Jour develops as alternate
realities. As scenes unfold,
each erases the other, negating
and inverting continually. Too
many contradictions oppose a
simple lateral viewing, the
privileged observation post
which the- rented theatre seat
too often affords. No key opens
the mysteries of Belle de Jour
to the light of day.
The imaginary is not heralded
by an exclusive originality,
nor reality by its excessive
banality — their attributes
alternate and exchange with
ease. In fact, within an outline
depleted of most quests,
whether romantic, moral or
poetic, Bunuel submits his
work to an interior and progressive destruction, more than
mere shifts in meaning: a complete reversal in oscillation
between transparence and extreme obscurity. It is a film of
a woman both seen and dream
ing, and seeing and dreamed
of; object and subject of adventures where it is simply
impossible to denote exactly
whether they are imagined or
lived—an object watched by a
subject watching. The death/
resurrection/wakening/healing
reconciliation of Pierre adds another set of variables. Impressively doubling upon itself, the
film closes a circle.
Belle de Jour reminds me of a
line in Nazarin, which, excavated from my memory, goes
something like: "Our tragedy
is that you are entirely sided
with Good, and I entirely with
Evil; that is why we are both
useless."
Severine's life fluctuates between two poles, which, depending on moral, social, or
medical terminology, may b©
described as Good and Evil,
Vice and Virtue, frigidity and
masochism, conjugal fidelity
and prostitution. Similarly,
other poles of reality and imag-
THE      UBYSSEY
inary, transparency and opacity reveal themselves. But,
while the circularity and careful equalization of sequences
resolve in purely academic debates, what seems more relevant is Bunuel's concern with
both poles, the vibrancy of
life unavailable to the single
absolute. In her movement
from one axis to the other,
Severine  liberates herself.
Some sequences show Severine
suffering innumerable aggressions and outrages which she
generally accepts passively or
participates in, sometimes with
abandon and pleasure. Indica-
tively, the only exceptions to
this are those involving similar
outrages inflicted upon her
either by, or by the order of,
her husband. Conjugality versus prostitution . . . Within the
fluctuation, the three hours in
the opposite camp, Severine
blossoms: this is her association
with, and dissociation from,
both poles—complete  division
—her life gaining purpose and
sincerity.
Marcel and Pierre are exact
opposites; the beauty and
charm of one reflects the perverse ugliness and brutality of
the other. Yet, as absolutes,
both basically want the same
thing: the complete and sole
possession of Severine. The
crisis eventually must occur,
and just as she must refuse
entire absorption (even in the
direction she is travelling —
toward "Evil") which would
necessitate the abandonment
of her duality, so the complex
elements of Severine, Husson
and Anais must eventually
survive in apparent freedom
and gaiety, while the simple
Marcel and Pierre meet with
"death."
Yet, Belle de Jour is a disappointing masterpiece.
Bunuel: "Those memories of
childhood  or adolescence,
Continued pf 7even
Friday, January   10,   1969 pf Shree
see mr sloane
before it's too loot
R
U
E
B
S
A
A
T
Friday, January   10,   1969
by NORBERT RUEBSAAT
Take a lower-middle-class English home situated in the center of a rubbish
dump (the beginning, and end, of an urban development plan) and put in it a
wilted, decrepit, sitting-by-the-fire father, a superannuated nymph of a daughter,
and a businessman son (who's just gotta be queer). In other words, imagine an
average family, long entrenched in their silent cold war. Then add a smooth-
skinned stranger.
We thus have the setting for Entertaining Mr. Sloane, George Plawski's M.A.
Thesis production of Joe Orton's 1964 play, currently at the Dorothy Somerset
Studio.
Self-aware theatre buffs, intimate knowers of Pinter, Albee, etc., etc., will
arise and say "Ah! we know what will happen: self-assured stranger enters to
rip open calcified family flood-gates, catastrophe of family, barbaric power
struggle." Maybe. Orton is outrageously subtle—we never know who is coercing
whom.
The stranger—twentyish, beautiful and presumably a murderer—wants comfort
and the good life. The fat nymph and her slim brother want, of course, him. He
seems, for a time, to manipulate them to his advantage, which, however, is blso
theirs. Power repeatedly changes hands on short notice, each character presumes
to be in control of the situation and playing the others off against each other.
At first we believe the stranger, Mr. Sloane, because he seems to be playing a
conscious, deliberate role. Kath, the nymph, and her brother Ed obviously want
to be deceived—the former to satiate her disarranged mother instincts and the
latter to appease his pet muscle builder. They are naive, but a guardian angel
working from behind their persons slips them easily into any action which is
to their advantage. It is not until the very end that we see the ultimately greater
power behind their unpremeditated action. But there, as Sloane's murder of the
father is used to completely net him in the family's web, we must, despite our
surprise, say, "Of course, the scheming Sloane could never have succeeded
against these primitive drives."
Only the old father refuses to be compromised. He sees through the acts, his
bleary eyes recognize Sloane as a murderer, and his son as a queer—which is
why he is constantly shuttled out of the room. His role of sanity, or seer of the
truth, must then be liquidated by Sloane—he threatens the power balance—
and once he is gone, the murder can be freely used to ensnare the murderer.
"It's been a pleasant morning," observes Ed at the end.
What carries the play is the double-edged power of the dialogue. The whole
thing is loaded with double and triple meanings—sometimes almost too obviously
—and yet throughout, Orton maintains the one-dimensional believability of
especially Kath and Ed. At the end, we don't even like to admit how thoroughly
we believed them, how subtly we were cajoled into accepting the unacceptable.
"Lie to me, boy, so I can believe you," says Ed, and it's not even strained, the
play holds it.
The non-professional cast of this production acted well—especially Kathy Webb
as Kath and Wes Taylor as the old father. I found Sloane's role a bit lumpy
in places, although it improved towards the end. Movement and facial expression
could have been a little smoother, especially where actors faced the audience
while interacting with characters behind them on the stage. Generally, however,
this did not deteriorate from the effect of the play once it got rolling.
A reminder, by the way, that another Joe Orton play, Loot, which immediately followed Entertaining Mr. Sloane, and which is equally
provocative concerning religion, death and such matters, will begin at
the Freddy Wood on January 17.
?
|*l       f
Contemporary Committee
By GEORGE ROSENBERG
One of the main attractions of
the Festival of the Contemporary Arts, which will take place
this year from Wednesday,
January 29 to Friday, February
7, will be the visit on campus
for most of the Festival period,
of 10 members of the San
Francisco Committee Workshop.
This group of young actors has
grown out of "The Committee"
the satirical San Francisco-
based review company. The
heart of their activity is improvisational theatre. Working
without scripts, props,, costumes, make-up, set characterisations or plots, on a variety
of stages, to different sized
audiences, they start off their
performances by eliciting suggestions from the audience.
They may ask for suggestions
of the names of jobs, of emotions, of something that somebody in the audience feels
strongly about, etc. These suggestions are not planted: anything may pop out. The suggestion becomes the theme,
and from the  suggestion,  the
group builds up the dramatic
event. The element of risk-
taking is nakedly there: will
what is done 'work' or not?
Because of this, the interaction
between audience and performers, which was started by the
initial suggestion, is electrically maintained; the audience
is committeed and involved in
the success of the presentation;
the barrier between passive
watcher and active performer
is eroded.
The idea of improvisation may
arouse suspicion: something
which is made up as one goes
along, must be amateurish, insubstantial and generally formless. But here, this is not at all
the case. What happens in the
presentations is the part of
the iceberg above the water;
what is underneath is a lot
of disciplined work on technique and inspiration, and in
particular a closeness of working together which involves
complete trust and complete
lack of ego-trips between the
actors.
To quote from a recent review:
Continued pf 7even
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pf 4oup
Musical Expose
By MICHAEL  QUIGLEY
To begin this year, here's a few plugs and platitudes cleaned
out of my musical Pandora's box. On the VSO scene, a
scattering of guest conductors is here for the next two
months: Wyn Morris this weekend (with guest pianist Phil-
lipe Entremont), Kazuyoshi Akiyami, and Dietfried Bernet,
possible successor to present conductor Meredith Davies. Big
Daddy Meredith returns in March to sock it to the audience
of bags and rags with concerts featuring Nielsen's 5th Symphony with its snare-drum cadenza which can drown out
most of the orchestra, Mahler's 1st Symphony, and Walton's
choral spectacular, Belshazzar's Feast. Perhaps also a couple
more Sounds of the Century concerts. And to help celebrate
the end of exams on April 30th, folksinger Judy Collins joins
the VSO at the Coliseum.
Another mention that you can get into VSO concerts for the
slim price of a dollar by showing your AMS card at the box
office about half an hour before the concert (providing there
are any unsold seats,) a high quality of entertainment bargain cheaper than any show or nightclub in Vancouver.
At UBC, the department of Music has obtained American
contemporary (avant-garde?) composer Morton Feldman for
the Contemporary Arts Festival. He'll give concert-demonstrations on January 29, 30 and 31. In the meanwhile, the
Music Dept. is giving FREE recitals and concerts at 12:30
and 8:30 every Friday this month in either the old Auditorium or the Music Building Recital Hall <the Music Building being the structure exactly north of the Auditorium).
Also free recitals on Thursday, January 16 at 12:30 and
Wednesday,   January  29   at   12:30.
People interested in encouraging or helping to promote jazz
or contemporary music locally should get in touch with Dennis Patten of 1091 Broughton Street in Vancouver. In a
recent letter to the Vancouver Sun, Patten blasted Vancouver radio stations for playing "a barrage of banal and
worthless junk of the institution named pop music, with one
hour of cocktail or background jazz thrown in for the 'hippie
set'." Over the phone Patten told me that within a year he'd
like to arrange for top name jazz artists to appear regularly
in Vancouver. If you're interested, phone him at his home
(688-6401) or his office. (685-9335).
On a different cultural level, you might note that the Beac:
Boys are coming to Vancouver in the Agrodome on the
18th. In spite of taunts from practically everyone I know, I
remain convinced that the Beach Boys are one of the major
cultural forces of the 1960's. More about them a few issues
from now.
The Beatles' new album (for those of you who aren't aware)
is being overplayed to death on CKLG, supplying the local
teenybopper mentalities with neat new catch phrases like
"Happiness is a warm gun". (How many times have you
heard that in the last month?) Analyses of the new album
dominate the printed media, from Jay Durwood's soul-searching account in the Province to the soon-to-arrive erudite
Playboy review. Any magazine that names Herb Alpert as
the world's best jazz trumpeter can't be all bad.
My own comment is that
nificant.  (Wowie  Zowie).
use that will be made of
heterogeneously gathered,
really want to know, my
And  my favorite  colour
The Adventurers. And my
the new album is reasonably sig-
More significant, however, is the
the fantastic material, somewhat
in the album. And for those who
favorite song is Martha, My Dear.
is red. And my favorite book is
fave boss fab groovy groop is . . .
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,  1969 Signatures fishy
but not golden
pf Sive
By ANDREW HORVAT
Gold and Fish Signatures, is
just that: two thin sheets of
gold paper attached to the
front and back covers, and the
side view of sixteen fishes
done with black ink on absorbent rice paper.
Actually, the book is much
more than just gold, and fish
imprints. It only contains two
sheets of gold, and a very
simple chart of world gold
prices courtesy of the First
National City Bank, and only
the last third of the pages
have any prints of fish. The
other two thirds are filled with
poems, or so the author, Reps,
Gold and Fish Signatures;
reps, (presumably Paul Reps)
published by Charles E. Turtle,
Rutland, Vermont, and Tokyo,
Japan, printed in Japan; distributed in Canada by M. G.
Hurtig Ltd., Edmonton. $2.50.
would wish me to believe. I
am convinced of the gold and
just in case I might mistake
the two thin sheets for Dunhill cigarette wrappers, the
inside cover tells me, "Reps—
borrowed from Chinese actual
gold papers burned at shrines
for very very good luck."
I am convinced of the fish
prints, or "gyotaku" as well,
and I find the explanation for
them —i "Because each whole
being writes his signature into
light-air-fluid as our dancing
atoms transmute you into me,
me into you" somewhat pretentious, unnecessary, but
nevertheless in complete harmony with the rest of the
book. Reps' sixty or so poems
are by his own admission not
really poems. On page 15 he
writes, "all night I looked
through the dictionary but
could not Find the words."
Probably for this reason, Mr.
Reps chose the medium of
brush on rice paper. His attempts with this medium, are
truly commendable. On page
14, Mr. Reps painted 3 flowers
done with a heavy black brush
then a lighter gray for the
petals, and three red dots for
the centres. This is Reps'
finest work, because it is unspoiled by such verbal comment as:
dear ■ ■ ■ / are we born / do
we die / how could we / we
have nothing / to do with
it / Like Leaves we Flutter /
and Let go / let go / birth
may be a separation / death
a reward / rest assured, /
reps.
Mr. Reps feels that because he
chooses Japanese media of
artistic self-expression, he can
suffice with Japanese grammar:
when right eye turns left
left eye turns left
to see you lost
in cherry tree
The true mystery in Gold and
Fish Signatures, is not provided
by its author's oriental exoticism, but by Charles Tuttle, the
publisher, and Keiko Chiba,
the designer of the book. Why
on earth did they bother to
invest the time and energy to
create such a beautiful book?
Do they believe that readers
will buy any book simply because it is exotic, published in
Tokyo, written by an American
of Swiss origin who only uses
his last name, and sold in the
lobbies of Hilton hotels?
3 flowers unspoiled by verbal comment
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These are McGill University scholarships for an advanced
course leading to a master's degree in mining engineering.
Applications should be made,
before February 3rd, 1969 to:
Chairman,
Dept. of Mining Engineering & Applied Geophysics,
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McGill University,
Montreal 110, P.Q.
These scholarships are sponsored  by a
group of Canadian Mining Companies.
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SUB Cafeteria 8:00 P.M.
MARATHON DANCE-* b.o bands
Friday Jan. 24-9:00 P.M. to Sat. 7:30 A.M.
SUB Ballroom  and  Cafeteria—Free  Breakfast
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COLLECTORS and POPPY FAMILY       LIGHTFOOT CONCERT
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MARATHON DANCE
Fri. 9:00
COFFEE HOUSE
Mon., Tues., Wed.
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COLLECTORS AND POPPY FAMILY       LIGHTFOOT CONCERT
Thurs. 4:30 Perform. Thurs.  7:30  Perform.
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MARATHON DANCE
Fri. 9:00
COFFEE HOUSE
Mon., Tues., Wed.
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COLLECTORS and POPPY FAMILY MARATHON DANCE
Thurs.  12:30 Perform. Fri. 9:00
COST SEPARATELY WOULD BE $4.50
COFFEE HOUSE
Mon., Tues., Wed.
Friday, January  10,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY CAMPUS POP
FESTIVAL
Papa Bears Medicine Show
Mother Tuckers Yellow Duck
Five Man Cargo Spring
Tomorrow's Eyes Seeds Of Time
Folk Singing Poetry Reading
Underground Movies Art Displays
Electronic Music Body Painting
Lights By Addled Cromish
Friday, January 17th
From 8:00 P.M. to 2:00 A.M.
Advance Tickets ($2.00) At The A.M.S. Office
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pfi 6ix
Happy never after
By  JUDY  YOUNG
Once upon a time, the yellow
blob that you see in the velvet
sky was composed of green
cheese and if you looked very
hard you may have seen a
certain cow jump over the
moon just for kicks.
All the very hip people lived
in a land of magic cosmetology
and blue forget-me-nots. One
of the hippiest was a simple-
hearted, generous maiden with
not a single bad bone in her
beautiful body.
To make a long story short,
especially since an elaborate
extravaganza version has recently been viewed on television, our hero fell in love
with a strange damsel oi
mysterious circumstances. In
one way or another, true love
conquered all and virtue reigned supreme with a little aid
from a godmother who happened to be a fairy as well. Prince
Charming and Cinderella lived
happily ever after. "Happily
every after," states the black
print as the book snaps shut
with absolute finality.
Ever hear of the Grave Robbers
and the Living Corpses? Don't
forget the drive-in cemetery.
In death every mother finally
achieves frozen age and unfading looks. Meticulously preserved, she is on display to
mourners like a store mannequin. Who knows, death robes
may become quite the rage.
If the dead can be disturbed
are fairy tales to be left sacred?
Are story, tellers to be eternally forbidden interviews from
the "happily ever after" "because one author couldn't
think of anything more to say?
Let's face it, fairy tale lovers
everywhere' have the right to
know any sordid details.
In true Hollywood style, the
stars of our drama faded out
of the newspaper limelight at
the end of a spectacular courtship fraught with suspense
and intrigue. The . divorce
court testifies that Heaven had
committed a boob.
Even magic makeup needs discreet touch-ups and naive
Cinderella was uniformed to
the arts of pampering her face
while catering to an amorous
husband at the same time.
Prince Charming realized
too late that familiarity breeds
discontent and all that innocent
simplicity stuff is for the birds.
In such a case, our charming
fellow didn't believe that "one
to one" should be "cursedly
confined when nature prompted" and thus he "Scattered his
Maker's image thro' the land"
as Dryden appropriately
phrased it.
Poor Cinderella was back at
the hearth to warm herself
with the ashes of a burnt-out
love. Prince Charming had a
ball with a sophisticated lady-
in-waiting.
I am afraid that soon Humpty
Dumpty will be heard to have
been made of silly putty. He
could not be put back together
again because the kids ate the
pieces thinking they were
chewing gum. Believe it or not
stomach pumps had not been
invented at that time.
Apollo 8 has shown that man
is as good as beast in jumping
over the moon, especially if
he is fortified with turkey
gravy instead of smelly cheese.
The world will not end if an
expose proves that the -wicked
queen was freaked on a bad
trip. My worse fear is that
Sleeping Beauty took an overdose of sleeping pills and her
insurance policy will be declared void on attempted
suicide and . . .
CAWSEY'S CLUBS
by FRED (The Snake) CAWSEY
For pop fanatics willing to brave the knee-
deep slush brought in with the new year, there
are some pretty heavy shows coming up.
Tonight, The Fleetwood Mac, from London,
England, will perform their blues trip at the
PNE Garden Auditorium.
They will do two sets with the Mock Duck
preceding each one. The Ecto-Plasmic Assault
will be there to flog your retinas with their
opticals, with the DeYong Sound Centre and
their humping big speakers to tickle your
auditory canals.
Advance tickets at $2.50 a throw are available
at Famous Artists in the Bay and at West Side
Music at 1684 Robson. Tickets will also be
available at the door, but for $3 a shot.
Joe Crowley, local promoter for Northwest
Productions, who are bringing the show to
Vancouver, says the company is trying to bring
top big name rock groups to town.
Creedence Clearwater of "Suzy Q" fame were
here last week, but more of that later, and
coming up for the gardens are The Steve
Miller Band and The Collectors.
If those shows bomb out promoters may forget
Vancouver completely as a dud.
Crowley is also making a point of using local
groups to back up the heavies in these shows.
That should make tonight's show a real blast,
as the Mock Duck are just about the top group
in town, musically. Their frenetic, jazz-oriented
rock sound has brought them a large following
recently at the Bistro and The Big Mother.
Singer and guitarist Joe Mock has been singing
around a long time and is a dedicated pro with
a lot to offer for people who dig originality
and pizazz.
Just to show how far some of the local groups
have come in recent months, Papa Bear's Medicine Show last week came off at least equal to
and often better than the headline group at
the Creedence Clearwater Show.
This is not to take away from the performance
of Creedence Clearwater, who laid on a solid
blues trip. It's just that the Papa Bears came
on with more funk and zip and are really trying
to open new fields in pop music.
Coming  up   Monday  night   at   the   Bistro   on
THE     UBYSSEY
Fourth Avenue, is a benefit for Cool-Aid,
featuring Kelly James, The Black Snake, Sleepy
John, The Seeds of Time and the Mock Duck.
Usually on Monday nights folk music is the
thing on the Bistro stage. This policy was tried
just before Xmas and organizers Bill Simmons
and Vince Shea say they are trying to renew
interest in folk music in town.
Admission is one buck and the atmosphere is
strictly informal. Musicians are invited to come
and do their thing right there on the stage,
and all other folk buffs are welcome to come
and folk around, says Simmons.
Bistro Owner Andrew Telegdi is continuing his
policy of featuring top local bands during the
week as well as folk singers between sets.
Since our last pre-Xmas issue, one of the big
nightclubs downtown had someone even "hip"
or "hyp" types could dig.
Bobby Gentry played the Cave from Nov. 29
thru Dec. 7 and proved to be quite an entertaining package. She's got a hell of a nice bod
and fetched a few palpitations as she danced
around the stage during her numbers.
Now that we've got all that settled, I'd like to
talk about a nice place to sit and have coffee
and meet friends.
It's called the Kiki Rouge Discotheque, and it's
downtown just off the north end of the Granville Bridge.
Primarily a membership club, the Kiki boasts
nearly 5,000 members. A six-month membership costs $2.50 and features free admission
Sunday thru Thursday and $1 each for members on Friday and Saturday. Non-members
pay $2 every time, so it pays to buy a membership.
Owner Pat McGrath says he wants to provide
an informal atmosphere where young people
can meet others of the same persuasion. It's
not a jacket and tie situation and many of the
club members are university students.
Tweet, the blond behind the counter, is friendly
if you approach her accordingly, and if you
wiggle your ears and nose in the same direction
four times and grin, she may even lift her
mini skirt a bit.
The Kiki is one of the cleanest, well-laid out
night spots in town. Try it some time.
Friday, January   10,   1969 COMMITTEE CONT.
FROM PF 3HREE
"This is improvisational theatre
■*' at its best, a free swinging, fast
dancing vehicle. With the three
ingredients of natural behaviour on the part of the players,
and trust and support between
them, the actors feel no compunctions about doing or saying anything. The excitement
A among them is electric, and
this excitement is generated to
the audience, and then back to
the actors again. The Committee has brought improvisational theatre back to the
people. They have brought it
in a big balloon filled with
laughing gas, and the people
love it."
It is planned that the Committee Workshop shall give
three to four full days' worth
BELLE CONTINUED
FROM PF 2WO
dreams, and daydreams, haunt
Severine . . . What interests
me is her interior drama, the
moral conflict; it is the masochistic character of these impulses which I want to place
in evidence . . . obsessions
which  appear  and reappear."
- Unfortunately, while Bunuel
succeeds in indicating the interior quest of Severine in
intellectual terms verging on
symbolism, he neglects the in-
»terior which translates itself
as emotion. Severine emerges
as a dull, lifeless character.
Some of the fault lies with the
insipid    dialogues    of    script-
- writer Jean-Claude Carriere,
and some with Catherine
Deneuve who never seems to
be as effective as Clementi,
Piccoli or Paige. However,
Bunuel must take the responsibility for his shallow heroine
and, moreover, his pointed
avoidance of drama. In th©
most obvious instance (Huss-
on's revelation to Pierre of his
- wife's activities), Bunuel is not
purposely ambiguous for the
sake of ambiguity—there is no
reason to doubt that Pierre is
told (on which level of reality
or imaginary is quite another
question). Simply, it seems
that the director is not interested  in  the   possible  dramatic
. intricacies inherent in such a
confrontation.
His is an ambiguity which
condemns no one, avoids
moralizing, tarnished only by
his mismanagement of Severine. Notwithstanding the implicit irony of angelic beauty
with demonic lusts, notwith-
. standing the humour in perversity, one very quickly loses
interest in Severine — Bunuel
omits in his heroine the interior facets that give life to
Husson, Marcel and Anais
within common circumstances.
Both Persona and Last year at
Marienbad have this circular,
symmetrical structure. Persona
involves a similar search and
sexual expression, but Bergman fully conveys the depth
of his characters. Resnais
gives Marienbad the flowing
poetry and suspense which
exist for their own sakes, satisfying and puzzling in the
revelation   of  each   sequence.
- Complete with its repertory
of effects and images drawn
from his previous works and
planted for Bunuel addicts,
Belle de Jour attempts at an
amalgam of the two films, and
"falls short of both.
Friday, January   10,   1969
pS 7even
of performances and workshops on the campus during
the Festival. This will give full
scope for interaction between
the group and the campus environment — something which
began to happen with the
Daddy Violet group from New
York in last year's Festival
but which was cut off by not
enough time and place being
allowed for it to fully happen.
The whole form of the Festival
this year aims to allow much
more of this kind of interaction
to happen than before. The old
criticism that the Festival is
for those who already know
and are switched on to the
contemporary arts, will, hopefully, be laid to rest. Events
will take place in a diversity
of settings: under a plastic
canopied temporary theatre at
the foot of the belltower, in
the basement of the Lasserre
Building, out on the Malls, and
in more traditional and usual
places such as the Auditorium,
the Fine Arts Gallery, the
SUB Auditorium, the Recital
Hall in the Music Building,
etc.
The program will include the
student "Living Theatre"; New
York poet Jackson McLow;
three performances of elec*-
tronic music by composer
Morton Feldman; an eight-day
sequence of theatrical events
and happenings using 'programmed scores'; films; an art
show of young American artists; a student play Super-Safe;
and many other events and
persons.
"A REALLY BEAUTIFUL MOVIE!"
—New York Times
Ituis cBunuelb (^Masterpiece ofcErotica!
224-3730
4375 W. 16th
SHOWTIMES
7:30   p.m.   -   9:30  p.m.
Monique Archambault sells
Canadian clothes
to Paris fashion shops.
Impossible? Not at all. Canadian designed and manufactured clothes are making a big
impression on the European market. In fact all over the world. Monique's job as a
commodity officer with the federal Department of Trade and Commerce takes her to
world fashion centres, helping the Canadian clothing industry to penetrate foreign
markets. It leads to bigger exports, a better balance of trade and a healthy economy
for the rest of us.
Monique is one of the new breed of people in public service . . . young, college educated, ambitious and dedicated. In Government service she has found a rewarding and
responsible future in the mainstream of Canadian development. The Public Service of
Canada has career opportunities for young men and women like Monique Archambault. If you'd like to know about them, write to:
THEUBYSSEY
Career Info.,
Public Service
Commission of Canada,
Tower "A",
Place deVille,
Ottawa, Ontario. p£ Sight
By VALLEY
The traffice office's answer to the physical fitness fad is new parking meter rates (or hadn't
you noticed?). Observe the meters in the Freddy
Wood parking lot — they cost a lot now, and a
lot more if you want to buy four hours un-
worried time on campus. It's a reverse package
deal: four hours coined at once on the metre
cost 70c. But if you are willing to jog back and
forth between classes, the same four hours cost
40c. This, of course, is a clever ruse to encourage
students to stay fit by making hourly treks
through the snow, at the risk of pneumonia and
other health-maintaining diseases. This, of course,
is to discourage students from monopolizing
parking space, and to encourage them to leave
their cars in the god-forsaken puddles of students' lots, rather than paying for visitors' parking, thus enabling them to partake in the pleasures of a 20 minute jaunt to and from their
transportation.
Which only emphasizes the pitiful state of parking facilities on campus, which is not entirely
attributable to the traffic office, who must be
commended for their concern over the physical
fat of the collective student body.
Other notable notes of post-Christmas slush are
the psychedelic lights on the tower of Union
College: the aurora borealis goes collegiate?
If you happen over the old auditorium way you
may notice that the stage has experienced a
sudden growth spurt over the holidays. Don't
be dismayed, the cancer (or should I say Can-
Cancer) is not malignant. It is part of the set
now being built for Mussoc's production of Can-
Can, opening February 6. Watch for it.
A recent refugee from San Jose College was
impressed by our controversial bell tower. He
wondered about the tightly-locked internal staircase, supposing it to lead to the fortress of faculty
for emergency use during student activists' antics.
All that would be necessary would be a coffeepot and loud-speaker defense system: "Now hear
this ..."
Farcical facts courtesy of Cinema 16: Paul Anka
was bound to be the greatest talent this world
had seen in the last 500 years! But whatever
happened to the nose-bobbed idol? And don't
be deceived by the provocative covers of the
C-16 notes. If there's only one voluptuous scene
in the weekly movie it's bound to make the
cover. The new C-16 series, The Roger Corman-
anagoria, starts Feb. 16 for horror-hungerers.
Series tickets are now available if you dig the
reel Roger Corman.
The Christmas Hols saw the closing of Vancouver's hip concert hall, The Retinal Circus, whose
ringed eyelids fluttered shut after a financial
disaster New Year's Eve. It is becoming increasingly more difficult for privately-owned clubs
to stay awake in this city, possibly because of an
increase in competition more than a decrease
of interest. Is the culprit exhaustion or boredom?
Backsides is interested in anything that interests
you. If there's something that raises your interest or ire, or somewhere you want to know
about before you go there, come to the Ubyssey
office and leave word and we will be glad to
investigate, discriminate, and report in this column weekly of benevolent backsides.
For Action!
Come to
JOSEPH for
Personalized Service
HAIRCUTTING
and STYLING
UNIQUE
BARBERS
3144   WESTERN   PARKWAY
behind Boulevard
Payment of Fees
Second installment now due.
Payment should be made at the
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
on or before
Wednesday, January 15, 1969
2/
-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE*
xs
LOOT
by JOE ORTON
An Irreverent Farce About Death
Jack Ammon     •     Alan Scarfe     #     Anni Scarfe
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
JANUARY 17-25
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for all performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
MONDAY, JANUARY 20th __
THURSDAY,  JANUARY  23rd  .
.   -    7:30 p.m.
__   12:30 noon
S\
m
Tickets: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE - Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre I
—■_ FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.———<-
M
B.C. HYDRO and POWER AUTHORITY
requires an
ACCOUNTING OPTION GRADUATE
for its
COMMERCE GRADUATE-IN-TRAINING PROGRAMME
The trainee, who reports to the Chief Financial Officer, is
given assignments or projects in various Financial Division
departments, such as Accounts Payable, Budgeting, Office of
the Comptroller, Purchasing, Revenue Accounting, Plant and
Cost Accounting, etc. This offers the young graduate excellent
opportunities to show his qualifications or interests for different
accounting and administrative positions within B.C. Hydro.
This basic training lasts 2 to 3 years, after which the graduate-
in-training is placed in a field of activity which best meets his
requirements and the needs of B.C. Hydro.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS:
JANUARY 16
PLEASE  ARRANGE  APPOINTMENTS  THROUGH YOUR
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969 Friday, January   10,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
Laxton places hopes on New Left
The fragmented North American New Left will unite into
a popular front to make radical
changes in society, B.C. New
Democratic Party leader John
Laxton said Wednesday.
"A coalition of the many
dissident groups of concerned
young people would have
enough influence to make the
changes they desire," John
told 40 persons in Bu. 100.
"Small local groups tend to
patch the problems of society
and defeat their own efforts to
create a new society," he said.
He said the NDP has changed
from reformist to radical and
as such gives Canadian leftists
a 20-year head start on those
in the U.S.
John also talked about propaganda and politics.
"Only an illusory picture of
the world will appeal to
people," he said.
A     .--BC.
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"People are convinced for
the most part that things cannot be any better than they
are. If there wasn't a propaganda side to politics, no one
would bother to vote for anyone or do anything."
He said popular enthusiasm
is   a   prerequisite   for   parliamentary action.
John, who is also chairman
of the NDP's policy committee,
is a Vancouver lawyer who
worked with the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association in defending Georgia Straight.
SPECIAL EVENTS "Speakers
present
II
SUB
BALLROOM
N.LF. (Viet Cong)
representatives from
SOUTH VIETNAM
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INTERVIEW DATE(S)
JANUARY 14 and 15
for students graduating in
BUSINESS
ENGINEERING
SCIENCE
We are a diversified industrial complex. Our
products and services include transportation
equipment, steel fabrication, engineering, steel
foundry, and power.
We are continually seeking to improve our operations and the available positions will afford
significant opportunities for career development
to graduates possessing drive and potential.
Talk to your Placement Officer. Read ourmaterial.
MAKE AN APPOINTMENT
n
it's not work,
it's pure enjoyment'
Bill Jackson, manager of group benefits for London Life in Toronto
"I studied actuarial sciences
at college. But before graduating, I decided I didn't want
to be behind a desk. That
sounded like work. Instead,
I wanted freedom, plus the
opportunity to get out and
meet people. My career in
group insurance has given me
this. As a result, my job isn't
work — it's pure enjoyment.
From my first day with London
Life, I received something
more than a regular salary —
the opportunity to determine
my own earnings beyond this
figure. There's no ceiling.
And if you earn a promotion,
you get it."
After receiving a B.A. from
the University of Toronto in
1 964, Bill Jackson completed
an intensive training course
at the head office of London
Life. He began in Toronto as
a group benefits representative and two years later was
promoted to a group supervisor in Sault Ste. Marie. Recently, he was appointed
manager of group benefits in
Toronto. To learn more about
careers in group insurance,
see your placement officer. Or
write to the Personnel Department, London Life Insurance
Co., London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969
The Aggies
Congratulate Our Queen
MISS HOMECOMING- 1968-69
wjifw*#*r?^*£ffl»*j*-»s
'-iv '*' '■■■■• 'Vs-
Jte*, -a^s?: —
■ 1- I-
■>■*»■
Jicdthi^ (DjOwAjojv Friday,  January   10,   1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
. and Cordially
Invite You to ..
4MKVU9
JAN. 11 -9-1 am
SUB CAF
MW TimA
TICKETS AT AMS
«»*^™-—_^a**-*<.
$4 Couple Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING - JANUARY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
3:00-5:00
*3:00-5:00
SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
2:00-3:30
•7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
12:45-2:45
7:30-9:30
"Except
Jan. 10 & 24
"Except
Jan. 11 4 18
7:30-9:30
Tues. Wed.
Aft. Aft.
STUDENTS   15c 25c
ADULTS       15c 25c
Fri., Sat.
& Sun.
Aft.
35c
60c
Even.
SKATE RENTAL OR
SHARPENING — 35c
50c   For information phone
75c     224-3205 — 228-3197
U.B.C.  THUNDERBIRDS
ICE HOCKEY JANUARY HOME GAMES
(Fri., 8 p.m.) (Sat., 2 p.m.)
UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG - JANUARY  10    JANUARY  11
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY  - JANUARY 24    JANUARY 25
—     FREE   ADMISSION   FOR   UBC   STUDENTS    —
FREE  — The  Arena   &   Curling   Rinks   are  available   FREE  through  the   P.E.
programme  4  hours  per  day,  Monday-Friday   inclusive   (U.B.C.   students).
The Club
Don't know what you want to do after graduation?
Welcome to The Club.
The Club, in case you haven't heard, is a not very exclusive organization of thousands of young degree candidates just like
yourself. The only qualification needed for membership is that
you can't decide what field you want to go into.	
Well, read on. We might just be the people who'll close the clubhouse door for you.
We? We are The Mercantile Bank of Canada, one of the nation's
chartered banks.	
The particulars: Mercantile, an affiliate of First National City
Bank, is headquartered in Montreal. We have seven additional
offices from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans: Halifax, Quebec,
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary and Vancouver. We're
growing fast because we're thinking fast. (You have to think fast
when you're a small chartered bank in Canada.)	
That's where you come in.
We need more people who can think fast on their feet. Dynamic
people with initiative; people who can innovate.
Since we're still fairly small as banks go, we can help you develop
your individual talents and potential for real accomplishment. If
you'll supply the ambition, we'll supply the challenge.
Our requirements are quite straightforward: you should have
good grades, evidence of wide activities and interests, a comfortable facility for dealing with people and a desire to excel.
If you're our kind of man, we want to talk to you about a career
with Mercantile.	
Not just pushing buttons, or shuffling papers, or looking neat behind a desk. But involvement—in every phase of banking, creative
banking.	
We're not concerned if you don't know anything about high
finance or the intricacies of banking. We'll train you ourselves
in all kind of banking operations. And when your training is over,
we'll give you as much responsibility as you can handle—every
step of the way... up.
Money? We aren't naive enough to think we'll get the best people
for precious little money. We pay competitive salaries to get you
in the first place. And keep paying top dollar for top performance.
So if you have any degree of interest for a banking career—a
bachelor's or master's degree, that is-make an appointment
through your university placement officer to get yourself interviewed by our campus representative.
 JANUARY   17-18	
Now. then, about those club dues	
Student union fees ignored
From Page 6
criticized by Saskatchewan's
NDP opposition leader, former
premier Woodrow Lloyd, who
said the board had "neither
the right nor the obligation" to
halt criticism at the university.
"When authority resorts to
such throttling it violates the
general public right of freedom of speech and freedom of
assembly," he said.
Regina faculty association
president Reed Robertson has
termed the move "stupid" and
"silly" and accused the board
of "using a fiscal sledge-hammer to impose censorship."
The student council has promised to fight the affair to the
finish.
A five-point program adopted by the union calls for public education on the issue, the
freezing of all expenditures not
involved with union defense,
mass meetings on the campus
and contact with other groups
including Saskatchewan farm
and labor organizations and the
Canadian Union of Students
for financial and moral support.
The student union accused
the board of governors of opting for "a policy of confron-
tatin rather than reasonable
negotiations" in connection
with the issue.
In a press statement, the
union termed the action "an
infringement of the legal rights
of the students to organize an
independent union under student direction and free from
outside control. It is an intolerable attempt to impose censorship on the Carillon and to
deny the students their right
to a free press."
This year, the Carillon incurred Willie's wrath when it
disclosed top-secret plans for
cut-backs in the university budget for the 1969-70 year; which
will either limit enrolment or
cause a steep rise in the stu-
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dent faculty ratio at the university. The budget cut would
also virtually eliminate night
classes and halt expenditures
on laboratory facilities and
equipment.
At that time, Willie accused
the Carillon of "gross irresponsibility" in reporting the budget situation, and said if he
could find the source of the
leak, "heads would roll".
Members of the Regina student council had concluded a
verbal agreement with the
board to collect fees for the
coming semester. The council
is currently studying legal action against the board for
breach of contract.
The board's decision, according to the press release, is not
irrevocable. "The door remains
open for discussions and negotiation between the student
union and the board. Any new ■
arrangement, however, will
have to be based on clear-cut
understandings and agreements."
A subsequent interview with
Willie revealed that these
"understandings and agreements" would have to include
the introduction of a "policy
board" to set editorial policy
for the paper. According to
Willie, the board could consist
entirely of students.
"This is not the idea of introducing censorship," Willie said,
"but there is a difference between criticism and what the
Carillon is doing."
Willie has stated that he
"does not care" what actions
are taken by the Regina student union in response to the
board actions, and that he will
give students "plenty of time"
to bow to the board's position.
"It will be very interesting
to see what support they have
and where it comes from," he
said.
4 ft •£■£-• i i*** «*.•*■
«swr~
RALPH S. PLANT LIMITED
will be on Campus January 28th to interview
Commerce Graduates with Marketing Option
and Forestry Graduates.
If you are interested in the Marketing of Lumber and Allied Forest Products
and wish to join an aggressive Vancouver based wholesale lumber firm,
please contact the  Placement Office. Friday, January   10,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
SPOR TS
Weekend sports
— dick button photo
THUNDERBIRD FORWARD Dave Rice (23) looks on disgustedly as UBC once again falls short of
the goal in a crucial fourth down play. Birds came through in fine style with a 66-51 victory.
Thunderbird hoopsters
come out of a tailspin
The 1968 edition of the UBC
Thunderbird basketball team
got off to an impressive early
start but managed very little
for Christmas cheer over the
holidays.
Their record is now seven
wins and four losses.
The best part of the early
start came in the Birds' victories over Simon Fraser and
Portland State in the Totem
tournament, Nov. 30-Dec. 1.
The Birds received a sterling
performance from flashy guard
Ron Thorsen in both games as
he popped in 25 points against
SFU and added 21 in the finals
against Portland State.
On Dec. 20 the team downed Lewis and Clark 94-83 almost entirely on the efforts of
centre Neil Williscroft who
dominated the contest by firing in 26 points and grabbing
17 rebounds.
The Birds then proceeded
into a major tailspin. With
Thorsen sidelined with a ruptured vein in his left arm and
recently Bob Barazzuol ailing
from a bout with the flu, the
squad took defeats from Lewis
and Clark, California State,
Portland State, and Western
Washington; pausing only to
pummel outclassed Winnipeg
117-59.
In the Lewis and Clark loss,
Derek Sankey's 20 point performance was in vain as was
Bob Barazzuol's 23 point showing against California as both
teams used effective fast breaks
to stop UBC.
The most consistent Birds
over the dry spell have been
Neil Williscroft, who has maintained a 15 point average
throughout the season, and
Barazzuol who had 18 points
against Lewis and Clark, the
23 against Cal State, and 12
against Portland before getting
sick.
The return of Barazzuol
this weekend will also solve
a few problems in that his
absence has meant a loss of
16 points per game and a solid
rebounder to back up Williscroft.
A tremendous effort by the
remaining seven of Peter
Mullins' chargers gave the UBC
Thunderbirds a 66-51 victory
over Fresno Pacific College
Vikings Monday at War Memorial Gym.
Six hundred loyal hoop fans
watched Bob Molinski turn in
a gutty display of versatility,
both defending and scoring.
Having switched from his
normal position to guard,
Molinski  fired   his   22   points
from every conceivable angle
and nabbed 10 rebounds, many
of them on the offensive boards.
Dave Rice helped out with
the rebounding and added 11
points, while Neil Williscroft,
alternating between centre and
forward, chipped in 14 points.
UBC departed from their
traditional man-to-man defence
and went to a 2-1-2 zone for
only the third time this year
in order to avoid fouls.
"We switched to get away
from the contact of individual
coverage," said coach Peter
Mullins after the win. "If you
have someone pn the bench
with fouls, you are in real
trouble."
The strategy worked as the
Birds picked up only six personal fouls and held the Vikings to a scant 51 points.
Fortunately, the persisting
maladies which have been
plaguing the Birds are showing
signs of letting up. Bob Barazzuol and Derek Sankey are
now ready for action and there
are hopes that Phil Langley's
pulled groin muscle will mend,
allowing him to play next weekend against Seattle Pacific.
The Birds are in Tacoma
tonight to take on tough Puget
Sound University in a two
game series.
Ice Hockey
The Thunderbirds play
against the University of Winnipeg Wesmen Friday evening
and Saturday afternoon. Game
times are 8:00 p.m. and 2:30
p.m. This is a good chance for
the Birds to catch up to the
leaders of the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Union  Hockey league.
Swimming
Saturday and Sunday the
swim team will be competing
in  the  Pacific  Northwest As
sociation Championships at the
University o f Washington.
Wednesday night they open
their season at home, Percy
Norman Memorial Pool against
Western   Washington   College.
Soccer
Saturday the Thunderbirds
will play against Victoria in
Victoria. Coach Joe Johnson
says the Birds only problem
seems to be too many helpings
of plum pudding over the holidays.
Continued Page 20
See: WEEKEND
— dick button photo
FAST BREAKING Thunderbirds' Bob Barazzoul (with ball)
and Phil Langley making beeline course for the Portland
State basket. Watching is Terry MacKay (24) and the pretty
UBC Cheerleaders. The Birds took this game and won Totem
Tournament for 1968.
FOR SALE
$1.98
plus tax
(cheap this week only)
The Thunderbird Shop
Open: Mon. - Fri.
Sat. & Sun.
U.B.C. Jackets
•  Largest selection of posters
•   Cosmetics
I
(THE NEW COLLEGE SHOP)
Downstairs in the S.U.B.
Across From The Bowling Alley
U.B.C. Class Rings
•  U.B.C. 6 ft. Scarves
•  Convenience items
for Resident Students
10:00 - 10:00 P.M.
Afternoons to 5:00 P.M.
U.B.C. Sweatshirts
•   Fraternity & Sorority Jewelry
•  Magazines &
Pocket books
SPECIAL ORDERS TAKEN FOR CLUBS OR FACULTIES
(JACKETS) (CRESTS) (PENNANTS) (SWEATSHIRTS) Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January   10,   1969
Mardi Gras benefit
for B.C. paraplegics
Proceeds from Mardi Gras
1969 will be donated to the
B.C. Paraplegic  Association.
The money raised will initiate a fund for a new hostel
and paraplegic facilities in
Vancouver.
This year's theme is "Mardi
Gras Goes Underground".
Mardi Gras officials refused
to speculate specifically o n
this, claiming that patrons can
do their own subterranean
thing.
From Page 19
Wrestling
The Wrestling team travels
to Nelson to compete against
the team from Notre Dame
University.
Cross Country
The whole cross country
team is competing this weekend in the fifth league race
at Simon Fraser University.
Intramurals
Soccer registration; last day
for entries is Wednesday, Jan.
15. All entries should be turned
into the Intramural office rm.
308, War Memorial gym before 1:30 p.m. Other intramurals are going as scheduled,
with action in Basketball, Ice
hockey  and   Curling.
The annual event will this
year include king and queen
candidate jollies around campus, a paraplegic basketball
game with half time demonstrations by some of Canada's
Para-Olympic gold-medal winners, and a kickoff dance on
Jan. 15. ;
Running from? Jan. 27 to
Feb. 1, the festival will have
the usual bazaar, raffle and
two dances at the Showmart
Building.
Women's sports
Basketball
The Womens Senior team
will be hosting the Invitational
Basketball Tournament being
held here over the weekend,
from 4:30-10:30 p.m. on Friday
and 9:30 .am.-10:30 p.m. on
Saturday. The Thunderette
Varsity team plays in Victoria
over the weekend.
Volleyball
The Thunderette Invitational Tournament with teams
coming from Washington and
Alberta as well as from the
surrounding area here. The
tourney will go from 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at War Memorial
Gym.
TUBERCULOSIS
CLINIC
Free tuberculin skin tests
and chest x-rays will be available to students, staff and faculty members until Friday,
Jan. 17.
Operation Doorstep is providing the tests through cooperation of the B.C. division
of Tuberculosis Control, the
B.C. TB Christmas Seal Society
and the University Health Services.
The tests are given in 20
mobile clinics throughout the
campus.
The Cong
are coming
"If we don't fight 'em now
in Vietnam, next thing you
know they'll be in the streets
of America."
Lydon Johnson said it, and
now they're here.
Hoang Bich Son and Huynh
Van Ba of South Vietnam's
National Liberation Front will
arrive in Vancouver next week
as part of the (NLF's latest
offensive. They will speak in
the SUB ballroom on Tuesday,
Jan. 14, at noon.
The engagement is sponsored
by the Alma Mater Society
Special Events committee. Admission is free.
-   CLASSIFIED   —
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines. 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO THE 5 MAN CARGO
at the Totem Park Jan. 11, 9-1.
Girls   .75,   Guys   1.00.   Couples   1.50.
CAMPUS POP FESTIVAL
Papa Bears, Mother Tuckers, Five
Man Cargo, Seeds of Time, Tomorrow's Eyes and Spring as Well as
Kelly James and Greydon Moore.
Also Underground movies, electronic
music, folk singing, poetry reading,
art displays, boutiques, body painted
dancers, and much, much more. Friday, January 17, 8:00 p.m. til 2:00
a.m. Advance tickets $2.00 at A.M.S.
office.
THE   THUNDERBIRD    SHOP
Come  in  and  see   our
new   U.B.C.   items.    S.U.B.    Basement
Greetings
12
Lost  &  Found
13
NIKKORMAT 35 M.M. CAMERA,
lost in women's gym, Dec. 21. Please
contact Bob Olafson 228-9466 or
228-2703.
BLACK RAINCOAT TAKEN BY
mistake for green raincoat from
Bookstore Cafe on Dec. 20. Will
exchange  266-4778 Nigel.
TODAY
POLI-SCI  ASS'N
Organizational   meeting   noon   today.
SUB G.
MARDI  GRAS   COMM.
Meeting noon today,  SUB  230.
SUB  FORMAL   OPENING
Committee  meeting noon today.  SUB
224.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
General meeting noon today, SUB 213.
SAILING  TEAM
Everyone    interested    in    sailing    in
elimination series this weekend must
sign list in outdoor club lounge by 5
p.m. today.
PHOTO  SOC
Meetings for all members noon today.
SUB 245.
VCF
Laugh-in noon today, SUB party rm.
CIRCLE   K
C.N.I.B. speaker  noon today.
UBC   NDP
General meeting, noon today, SUB A.
CLUBS  COMM.
Meeting   for   all   clubs,   noon   Tues.,
Jan. 14, SUB 214.
CIASP
Spanish conversation noon today, SUB
113  B.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting     noon     today,     I.H.     upper
lounge.
GERMAN   CLUB
Meeting   for  those   interested   in   Mt.
Baker    skiing    this    weekend,    noon
today, SUB 215.
THEATER
Entertaining   Mr.   Sloane,   8:30   p.m.,
Jan.    10    &    11,    Dorothy    Somerset
Studio.    Adults    $1.50,    Students    $1.
228-2678.
MAMOOKS
Potential instructors in batik and
silkscreening please apply SUB 249.
Classes begin  at end  of month.
THE FUTURE
SKYDIVING
Packing lessons, Jan. 12, 7 p.m., party
rm. SUB.
AQUA SOC
Dive   on   Argonaut  II,   Sun.   Jan.   12.
Boat   leaves   Blackmore's   marina   at
6:30 a.m.
'tween
classes
SDU
Meeting to re-organize Tues., Jan. 14,
clubs lounge, SUB.
WOMEN'S   TOURNEY
Senior   B   girls   invitational   tournament, women's gym, Jan.  13-14.
ACE
Dr. Oldiridge speaks on Kamloops
project, Monday noon. Ed. 1006, non-
members 10((.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting noon. Wed., Jan. 15,
BU. 100.
PUBLIC LECTURE
The   World,   Life   and   You   by   The
Rosicrucian   Order,   2:30   p.m.,   Jan.
19.  805 West 23rd.
OPERA   THEATRE
By popular demand, two extra performances of Barbar The Elephant
on Sat., Jan. 18 at 8 p.m. and Sun.,
Jan. 19 at 2:30 p.m. Reserved free
seats at 228-3113 between 10 a.m.
and  4 p.m.  weekdays.
HISTORY  UNION
Meeting to discuss faculty-student
negotiations, noon, Tues., Jan. 14,
SUB E.
GRAD   CLASS
Council meeting, Mon.  noon, council
chambers.
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Socialism/Capitalism,  Mon.  noon, Bu.
100.
EL  CIRCULO
Slides -of Spain, Mon. noon, I.H. 402-4.
VIET CONG SPEAKERS
Viet Cong reps, from South Vietnam
talk noon, Tues., Jan. 14, SUB ballroom.
SKI  FILMS
Films of Du Maurier International,
noon, Mond. and Wed., Jan. 13 and
15, SUB ballroom.
MUSSOC
Ticket comm. meets noon, Tues., aJTn.
14,  clubroom.
BA   OBJECTORS
Meeting   for   all   arts   students   who
obpect to requirements for BA, noon,
Mon., SUB 125.
BADMINTON
At   men's  gym   every  Tues.   1:30-2:30
p.m.   and   women's   gym   every   Fri.
2:30-4:30 p.m.
LOST: ONE ROADRUNNER. FIND
him in the old Auditorium Mon.,
Tues.   and   Wed,   noon.   Only   25c.
LOST: PAIR BLACK SKI GLOVES
in Angus 104 or Chem 200, noon,
Jan.   8.   Phone   Mike   224-0277.
Help Wanted—Male
52
CAREER POSITION
The insurance salesmen are among
the highest paid in Canada. Why not
find out if you can qualify for this
type of career by taking a scientific
aptitude test free of charge. Write
for an appointment to Canadian
Premier Life Insurance Co., Room
300,  2695 Granville St.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
CAMPUS REP'S — EVELYN WOOD
Reading Dynamics. See File P. 393.
Placement   Office.
THINK PINK!
I need students for evening and
weekend work. Earn up to $100 or
more per mon. Part-time. No experience necessary.  Phone 524-4618.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Special Classes
63
SPECIAL CLASSES OF ENTER-
tainment at the Campus Pop Festival Friday, January 17. Advanced
tickets available at the AMS office
for  $2.00.	
Rides   &  Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED. VICINITY DEL-
brook-Highlands area. North Vancouver. Phone Bob at 987-5313 after
7:00   p.m.
DRIVER WANTED FOR CARPOOL.
Highlands - Delbrook - N. Lonsdale
areas, North Vancouver. Phone 987-
5313,   Boh   after   7:00  p.m.
Special Notices
15
FAMOUS ARTISTS LIMITED
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE - THURS. JAN. 23 AT 8:30
Rod McKuen
'■-**»«;'
4.50, 4.00, 3.50, 2.50
TICKETS: The Bay Box Office
Main Floor, The Bay—Daily
10 A.M. to 5 P.M.-681-3351
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
ALL WELCOME TO GENERAL
meeting of the Newman Center, to-
day,   12:30,   SUB   213.	
ROADRUNNER   CARTOONS.   IN  OLD
Aud.   Mon.,   Tues.   and   Wed.   noon.
Only   25c.          	
THE CAMPUS POP FESTIVAL IS
for split personalities. You can
choose from six bands, folk singers,
electronic music, underground movies, body painting, art displays and
Much much more at tha Campus
Pop Festival, Friday, January 13
at S.U.B. Advance tickets at the
A.M.S.   office   ($2.00).
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premiums? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott   299-9422.
Travel  Opportunities
16
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
CONVERSATIONAL AND PROPER
pronounciation of French taught at
my home evenings. Small groups
preferable. Rates reasonable. 433-
6625.
Tutoring
64
LAW   STUDENTS   BY   EX-LECTUR-
er.   Practicing   Barrister.   224-0443.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR   SALE
71
300 MM LENTAR LENSE 1.5.5
screw or bayonet mount and case.
$40.   224-9017,   room   424.
OLYMPIC 300 —- 10 SPEED RACING
bike. lyr. old, excellent condition.
Ask  for  John   at   298-8318.
RENTALS &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
TWO LtA R G E COMFORTABLE
sleeping rooms available in family
home. $45.00. Call after 5 p.m. —
261-4100.
BASEMENT ROOM. PRIVATE EN-
trance. Cablevision. Semi-furnished.
Available immediately. Phone 738-
4744.
FULLY FURNISHED ROOMS.
Other facilities available. Male student preferred. Convenient location.
Phone   after   6   p.m.   733-5255.
FURNISHED UPSTAIRS ROOM.
Kitchen priv. or board. 3 blocks
gates.   228-9460.
•64 FIAT 1100 SEDAN. VARIOUS
accessories. Owner left country,
Good  price,   228-8465   after  7  p.m.
'64 ALPINE. GOOD MECH., BODY,
Tonneau,  radio.  Must  sell,  261-1449.
'63 CHEV. V8 STD., 4 DR. NEW
trans., clutch, muffler, battery,
seat   belts,   $525,   733-3638   evenings.
Autos Wanted
22
STAFF MEMBER WISHES TO PITR-
chase small reliable car. Phone 263-
4278   after   six.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
DUNBAR    COSTUME   RENTALS
Costumes   for   all   occasions.
3567  W.   41st Ph.  263-9011
Scandals
37
WILL THE TWO HITCHIKERS
picked-up Nov. 23 by a '64 Chev.
which was subsequently stopped by
the police on Marine Drive. Please
call   261-6623.
AQUA SOC BOAT DIVE TO MARY
Island Sunday, Jan. 12. Leaves
Blackmores Marina at 6:00 o'clock.
Info,   on   Club  notice  board.
INVITE YOUR PROFS,
open   weekly.
PIT NOW
COYOTE CATCHES ROADRUNNER?
Be in the old audit. Mon., Tues.
or Wed. noon and see for yourself.
Only   25c.
SEE THE DANCING GIRLS WITH
their bawdy paint at the Campus
Pop Festival. Friday, January 13th
at 8:00 p.m. Not advised for the
weak-willed  males.
THE    THUNDERBIRD    SHOP
Now  open   at   night
10:00  a.m.   —  10:00  p.m.
Typing
40
FURNISHED ROOM. ALL HOUSE
facilities. Male only. 3rd and Burrard. Phone 738-0784 or 736-7128.
Paul   — All   students.
PRIVATE ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR
two students in rented house. 3791
Seventh at Highbury. Phone 224-
3035.
BEDSITTING ROOM WITH PRIV-
ate bath for female student. Phone
736-6960.
Room & Board
82
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good
food, short walk to classes, quiet
hours, enforced for study, phone
228-9389  or  224-9841.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Excellent food, quiet, pool table,
table tennis. Phone 228-9439. 7-8
a.m.,   11  p.m.   -   1   a.m.
LIVE ON CAMPUS. ENFORCED
quiet hours. Good food and congenial atmosphere. AH available by
calling Jim at 224-9986 or stopping
in   at   2280  Wesbrook   Cres.
Furn. Houses  &  Apts.
83
2 OPEN-MINDED GRAD STUDENTS
have 3-4 br. house to share, vie.
24th & Dunbar. Prefer females,
arts   major   (s).   224-4507.	
GRAD WANTED TO SHARE FULLY
furnished apt. Kitsilano area. Ap-
prox.   $43   per  month.   Call   738-2850.
MALE STUDENT WANTED TO
share furnished apartment in West
End   with   two  of   same.   688-9190.
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable   Rates —  TR   4-9253
EXPERIENCED   ESSAY   TYPIST
Reasonable  —   Tel.   681-8992
EXP. TYPING ESSAYS AND
Theses; legible draft, reas. rates;
phone 738-6829 after 10 a.m., Mon.-
Fri.  and  Sundays.	
TYPING —-  PHONE  731-7511  — 9:00-
-5:00   after  6:00   266-6662.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
STUD. TO LIVE IN KERRISDALE
home, 2 wks. while parents away.
3 teen boys. No cooking, trans,
available  $45-$50.  261-5610:
3 MALES OVER 21 WANTED TO
share with 2 others. Warm, beautiful 5 bedroom house. W. to W.
furn. etc. No restrictions. All found
except food. $80 & $90 near UBC.
228-8Q40.	
LEGAL SUITE — SELF-CONTAIN-
ed. Great view. Sen. or Grad. Male
to share with 2 others. 3rd & Tolmie.
224-1935.
WIDOWER TWO CHILDREN SEEK
suite for February daytime babv
sitting. Facility welcomed. Jeremy
McCall   261-1987.
COMFORTABLE SELF-CONTAINED
basement suite available immediately. All facilities. South Granville.
Suit two sharing. $75 monthly.
Phone   266-6568.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
SWELL   LARGE   COSY   BASEMBNT
suite.     Private     entrance,     shower,
fireplace.   Very   close.   4324   W.   11th   --
Avenue.    228-9358.

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