UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 22, 1983

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127864.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127864.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127864-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127864-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127864-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127864-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127864-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127864-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127864-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127864.ris

Full Text

Array Visiting Polish prof draws protest
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The political science department's decision to hire a Polish
academic with close ties to general
Wojciech Jaruzelski's government
has drawn protest from the university community and Solidarity supporters.
Jerzy Wiatr's appointment as
summer instructor was made Jan.
15 and is virtually irrevocable* acting department head David Elkins
said Friday.
Wiatr also taught at UBC as a
visiting professor in July 1981.
Wiatr is a part of the party central committee which advises
general Jaruzelski, and has spoken
out against the Polish trade union
movement on many occasions, according to local Solidarity supporters. Wiatr is also the director of
the officially sanctioned Party Institute of Marxism-Leninism in
Poland,  a post  he  has  held  for
several years.
"It's true, he does have a degree
of connection with the government
in Poland, but I don't see that as a
problem," Elkins said. "One
wouldn't want to rule out people
who are advising their governments."
Although Elkins called protests
against Wiatr "a reasonable concern," he said "those are different
concerns, which I might not have."
Elkins said the decision to hire
Wiatr was "made primarily by
me."
"Wiatr can be graciously described as a party hack," said Stan Persky, author of At the Lenin
Shipyard, about the Solidarity trade
union's rise in Poland.
Persky said Wiatr's attitude in
1981, six months before general
Jaruzelski's coup and imposition of
martial law, was " 'if the situation
gets out of hand, there'll be
guns.' "
'No more funds'
By CRAIG BROOKS
The provincial government probably will not pass on a recent 8.4
per cent increase in post-secondary
education funding to universities,
B.C.'s deputy minister of universities said Monday.
The federal government transfers
money for health and post-
secondary education to the provinces under the Established Programs Financing formula.
EPF funds are "general revenue"
for the province, Robert Stewart
said. "They will be distributed according to the priorities of the
government."
"The provincial government has
never accepted that EPF is earmarked," said Stewart in a
telephone interview from Victoria.
"There is no legal support for such
a notion."
Stewart said B.C. universities can
still expect no increase in funding
for next year. "We've had no
change (in policy)."
UBC administration president-
designate George Pedersen said
Saturday the provincial government
should match the federal increase,
and abandon its zero per cent increase plans.
The federal government, through
EPF, pays 67.3 per cent of UBC's
costs, while the province contributes only 19.6 per cent, said Lisa
Hebert, Alma Mater Society exter
nal affairs coordinator.
Hebert will present a motion to
student council Wednesday protesting the government's decision.
If the government maintains its
no-increase policy, $14.5 million
will have to be cut from UBC's expenses, Hebert said. This is
equivalent to the entire medicine
faculty budget, or the combined
subsidy to commerce, dentisty and
agriculture, she said.
"I don't see how the provincial
government can continue to talk
about zero per cent increase (in funding)," said faculty association
president Jonathan Wisenthal.
The university community should
"get together" to pressure the
government to reverse its decision,
he said.
But the increased funding to
"general revenue" many indirectly
help out the university funding
situation since the province would
"have more money in total,"
Stewart added.
The final decision on next year's
funding, which becomes effective
April 1, will not be known for some
time, he said. "We don't know
when (the provincial budget) will
come down."
Pedersen has criticized the delay,
saying universities operate in a
"vacuum" since they are well into
fiscal years before they know their
funding level.
Explicit rules sought
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Petitions which advocate a new
set of guidelines for the selection of
material sold in the university
bookstore are being circulated by
an ad-hoc committee against pornography on campus.
The guidelines, if adopted by
UBC's board of governors, will not
allow the bookstore to sell material
which degrades or exploits women
and others and endorses hatred and
violence against them.	
See related stories,
page 9
"We want explicit selection
criteria that are in line with campus
ethics," said committee member
and education professor Josephine
Evans. The signatures collected and
a letter will be given to the board of
governors as soon as possible, she
said.
Evans has been trying since
September to get bookstore
manager John Hedgecock to
remove the magazines which depict
violence against women. Because he
has refused to address objections to
the magazines, the committee is trying to pressure the board to give
him a clear directive which he has to
follow, she said.
The   committee    collected    414
signatures within the first 48 hours
of distributing pamphlets with the
tear-off petition at the bottom.
While 399 gave their support for the
campaign, 14 disagreed and one did
not care.
Of the 14 who disagreed, 12 were
concerned about freedom of speech
and two were "definitely women-
haters," said Evans. "One said
Playboy doesn't degrade women, it
shows their best side," she said.
"Another said bring back the
Red Rag." The Red Rag was an annual newspaper published by UBC
engineers which drew protest over
its sexist and racist content and was
consequently forced to cease
publication last year.
The small minority who
disagreed with the campaign are
misinformed, said Evans. "People
confuse human rights. Any selfish
desire is portrayed as a right.
"If we were talking about the
degradation of colored people, it
would be understood there was a
problem. We wouldn't have to ask
for this," she said.
"We're asking the very
minimum. It's such a tame, mild request. If it is not accepted, it's
enough to make me question the
morals of this university," she said.
Wiatr has been allowed to continue as a leading academic and
represent his country, which indicates that he still supports the
Polish government, Persky said.
"He's obviously got to be party
sanctioned. Why do we want someone like that?"
Slavonic studies head Bogden
Czaykowski said he was concerned
about Wiatr's appointment, considering recent events in Poland.
Any protest against Wiatr is not
"questioning the freedom of
speech," said arts 4 student Fraser
Easton, spokesperson for the UBC
Solidarity study group. "Nor is it a
question of academic freedom."
"It's a very bad move on the part
of the political science
department," he said. "He is not
only caught in the (Polish) government, he's also actively supporting
it.
"If anything can be done to
reverse the decision, it should be."
But the decision to revoke
Wiatr's appointment will have to
come from the university, an external affairs department spokesperson said Monday from Ottawa.
Although Canada has cancelled all
official cultural and academic exchange programs with Poland, the
Wiatr visit falls into a "private domain," he said.
I.' * ■    . *%.l~
— arnold hedstrom photo
SMALL PERSON IN eight wheeled vehicle gazes into donut at Granville Island and wonders if future post-
secondary education will be as interesting. Meanwhile new UBC president George Pedersen mainstreets for
more education dollars from stingy Socreds. See story page 3.
Cuts mean end of special program
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
The provincial government's plan
to cut a 25 year old grant for industrial education teacher training
may force UBC to abandon the
only program of its kind in the province.
Industrial education division
head Bill Logan said Monday he
can't understand why the government would cut funding for a program in.such great demand.
In spite of secondary school funding cuts, 70 per cent of graduates
who sought work in high schools
last year found it, Logan said adding that in normal economic times
B.C. imports teachers in the field.
Education dean Dan Birch said it
is false economy to discontinue the
grant. "If they persist with these
kinds of cuts it will cost them in the
long run." B.C. may have to import teachers or send students out
of the province for training, he
said.
The cuts conflict with the stated
provincial priotities of emphasizing
trades and technical education,
Birch said. "They have cut off the
source for bringing skilled
tradesmen into education."
Birch blamed the cut on lack of
communication within the government.
The program has been funded by
a provincial government grant since
its inception in 1957. The $800,000
grant was cut in half for the current
academic year and the government
plans no funding for next year.
Dean Goard, universities
ministry director of programs, said
See page 2: PROGRAM
More bodies needed
Education is an easy target for spending cuts because most people
aren't directly affected by them and because the benefits are long
term and intangible, education dean Dan Birch said Monday.
"It's quite unlike health care where you can deliver the bodies to
the steps of the legislature," Birch said.
"A smaller proportion of the population than ever before are
engaged in education or have a member of their family involved in
education," he said. "People aren't inclined to sympathize with
something they're not involved in."
Birch points to the common belief that B.C. has a glut of teachers
as an example of people's misconceptions. "With the exception of
the last couple of years B.C. has been a net importer of teachers,"
Birch said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
Program'normaI'
From page 1
the special grant was never intended
to continue forever. The grant was
aimed at getting the program
started and the provincial government has decided it is time to
transfer the program to regular
university financing, he said.
Birch said it is quite misleading to
suggest that the funding was of the
kind given to new and emergent
programs. "This has been a special
program with designated funding
for 25 years. There has never been
any suggestion that it was an interim measure. They have chosen to
characterize it that way after the
event," he said.
Birch said he has no objection to
the grant becoming part of the
regular universities' operating
budget. "So long as the money is
earmarked for the industrial education program, the method of getting
the grant isn't important to us. But
we can get no real assurance that
the money will appear in the regular
operating budget.
"Certainly we could not find the
money at the expense of other
education programs. Our other programs have already been pared to
the bone," he said.
Birch said the industrial education grant isn't the only example of
financial burden being placed on
the faculty of education by the
universities' ministry. Cuts within
the ministry have placed responsibility for industrial education in
service training and course development on the faculty.
Ooops!
Joe who?
As all good Tories know, Joe
Clark is the federal tory leader, not
Joe Clarke as reported in Friday's
Ubyssey (Tory, Tory, Tory, page
9).
The Ubyssey apologizes to all
Conservatives who still support Joe
for any tension they may have endured as a result of our mistake.
The reporter concerned has been
sentenced to sit through the entire
Last Who concert in Ottawa during
June.
CAP THEATRE presents
LEAR
a contemporary version of Shakespeare's
King Lear. March 17-19, 22-26. Curtain
8:00 p.m. March 22 only curtain 7:30
Presentation House, N. Van.
Tickets $4 in advance
$5 at the door
Call 986-1351
CHARLIE'S
GIRL
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women.
STUDENTS ONLY
Cut, wash, blow dry
Gents $10
Ladies $15
CUT & PERM
$45
3615 W. 4th Ave.
 734-3841	
The program, which operates out
of a building adjacent to the British
Columbia Institute of Technology
in Burnaby has 18 staff and 79
students.
BARTER SCHOOL
In exchange for practical experience,
barter your labour for a six week period
beginning anytime after May 1st.
Learn animal husbandry, working with
draft horses, log building, beekeeping,
gardening butchering ft preserving meat,
and all skills associated with organic farming.
Start re-discovering your culture.
For   further   information   write   to   the
Cariboo   Organic   Commune,   (formally
Troopers Commune).
Box 4534
Williams Lake, B.C.
V2G2V5
iiiMiiiiiiiiiiiis
Mi
m
jffffff I
SPECIAL EUROPEAN OFFER
(cwtiki) + Cheap Airfare +
Free Accommodation = f *™yjL
t^ curs
See Europe with Contiki, the world's foremost student and youth tour
operator, and travel cuts will supply the best transatlantic airfare
from Canada to London along with two free nights accommodation in
London. Why book anywhere else?
For your free CONTIKI brochure and airfare ratesheet, complete this coupon
and send it to your nearest TRAVEL CUTS office.
Name ___
Address
City
Postal Code
INSIDE UBC
EDITOR
The AMS is now accepting applications for the
position of Inside UBC Editor.
Inside   UBC   is  a   student   handbook/magazine
published annually by the AMS. It includes campus
information and interesting feature stories of the
University.
The AMS offers four months' paid employment for
this position. Applicants should submit a resume to
SUB 238 outlining their related experience in addition to their ideas of direction and goals for this
year's edition.
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL
MARCH 25, 1983.
■■■■■■■■
"DOWNUNDER j
1
1
1
I
I
 1
Going   r 4 TRAVEL 1
YburirVay!**   CUTS    |
The travel company of CFS        m
I   TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER    ■
UBC, Student Union Building       |
GO DUTCH!
travel cuts has the best prices
available to Australia and
New Zealand
Auckland   from $420
Sydney   from $420
Melbourne   from $510
• Prices based on us dollars
• Double price for return fare
• Departures from Los Angeles
• See travel CUTS for special fares
to LA
m t>U4
Wgam 9HJB tmWM
604 224-2344
I mWm
Or German...go anywhere you
like and save money!
AMSTERDAM
Fixed Return from
$747
FRANKFURT
Fixed Return from
$779
Going   r* TRAVEL
YourVVSy!**   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344
1516 Ouranleau Street
604 687-6033
THIS WEEK
AT HILLEL
Tues. March 22
The Last B'nai B'rith Women's
Free Salami Lunch for the year - 12:30 p.m.
Thurs. March 24
Network Seminar - Year end
wrap-up 12:30 p.m.
NEED A JOB
THIS SUMMER?
LET US HELP
List your name and job preference with
JOB-LINK — an A.M.S. newspaper
distributed to thousands of potential
employers in the lower mainland.
3 LINES - $1.75 (Deadline March 31)
For more info:
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE SUB
or call 228-3971, 3977
■.Your Alma Mater Society,
CALL  FOR NOMINATIONS
Graduate Student Society
Election of Executive
Officers to Council 1983-84
nominations are required for:-
President Finance Director
Vice-President House Director
Secretary
as well as:- 3 GSS Council Representatives
to AMS Council
NOMINATION PERIOD:- MONDAY, MARCH 21st until
FRIDAY, MARCH 25th, 4:30 p.m.
NOMINATION    FORMS:-    Available   from    the   GRADUATE
STUDENTS' CENTRE as well as the AMS BUSINESS
OFFICE, AMS BUILDING.
The elections will be held at the GRADUATE
STUDENTS' CENTRE, between APRIL 5th and APRIL
8th. The polls will be open 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday plus 3:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.
An all-Candidates meeting will be held on Tuesday March 29th,
at 12:30p.m. in the Graduate Students' Centre.
GSS is incorp. as the "THEA KOERNER HOUSE -
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE.
AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT. . .
CJOR 600 Weekdays 3-6 p.m.
ART FINLEY'S IMEWSTALK on Tuesday, March 22, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Presidents campaign on Island
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
George Pedersen and Doug Kenny are not typical Granville Island
panhandlers.
But like jugglers and street musicians, along with 15 students, the
two university presidents went begging for money Saturday at Vancouver's trendy public market.
For about one hour, they handed
out leaflets soliciting support for
B.C. post secondary education. The
event was the first of a Canadian
Federation of Students province-
wide campaign which also includes
rallies and demonstrations.
Tonight students from UBC and
other institutes will go door to door
to talk to citizens about education
funding.
"It's a positive approach," said
Lisa Hebert, Alma Mater Society
'Lesbian power
frees women'
By SARAH COX
Women will not be liberated until
the^i break free from men and their
patriarchy, a feminist writer and
theologian said Saturday.
Mary Daly, author of Gynecology, spoke about the power of
women to 300 women and about 25
men in Hebb Theatre.
"Are there any feminists in the
audience,?" she asked before her
speech.
A few women answered and Daly
looked around.
"Are there any revolting old
hags?"
Cheers, claps and whistles filled
the auditorium.
A hag is a feminist who rejects
men and their imprisoning domination, said Daly. "The key to our
liberation is to overturn phallic
rule."
Male rule and domination cause
the escalating violence prevalent in
society, Daly said. Pornography is
one example of this, she said.
"Pornography is essentially a
configuration and propagation of
lies," said Daly, adding it should be
looked at in the larger context of
our male dominated world.
understood if it is construed as a
separate entity from the other
oligarchies of patriarchy."
The patriarchy's inherent
violence is presently at its most extreme, said Daly.
"The '80s are a period of extreme
danger for women and our sister
earth. We are targeted for a nuclear
holocaust."
Women will regain power from
men by having lesbian relationships, which break the boundaries
of male domination, Daly said.
"Women who touch women and
who are touched by women move
beyond these boundaries.
"We pass beyond our former
limits and find our original integrity. If a woman deviates only in her
career choice she remains tied to the
fathers."
Freedom for women is the
realization that men have controlled
and shaped their passions and emotions, said Daly. Women do not
react to the male created violence
around them because real emotions
are suppressed, she said.
"The breaking out into our own
realm of being requires the
understanding of what has happened in our past to our passions and
"Pornography   cannot   be    lusts."
Campus opens
Douglas College opened a $40
million facility in New Westminster
Friday, but may not be able to
make use of the entire campus.
Jim Davies, Douglas College
faculty association vice-president,
said the association is concerned
about cutbacks which make it difficult or almost impossible to use
the facility.
"Cutbacks have resulted in the
loss of the equivalent of 25 full time
instructors at Douglas College,"
said Davies. "The new building was
specially designed with specific purposes in mind. The floor meant for
the dental assistants program is not
completed because of cutbacks."
Douglas College is also building a
new campus at their Newton location while Kwantlen College, part
of Douglas College until April 1981,
was forced to close down their
Langley campus in January.
The opening of the Newton facility doesn't directly affect New
Westminster campus funding, said
Davies, "but some of the
technology has likely been delayed
because of its costs."
The faculty association and student society planned a joint protest
for Friday's opening ceremony to
express their concern about the lack
of funding.
The protestors planned to greet
education minister Bill Vander
Zalm's speech with silence, but instead he received enthusiastic applause from a large crowd of Socred
supporters.
"In spite of tough economic
times, colleges are still being built,"
said Vander Zalm.
Protestors displayed T-shirts and
posters reading "If you think
education is expensive, try ignorance."
external affairs coordinator Monday.
"We feel we have to affect public
opinion, particularly since the
government runs by public opinion
polls. Collectively students can
reach at least 50,000 people in the
community," Hebert said.
Hebert said this fiscal year will be
bad for students with possible
enrolment restrictions, tuition increases, deterioration of equipment
and layoffs because of government
underfunding.
Pedersen and Kenny both called
on the government to match provin-
cially a recently announced eight
per cent increase in federal funding
for education.
Provincial government plans to
hold education spending to  1982
levels will mean 12 per cent average
cuts in spending power because of
inflation, Kenny said.
"Our worry is the province will
say the funds are a transfer to
general revenue and not for education," said Petersen, who becomes
UBC president July 1.
Pedersen criticized the provincial
government for lack of economic
diversification and added future
economic growth depends on
education.
"B.C. has never been supportive
of education," Pedersen said.
B.C. has the lowest post secondary participation rate of any province in Canada, he said.
About 70 UBC students signed
up to  knock  on doors  from  the
campus to Granville street, including some engineers and a group
of industrial education students
whose program may be scrapped
for lack of funds, Hebert said.
She said more students are needed to help with the campaign. Interested students should meet in
SUB 260, the AMS offices, at 5
p.m. Transportation is provided.
The CFS week of action also includes a rally sponsored by University of Victoria students and a
demonstration in front of education
minister Bill Vander Zalm's Surrey
constituency office by Kwantlen
college students Wednesday. CFS-
Pacific chair Donna Morgan said.
Wednesday is National Student
Dav.
Charles Campbell photo
JESUS CHRIST, I wish exams were over, preaches enthusiastic religious studies prophet, reading from Jobless
- Book I. Sunny weather brings smiles to reader, despite vile pornography in nearby bookstore. But sheepish student flock didn't have wool pulled over eyes by latest evangelical visitor to UBC.
Few respond to employment ad
Response to the Alma Mater
Society Job Link employment
advertising supplement has been
limited, AMS executive secretary
Terry Jackson said Monday.
The supplement is intended to
provide students with the opportunity to advertise their availibilitv
for summer employment. But
despite the high number of
unemployed students on campus,
few have actually bought advertisements in the publication.
"There's been a lot of students
talking about it," said Jackson.
We're counting on the fact that
Movement needs youth
TORONTO (CUP) — Women
have shown in the past year how
much political power they can wield
but feminists should work to involve more younger women, according to the president of the Canadian Advisory Council on the
Status of Women.
Council president Luci Pepin
recently told a University of Toronto audience she is "convinced that
Coffee perks up shy
(RNR/CUP) — If you're the shy quiet type it might help to drink a
cup of coffee before taking a test.
University of Minnesota researchers found that introverted
volunteers who took a memory test performed 14 per cent better
after drinking coffee.
But for outgoing types the reverse is true. Extroverts' performance
on the test slipped 25 per cent after a jolt of caffeine.
One researcher theorized that caffeine may provide a needed
stimulant or memory jogger to withdrawn students, while it's just
another distraction to alreadv stimulated extroverts.
(1982) stands as an important
testimony for Canadian women of
what can be achieved through involvement in the decision-making
process.
"From the constitution (debate,
where women's groups organized to
enshrine women's rights) to the current campaign against pornography, this year has underlined
the power women can gain through
participation."
But Pepin said she is worried
about the apparent lack of involvement in the feminist movement
among younger women.
"1 looked behind me and ask
myself, 'where is the young blood,
where are the new followers and
who will be the future leaders.' "
The remedy for this gap, she said,
is a "slowing down" of the movement to allow women of all ages
and backgrounds to ask questions
about its means and ends and to
assimilate it into their lies. Only
when women are solidified in an
awareness of their common plight
can they be effectively mobilized,
said Pepin.
Misconceptions of feminists
alienate women who see feminism
as a total sacrifice of everything
feminine, including the stereotype
of the feminist as "an uncombed,
man-hating, angry woman who is
never satisfied," she said.
"We don't tell women it is no
longer enough to stay home and
raise a family, only that they have
more choices open to them."
Pepin said another misconception is that feminism has already
succeeded. "Many women see what
has been done and think that all is
going well, so they don't look ahead
to see the great amount of work
that still needs to be done.1'
people will come out at the last
minute."
Uncertainty still exists on the format in which Job Link will be
published.
"We don't know exactly what is
going on," said AMS president
Mitch Hetman.
Hetman said it will probably not
be coming out as a supplement of
The Ubyssey because of concerns
expressed by Ubyssey staff
members at the Feb. 23 student
council meeting, when the Job Link
proposal was announced.
Other possibilities for publication
format are being investigated, he
said. "We want a wide
distribution," Hetman said.
Markets such as retirement
homes where odd jobs need to be
done will be a major target for
distribution, he said.
Jackson said Canada Post will do
a bulk mailing of the listing to
business and residential areas where
possibilities of jobs such as gardening may arise.
A $1,300 budget has been
allocated for Job Link with a
distribution of 15,000 copies,
Jackson said. $600 is coming from
AMS funding, she added.
She said the AMS is attempting
to acquire additional funds from
the alumni association and from the
Walter Gage fund which gives
financial assistance to needy student groups. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
 News Item: Ombudsoffice to release report on filmsoc.
Ellsberg rare peace monger
By CHRISTOPHER G. CORLESS
On March 26 Daniel Ellsberg will
be speaking on "Cold War II and
World War III" at the War
Memorial gym at 8 p.m. Ellsberg
has quite an impressive
background, in both education and
employment.
Daniel Ellsberg attended Harvard
university and Cambridge university (post-graduate) as a scholarship
student, and after Cambridge,
Ellsberg returned to Harvard to
become a teaching fellow and take
his examinations for a doctrate in
perspectives
economics. In 1958 Ellsberg was
hired by the Rand corporation (a
firm set up to consult for the U.S.
defense department) as a weapons
systems analyst and later as a
strategic analyst.
After leaving the Rand corporation in 1964, Ellsberg joined the
defense department and in the
following year he volunteered to
serve in Vietnam for the state
department.
While working for the defense
department Ellsberg held the rank
of GS-18 (the highest civil service
super-grade, equivalent to the rank
of major general) and was given the
highest security clearance available.
Thus, he had access to government
documents that were classified
beyond top secret and he was able
to   apply   this   knowledge   to   his
work.
In this contest, Ellsberg studied
the American war plans in the
Pacific, and in 1961 he was assigned
the task of writing the Kennedy administration's official guidance for
strategic nuclear war plans.
Secretary of defence Robert
McNamara signed and issued
Ellsberg's draft as a directive to the
joint chiefs of staff and it remained
the basis for strategic war planning
through the early 1960's.
In 1967 Ellsberg returned to the
Rand corporation and worked as a
researcher on the top secret
McNamara study, "History of U.S.
Decision-making in Vietnam,
1945-68," and in 1969 he was
authorized to have access to this
43-volume history. As he read the
study, Ellsberg found it to be a
documentary record of major
deceptions and illegalities by four
presidents and their administrations, of the highest relevance to
ongoing political decisions of war
and peace.
Consequently, acting on conscience, he released copies of the
study to the senate foreign relations
committee and later to the New
York Times and the Washington
Post.
As a result of the release of these
Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg
was tried on 12 counts of theft and
conspiracy. However, Judge
William Byrne dismissed the case
"on the grounds of a pattern of
numerous violations of law and of
the rights of the defendents
(Ellsberg and Anthony Russo) committed by the executive branch of
the U.S. Government."
During the 1970's, Ellsberg
cooperated with the Watergate, impeachment, and CIA investigations;
testified before congress on the
risks on democracy of the secrecy
system; lectured widely in support
of activities orientated to peace and
democracy, and more recently has
been involved in the movement for
multilateral disarmament.
Today, Daniel Ellsberg is still not
out of date as an evaluator of
weapons systems. As former national security council member
Morton Halperin stated, "once
you've had a high security
clearance, the information you've
acquired doesn't change much."
From the above information, one
can conclude that Ellsberg is a rare
lecturer as he has come to understand, from the inside of the U.S.
government, the real purposes of
the various nuclear weapons
systems and strategic doctinres of
the United States and the Soviet
Union. Therefore, I strongly urge
everyone who is concerned about
global peace and security to attend
the talk and discussion that will be
given by Daniel Ellsberg.
Christopher Corless is a third
year political science student interested in strategic analysis.
Letters
God and son greet campus with devotion
As Almighty GOD, 1 greet you:
As the waning days slip silently by, My Son and I
look forward to early retirement.
The grind has been devastating upon human flesh
and blood. My Son works forty hours per week in a
machine shop. Saturdays and Sundays should be a few
days of rest — not so with My Son. He will sacrifice
these days to send Our Letters of hope throughout the
world. We also answer letters from people who were
kind enough to write.
As Almighty GOD, I ask Our many friends in the
newspaper industry to contribute - a sum of money, no
matter how great or small, whatever your heart dictates - to Our endeavors to keep Our correspondence
alive. I ask this in My Name and also in My Son's. We
must sacrifice Our Dignity to ask for enumeration to
keep hope alive throughout these declining years of
worship. We desperately need funds to revive Our first
Book — ALL SOULS ARE MINE — so more people
will know that I Am truly alive in this Dimension of
Time and Light.
The meager assistance from Social Security, a small
bank account of four thousand dollars and a paltry
pension, is not enough to carry on Our Works in years
to come. Though We have little to offer in restitution,
as Virtue must not take sides, because the difference in
good and evil must still be evaluated for Justice to attain her goal.
With Love and Devotion from My Son and 1,1 close
this letter of Hope with a Prayer that Our needs will be
met with Divine Grace. Only My Son will sign His
Name to keep the candle of Love lit in human hearts
throughout the World.
sin My Son's worldly assets, 1 must also mention He
owns NO Real Estate whatsoever, nor does He have an
automobile. He owns a typewriter, a color TV and as
He says, some dingy clothes.
By Grace, We would like to receive $10,000.00 to
reproduce Our Books: ALL SOULS ARE MINE, plus
postage.
Eugene Changey
Ohio
Job Leched up
Visiting Polish professor Jerzy Wiatr should not teach at UBC.
Allowing Wiatr to teach second year political science courses
this summer cannot be justified by cries of academic freedom and
expression.
The political science department and the university community
cannot defend Wiatr's appointment on academic grounds. Those
who advocate a distinct separation between academia and politics
need to re-examine their position.
It is easy to make safe, comfortable distinctions that evade the
central issue of overlooking Wiatr's ties with Jaruzelski's repressive
government in favor of his academic credentials.
Martial law has not ended in Poland, despite Jaruzelski's claims
to the contrary. Citizens and Solidarity supporters have been detained and jailed for no apparent reason.
Many people, including academics, have fled the country. Jerzy
Wiatr chose to stay in Poland, because Wiatr is not just an ordinary
academic practising in Poland. He is an academic who is stridently
anti-union and anti-Solidarity. And Wiatr has managed to retain his
position as a leading advisor to the current regime.
By supporting Wiatr, UBC is supporting the Polish military
government by giving legitimacy to one of its most prominent sympathizers and spokespersons.
Although David Elkins, political science acting department head,
says the decision to hire Wiatr was made Jan. 15, the university
should revoke Wiatr's appointment.
' THE UBYSSEY
March 22, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member. Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office in SUB 266. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising 228-3977.
The day Chris "Things will change next year" Wong met Muriel "I think it's fucked"
Draaisma, he fell in love with Craig "I'm hungry" Brooks and Brian, "I can get this done in a
half hour, but it will probably take me six hours" Jones, both of whom had just eloped with
Sarah "Oh my God, I think it's disgusting" Cox and Shaffin "75 inches won't satisfy me"
Shariff after listening to Arnold unemployed students is news (especially if it's from CUP)"
Hedstrom and Robert "I'm neither homophobic nor defensive" Beynon, who had just met up
with Victor "I inspire something," but I don't know what Wong and Lisa "I don't need to be
edited" Morry who had just said goodbye to "Jean" I like relish, too" Mustard, Peter "my
mouth runneth amock — often" Berlin, and Charles "sunny days are here again" Campbell.
Letters
Prof should face trial
I would like to comment on Jan
Dube's letter, (Luitjens reaction,
March 4). I can sympathize with
Dube's apprehension that this much
respected teacher could possibly be
the victim of a judicial error.
I also agree with him that when a
man is charged he should be
presumed innocent, until proven
guilty in a fair trial in a court of
law. Therefore, Luitjens may,
or may not, be innocent of the
charges of war crimes laid against
him by the Dutch government.
However, neither his present
moral character, nor the fact that
he was judged in his native country
in absentia, constitute grounds to
dismiss such charges out of hand.
Contrary to what Dube believes,
trials in absentia are not necessarily
kangaroo courts: many such trials
were conducted in Holland, France,
and other European countries after
the Second World War, because of
the flight of many Nazi criminals
from justice. Klaus Barbie, the
"Butcher of Lyon" recently extradited by Bolivia to France,
where, during the war he brutally
tortured and murdered thousands,
was twice tried in absentia, and yet
he will benefit from a retrial.
If Luitjens is innocent, could he
not voluntarily travel to Holland, in
order to clear his name? After all,
Holland is not the Soviet Union,
China, Uruguay, or Argentina: it is
an exemplary liberal democracy;
there are, consequently, no grounds
to fear that Luitjens would not obtain a fair hearing there.
Jan Dube's letter contains two
further points on which I wish to
comment. He complains that "we
live in an era when we are constantly reminded of man's inhumanity to
the Jews. What a curious phrasing
According to Dube's peculiar
logical categories, the holocaust
was perpetrated not by the Nazis, or
other identifiable groups, but by
something vaguely called man, a
universal which does not appear to
include the Jews. His irrepressible
antisemitic emotions lead Dube to
conclude his letter with the brazen
lie that Jews recently massacred
homeless Palestinians in Lebabon.
Even the mass media, which are
so prejudiced against Israel uttered
no such accusations, but established
instead that the massacres were
perpetrated by Lebanese christian
militiamen and that the Israeli command bore the responsibility of
having allowed them into the
refugee camps, a conclusion that
was confirmed by Israel's official
judicial commission of enquiry into
that tragedy.
Furthermore, Dube's taunting of
rabbi Daniel Siegal saying that "he
should be the last one to talk" implies that by the mere fact of being
Jewish, the campus rabbi is an accomplice of murder.
As far as we have been informed,
the persons whom Luitjens is accused of having murdered were not
Jewish. So, why this sally against
the Jews, Dube?      Rene Go,dman
asian studies
'■■ . ^
Write The Ubyssey a letter
because, as you see by the one to
the very left, we are running very
low. There are only two issues of
this rag left, Friday and March 31,
so get out your typewriter (set at triple space on a 70 character line) and
get to work.
Deadline for letters is March 29
at noon. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit for brevity, taste,
grammar, style, and libel. Tuesday, March 22, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
The flip side of the imperialist record
By LAWRENCE KOOTNIKOFF
With the events in Central
America more and more in the news
recently, it is difficult to obtain a
complete picture of the troubles
in the region. The Reagan administration persists in presenting
the conflict as a proxy battle bet-
perspectives
ween East and West, and refuses
to look into the deeper historical
and economic causes of the current
turmoil.
What news we get in the local
media is usually filtered through
American news agencies, and is
therefore selective, representing the
views of mainly the Salvadorean
government and the U.S. state
department. Nicaragua and
Grenada are presented as "Marxist
states' when 60 per cent of the
Nicaraguan gross national product
for 1982 was produced by the
private sector, and the governing
New Jewel Movement in Grenada is
a member of the Socialist International, along with such wildly
"Marxist" parties as te Social
Democratic party of West Germany, the Socialist parties of
France and Spain, and our own
New democratic party.
The people of Central America
have begun to struggle for true
social justice and change, and
deserve the support of freedom-
loving people everywhere.
It is incumbent on movements for
social change to first try democratic
means. The people of El Salvador
and Guatemala have done this, and
have finally been driven
underground.
The last time the leaders of the
opposition Democratic Revolutionary Front (FDR) of El Salvador
appeared in public in that country
in a press conference, they were
brutally dragged away by government security forces. Their butchered bodies were found a few
days later scattered around the
capital.
The same story applies to
Guatemala. Is it any wonder opposition   forces  do  not  dare  lay
down their arms to participate in
so-called democratic elections being
pushed by the Reagan administration?
The Latin American Support
committee exists at UBC to try to
present a bit of the other side of the
story. We sponsor films, speakers,
cultural events and other educational activities.
This week there are a number of
activities happening around town
and the campus over the issue of
U.S. intervention in Central
America. All week long there will
be pickets outside the U.S. consulate at 1199 W. Hastings, with
Wednesday set aside as the day for
student pickets.
In SUB 209 at 12:30 on Friday
Linda Shuto of the BC Teachers
federation will speak on her trip to
Nicaragua in July of last year. On
Friday evening a film, Decision to
Win, will be shown at the Britannia
Community centre at 1661 Napier,
at 7:30.
The culmination of activities will
be on Saturday, with a demonstration at Robson square starting at 1
p.m. We urge all of you to attend
and show your support for the just
struggle of the people of Central
America.
Lawrence Kootnikoff is a student
involved in the Latin American support committee. Perspectives is a
column open to the university community.
Letters
Walton's pious remarks reek of vilolent hypocrisy
In response to Paul Walton's
almost incoherent letter (Pretence
revealed, March 15), the idea that
any action which is prohibited by
the state cannot be a politically
motivated action but is merely a
crime is asinine.
Would he suggest that the revolutionaries in El Salvador are just
criminals because they commit acts
which the Salvadorian dictatorship
deems illegal? Are Soviet dissidents
who break repressive Soviet laws
criminals? What nonsense.
Walton's pious remarks on
violence reek of hypocrisy. He says
that no one has a right to initiate
violence yet he tacitly condones the
institutionalized violence of the
state.  By equating morality with
legality Walton merely reveals his
own moral bankruptcy.
The law is not accepted voluntarily by people, but imposed on them
by force. Its foundation is not vir-
ture, but power. To confuse the
two, as Walton does, is to commit a
grave error, making it virtually impossible to criticize the law from a
moral point of view.
Amnesty petitions for rights
The faculty association has joined with Andrei Sakharov and six
other Nobel peace prize winners in
endorsing a worldwide signature
drive by Amnesty International for
the release of people imprisoned
solely for their ideas or origins.
Amnesty International, the
worldwide human rights organization, has worked on behalf of such
prisoners for 22 years. Over that
time period more than 20,000 cases
have been taken up, but these are
but the tip of the iceberg.
A research staff of 150 at
the international headquarters in
London England does its best, but
for so many nothing is available.
Reliable estimates are that for every
name known to AI there are 50 to
100 which are unknown.
At the 1981 session of the UN
commission on human rights, AI
called for international procedures
to gather information on prisoners        Here at UBC petitions will be
of conscience and to check on how
member states have observed UN
resolutions for the release of certain
categories of prisoners, which have
included prisoners of conscience.
Despite these efforts the problem
persists. Thus AI decided to launch
a worldwide petition drive for the
universal amnesty of all prisoners of
conscience. It will be presented next
year to the president of the UN
general assembly and to all heads of
state, and is specifically intended to
help not only recognized prisoners
of conscience, but all the forgotten
ones as well; the ones who can be
helped no other way.
The appeal declares, "None of
these people should be in prison.
The fact that they have been arrested and punished because of
their beliefs or origins is an affront
to humanity."
12th - century returns
placed in all department offices. Information tables at SUB and at
various points about campus
throughout next week will carry
petitions and displays about the
work of AI. Many AMS clubs and
undergraduate societies will be invited to endorse the petition and encourage their members to sign. It
will be a major effort.
In the end, will there be any concrete benefit deriving from this kind
of campaign? Even if prisoners of
conscience are not released as a
direct result of this petition, we will
have succeeded in raising the level
of human rights awareness here on
campus and around the world, and
this cannot help but have a positive
effect in the long run. It is only if
we lose our sense of outrage that injustice can continue unchecked.
Stephen Fether
president AI—UBC
In his distinction between
freedom from and freedom to
Walton has got everything
backwards. The claim, made by
liberal apologists, is that only
negative liberty, the freedom from
coercion, is an acceptable form of
freedom because positive liberty,
the freedom to certain things (eg.
autonomy, well-being, etc.), requires repressive enforcement.
But this is so much ideological
doubletalk. By this criterion, even
the most economically and socially
oppressed people are free because
no one is forcing them to be poor.
What liberals like Walton never admit is that their particular view of
freedom also requires enforcement,
especially against those who do not
accept such a one-sided view of
freedom.
The five local political activists
who are now facing charges for
various activities have already been
granted political recognition by the
police, who refer to them as extremists (a term which only makes
sense applied to the political spectrum), who have been harassing
political activists in Vancouver and
Toronto, who have attempted to try
the five through the media with
carefully orchestrated and sensa-
tionalistic press conferences, and by
the court which has denied the five
bail for obviously political reasons,
as none of the five have been accused of murder while contract killers
who have are granted bail.
One last thing: Walton talks as
though the five have already been
proven guilty, that they have committed the acts of which they have
only been accused. So much for his
'justice . . . administered fairly to
individuals.'
Jamie Baugh
unclassified
r
Campaign meets campus
I thought readers would be
interested in a progress report
on the campaign to prevent the
UBC Bookstore from selling
pornography.
Returns so far: 399 people
agree, 14 disagree, and 1 person doesn't care.
Many of the 399 who agreed
added comments referring to
the special responsibility of a
university-owned store not to
participate in human degradation. Most of the 14 who
disagreed mentioned reasons
like "freedom of print" and
one or two asserted that using
women as sex objects is okay
— one man said. "Bring back
the Red Rag."
Jo Evans,
Education
Even upon close scrutiny of Jim
Davies' letter (Nudity vulgar,
March 15), I was unable to detect a
definite sign of irony, so I assume
he is serious in his claim that The
Ubyssey's display of a naked
woman will "bolster its ratings . . .
or currupt the mind of every first
year student."
On the same day his letter was
published, signatures were being
collected in SUB for a petition opposing UBC bookstore sales of any
materials "exploiting" women. The
documentary evidence that was supposed to provoke the outrage of
SUB strollers and clinch the question of the bookstore's barbarity
was a sheaf of uninspiring breasts
and buttocks shots culled from
Playboy and Penthouse.
It's lamentable that despite (due
to?) UBC's proximity to Wreck
beach, 12th-century dread of nudity
is a feverish pitch here. We should
be leading the way along the path of
enlightenment. The dress code
should be modified to permit
generous frontal and rear exposure,
and the anachronistic practice of
segregation that requires boys to
relive themselves between blue walls
and girls between pink ones should
be abolished.
In an age that is said to have
abandoned   god   in    favor   of
pragmatism, it's surprising that an
old tribal taboo can continue to
restrict our access to only 50 per
cent of the available washrooms.
Uriel Wittenberg
Unclassified
Committee aims
There has recently been formed
an AMS club, called the Palestine
education committee, which has as
its aims the following:
i) to promote understanding at
UBC of the situation in the Middle
East,
ii) to educate the university community about the diverse aspects of
Palestinian culture and its role in
the struggle of the Palestinian people,
iii) to promote peace with justice
for the Palestinian people,
iv) to confront Zionist claims in
the Middle East with an alternative
information base.
v) to promote Canadian popular
support for the struggle of the
Palestinian people.
If you wish to join the committee
or to obtain more information
about the committee's aims and activities, please contact us via the
AMS business office.
J. R. Boyle
Palestine education committee
■ The Martlet Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Ma
The OLD FORT BREWING CO. reminds you to not miss seeing THE REDS this
Thursday and Friday.
IN THE PIT
A.M.S. UBC OPEN
FOOSBALL
TOURNAMENT
Saturday, March 26 at 2:00 p.m.
in the PIT
Total of $370 in prizes—
$140 Top Prize
Entry Fees—$10/Team Open Doubles
$4/Team UBC Doubles
The first round consists of two
separate double knockouts, UBC and
OPEN with the top two teams in each
division advancing to the round robin
final round. UBC teams will be given
a one goal per game advantage
against OPEN teams. Yes, you are
good enough to play!!!
For further info, contact ERIK LIN-
DHOLM 224-6552 or REID ABEL
224-9776.
There are lots of placement prizes ($$)
as well as T-Shirts, etc.
A.M.S. CONCERTS
SPECIAL EVENTS LINE-UP
Wed., Mar. 23 -
Thurs. Mar. 24 —
Wed. Mar. 30 -
Thurs. Mar. 31 —
Tues. Apr. 5 —
Thurs. Apr. 7 —
Fri., Apr. 15 —
Sat., Apr. 23 —
Punchlines Comedy Show
Last show this year
SUB AUD, 12:30 p.m.
Bill March
Member of the 1982 Canadian team on
Mt. Everest — SUB Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Ross McKim
Ballet from London, England
SUB AUD, 8 p.m.
Free Music
SUB Courtyard, 12:30 p.m.
ULTRAVOX
War Memorial Gym, 8 p.m.
Catholic Girls
From New England
The Pit, 8:30 p.m.
Rational Youth
From Montreal
SUB Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Dead Kennedys
SUB Ballroom, 8 p.m.
Pit Updates
THE REDS
Pop — Direct From Philadelphia
March 24 & 25
FRIDAY NITE COVER CHARGE
$3.00 Students
Non-students $1.00 extra ch 22,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
^44/
INTRAMURAL STAR
INTRAMURAL OFFICE
ROOM 203
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
STORM THE WALL -
HOW DO YOU RATE?
At last, a Prediction Board similar to that produced for the infamous Arts '20 Race!
Not concerned? Well listen to this! Our bookies have a track record of better than 70%
on their selections. Aha! So now, you're listening. This week there will be well over 100
teams stormin' the wall, and this is how they are picked to place.
TOP FACULTY MEN
Forestry has dominated so many of the running events this year, so they are a natural
to win. However, Commerce is always tough, and will be attempting to repeat their
winning performance of last year. Third place will be a fight between the Engineers and
Phys Ed.
1. Forestry 9:5
2. Commerce 7:3
3. Engineers 7:1
TOP FACULTY WOMEN
As in past years, the ladies from Forestry are sure to dominate this division. Their
winning performance last year gave many of the men's teams the jitters. Aggies and
Commerce will be relegated to battling it out for second place.
1. Forestry
2. Commerce
3. Aggies
8:7
3:1
4:1
TOP FRATERNITY
Last year the frats lived up to their competitive reputation by capturing three of the
top six overall placements. This year, there are four contenders for the winners circle.
The Dekes and Betas will be vying for top spot, with Fijis and Phi Delts hot on their tails.
1. Dekes 5:4
2. Betas 5:3
3. Fijis 6:1
TOP SORORITY
The top sorority position will be a repeat performance by Gamma Phi Beta. The Gamma Phis were 6 minutes ahead of their nearest challenger last year. The competition will
come from Kappa Kappa Gamma, with Alpha Phi and Alpha Delta Pi fighting for third
spot.
1. Gamma Phi 7:4
2. KKG 7:2
3. A D Pi 8:1
TOP VARSITY (MEN)
One look at the Storm the Wall trophy and there's no doubt who will dominate this
Division. The Rowers will be tough to beat! The Ski team and field hockey teams will be
forced to compete for second place. Should be no contest.
1. Rowing Crew 10:7
2. Ski Team 7:2
3. Field Hockey 7:1
TOP VARSITY (WOMEN)
As with the men's teams, the Rowing crew is going to be tough to beat. However,
the basketball team is likely to be up to the challenge to win this division. Third place
will be left for the field hockey team.
1. Basketball 4:1
2. Rowing Crew 5:1
3. Field Hockey 7:1
Other categories include top Co-Rec Team (watch out for Gage), Top Independent
(Phrateres look in top condition for the women; men's is up for grabs), and Top
Residence men and women.
The Ironman/Woman competition unofficially determines UBC's greatest athlete. Individual competitors will complete the entire STORM THE WALL relay course. They
may have an assistant at the pool, at the cycle point, and to assist over the wall. Who's
your favorite athlete?
THE WALL RETURNS
Yes, the big bad wall is back! And that can only mean one
thing .  .  . time to STORM THE WALL!
The fourth annual Storm the Wall Competition begins this
week with qualifying rounds today and tomorrow; semi-finals
on Thursday 12:30-2:30; and the finals on Friday 12:30-1:30. The
12-foot wall is located just off of SUB plaza on East Mall.
Each team has five members, each with a specific responsibility:
#1-SPRINTS 300 m
#2-SWIMS 200 m
#3-RUNS 1 Km
#4-CYCLES 5 Km
#5—CAPTAIN (moral support)
Once all of this is completed, all five team members must
make it over THE WALL, and cross the finish line together.
Conquering the wall is harder than it seems. Many a person has
lost their shorts on the way to the top of the wall, as teammates attempt to give an extra boost. Others have made the
mistake of trying the "quick" way down in a race to the finish
and end up with a sprained ankle. The key to winning is climbing the wall in the most efficient and safest way possible. No
one should ever stand on the top of the wall or attempt to
jump off the top.
Don't miss the action. Come out and cheer your favorite
team on to victory! LET'S GO STORMIN'!
WRESTLING
The Intramural Wrestling Tournament held
last Wednesday saw the Dekes and Betas
well represented. UNDER 140 LBS. - 1st
place Kelly McCloskey (Dekes); 2nd place
Greg Seebach (EUS). 140-155 LBS. - 1st
place Walter Taylor (Gage); 2nd place Ralph
Plant (Betas). 156-170 LBS. — 1st place
Steve Olson (Dekes); 2nd place Randy Tonks
(Betas). 171-185 LBS. - 1st place Warren
Newcomen (Alpha Delta Phi); 2nd place Darwin Dewar (Koyotes). 186-200 LBS. 1st place
Mark Hopkins (Forestry); 2nd place Brian
Pedlar (Betas). OVER 200 LBS. - 1st place
Graham Thorn (Betas); 2nd place Brian Pedlar
(Betas).
The INTRAMURAL STAR is made
possible through the generosity of
the OLD FORT BREWING COMPANY.
We thank them for their continued
support of the UBC Intramural Sports
Program.
Editor — Linda King
Director — Kelly McCloskey
COLOUR NIGHT
Get your tickets now for this gala  night of
awards, banquet dinner and dance. Tickets are
available at the Intramural Office or AMS Box Office for just $15.
5:30 Reception
Unit Manager Awards
7:00 Banquet Dinner
8:00 Second Term Awards
All-Star Team Awards
Top Referee Awards
Most Improved Unit
Top Unit Manager of the Year
Intrafraternity Council Sport Award
Top Participant of the Year
Top Unit of the Year
Don't miss the best Intramural Event of the
Year! Come and support your unit, and bring a
friend. See you there!
Watch the Birdie
The Buchanan Badminton Tournament of Champions, held March 12th and 13th, saw an upset victory for the Mens' Doubles team from the Engineering Staff. In tournament play the 6th seeded team of
Stan Kita and Walter Janzen consecutively beat the
4th and 5th ranked teams, then squeaked by a win
over the number one team of Huang and Lee
(C.V.C.) to advance to the finals. Kita and Janzen
then stormed Phi Delts Delaney and Esson 15-10,
15-4 to take the trophy.
In Singles Play, Don Anderson (Dekes) defeated
Doug Van Helden (Fijis) to claim the Div. 1 honours.
Rob Bentley (Vanier) took three straight over Beta's
Nick Poucher to win Div. 2. In Div. 3, Colin Chin of
Koyotes downed Pete Seddon (Betas) in the finals.
On the women's courts, Nancy Walter and fellow
engineer Natalie Suzuki competed for the Div. 1
trophy. Walter dominated 11-5, 11-6, 11-0 to take it.
Science's Wendy Lee dumped Tracey Black (KKG) in
the Div. 2 championship. The doubles team of Vicki
Weiland and Caroline Thompson, from Delta Gamma, claimed the Double's Championship by downing
Ann-Marie Carter and Catherine Bize, KKG, by a
score of 11-9, 11-0.
TOURNAMENT OF
CHAMPIONS
RESULTS
Men's Hockey
Superleague - COMMERCE
Division 1 - PLACE VANIER
Division 2 - GEOLOGY
Division 3 - EUS "MINORS"
Women's Hockey
Championship - GEOLOGY I
Women's Floor Hockey
Division 1 - MIXED UP
Division 2 - TWEEDSMUIR
Division 3 - AGGIES
Sub 6' Basketball Tourney
1st Place - ENGINEERS
2nd Place - PHI DELTS
INTRAMURAL
COLOUR NIGHT
Friday, March 25
m
Awards, Banquet & Dance
Tickets available at
Intramural Office and AMS Box
Office NOW! Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
Would-be mods fill Club fad
By NEIL LUCENTE
"Fashion is my only culture,"
Gerry Dammers of the ska group
The Specials once said. The phrase
captures the prevailing mood of the
Culture Club concert at the Commodore March 16.
Vancouver youth are importing
their latest notion of chic from their
fore-runner from the English band
Culture Club and Boy George.
Once London's most notorious
non-conformist, Boy George suffers from mass imitation.
Performing before a well-
behaved sell-out audience, George
and the band faced a banage of Boy
George clones.
Male and female members of the
audience braided their hair, made-
up their faces, and wore wide-
brimmed black hats. With fashion
consciousness so high, the musical
appeal of the concert was less than
marginal.
The show was professional and
marketable, but lacked life and
charm. Despite their clever gimmicks and hype, Culture Club fell
flat with monotony and predictability.
Using a combination of reggae
guitar, funk bass, Caribbean drums,
salsa horns and excellent backup
vocals, Culture Club maintained an
unchanging tempo that kept the au
dience bobbin up and down.
But even with all their versatile
resources, the band failed to churn
up a sweaty and sincere intensity in
the crowd.
The show did brighten at times
with the more reggae-influenced
compositions and with their excellent single: "Do You Really
Want to Hurt Me." Unfortunately,
two or three songs never redeem a
show.
The androgenous Boy George
tried his hardest to outrage his audience with homosexual innuendos
but his attempts at sexual humour
resulted only in a very boring Boy
George.
Well-researched dream pops
By VICTOR WONG
Quebec is a unique province in
Canada because of its French
cultural heritage. As a result
Quebec has had problems with the
federal government.
Some people feel the average
Anglo-Canadian does not really
understand exactly what La Belle
Province is complaining about, and
have written books in which
educators speculate about the
reasons why Rene Levesque wants
to pull his province out of confederation. Book publisher Mac-
millan of Canada contacted an Ottawa history professor and asked
her to write an historical commentary on Quebec. The result is Dream
of Nation.
The Dream of Nation: A Social and
Intellectual History of Quebec
By Susan Mann Trofimenkoff
Macmillan
$22.95, 344 pages
It is difficult to say whether
Dream of Nation should be used as
a textbook or as a sourcebook. The
book is well researched, and it contains enough factual documentation
on modern Quebec history to
qualify as an historic text. But the
lack of illustrations render it impractical for use as a main text.
Precision Haircutting.
15% OFF
^ .    Any Service
KEN    HIPPERT    HAm
CO.
UBC Village -
Phone: 228-1471
with presentation of ad
to Terry, Karin, Debbie
This book is definitely not for
pleasure reading. The author has a
dry style typical of most analyses.
Because there aren't enough illustrations to break up the text's
monotony, readers who try to complete the book will be sorely tempted to break off before they reach
the fourth chapter.
This is not to say Dream of Nation is a bad book. Trofimenkoff
-thoroughly analyses Quebec history
from 1600 to the present.
This book will find its way onto
UBC and Vancouver Public Library
shelves, where it belongs. The
book's rather dry style and its
somewhat high price (the book is
currently only available in cloth-
bound hardcover) will keep it off
the private shelves for some time.
— n«ll lucent* photo
CULTURE CLUB . . . empty antics deflate show
MWM     1
STUDENT
WEEKDAY SPECIAL!
Spend the night with Bogart.
Bo Derek, Richard Pryor or
Jane Fonda for only $3.00.
1    LONDON TO   i
I       EUROPE      I
I1      Student Flights     1
TRAVEL CUTS has some great     ■
rmmmtmWmmmmMm^mmmmmwmmmim%mt
■H Wkwk Wtm WmWt mm mm mm
The Economical
EAST
Low-coat flight plans]
From Vancouver
TRAVEL CUTS has some great
fares available to Europe from
London:
■ AMSTERDAM    $99
■ ATHENS $169
I BERNE $119
I FRANKFURT   $89
■ PARIS $89 I
a ROME $149 I
I TEL AVIV from $239* I
| ZURICH    $109         |
■       Add these fares to a TRAVEL
CUTS London flight for an
unbeatable combination!
I     HI
II
1
Tokyo
Seoul
Osaka
Taipei
Manila
Hong Kong
Bangkok
Singapore
Colombo
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
$1,1091
1,0991
1,189
1,069
1,0691
1,1091
1,399 §
1,6091
1,8591
■ • Canadian dollars
• Return air
• One-ways on request
• Contact TRAVEL CUTS for other
money saving connecting flights
|
RENT A VIDEO RECORDER
and one free movie for
$7.99 Mon.- Thurs.
/with Student Card)
Video Stop
2517 Alma St., 228-1478
■ With each Eurail Pass *
I or Eurail Youthpass I
| purchased! |
I For prices and I
§ information contact: |
1 Going *4 TRAVEL |
| YouiMray!**  CUTS    I
■ The travel company of CFS       I
I   TRAVELCUTSVANCOUVER    ■
UBC. Student Union Building      ■
■ 604 224-2344 m
■MM MM Hi Mi Mini
• All prices quoted in Canadian
■     dollars for one-way flights
• Double price for return journey
■    except for *Tel Aviv flights where
the return price is $420 ■
• Contact your nearest travel cuts     ■
■    office for booking conditions
• Price subject to change due to
m    currency fluctuations
■    • Some fares apply to flights origi-      «
H    nating in Europe |
nating in Europe
Going   r*TRAVEL
Youi¥£y!f,*  CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344
1516 Duranleau Street
604 687-6033
HHMfMaiKi
From London
Hong Kong     from $399
■ Jakarta from     5591
■ Kuala Lumpur from      489
■ Bangkok        from      369
Singapore      from      409
• us dollars
• One-way airfares, double for
return rate
• Combine with a low cost travel
CUTS London flight
Going   ** TRAVEL
YourirViry!*^   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVELCUTSVANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
kO!_"+ *tm\
YUKON JACK CHALLENGE
Dare to be there!
Join the crowds this weekend
(March 26-27) at beautiful
Blackcomb Mountain for 2 days
of thrilling, chilling head-to-head
slalom ski racing, in the finals
of this year's "Pacific Western
Pro Tour'.' Inspired in the wild,
midst the damnably cold, the
"Yukon Jack Challenge" is
brought to you by the black
sheep of Canadian liquors,
Yukon Jack.
\Ukon
Jack
The Black Sheep of Canadian Liquors.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky. Tuesday, March 22, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
First choice object of furious porn debate
By Canadian University Press
The show went on — March 4.
First Choice brought "the Playboy
channel" an estimated 140,000
Canadian living rooms. As promised, TV screens are lighting up with
titillating "respectable" middle-
class soft porn.
What was intended to be ir-
resistable bait for subscribers to
First Choice, one of three new pay
people have become exposed to the
fact that Playboy is pornography —
vastly different from erotica. They
realize Playboy is based on violence
against women."
However, First Choice subscriber
and "Freedom of Choice" (for
movies) proponent Steve Montgomery says he believes that
Playboy and other "soft porn"
material which is available in video
TV channels in Canada, has been
the object of furious debate and
nation-wide demonstrations for the
past two months.
And now, even as Playboy airs,
opposition has not surrendered.
"Now we are on the offensive.
They are on the defensive," says
Teresa Sankey, of Women Against
Pornography, which led the protest
against Playboy TV in front of
Eaton's downtown Victoria store in
January.
Within days of hearing First
Choice's plan to run Playboy
shows, picket lines appeared in
front of Eaton's department stores
across Canada.
Hundreds destroyed their credit
cards to protest the Eaton familys
controlling 80 per cent interest of
Baton Broadcasting Incorporated
of Toronto. Baton owns Glen-
Warren Productions Limited of
Toronto, which will produce a large
share of Playboy sex movies.
While the T. Eaton Co. Ltd.
scurried to draft a letter to cardholders denying Eaton's had any
role or say in the production of TV
programs, vote-conscious politicians expressed uncommitted
outrage against television pornography.
But the Canadian Radio-
television and Telecommunications
Commission, which licensed First
Choice, says it has no power to censor broadcasters.
In the meantime, says Sankey,
"With all of this attention, a lot of
outlets "is not hurting anyone."
Montgomery also attended
January's rally in front of Eaton's
carrying a petition and his own
placard insisting: "We want our
freedom. It's our right and our
choice." He was joined by a small
group of people wearing T-shirts
with Red Hot Video logos.
"Playboy TV will just show a little more skin, that's all. It's suggestive," he says.
But Sankey disagrees. "There's
no reason to believe the Canadian
programming won't be the same as
the U.S."
Gang rape, woman battering as
humor, children portrayed as sex
objects and masochism are a few of
the themes from a typical night's
programming seen by U.S. Playboy
TV patrons.
First Choice advertises its
Playboy fare as "gentle erotica."
"We are not against true
erotica," Sankey says, defining it as
"an expression of freedom," unlike
pornography which allows repression — primarily of women.
"Erotica necessitates mutuality
and respect. No sexist stereotypes,
no power, no exploitation."
According to Sankey, Playboy
material has become increasingly
exploitive and violent over the past
10 years.
Women Against Pornography
point to a continuum of violence inherent in pornography. It begins
with Playboy, presenting women as
mindless objects — where rape and
MAN, WOMAN
and CHILD
doesn't open in Vancouver until April 1
BUT
THE UBYSSEY,
FAMOUS PLAYERS THEATRES
and PARAMOUNT PICTURES (Canada)
would like to invite you to a special
by-invitation only screening
on Wednesday, March 23, at 9 p.m.
at the CAPITOL SIX Theatre
The free double passes will be given away in the
Ubyssey office, SUB 241K, only while they last.
Ubyssey staff, student council and SAC members, and employees ]
fof College Printers are ineligible for this giveaway.
battering are often depicted as
humorous — and ends with
"snuff," where women are actually
murdered during filming.
"In order to beat a woman, to
tear her from limb to limb, one
must see her as an unfeeling object,
a thing which exists only for
another's pleasure," Sankey says.
But Montgomery says Playboy
programming and other outlets like
Red Hot Video regulate violence.
"People won't be looking for the
weird stuff. If you censor it (pornography) will go underground,
and then it will be really bad."
Montgomery is a member of a
video outlet's club (not Red Hot
Video) which, he says, makes 'the
weird stuff" available, and claims
to have seen films containing scenes
of beastiality and violence.
"It's hard to know the kind of effects this stuff can have. You don't
know the human mind. It works in
mysterious ways," says Montgomery.
He argues that studies (in Denmark) have proven the rate of sex-
related crimes decreases if pornographic material is readily
available 'to provide a sexual
outlet."
More current research on the subject of pornography and violence,
however, is cited in a recently
published  book,  Take  Back The
Night — Women On Pornography,
edited by Laura Lederer.
The book provides evidence that
the well-quoted studies of Denmark's liberalization of pornography laws are misleading and
incorrect. Rape, separate from
"milder" sex offences, did not
decline.
Sankey hastens to say that
Women Against Pornography does
not want state censorship as a
means to end pornography.
"Censorship would only work
against women and minorities.
"Instead, we prefer to go after
those who are responsible for
creating pornography.
Porn teaches male domination
By SARAH COX
A woman's torso disappears into a meat grinder on
the screen, her legs curled in the air. Gasps of horror
echo around the room.
The projector clicks and a plate of spaghetti illuminates the large room. Red meatballs shaped as
mangled breasts and legs and a bloody mass spread
slowly over white noodles. One woman in the audience
moans quietly in disgust.
The pictures illustrated an article in Hustler, a pornographic magazine, said the commentator at Saturday's Feminist Forum on Pornograpy, held at Robson
Square. Sixty woman and several men attended the day
long forum, which included speeches about the links
between violence and pornography, and discussions on
why pornography exists.
Some men's needs for violent pornography are
largely a reaction to the feminist movement, said Vancouver Rape Relief member Regina Lorek.
"As women get more and more vocal in larger
groups we become more threatening to men," she
said. "Men are attracted to the powerful images of
themselves in pornography because they are fearful of
being controlled by women. The imagine that force or
the threat of force will keep us under control."
The women's movement threatens men because they
have traditionally considered women to be their property, said Debra Lewis, a member of Battered
Women's Support Services.
Pornography is a crucial weapon designed to con
tinue the domination of women, said Lewis. "It is a
part of a political system which can only be described
as sexual fascism.
"It reinforces for us that violence and coersion
should be part of our lives. Pornography provides a
warning to us of what will happen if we do not accept
our traditional roles."
Most women choose to ignore pornographic
magazines and video stores, Lorek said. For years,
Lorek ignored the pornographic images around her.
"Pornography has always made me uncomfortable
because I feared it and loathed it," she said.
But Lorek forced herself to confront the issue of
pornography. She joined the B.C. Federation of
Women and has spent the last six months examining
Red Hot Video pornographic tapes.
Violence against women in video tapes has increased
over the years, said Lorek. "Now they show more rape
and less conversation," she said. "Women are always
portrayed as loving the rape in the end."
Lorek told the hushed audience about a conversation she had with a woman who phoned Rape Relief.
"A man who was raping her told her to say 'I love it',"
she said. "She refused, and he beat her with a brick
until he thought she was dead. She survived, but is
paralyzed."
Despite increasing protest, the pornography industry is booming, said Lorek. It is larger than the film
and record industries combined and annually grosses
$550 million in Canada.
Local Hero
A beautiful coastline...
A rich oil man wants to develop it.
A poor beach bum wants to live on it.
An entire town wants to profit by it.
A real-live mermaid wants to save it...
And only one of them will get their way.
"LOCAL HERO"
An KniKma 1'r.Klm l...n l.,r t ;,.ld.T*M
PETER RIEtiEHT • DENIS LAWSON • FULTON MACKAY and Bt'RT LANCASTER
Music bv MARK KNOPFLER • Produced hv DAVID PITTNAM
Written and Directed bv BILL FORSYTH
Now Playing At A Theatre Near You.
Check your local listings for details. Page 10
TODAY
ASIAN CENTRE
Photography exhibit, portraits from Yang family
village,  noon - 6 p.m.  All week, Asian Centre
Gallery.
UBC LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT
COMMITTEE
Solidarity week with the people of El Salvador
and Central America, pickets, 12 pm all week,
U.S. Consulate, 1199 W. Hastings
NEWMAN CLUB
Souper douper soup lunch, noon, Si Marks College lunchroom
AMS ART GALLEr ' COMMITTEE
Open meeting >cuss policies,  t 1 30 p.m.,
SUB 260.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
New bike display, meet B.C. b. v council
motorcycle instructor and club members, all day,
SUB plaza.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Davey Crockett, 6:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium. $1 50.
UBC LAW UNION
Social justice in Guatamala: the role of Lawyers,
with Enrique Torres, noon, Law 178.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Footprint of the Buddha, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
CUSO UBC
Development education series: Under the Gun, a
disarming review by Headlines Theatre, 7:30
p.m., International House upper lounge.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Info table, discussion, 11:30 p.m., SUB foyer
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB
DEBATING SOCIETY
Public debate: did Jesus really teach fundamentalist beliefs? noon, SUB 212
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW ASSOCIATION
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Stephen Rodgers speaking on Socred en
vironmental protection policy in the '80s, 8 p.m.,
Law 101-102.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Pre-election meeting, noon   Scarfe 1227
ENGLISH 100
English 100 final round for debates: "resolved
that the CBC should be turned over to private
control," noon, Buchanan B316
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Book table, 11:30-3:30, SUB plaza.
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
New executive struts their stuff, final meeting of
term, noon, St. Mark's College music room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation    hour,     1:30    p.m ,     International
House main lounge.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Meeting, guest speaker Dale Maranda on the
Aquarian Conspiracy, noon, Buchanan B315
SOLIDARITY STUDY GROUP
Speaker   from   Poland's   independent   student
union, students' solidarity, noon, Buch 203
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Praise,  worship,  bible study,   11:30 p.m.,  SUB
119.
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW ASSOCIATION/
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
MLA Bob Skelly speaking on NDP environmen
tal   protection   policy   in  the  '80s,   noon.   Law
101-102.
GREEN PARTY OF BC
Second constituency meeting, 7:30 p m , Grad
centre,
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small home group meeting, praise, worship, and
sharing the word, 7:30 p.m., SUB 119.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Film, Disappearances, noon, IRC 5.
Vancouver's Hottest
Entertainment Spot
Bands 8:30 p.m.
• B Randywine
• Joe Clark 5
• Questionaires
CONTINUOUS DANCERS
205 MAIN STREET
RESUMES
with
COVER LETTERS
Laser printed on quality 20;
lb. bond white paper. Each
cover letter is individually
addressed at no extra charge.
Get litho printed quality at
photo copy prices! Packaged;
price 10 resumes and 10
cover letters (same to 10 different addresses) only $35. 2
Page resume package onlyi
$40.
Call for more information
988-4161
RALF KRIEGER
DATA SERVICE LTD.
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
THURSDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film double feature, If You Love This Planet and
The War Game, noon, SUB auditorium.
ENGLISH 100
English department players present scenes from
Hamlet,    Waiting    For    Godot.    Antony    and
Cleopatra,   and   Saint  Joan,   noon,   Buchanan
A106
MUSSOC
Planning meeting, all execs and other interested
can  attend,   1:30   p.m.,   Old   Auditorium  club
room
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Film: How to be a great lover, noon, Chem 250.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
The voice of those who are not here: a film on
disappearances, noon, IRC 5.
UBC CHESS CLUB
Siamese Idoublel chess tournament, first prize,
trophy.   Members   free,   non-members   S3.   8
rounds, random pairings; Siamese rating will be
calculated, noon, SUB 205.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General   meeting   and  question   period,   noon,
Brock 304.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Policy conference meeting, noon, SUB 206.
WOMEN STUDENT'S OFFICE
Workshop  on  exam-writing  tips,   noon,   Brock
302.
PHOTO SOCIETY
Spring general meeting, 7:30 p.m., SUB 211.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film:  Land of the disappearing Buddha, noon,
Asian centre auditorium.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Film:   Cycling:   Still  the  Greatest,   noon,   Buch
A102.
EDUCATORS FOR
NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Luis de Sobrino,  UBC  physics dept.,  on The
Cruise Missile, noon, Computer Science 200.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting to find out more info on Pack
'n' Pit nights (every Tuesday at 7:30), noon, SUB
216G
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Benefit dance with John Doe, 8 p.m., SUB partyroom
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Squash night, last of the year, all welcome, 8
p m , Winter Sports Centre.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden, new logo silkscreening, bring your
own t shirts, elections, movie Road Warrior,
Westwood racing seminar, 4 p.m., SUB 125.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Linda Shuto of BC. Teachers Federation speaking about her irtp to Nicaragua, noon, SUB 209.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Marks College lunchroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, apportex des biscuits,
gateaux, ooon. International House, main
lounge
SATURDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Daniel Ellsberg speaking on Cold War II and
World War III, tickets AMS box office, 8 p.m.,
War Memorial gym.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting and election, all exec positions
are open, applications must be submitted by 1:30
p.m., Friday, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Rally to protest U.S. intervention in E! Salvador
and Central America, 1 p.m., Robson Square.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride, 10 a.m., SUB cafeteria.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Diner final a un restaurant chinois, get info at the
meetings on the 24 and 25.
tfrffc^
Quickly, get thee to Buchanan A106.
Little Billy Shakespeare's Hamlet, and
Antony and Cleopatra are waiting. Who
are they waiting for? They're waiting for
Godot of course, who might just run into Saint Joan. They're all part of the
English department player's dramatic,
emotional, and soul-wrenching production, noon, March 24.
And justice for all, said an up and
coming actor. Hear about social justice
in Guatemala and the role of lawyers,
with Guatemalan lawyer Enrique Torres,
today at 12:30 p.m., Law 178.
Students of the world, unite. Wlod-
zimierz Wlodek, former vice-president
of Lublin University in Poland, will be
speaking, representing Poland's independent student union — students'
solidarity. 12:30 p.m. March 24,
Buchanan 203.
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
See London
and SAVE!
Now you can afford London
with a low-cost TRAVEL CUTS
flight]
$599
$89S
V
One Way from   489
Fixed Return from
Open Return from    0«79
(via USA)
(via USA)
Going   **TRAVEL
You
oing
i¥fay!
cms
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
1516 Duranleau Street
604 687-6033
Custom
Sexy/\ Suits
(on sale)
2 pes. $349.00
reg $450.00     consulted, designed, cut &
fitted by Steve Samson
STEVE SAMSON
718 Robson till 2 p.m.
2934 W. Broadway 3-6 p.m.
669-7848/733-6711
WE CUT SUITS
ft z
Alterations Welcome.
inir nludio inc.
MONDAY lg FRIDAY
9:30 am   5 pm
SATURDAY
9:30 am   4 pm
APPOINTMENTS
2241922   224-9116
CHAKGHX
VALUABLE COUPON
WORTH
$300
OFF ANY
HAIR STYLE
Maximum — One Coupon Per
Person. Good only
on presentation of
this coupon.
IN U.B.C. VILLAGE
NfitT TO BANK OF COMMERCE
VoiOH-f.W-i-K^^a^^
Open<s Fcbrttani I.
^0*0 Blurvaell £d- XfB-4345
(M'S PLACE
.THE CLASSIFIEDS-
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
Coming Events
DINNER IS SERVED AT THE Diner this
week in SUB theatre. (Sorry, all you ANNIE
fans!) Showtimes are Thurs., & Sun. at
7:00 and Fri at 7:00 & 9:30. NOTE: no
Saturday showings!
EXPERIENCING year end stress? Can I
help you? Geraldine Fordyce, M.S. W., experienced counsellor and member of the
Chaplaincy. For appointment 325-8291. No
charge.
35 - Lost
40 — Messages
ST. MARY'S Ukrainian Catholic Young
Adults Club. Monthly meetings. For more
information please call either 255-0841 or
433-8627.
THERE IS AN INDISSOLUBLE BOND of
union, binding us to a real and personal interest in the Star and Crescent. Schlong.
11
For Sale
Private
50
Rentals
ELECTRIC BLUE 1979 SUZUKI A100 street
motorcycle, 6300 Km., good condition
$550. Call Peter at 228-9458.
FOR SALE: Two return air tickets, Vancouver
- Toronto. $199 & tax each. Lv. May 1
return May 23. 738-5857, 733-1987.
SMITH CORONA ENTERPRISE electric
typewriter, with cartridge, like new. $190.
224-0364.
FOR SALE: ticket to Toronto $175 and 10
speed bicycle in good condition $130 o.b.o.
Call Rex 253-9683.
NEWLY PAINTED RED 1976 Fiat 128A,
one careful owner and only 24,000 miles.
Immaculate 4-dr. will go to the first smart
person who sees it. Quickly call 266-0824.
FOR RENT: room in anti-sexist co-op house.
Our house is large and comfortable. We are
politically concerned and friendly, looking
for same. Rent $180 per month plus share
utilities. 876-5609.
60 - Rides
SAN FRANCISCO: need extra passengers
for trip to San Francisco to help pay gas.
Large station wagon. Leave from Vancouver Apr. 16. Please contact Steven
Marazzi btw. 5 & 10 p.m. 261-1867.
85 — Typing
15 — Found
20 — Housing
WILL DO FMT & regular typing - lots
of experience with macros (thesis, special
symbols) also have IBM Selectric. Will do
any kind of typing work on campus, excellent service, good rates. Erin. 228-9392
after 5:30 p.m.
SUMMER SUBLET: July 1 - Aug. 31.
Large furnished two bdrm. apt. 3rd Ave. in
Kitsilano. Quiet, near beach. $900 for both
months. Ph. 736-7192, eves.
SUMMER HOLIDAY HOUSE Exchange:
College instructor living in rural setting outside Kamloops would like to exchange
houses. Consider quiet locations, U.B.C.
West or North Vancouver preferred. 3-4
weeks, July 15 - Aug. 15. Phone 573-3047
eves, or write Peter Peters, Dept. of
Economics, Cariaboo College, Box 3010.
Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5J6
TWO STUDENTS looking for 2 bdrm.
sublet May 1-Aug. 31 near campus, under
$400/mo. 224-2129.
TYPING. Almost-on-campus. Fast and
precise. $8.50 per hour. Also editing, term
paper tutorials, by M.F.A., phone
222-2589.
ESSAYS, theses, reports, letters, resumes,
Bilingual, Word Processor, Clemy,
266-6641
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further, resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional results.
Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.
YEAR-ROUND expert typing, essays,
theses. Phone 738-6829 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
On King Edward bus route.
25 — Instruction
HOW TO PASS THE
ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
EXAM
Attend an afternoon seminar
especially designed for English 100
students and learn all the skills and
techniques necessary to pass. Full
notes provided. Preregistration, by
March 28th is essential due to
limited enrollment.
1:00-5:00 p.m. Monday, April 4, 1983
SUB 213, fee $35.00. Contact: L.A.
Johanson, B.A. (Hons.) Res: 732-1593.
Bus:434-4515.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, equation typing. Rate $12 on
correspondence, Days, Evenings,
Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation tyoing. Rate $10 on
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
90-WANTED
30 - Jobs
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES needed for
Thurs., Fri., and Sat. nights 10 pm - 2 a.m.
$4.00 per hr. & tips. Application forms
available at Marco Polo 682-2875.
WANTED —Women to play on a local
women's rugby team. No experience
necessary. Call 733-3877, 732-0546.
WANT TO RENT Camper/Motorhome from
Mid May-Mid July, 1983. Ready to pay up
to $1500. 738-3935. Tuesday, March 22, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Awards recognize athletes
If the unassuming fellow sitting
next to you in SUB or on the bus is
short, weighs around 140 pounds,
and if he doesn't look particularly
menacing or muscular, then he just
might be Martin Gleave, Canadian
Intervarsity 65 kilogram wrestling
champion.
In recognition of his success on
the mat over the last three years,
which has included two championships and one runner-up medal,
Gleave was awarded the annual
Bobby Gaul award for the outstanding UBC male athlete at the
Big Block dinner Thursday.
Gleave beat athletes such as
Thunderbird running back Glenn
Steele and disabled champion Rick
Hanson to win the award, which is
remarkably given the Cinderella
status of wrestling at UBC.
Hansen himself won a special
achievement award in recognition
of his exploits in a wheel chair over
the last 12 months. Another special
award was made to one-legged
swimmer and mutliple record
holder Gary Simpson.
There are no team awards for the
men, but 29 footballers won big
blocks, 19 won 'Varsity' recognition, one step down from big
blocks, and Frank Smith won a
one third share in the coaching
award which demonstrates that
football teams are big at UBC.
The highlight of the evening was
without a shadow of a doubt
Senator Ray Perrault, minister for
amateur sports and alumni of UBC,
who filled the role of guest speaker
with aplomb. But in filling the time-
honoured tradition he was mind-
numbingly tedious and spoke far
too long. Athletes who had endured
endless hardship in pursuit of ex
cellence in sports withered before
his onslaught. The only redeeming
feature of Perrault's diatribe was
that it proved a fine example of
shameless political huckstering.
Perrault attempted to give the impression   the   federal   government
was desperate to buy indoor running tracks, field houses and all
manner of expensive facilities for
B.C. athletes. He also had the gall
to claim some part of the responsibility for the rowing course the
Vancouver Rowing Club is plan
ning for False Creek.
Perrault concluded by inviting
suggestions on ways to spend
money on sports in B.C. But he went
white when soon-to-be ex-president
Doug Kenny stood up and thanked
him, in typical fashion for all the
charlea campbati photo
BOOKSTORE WAS AGAIN VICTOR in annual bookstore intramural tug-of-war. No team could budge store
either from physical foundation or from policy jf stocking pornography. Bookstore sponsored event in attempt
to save costs when store moves to new location mis summer. "Student power is cheaper than physical plant any
day," said bookstore bookworm.
c
'Bird Droppings
J
second half penalty.
The win leaves UBC equal with
the Vancouver Reps, who have also
won two. But the Reps are still
undefeated in the McKechnie.
Two UBC athletes have been
awarded the Sparling trophy, given
annually to the outstanding woman'
athlete at UBC. They are gymnast
Patti Sakaki and field hockey goalkeeper Alison Palmer.
For Sakaki it was her third such
award in four years. Nobody else
has ever won the Sparling trophy
more than once. She won the CIAU
individual all-round competition
again this year, even though she
suffered stress fractures in both
shins earlier in the season.
Palmer is currently in Australia
training with the Canadian national
team in preparation for the world
championships in Malaysia next
month. She was a key member of
the UBC team, which won the
CIAU championship in the,fall.
The team award went to the gym
nasts, who are national champions
following their victory in York
earlier this month.
MEN'S FIELD LACROSSE
For the second year in a row,
UBC's men's field lacrosse team is
Canadian Inter-University Athletic
Union champion.
UBC beat the University of
Alberta Dinosaurs for the national
crown 5-3 after a fight-filled game
at Guelph's University of Waterloo.
Alberta team member D. Semen ko
was ejected after initiating a fight
with UBC's Glen Steele.
Coach Hugh Campbell was pleased with his team's performance. "I
am really pleased with my team's
performance," Campbell said from
his California home.
UBC players Rick Noonan and
Steve Campbell were outstanding in
scoring three goals each, Campbell
said. "Besides, Steve is my son, and
I like him."
RUGBY
The UBC rugby team improved
their McKechnie cup record to 2-1
following an 11-4 victory over Vancouver Island Crimson Tide over
the weekend.
The UBC team had two tries, one
from Ian McKay and one from
Randy Roadea. Fullback Peter
Mclean failed to convert either try
but contributed three points with a
QT^IIinfs
Jfor2
from
3 to4
c
CAKE & COFFEE*
(per person)
MUFFIN & COFFEE*
(per person)
$2.50
$1.25
"or tea of course1
U
MONDAY - FRIDAY
(at the back of the village)
A
'goodies' he would provide and said
he would suggest many himself.
Kenny received as fine an epitaph
as a man could hope for when the
Athletics Department's Bob Hind-
march called him the 'best president
that athletics had ever had.'
All star
hockey
After several weeks of fund raising involving raffles, carnations and
impersonations, the Thunderbird
junior varsity women's field hockey
team set off Friday to participate in
the University of Calgary Indoor
Invitational Tournament.
In round robin competition the
'Birds defeated the University of
Calgary 5-1, the Wanderers 9-1 and
the Edmonton Selects 5-2. In the
semi-finals they blew away the
Calgary Roadrunners club 7-1.
The final game, against the
University of Alberta, added some
spark to the tournament for the
Thunderbird team as they were
down 4-3 with only two minutes remaining in the game. The team
fought back and goals by Kim Eagle
and Moreg Martin in the final
seconds allowed the team to emerge
victorious with a 5-4 win.
Lisa Lundell was the top goal
scorer for UBC in the tournament
with 10 goals in five matches, while ,
Cindy Coneen notched six.
Over the Easter weekend an all-
star team consisting of players from
Vancouver and Victoria will be
representing B.C. at the USA Super
Indoor Tournament in
Philidelphia. Terri Drain, Wendy
Westermark, and Jean Mustard are
the members of the UBC team who
will travel with this team.
BLACK & LEE
TUX RENTALS
NOW 3 STORES
RICHMOND 273-5929
VANCOUVER 688 2481
SURREY 585-0733
AUTO SALES - PARTS & SERVICE
4780 EAST HASTINGS ST.
w
automobiles'"
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STUDENTS & STAFF
Honda owners, take advantage
of this limited time offer:
IF YOUR HONDA AUTOMOBILE IS IN NEED OF
REPAIR OR REGULAR MAINTENANCE, BRING
IT TO HAPPY HONDA.
HAPPY HONDA WILL DEDUCT "15%" OFF
THE PRICE OF PARTS
AND LABOUR COSTS ....
No matter how small or large your repair bill!
For appointment or information
please phone our service dept.
294-8303
Service Manager: Dick Foster
AMS COMMITTEE OPENINGS
Nominations are now open for appointments to the following posi
tions:
— 5 members of the Student Administrative Commission;
— Assistant Director of Finance;
— Ombudsperson;
— AMS representatives to the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
• Child Care Services
1 rep
• Concerns of the Handicapped
1 rep
•  Food Services Advisory
4 reps
•  International House Board of Directors
1 rep
•  Land Use
1 rep
•  Men's Athletic Committee
3 reps
•  Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
1 rep
• Student Placement
1 rep
•  Student Services
1 rep
• Traffic and Parking
4 reps
•  United Way Campaign
1 rep
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund
1 rep
•  War Memorial Gymnasium Fund
1 rep
•   Women's Athletic Committee
1 rep
• Youth Employment Program
1 rep
• Capital Projects Acquisitions Committee
1 rep
Nominations are also open for one active member of the society other than a member of Council or
SAC for appointment to the Budget Committee of the AMS.
Recommendations for appointments will be made to Students' Council by the Selection's Committee.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE MARCH 25,
1983
All students are encouraged to apply for these positions.
Nomination forms are available in SUB 238. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
T1IIITTII111111II1I
NOW!
PORTABLES
RT 100 SUPER VALUE
«MaM««l
• •
1     #
Metal capable Cassette Deck with
Sharpscan Peak Level Display & Dolby
Noise Reduction.
195
music/box
O YAMAHA
EFi.  H
PIONEER
m ■x\^^xs»■S»^^« **
i..
SX3700
The SX3700 AM/FM Receiver produces an impressive
45 watts of power per channel with no more than 0.02%
total harmonic distortion.
195
AND KSP
SOUND PARTNER
HEAD PHONES
Compact,
lightweight
metal capable
portable stereo
cassette
player.
R300 & CS508 & 100
Yamaha AM/FM Receiver provides plenty of power
with 60 watts total. Dual CS508 Semi-automatic Turntable with ULM tonearm is fully equipped with an Or-
tofon 55 Cartridge. Completing this package are EPI 100
2-way speakers featuring Linear Sound. Handling
capacity: 15 to 90 watts.
195
PACKAGE
195
ALPINE
^U'j-VH'fMfC'"""
AM/FM cassette deck with auto-reverse is also bi-level so that
you can easily correct additional power & add-ons. 6205 6x9"
speakers give high power handling and wide range response.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127864/manifest

Comment

Related Items