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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1967

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Array COUNCIL BOOSTS STRAIGHT, BOOS MAYOR
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Freedom of the press was upheld toy student
council Monday night.
In a motion by arts president Stan Persky and*
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye council expressed "unqualified disapproval" of the action by Vancouver
Mayor Tom Campbell in suspending the tiUsiness
license of the newspaper Georgia Straight^ They
then voted to send a telegram to the city Council
stating so.
"It's not a question of content but of the right
of the mayor to shut down a newspaper," said AMS
president Shaun Sullivan.
Council also voted against a motion by Mike
Coleman to censure Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman
for opinions expressed in editorials.
An amendent to fire Stoffman by engineering
president Lynn Spraggs was defeated.
Coleman claimed several editorials in The
Ubyssey misrepresented his  views.
Forestry president Jim McCallum objected to an
editorial titled "CUS fuss" which referred to a block
of council representatives as Neanderthals.
"'I doh'Vlni^dJbejng called a Neanderthal or an
asshole — people call ine this all the time," he said.
"But it has a territile effect on our appeal," he
-isaid. "With such a - ^tremendous demand for professional talent it's bad to discourage people from
coming into oyr faculties."
"It's ^ Jreedom of the press issue," said Hoye,
"who opposed the motion.
"The Ubyssey is responsible to council," said
law society president Jim Taylor, voting for the
censure  motion.
"Its budget is supplied to the extent of $16,000.
What the members of The Ubyssey want to be is
a totally irresponsible press."
"I read the editorial — it's exactly what I
thought," said AMS second vice president Kim
Campbell.  "Sometimes the truth hurts."
Stoffman asked Coleman what censure meant.
Coleman replied it was only a "wrist slap."
"The editor has not done justice to both sides
of an issue," said Coleman.
(Coleman was complaining about the editorial
"CUS fuss" which called him a "witty little man".)
AMS president Shaun Sullivan voted against the
censure motion, supporting the right of the press to
criticize.
"I fully expect to be crapped on by The Ubyssey
in the coming year and would be surprised if this
didn't happen," Sullivan said.
Stoffman told council Coleman's censure motion
was "totally irrelevant."
"Neither myself nor The Ubyssey staff is prepared to accept any direction from council with regard to the content of the paper," Stoffman said.
See: Earlier Stoiy Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIX, No. 7
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3,  1967
224-3916
Referendum
on CUS set
for Nov. 1
— bob brown photo
"OOH, THAT TRICKLES," says  nurse Ann  Knel sen,  feeling in a sympathetic vein as an  unflinching Doug Walkey tries to keep awake. Th ey're out for blood all this week in the armory.
Boat rattles biologists
Student council voted Monday night to hold a campus-
wide referendum on the question of UBC memibership in
the Canadian Union of Students.
A motion by engineering
president Lynn Spraggs to hold
a campus referendum Nov. 1 to
withdraw from CUS was passed
by council after half an hour of
debate.
An earlier motion by university clubs committee chairman
Mike Coleman to rescind minute 22 of the last council meeting was withdrawn by Coleman in favor of Spragg's
motion.
-Minute 22 said council should
re-affirm its support for CUS
and continue membership at
the present levy of 65 cents per
student.
"It's their (the students)
money and we should let them
vote on it," said Spraggs.
"The discussion is quite futile," said AMS president
Shaun Sullivan. "I think this
is a matter where council has
to exercise its leadership responsibility.
"Students don't give a damn
for CUS—all they care for are
the policies proposed by CUS
and carried out on campus.
They're happy if they can deduct fees from their income
tax."
(Fee deduction from income
tax was brought about by CUS
lobbying in Ottawa.)
A subsequent motion by agriculture president Gene Zabawa
to prepare a newsletter to all
students stating both positions
on CUS was tabled until the
next council meeting.
Last week council voted 12
to nine to reject a motion by
Coleman to withdraw from
CUS and use the $10,000 CUS
fee for campus programs instead.
Sullivan opposed the move
in strong speech, saying that
UBCs withdrawing from CUS
would sound a death knell for
the organization.
Also at the earlier meeting,
arts president Stan Persky said
it is important that Canadian
students fight for universal
accessability.
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye
pointed out last week important
programs CUS has lobbied for
students, including getting interest free student loans and
income tax free deduction.
No bones about it, the 20-foot boat on
Agronomy Road is a skeleton in the closet of
the biology department.
Nestled outside the forestry and plant path-
oology house, the bell-buoy fibreglass boat belongs
to the Canada Wildlife Service.
Officially, the boat was used on water fowl
counts around Boundary Bay until four years
ago.
It was really used as a private fishing craft
for a former member of the biology department,
an anonymous staff member told The Ubyssey
Monday.
The boating biologist left years ago, at the
same time the boat was moved from Crescent
Beach for storage.
"There was always a fuss about the expense,"
said the staffer. "All across Canada people think
that all we do out here is go hunting and fishing
year round."
The boat, which needs repair and a new
engine, will be overhauled when the department
needs it again, he said.
Stranded boat just sits and waits Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3, 1967
BLOW  WIND
BLOW
Student role examined
By SCOTT MacRAE
The role of the student varies as the wind
changes, according to a Brock debate Monday.
Arts president Stan Persky, Alma Mater
Society president Shaun Sullivan and commerce
president Pete Uitdenbosch discussed the role of
the student, in Brock lounge.
The discussion was sponsored by the Lutheran
Student Movement.
Sullivan gave his view of the student as one
who makes the best of the opportunity to get an
education in the university environment.
"The student's role is to question the values
of society, not necessarily through revolution but
in an objective light to change the values if
they are wrong," Sullivan said.
Persky prefaced his remarks by saying students are supposed to learn.
"If a student makes love, goes to a rock dance
or sees an anti-war film has he had a learning
experience?" Persky asked.
Commerce pres. Pete Uitdenbosch said the
primary purpose of the student is to get a degree.
"Let us try to impose our wills on ourselves
before we impose them on others" he said.
A short discussion on student government
followed.
Sullivan talked about frustration due to student non-involvement in the council. The potential for collective action is of great importance,
he said.
Persky felt that student government prevents
the student from doing "good" things.
—kurt   hilger   photo
"Who   says  Georgia   Straight   is illegal ?"
Not at UBC, says John Churchland, arts 1.
Art is what $ells
A member of the Progressive Workers Party
told a UBC audience Monday art is a reflection
of economic reality.
Peter Cameron, activist and former UBC fine
arts student, spoke to the arts and politics symposium at noon in Bu. 104
"If an artist wishes to live," he paints what
sells, and keeps it representative only as it is
a marketable quantity," said Cameron.
Because they have the money to support it,
"the biggest patrons of art are the very wealthy,"
he said. "And it is the corporation heads that
back art magazines and galleries.
"In this way, the rich people become the taste-
makers."
The appreciation of art is supposed to be
by the sensitive and refined, said Cameron.
"The rich, because of their money for patronage, are therefore labelled as sensitive and refined. The unwashed masses cannot afford to buy
art and therefore are not deserving of an important role in society."
In this way, said Cameron, wealth is legitimized and the elitist idea of society is advanced.
Artists do not want to seek alternatives to
their elitist role, said Cameron. It is flattering to
be a member of one "sensitive" group creating
for another "sensitive" group.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3, 1967
CUP '^m^mWtl^fft-   NEWS ROUNDUP
"I'll take my money
and qo home"—Glick
PHILADELPHIA (CUP-CPS)—A retired businessman
has withdrawn a $250,000 bequest to the University of
Pennsylvania because of an editorial in the student newspaper calling for the resignation of the university's president.
James Miller dicker, who attended the Penn Law
School, objected because the newspaper has "played it
hard on the ears" in its treatment of the president.
The paper printed the editorial last spring and reprinted it this fall. It suggested president Gaylord P.
Harnwell had accomplished a good deal in his 14 years
as president but it was time for him to step down in favor
of a younger man.
Glicker said he heard excerpts of the editorial on a
local radio station and it offended him and his wife deeply.
He told members of the Daily Pennsylvanian staff that
having excerpts from the editorial "broadcast to 30 million
people" was the wrong way to handle the situation.
Glicker suggested that the newspaper staff ought to
consult alumni, particularly wealthy alumni, before taking
such editorial stands. "Penn will pay for this," he added,
saying he would give his money to another Philadelphia
school, instead of the university.
"When you speak over the radio, every 'nigger', everybody else, hears the whole damn thing," he said. "All
kinds of garbage mop this up and all the communist types
love it."
Glicker said he didn't particularly like Harnwell but
that he wouldn't have done what the paper did. He said
he had met the president six or seven times.
Student reps at UofW
WINNIPEG (CUP)—The students' association of the University of Winnipeg has been granted two seats on the policy
steering committee of the university's board of regents.
Tom Mercer, student council vice-stick, said the move
resulted from executive negotiations with the administration
during the summer months.
"We wondered if maybe two were enough," he added.
The committee, which recommends policy to the board
of regents, already has representatives from the board itself,
and from the faculty of the University.
David Campbell, senior stick, and Alan Goddard, treasurer
of the students' association, will hold the seats.
Viets  evade  questions
after  rousing  welcome
MONTREAL (CUP) — Visiting Vietnam students were
applauded loudly as they entered to address 9001 McGill students
Friday.
In contrast to the rowdy reception they received from Sir
George Williams students Thursday, the meeting, under the
chairmanship of Laurier Lapierre, allowed the three Vietnamese
to explain the Vienam war from the inside.
During a question period after the meeting, their answers
were evasive.
Asked if they condone the killing done by the Viet Cong,
they answered that theirs was a war of liberation.
"We are not killing people who are foreign to us like the
Americans," they said.
Ly Van Sui, spokesman for the group, said they do not
answer questions (beginning with if when they were asked what
their people would do if the Americans stopped bombing the
north.
The students are visiting Quebec centres under the sponsorship of th Union Generale des Etudiantes du Quebec.
In the House of Commons, Prime Minister Lester Pearson
said the American government is trying to obtain information
-bout the visitors.
The American embassy has denied the charge.
Acting opposition leader Michael Starr termed the visit a
propaganda tour.
No plans to visit other Canadian provinces have been
released.
~
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'Democracy a must'—Dapoe
MONTREAL (CUP) — CYC
students they should fight for
worker David Dapoe last Wednesday told McGill university
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Dapoe, 23, speaking at a
Hyde Park program, said
there was a world-wide youth
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society."
He said society must be run
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Neither university administra-
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
*isrzF&rB
LETTERS
0)
U-4Q
Fidler
„_ ._____. _—.^^ , - ib^-,-. ■",..Floundering
^ V still  a  'beautiful  cat'J* f 5t|^g|^J3V tS&0p  «M^
|L, Xjisj9Aiun aqj Suppj U9anf) in&n\
Saba's view of the world of hip.
Campbell's cowboy morality
guns down  Georgia Straight
By ARNOLD SABA
It is important that the Georgia Straight
regain its license.
By this time it is probably too late to really
add to the controversy; it looks as if Mayor
Campbell's self-righteous decision will be overruled.
But let us see just what happened.
We all know what the Mothers think of
Georgia Straight, of course. It puts the fear of
the devil in them that their little darlings should
see this. The Straight advocates free love, drugs,
etc. They also say: do it knowingly, lovingly,
meaningfully.
IRRATIONALITY
The Sun is allowed to represent its attitudes
in view of children, and so should the Straight.
Who knows that the Sun is correct, and the
Straight is wrong?
Campbell's favorites excuse of "this shall not
■be sold to our children" is nothing but a cover
up  for  his   own  vicious   attitude   toward  the
hippies.  His  irrationality  is  triggered  by  fear
*^of "something else" — anything different.
Like most people in this city, he hates the
hippies, and sees them as a blight on our wonder-
f u 1 Vancouver-toy-the-sea-with-mountains-and-a-
summer festival.
Vancouver's "good life" image is damaged by
• dissent. Maclean's magazine's spacious praise for
- our enlightened swingers and doers had no room
for hippies. They were in a separate article (albeit a good one).
SOUND OF MUSIC
We like to say we are cultured, erudite, hip,
intelligent, urban people. But Vancouver is culturally bourgeois. Our festival runs a fifth-rate
production of the Sound (gag) of Music.
The few oasis of true indigenous artistic
attempts starve slowly to death — the Bunkhouse, the Bistro, the Bau-Xi Gallery. Art has
nowhere to go tout underground.
As long as we can stay healthy and comfortable, and go to see crummy culture once in a
while, and listen to 50,000 godawful watts of
schmaltz on CHQM, we think we're great. If
someone says we're not, he's wrong. So out he
goes.
Campbell's Georgia Straight move resembles
nothing so much as the Marshall ridin' out to
gun down the bad guys. "By Hell, keepin' the
place safe for womenfolk and children." Local
magistrates have been giving immigrant hippies
24 hours to get out of town. Bang.
COWBOY MORALITY
Vancouver is still ruled by cowboy morality.
The local press plays it moral on both sides of
the issue, whipping the citizenry into a frenzy
about hippies, and now condemning Campbell's
action. The west coast is the home of fanatic
conservatism and weird deviations — Vancouver
has only tame versions of both so far. But the
worst is yet to come.
The Georgia Straight was by no means a
good paper. But then neither is the Sim.
Campbell just hates hippies, that's all. And while
he plays Moralman like this our real freedoms—
freedom of the press, freedom to be a freak—are
sacrificed to our freedom from deviant thoughts.
TAKE CHEER
Take cheer in the fact that it looks as if
Vancouver is going to take a giant step forward
and tell Campbell that we don't need to be protected by a cowboy vigilante—that if society is
right, it isn't scared. And if it's wrong, it should
be changed.
One-way  marine?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This year the highways department completed a two and
one-half mile segment of a
four-lane divided highway on
S.W. Marine intended as an
access route to UBC. Every
morning there is a giant bottleneck as hundreds of cars from
Marine Drive, West 41st, and
Imperial Drive must all jam
into one lane at the end of the
new section, to get on to the
old road. As these cars crawl
in line every morning, perhaps 50 cars an hour (high
estimate) travel the other way
along Marine. If S.W. Marine
were made one way 7:30 to
9 a.m. from 41st to the first
A-lot entrance the traffic situation might be relieved. Can
this be done?
CLAIRE TOYNBEE
sc. 3
Heroes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
When I read your article in
The Ubyssey of Sept. 22, regarding William Oldham's 26-
minute wait for an ambulance,
I was reminded of an incident
which occurred during the
summer session when a young
man was struck by some light
fixtures which apparently fell
from the ceiling in the corridor
between the fine arts library
and the reserve book section.
As I entered this area, I saw
the young man, obviously badly injured, lying in a twisted
heap on the floor. He was only
semi-conscious and was moaning terribly. There was a
crowd of onlookers gathered
about doing nothing. At this
point a fair-haired young woman who works, I believe, in
the reserve book collection,
came in and took charge.
She posted people at the
doors to stop anyone coming
in and asked whether a doctor
and ambulance had been called. She then dispatched people
to perform these chores and
then busied herself keeping
the multitude away from the
injured man and away from the
live electric wires dangling
from the ceiling.
Some time later (I would
estimate 15 minutes), two
staunch brownshirts arrived
carrying a stretcher and prepared to lift the injured man
onto it by lifting him by the
arms and legs. At this, the
young lady who has assumed
command told the patrolman
to leave him alone until the
doctor came. Eventually a doctor arrived and he supervised
the removal of the man, presumably to the hospital.
I understand that the injured
person had quite serious back
injuries, and although I don't
know how he is progressing, I
can truthfully say that if those
patrol men had been allowed
to move him as they were
about to, he might now possibly be paralysed or dead.
It is many years since Itook
St. John's ambulance first aid
course, but it seesm to me that
one of the first rules taught
was not to move the injured
person until a doctor was present, unless there was immediate danger from fire, etc.
It is many years since I took
there are a few people around
like  that young  lady in the
library, who don't panic in an
emergency, and are able to use
a little common sense. I
wonder whether she has been
thanked by anyone in authority for her efforts, or whether
that man is aware of how close
he came to a possible permanent disability.
MOSLEY RICHARDSON
New Westminster
Yay  team,  arts
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I venture to suggest to Mr.
Boulonge (letters Sept. 28)
that sports cannot pay for
themselves while folk with his
attitudes persist in the domination of the "institution-consensus" with respect to sports.
It has been my experience
that other universities do consider sport to be of benefit to
"the general student". I further suggest that the lack of
pride and generally poor cohesion at this university could
be less it students who share
Mr. Boulonge's views were to
spend a little of their so-very-
precious time in support of
their representatives in what
to me is an integral part of
the university — sport.
Furthermore, the AMS is not
"a democratic organization",
although contrary to Mr. Boulonge's postulate, it does give
in to some minority groups.
With characteristic inconsistency it attempts to humble
others by aristocratically refusing them funds out of the
pool to which they have very
largely contributed. Damn the
arrogance of the "petty powers".
I hope the arts undergraduate society succeeds in their
admirable program, despite
AMS harrassment.
COLIN HARIVEL
science 2
'Stone's  throw'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The greatest thing about the
new music building plaza is
that it is only a stone's throw
away from the administration
building.
ROGER SCHIFFER
arts 1
Only four
for Senator
Four students will be
acclaimed to the UBC
academic senate if no
new nominations are
made by Wednesday.
Only nominee for the
sole position of grad student representative is Ian
Worley, a botany student.
Kirsten Emmott, science 4, Gabor Mate, arts
4, and Ray Larsen, arts
4, are running for the
three undergraduate
seats.
"If no new candidates
appear, all three will
automatically be on the
senate," said second vice-
president Kim Campbell.
"But an election will
be held to determine who
is to win a two-year
term."
Nominations close
Wednesday at 4 p.m. ~_ „&". .j* - ,\;
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
OCT. 3, 1967
Saturation
One more in a series of frontal assaults on education
as it is practised at Canadian universities appeared
last week in the form of the University of Toronto's
MacPherson report
The report, prepared by a committee chaired by
political economist C. B. MacPherson recommended
"drastic" changes in U of T's arts faculty.
Strange as it sounds, there is nothing very drastic
about recommending drastic changes in Canada's universities and high schools.
People who know something about education do it
all the time.
At UBC, for example, there has been Guideposts to
Innovation (1964), a comprehensive recommendation
for reform, both academic and structural.
A year later there was Discipline and Discovery, a
program for change, aimed specifically at the arts
faculty.
Discipline and Discovery is similar in tone to
Toronto's MacPherson Report which recommends, among
other things, a drastic reduction in both classroom hours
and examinations. Lectures in any course would be
limited to one a week.
The MacPherson report's attack on the anti-educational lecture system echoes criticism of the system
voiced by the new UBC president Kenneth Hare in an
interview with The Ubyssey in August.
Hare compared an overdose of lectures to "saturation bombing," while admitting that an occasional lecture
can be valuable.
The reports, the criticisms of Haxe and of others,
and the experience of both students and faculty add up
to a complete discrediting of the three-a-week lecture
system.
The worst aspect of the system is the false sense
of achievement it can engender in students, many of
whom sit through hours of lectures, dutifully taking
notes, convinced they are learning something.
It is only when a student is required to defend or to
argue an idea or opinion that he becomes aware of the
gaps in his knowledge.
Such awareness, giving a direction to reading and
to thought, is the best stimulus to learning.
Despite continued harsh criticisms of lectures three
times a week, instructors continue to lecture three times
a week and universities continue to build halls for them
to do it in.
Yet no one bothers to defend the system from the
blows of MacPherson reports and Discipline and Discovery pamphlets.
One wonders why. If a system is indefensible, why
continue it?
A small but promising attempt at educational reform is this year's Arts I experiment, involving 243
freshmen.
The program is a straightforward attempt to put
into practice common knowledge about the learning
process.
Use of this knowledge by educators is no more
radical than the use — based on proof of effectiveness —
of a new vaccine or antibiotic by a doctor.
Yet, amazingly, the program was opposed by a substantial number of arts faculty members.
On the success and expansion of Arts I and extension of similar programs to other faculties depend the
future of UBC as a centre of education.
Continued "saturation bombing" will destroy that
future.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City Stuart Gray
News Susan Gransby
Managing       Murray  McMillan
Photo      Kurt Hilger
Associate    Al   Birnie,   Kirsten   Emmott
Senior      Pat  Hrushowy
Sports     Mike Jessen
Wire     Charlotte  Haire
Page Friday Judy Bing
Ass't. City    Boni   Uo
Using rulers, the unshaved rebels
inched along wetly in the reign. In
lumbered a forester, who barked
once and was loathe to leaf. What a
boar, said Ann Arky, going hog-
wild. Struggling with 600 tubes of
toothpaste were Steve Jackson,
Pamela Mutch, Scott MacRae, Wendy
Carter, Pat Ford, Mark De Coursey,
and Irving Fetish.
Nigel Thursfield led the counterattack against the blorgs, helped by
Jade Eden, Alexandria Volkoff,
Kathi Harkness, Miss Leslie Plom-
mer and Richard Baer. Hew Gwynne
felt bottled-up, as did Norman
("Corky") Gidney and Fran Mc-
Grath.
Chris Blake, George Hollo, Lawrence Woodd and Bob Brown, were.
"Psst . . . underground newspaper?"
GUERRILLA  GOVERNMENT
If Art had $$$...
By STAN PERSKY allowed to use university facili-
Let's just imagine for a mo- ties just as at present,
ment (in the name of happi- The way I figure it, that
ness and community) that arts leaves arts with $35,500. Let's
and the Alma Mater Society also suppose arts is very gen-
split into two separate govern- erous and decides to put up
ments on this campus. $5,000 for special events and
Let's also imagine that the $2,000 for fall symposium
split isn't violent, but gentle- (since I think of both those
manly, responsible and cau- programs as being primary
tious. Say that this imaginary concerns of arts students),
arts government agreed to ac- PROGRAM
cept a full share of the finan- We still have $28,500 with
cial and moral responsibility which to conduct a program
for campus-wide projects as for students. What would arts
they presently exist. do with that money? Even
ARTS BUDGET after anti-calendars, free lock-
Picture the arts budget ers, dances, speakers, experi-
(Dave Hoye, please note): the mental collets, magazines,
$29 student fee (which is en- drugs and f <.._., there would
forced by the board of guvs) still be a lot of money left over
would go to arts, giving them that would have to be thought
$150,000. about.
Here is how it might be At Friday's arts council meet-
spent: ing in Buchanan lounge, things
SUB   $75,000 weren't   made  any better by
Sports     $25,000 the appearance of Dave Hoye,
Canadian Union of who explained to us why he
Students   $ 3,250 considers   arts   "incompetent,"
AMS odds and ends  $ 2,500 why  he's   giving   us   nothing
World University and why he's frozen our funds.
Service     $ 1,750 Hoye's speech was an amalgam
Ubyssey      $ 5,000 of   half-truths,   unimaginative
Contemporary Arts thinking, nitpicking and self-
Festival   $ 2,000 justification.
  LIE
Total    $114,500 What   the    central    student
  government does is try to pre-
As you can see, I've kept all tend that money matters are
the proportions exactly as they so complicated that only they
are now. Arts still pays its full are capable of handling them,
share   of  what's  called   "non- This is the lie of bureaucracy,
discretionary" funds. Money can be used for con-
You can also  see that this structive activities, as simply
budget makes no judgment on as I've outlined in my imag-
SUB or the athletics program. inary budget. The fact of the
which is why I think of this matter is that AMS will use
as a very moderate proposal. its power to make sure such
In return for this sense of governments don't become re-
responsibility,  arts  would  be alities.
Money—
here's how
it goes
By AL HORST
All about money, sex and
presidents.
UBC's students, faculty and
staff have appetites. For example, they paid $38,000 last
year to pick fish bones (eat
fish).
That means they spent about
$10,000 more at that than to
pick   ex-president  John   Macdonald's     bones.     Macdonald      *
earned $29,375 last year.
These figures were published
last month by the UBC administration   in  accordance   with     -
the  parking   lot  morality   of
Sir Ouvry Roberts.
OUV'S EARNINGS
Speaking of Ouv, he earned
$11,475. He also earned $81
for expenses. No explanation
is offered by anyone for this
last figure.
In fact, Ouv earned as much   ^
as people here spent last year
on eggs, $11,000.
The Jiffy People spent
$1,069.
Psycan Psychological Services of Canada Ltd. earned
$1,938 from UBC last year for
telling the administration they
needed a leader who smiles
after the resignation of our
past master.
The Pedlar People Ltd.
charged $839 for services the
administration refuses to comment about.
That wasn't near the amount
charged by another pedlar.
Classic professor Malcolm F.
McGregor earned $19,875.
All figures cited are called
basic salaries by the administration and additional emolu- ' '
ments and expenses (expense
accounts) are not mentioned
here in wages.
At least not until we find a
certain J. Roby Kidd who
didn't earn any salary but did
spend $6,250 in expenses trying to find money to pay
UBC's expenses.
English    professor    Michael
Goldberg   earned   more   than
$6,000 for what students call-    . .
ed  in the  arts  anti-calendar,
"a delicious voice."
BREAD AND ROLLS
Meanwhile ecomomics professor Russell Uhler earned
about $1,000 more for being
poorly organized, inaudible,
talking over students heads
and addressing the blackboard?
Then there was our ex-president's assistant Refrigerative
Supply Limited at more than
$4,000 a year.
And, Fletcher (Lock) and
Safe Co. Ltd. spent about $6l3
providing services to UBC.
Barry .Morrison, history professor, earned more than
$7,000 for, as students called
it, "wandering off into weird
avenues."
FOREIGN SERVICE
Educational    Services    Inc.    <*
charged   only   $1,000    which
must prove something.
And then to finalize the re-
port, the administration
doesn't forget to mention Lud-
wig Roehrscheid GMBH, classified as a foreign service, ^
which charged more than
$1,000.
And so the money goes. But
no fear, we all know where.
Who else knows how much it
costs to cool a president? Tuesday, October  3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
INTREPID UBYSSEY reporter Nigel Thursfeild (pictured on
right) experiences seductive radiation of Gammacell. Pert,
Gammacell 220 will aid UBC scientists to discover effects
of radiation on chemical systems. It's filled with lead and
cobalt 60, surrounded by 48 steel rods.
Gammacell irradiates
systems seductively
By NIGEL THURSFIELD
The newest arrival in the depths of the chemistry building
looks like a boiler but isn't.
It is Gammacell, the very latest in gadgetry to discover the
..primary effect of radiation on chemical systems.
Revealed Monday, it has no flashing lights, buzzing or
belching to attract attention — just seductive inertia.
Gammacell, the second of its kind in B.C., includes a five
foot hollow column of lead, surrounded at the base by 48 steel
rods containing cobalt 60, the source of radiation.
A sample to be irradiated is lowered into the cylinder,
where it is bombarded by gamma rays. These are of the same
Hype as radio and light waves but of higher photon energy.
(Photon is a quantum of light energy, analogous to the electron.)
Dr. David Walker, the associate professor of chemistry who
will use the machine, said the samples will not become radioactive and can be handled safely after removal.
.- The $20,000 Gammacell, made by Atomic Energy of Canada, was 'bought with a $12,000 grant from the National Research Council. The rest was supplied from department of
chemistry funds.
Bleed for juice
Free drinks are available this week at the armory — if
you're willing to part with a pint of blood.
Two thousand donors will be required, said John Ritchie,
civil engineering 3, student donor chairman.
-        Types O positive and O negative are specially needed for
emergencies and major surgery throughout Vancouver, Ritchie
said.
An urgent appeal for types A and AB blood has been made
made by the clinic supervisor Dr. Stout. These types will be
needed to help a hemophiliac now recovering from major surgery
at St. Paul's Hospital.
j       Trophies will be awarded to the residence and faculty who
donate the most blood.
Acadia Park "refugees'
should be reimbursed
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
The plight of two families still left out of
Acadia Park was revealed Monday by UBC
housing officials.
Mr. and Mrs. Orla Peterson from Nelson
have been paying $150 a week for themselves
and their two children at a motel since Sept. 15.
Storing their furniture is costing them another $50 a month.
They cannot move into Acadia Park until
Oct. 16.
Another family, Mr. and Mrs. Ian Prattis,
arrived in August from England to find no room
for them in Acadia Park.
They are paying $130 a month now for a
suite whereas Acadia Park housing is $20 less.
For their first week they stayed at a motel
for $170.
They have a 12-month income of $3200-$1200
as a Commonwealth Fellowship, and $2000 from
a UBC fellowship and his position as a research
assistant. He has a Ph.D. in sociology.
Fellowship regulations forbid that his wife
work in Canada.
AMS Housing Committee chairman Don
Munton has proposed that families inconvenienced by Acadia Park delays be reimbursed,
either in cash or by rent adjustment.
A precedent has been set, said AMS 2nd
vice-president Kim Campbell. In 1964, students
affected by a delay in completing Totem Park
had their rents reduced.
Anti-calendar unscrupulous;
students defend instructor
.^ 8<C0ME ON! YOU'RE COINS TD SEE)
,_§ ^MnmiFicENrw>EmW!\
Eighteen veterans of English 350 have issued
a joint rebuttal to a description of their .ourse
and instructor in the arts anti-calendar.
In a statement Monday, the students said the
anti-calendar's entry for English 350 (Old English) came as a surprise to them. The course is
taught toy Prof. Watson Thompson.
"In this particular instance, the anti-calendar
is inaccurate in detail, unrepresentative of the
majority of opinion and unfair to the instructor,"
the students said.
The students, who took the course last year,
are: Lilita Rodman, Janet Matheson, Henry
Myers, Vicki Frimer, Ron Miles, C. Marshall,
M. W. Kent, Terry Sayers, Judy Lowe, Philip
Allingham, L. W. Bent, Robert Dunn, Patricia
Edgar, Jeanne Mary Wilson and Gordon Cochrane.
Pill center at UBC
good idea-Sullivan
UBC will probably not jump on the
contraceptive band wagon.
At least, not while centres in Vancouver provide birth control information.
Dean Walter Gage, acting president,
and Alma Mater Society president Shaun
Sullivan were asked if they thought a birth
control information centre should be established at UBC.
Reports of such a centre at the University of Toronto appeared in The Ubyssey
last week.
Sullivan thought the program was a
good idea but unnecessary on campus.
"We have centres all over Vancouver
that provide birth control information, so
instead of building one here, we should
just advise students to see those in the
city," he said.
He suggested The Ubyssey publish a
list of locations where students could get
such information.
Sullivan said the criminal code needs
revision when it comes to information on
contraceptives.
"No one obeys it anyway," he said.
"Everyone knows the law is being broken;
there is no need to bring attention to it
by providing such a system on the campus."
Dean Gage had no comment to make.
The statement said total representation of
the course was eight out of 21.
"And of the eight forms that were filled out,
three were not collected by the anti-calendar's
solicitor," it said.
It further said students taking the course
were not, as claimed, all graduates.
Also, the course content as stated by the
anti-calendar ,was also incorrect, the students
said.
The anti-calendar said Thompson was well-
organized, but not interesting because of the
course material.
"Mr. Thompson's presentation was a triumph
over great odds," said the letter.
"Only an extraordinary intellect could have
arranged and condensed so great and so diffuse
a body of material into so concise and so lucid
a shape."
The statement said the letter was not intended
as a rebuttal for injured merit.
"What matters is that those who don't know
any better have been badly misinformed," the
letter said.
"If the editors of the anti-calendar take their
task seriously, a greater care for accuracy and
a few more scruples might help to avoid future
entries like this one."
Arts undergraduate society president Stan
Persky said Monday the students who issued
the statement are correct.
"The students who issued this statement are
no doubt absolutely right," he said.
"I'm glad they went to the trouble to make
it public.
"We erred and we accept responsibility for
having made a very bad mistake and have issued
an apology to Thompson."
Queen is a nurse
A first-year nursing student who wants to
work   in   Africa   for   the   Canadian   University
Service Overseas has been
named science queen.
Janice Andrew, 18, was
chosen by the science undergraduate society popular vote
and the SUS executive.
As science queen, she will
represent SUS in the homecoming queen contest.
Miss Andrew is 62 inches
ANDREW        tall, weighs 109 pounds and has
grey-green eyes and Monde hair.
OUR mmFICENTmEFFORT! \^cX SPONSORING THIS EFFORT!
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SEWUHtt
ENEMY! Tuesday, October 3,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
An advanced retreat
-«. „ %A-Ms*iwmmsmm-
s>;
By AL BIRNIE
_, Ubyssey Associate Editor
No startling, vocal conclusions came out of
this year's frosh retreat, nor were the frosh
harangued by their more knowledgeable seniors
as to where things are at.
Despite some rain, the 30 frosh and 10 upperclassmen enjoyed themselves, and Rosario Beach,
and talked about whatever they wanted to talk
about.
Some made love, a few felt marijuana should
be legal and burned joints in protest, most drank
beer, and everyone talked.
Some people from arts 1 got together, and
felt generally they were on to a good thing,
particularly   since   finding   out   what   normal
courses are like, but although the assigned reading lists are good they are so long there is little
time for anything else.
r     Some felt frustrated by a super-survey course
which touches everything briefly but has no
time for even minimal depth. Some were bugged
by arts 1 profs dominating the sessions to the
point of little student participation. Others said
4 their classmates wouldn't say anything anyhow.
*     Most wondered how they would fit into regular classes after the first year—they felt arts 1
would have to be extended to four years to be
^successful, but saw this as unlikely in the near
future.
A few felt they would have to drop out of
straight university to continue their real education — the free university concept was mentioned
with enthusiasm, but only as an idea.
The CYC man, who came up the hard way,
slums and drugs, had his mind blown, briefly:
"There are people here who want to be schoolteachers! Wow."
However he recovered, and came on strong
Saturday afternoon. He talked about his past,
and his present work with people in a housing
project — real people with real problems, and
the imposed human weaknesses which cause the
problems, and the internal human strength and
feeling which can help people join together and
overcome.
He wondered about university students set in
a segregated institution and told they are learning how to improve society. He wondered about
the social position of university graduates in
relation to the principles they are supposed to
be fighting for — do well-paying, bureaucratic
jobs with socially acceptable modes of acting
and thinking mean the improving of human
relations and the way to liberty and happiness
for all?
He believes in progress through human action
and interaction, in unity of theory and practice.
Later, a group talked about these things and
discussed the arts council, which was praised.
The second-year student from Ontario thought
the arts council is as good as any other action
movement because no matter where people are
they benefit and do good things from such free
association with a social purpose.
Another, a dropout, agreed up to that point
but asked, viewing again the alienated relationship of students to the society and the pass-or-die
education structure, whether arts council philosophy and activities would make any really
meaningful changes at a university which would
then affect society.
He felt the arts council is only a training
school and the struggle there will only prepare
people to be willing and able to fight a much
harder battle when they leave.
On the bus ride back, the CYC man sang some
songs—about men in uniform: cops, universal
soldiers, judges, and border guards — and soc-
ieties with uniform minds; Mississippi and its
blacks, America and its Vietnamese browns —
and people at times fell totally silent listening
to him.
The songs were about the crimes of their own
over-computerized society with a super-emphasis
on machines and structures to the neglect of
human beings, and they wondered again as to
what is more important—having dull, passive,
but steady intercourse with social institutions, or
brief but meaningful relations with human
beings.
9£
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
xs
THE YEARS BEST TRIP
VOLPONE
(THE FOX)
by Ben Jonson
with Derek Ralston and Lee Taylor
directed by Donald Soule
designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Sept. 29-Oct. 7
Student Tickets 75 cents
(available for all performances)
Special Student Performances-Mon., Oct. 2, 7:30 p.m., Thors., Oct. 5, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre - Room 207 or 228-2678
SAVAGE     •     GROTESQUE      •      HILARIOUS
THE FIRST AND GREATEST BLACK COMEDY
SUPPORT  YOUR  CAMPUS THEATRE
WS FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.—c___________fW
Arts I trip downtown,
sees building sights
(An Arts I student describes how her class trooped
through the wicked city on a field trip last week.)
By PAT FORD
"O.K., let's all turn on now," a voice said mockingly.
Then the car with the face screeched around the
corner.    But the bearded orator remained unconcerned.
Architect Allan Bell (beard), and UBC professor Fred
Stockholder (instigator), had arranged a Friday afternoon,
pavement pounding, intellectual happening for 17 Arts 1
students.
The gathering started at the Court House, where Bell
explained that a general cross section of Vancouver life
could be experienced architecturally by walking through
the downtown area.
The first stop was the new Bentall building, where
we were curtly requested to move on, by several disgruntled
surveyors.
Via Hastings Street, we arrived next at the notorious
Honest Joe's restaurant. As Bell pointed out several
features of this imposing edifice, the crowds gathered.
Mouths agape, they globbered to each other:
"Probably Commies."
"Look like hippies to me."
"Same thing."
The tour continued for two and a half foot-weary
hours: back alleys and gardens, court houses and skid road
whore houses, churches and firehalls, and people, people.
Through this excursion we realized that as Bell had
said, "The world of a large city is an organic whole."
This idea was displayed more vividly than would
have been possible in any number of lectures.
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Come in now and take advantage of a  student discount
on all of our knitwear.
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and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
For all of your clothing requirements Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3, 1967
—kurt  hilger photo
THE PIED PIPER lives.  His children are the more  enthusiastic   members  of  the  arts undergraduate society. They laugh and sing and dance and sometimes play music like they did
Monday, merrily clanking and banging and tooting away. Arts undergraduate society members are a new breed.
I  didn't like it",
Tom says of Straight
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
A UBC student delegation braved hostile guards, nervous
aldermen and 50 middle-aged ladies to talk to Mayor Campbell
about Georgia Straight Friday.
Disturbed by Campbell's recommendation that led to the
suspension of the newspaper's business licence, arts council members including arts first vice-president Harley Rothstein, treasurer
Russ Precious, Ray Larsen, John Churchland and Marion-Lea
Jamieson journeyed to city hall.
I went along to cover the event for The Ubyssey.
Campbell announced the decision to suspend the licence
Thursday morning after conferring with city corporation counsel
Russell Baker and city licence inspector Milt Harrell.
The action followed reports that city hall had been flooded
by "hundreds of calls" complaining about the paper.
But lawyer John Laxton, acting for the publication, claimed
no specific reason for the suspension had been given.
Said arts delegate Churchland, "We wanted to pin Campbell
down as to what really happened, exactly what he thinks he's
doing."
But the mayor was not easily pinned.
Weaving through approximately 50 whispering ladies from a
parent-teacher association, we reached Campbell's office and the
guard.
"You can't see the mayor today," said sergeant-at-arms John
MacRitchie, who refused to identify himself, "I suggest you write
a letter."
"The secretary told us to come today—that Campbell would
be in," said Larsen, "We represent 5,000 people — residents of
Vancouver."
''Read the newspapers," said MacRitchie. "You can't expect
to see the mayor. That's ridiculous. Ladies from the PTA, you
may go in now."
Ten minutes later, however, Campbell did emerge, flanked
by MacRitchie and an unidentified alderman.
"The Georgia Straight is filth, in my opinion," Campbell
said. "It will not be sold anywhere. Selling it to the schools was
the last straw. I didn't like it being sold anyway."
"I have seen other publications sold here in Vancouver
that were hard core pornography," said Larsen. "Why hasn't
something been done about these?"
"They were not sold to school children," said Campbell.
"Do you only object to it being sold at schools?" asked
Churchland.
The alderman tugged at Campbell's sleeve. "That's enough,
that's enough," he whispered.
"I'm not accountable to you people," said Campbell, "You
don't have an appointment and I've talked to you for two minutes.
The two reasons for the suspension of the Georgia Straight licence
are that it is filth and that it was sold to school children."
"That's enough," whispered the alderman.
"Thats enough," said Campbell.
"Aren't there any other reasons?" asked Churchland.
Campbell walked away.
Maria Corvin
Out
of
Africa
ii
Wed. Oct. 4
AUDITORIUM
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Just 2 blocks from the gates Tuesday, October 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3, 1967
Birds football not improving
UBC Thunderbird football coach Frank Gnup
chewed on his cigar and said, in his raspy voice,
"Our team put on the worst display ol tackling
I've ever seen."
He made this statement after the Birds'
second loss of the season, this time to the Willamette University Bearcats, toy a 43-13 score.
Gnup singled out Dave Corcoran, Sam Krav-
inchuk and Kent Yaniw for their good performances but handed out no bouquets for the rest
of the team.
The Birds scored their first points of the
young season but a defence filled with holes
opened up the way for the sloppy Bearcat
victory.
Both teams fumbled the ball four times and
Willamette intercepted three Birds passes while
UBC intercepted one.
"Even when they looked bad, they looked
good,"  commented Gnup about the Cavaliers.
The Birds scored on field length ground
drives.
"We rammed the ball down their throats,"
said Gnup.
Corcorcan, who rushed for 67 of UBC's 70
yards, took the ball into the end-zone in the
second quarter.
The Birds went off the field at half-time
behind 34-6. UBC was unable to convert the
touchdown as punter, Dick Stein had earlier been
kicked out of the game.
Halfback Ron Faulkner scored UBC's other
touchdown on a three-yard, off-tackle effort in
the last minutes of the game. Quarterback Gordon Hardy passed to Rod Smith for the convert.
Another time the Bearcats intercepted a pass
on their seven yard line to stop a potential
scoring chance.
Hardy, who completed seven of ten passes,
was replaced by Kent Yaniw for most of the
second half. Yaniw proved to be a steadying
influence to the team although he completed only
two of seven throws.
Hardy lost many yards as he was caught on
his rollouts and again showed his inexperience
at calling plays.
Most of the Birds' troubles came from their
inability to stop speedy tailback, Jim Nicholson
who ran for three touchdowns.
Halfback Vic Iwata was hurt during the
game, but x-rays showed only a chipped bone in
his hand thus saving Gnup from more troubles.
Iwata will probably play sparingly in this
Saturday's away game against Southern Oregon
College.
That the Birds were playing the fifth-ranked
of all Pacific Northwest small colleges is little
consolation for the loss.
One team posts win
Playing an uninspired Jokers I team in the
first game of the regular season Sunday, the
UBC field hockey Thunderbirds scored twice
in the first half and one in the second to win
3-1.
The Jokers, the Birds' personal nemesis from
last season (three games ending in three ties),
never once dominated the match, and in fact
scored their only goal with the help of a rule
infraction that the umpire failed to detect.
The Birds played strong team hockey, moving the ball up quickly and passing well in the
forward line.
It is probable that the Birds, one time B.C.
champions for five straight years, are once
again on the road to the top.
Rugger men fail to boot
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds lost a Sunday
game 11-8 to the Kats, the power in Vancouver
rugby.
The Kats kept a 11-0 lead and until late in
the game. Then the Birds came back as Chuck
Plester and Bob Grimsdick scored one try each
and Morley Lercher made one convert.
The UBC rugby Braves fared better and beat
the Kats II 11-3.
Coach Donn Spence was disappointed with
the overall play of the Birds. He feels that the
teams lack cohesion and could play much better
if they try.
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
ACTORS   AUDITIONS   ACTORS
GET   INTO   THE   ACT
ROLES GALORE
EVERYTHING FROM STRUMPETS TO DUKES
XS
in
by Wm. Shakespeare       directed by John Brockington
(Playing November 17-25)
ORGANIZATIONAL  MEETINGS
(to Arrange Individual Audition Times)
FREDRICK   WOOD   THEATRE
Monday, Oct.  2 -   12:30  p.m.
Tuesday, Oct.  3 -  12:30  p.m.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE,
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18, 1967.
Elections for the Positions
of Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office
of Student Senator:
1. One student registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to be elected by the students registered in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies only. To be eligible for
election to this position, a student in the academic year
most recently taken prior to the election shall have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at
this University and satisfied the academic requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies; he shall
also have been granted clear admission to, and be
enrolled in, the Faculty of Graduate Studies of this
University as a full-time student.
2. Three students from the student body at large (including the Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected
by the student body at large. To be eligible for election to one of these positions, a student in the academic
year most recently taken prior to the election shall
have taken a full winter session programme of studies
at this University and attained at least a second class
standing; he shall also be registered as a full time
student at this University.
Terms of Office:
1. The student elected by the faculty of Graduate
Studies shall hold office for two years:
2. Of the students elected by the student body at
large, the candidate receiving the highest number of
votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations:
Nominations are open immediately.
Nominations will close on Wednesday, October 4, 1967
at 4:00 p.m.
Voting will take place on Wedesday, Oct. 18, 1967.
Nomination forms and copies of election rules and procedures are available at the AMS office, in Brock
Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 53. For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd vice-president,
224-3242. Local 47.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student administration advisory committees:
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Appointments will be made at a meeting of
Student Council, Tuesday, October 10, 1967, at which
applicants should appear.
Letters of application and further questions should be
addressed to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, A.M.S.
Mailbox No. 53.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant
will work with the interim returning officer during
the October 18th elections, after which he will assume
responsibility for running all referenda and AMS elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications
and questions should be addressed to Kim Campbell,
2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53, or
224-3242, Local 47. Appointment will be made at a
meeting of Student Council, Monday, October 2, 1967.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51. Tuesday, October 3,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
WHITEWASHED AGAIN
Jayvees lose 20-0
By PIO URAN
The Jayvee football Thunderbirds stubbornly refused to
lay down and die as they
were beaten 20-0 by the Seattle
Cavaliers Sunday.
The same team that ran up
a 64-2 score against George
Fox last week scored only one
touchdown in the first half
and were repeatedly stopped
from scoring in the second
half by the Jayvees.
The first half of the game at
Wolfson Field was played in
wind that had the pouring
rain falling horizontally at
times.
In the early minutes of the
first quarter the Jayvees got
a shot of confidence when
middle linebacker Doug Bruce
intercepted a short Cavalier
pass in UBC territory. Then
again in the first quarter the
hard hitting of the Jayvee defense gave defensive end Ralph
Stephanie a fumble recovery.
In   the second quarter the
red-dogging UBC defense
blocked a punt and the ball
was trapped by UBC's Herman
Enzenhofer.
But minutes later it was the
Birds who dropped a punt at
their own 30. From there it
was only a few minutes until
the Cavaliers used their
weight advantage to push in
for their first touchdown.
Although the rain had stopped for the second half, the
mud made the ball slippery
so that the Jayvees fumbled
and lost the ball on their own
25. On the very next set of
downs, with the line of scrimmage at the UBC seven-yard
line, the Cavalier backfield
lost control of the ball. When
the pile-up was taken apart
Enzenhofer was found with
his second recovery.
Although all the action in
the third quarter was centered
around the UBC 20, the Cavaliers couldn't reach the UBC
goal line.
In the fourth quarter the
Jayvees got the hang of playing with a slippery ball but
lost control of the Cavaliers
and saw the score go up 13-0
and then 20-0.
With their ire up, the Birds
started an offense series that
carried them almost the length
of the field.
But despite some good running by left half Bernie Fan-
rich and one particularly nice
pass play from Greg Thomas
to Jim Judiesch, the Birds
were stopped 15 yards from a
score.
Coach Nestor Korchinsky, In
his first year coaching Jayvee
football, said that while the
defense had a good game, the
offense could improve their
timing. Considering the opposition, he wasn't unhappy with
the score.
The JVs have lost earlier
games this season by scores
of 61-0 and 26-0, so this game
was really an improvement.
— derreek webb photo
JAYVEES' GUARD ED McKENZIE (68) makes a desperate, diving attempt to stop a charging
Seattle Cavalier as end Don Rose (84) seems to be yelling words of encouragement. Cavaliers beat the UBC football Jayvees 20-0 in a Sunday game on campus.
h
LEXANDER &
XELSON
Phone 224-6811
PPLIANCES
LTD.
4558 WEST 10TH AVE
WELCOME STUDENTS AND FACULTY
Your Headquarters for
Fine Recordings Record Players
Tape Recorders Radios Television
And Repairs to all above equipment
Your A.M.S. Card or Faculty Card
is worth 10% Discount
NOTICE
^i-_»->«~-p*<>
Students entitled
to   Prov.   Govt.
BURSARY AWARDS
CHEQUES
CALL AT ADMINISTRATION
OFFICE
Oct. 3rd to Oct. 6th
SWEATER
SELECTION
is great
at
J* MEN'S  Vi
WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
CAMPUS
A GO-GO sat oct 7
WILDEST  DANCE  OF  THE  YEAR
BANDS  *^e fcest fn roc/c
the best in psychedelic
and the sexiest GO-GO GIRLS on campus!
UBC ARMOURIES T^soZ^
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
*«•
>**!
<m> CONTACT LENSES
AVAILABLE OHLYAT OUR OFFICES
Only Vent-Air invisible lenses are designed with four
air vents that permit better circulation of the eye's
natural moisture and air so necessary for proper wear.
NOW AN UNPRECEDENTED EXTRA-with every new
pair of Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare
pair at no extra charge ... tinted grey, blue, green, or
brown as desired. 10o/o STUDENT DISCOUNT
Learn all the advantages of our unique "No-Risk"
wearing plan. Come in for your personal no-obligation
demonstration today.. .You may see without glasses
tomorrowl Remember, Vent-Air invisible lenses are
only available at our offices.
CHECK-UP • REPLACEMENT • DUPLICATION
Of All Types of Contact Lenses.
Vent Air.
KLEAR VISION CONTACT LENS CO.
BIFOCALS
j      TOO!
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| sua nam
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!_pu?.Si 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily incl. Sot.; Monday to 8 p.
Suite 618, Burrard Bldg."-80   3/v>/«t
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1030 W. Georgia St, Vancouver, BJO.
MU 3-7207
5_,*S"_-.,_f £¥£?". «■■*•«•* awu*
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Mr.
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■ S.S.S. MB I Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September  26,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
AND ALL  THAT  BILGE
Art and  politics at fall  symposium
Fall symposium, Art and
Politics. Free lectures Tuesday and Wednesday noon, Bu.
106. Tues. — Bill Ried, Haida
artist; Wednesday, Arthur
Erickson, designer of Simon
Fraser University.
ISA
Gurbax Singh speaks on International Love and the End
of   War,   noon   today,   upper
lounge IH.
PRE MED SOC
Films, the History of Medicine   in   Canada,   Wednesday,
noon, Wes. 201.
WAD
First practice of the women's
intercollegiate     tennis     team,
Wednesday,   4:30   p.m.,   field-
house.
SAILING CLUB
First   meeting,   noon   today,
Bu. 100.
GAMMA DELTA
Rev.  Jim McKibbon  speaks
on the New Outlook, Wednesday noon, Ang. 110.
COLLEGE LIFE
Thanksgiving weekend  con-
LETTER
Tear and trembling'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Each time a Ubyssey reporter enters my office I am left
in fear and trembling. The
absolute determination of
Ubyssey reporters to construe
the exact opposite of what is
said is almost perverse.
I did not tell your reporter
that "the reason for the memorandum (on mini-skirts) was a
lack of decency." I said that I
did not particularly care what
the girls wore as long as they
avoided absolute extremes and
that I had no intention of infringing upon their freedom of
individuality. As a matter of
fact I have never seen this
memorandum.
INGLIS BELL
associate   librarian
ference at Cultus Lake. Sponsored by the Campus Crusade
for Christ, full details available by phoning 732-6433.
MUSSOC
General    meeting    Wednesday, noon, auditorium.
FOLK  SONG  SOC
Joe   Mock,   folk   and   blues
singer, Wednesday noon, Brock
lounge. Admission 10 cents.
VOLLEYBALL
Varsity   and   JV   volleyball
teams begin practices tonight,
7 to  8:30  p.m.  and Thursday
6:30 to 8 p.m., gym.
FENCING CLUB
General  meeting   and   practice    Wednesday     7:30    p.m.,
women's gym.
PRE-LAW SOC
Organizational meeting noon,
today, Ang. 410.
WBBC
Women's   Big   Block   Club
initiation   Tuesday,   7:30   p.m.
to 10 p.m. at 3095 W. Twenty-
sixth.
AQUA SOC
General meeting noon today,
Bu. 2233.
RAMBLERS
ATHLETIC CLUB
Hockey  practice  8  p.m.   tonight,  winter  sports  centre.
ACEI
Orientation    meeting    Wednesday   noon,   ed.   204.   Dean
Scarfe    and    Mrs.    McKenzie
speaking.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting,    noon    today,    Bu.
205.
IH
Coffee   hour   today,   3   p.m.
and every Tuesday. Upper
Lounge, IH.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting,    noon    today,   Bu.
204.
SQUASH CLUB
General  meeting,   noon   today, Bu. 220.
CIASP
A meeting for those interested in doing community development  work in Mexico next
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON W DRUGS
f
Limited
GLASSES  from  9.95  Complete
CONTACT LENSES one price only $69.50
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
677 Granville   ffflTnT"TV7lTYT_TO        6S7 Colm.ibia
Opp. THE BAY I I I I I 1 I L I I I I 1 J k I    New  Wettminstar
681-6174       L__k__l_---UJL__------_------J Opp.   Army  & Navy
summer, noon today, Bu. 104.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Discover Your  Being,  Wednesday noon, Bu. 223.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Maria Corvin speaks on Out
of Africa, Wednesday 7 p.m.,
auditorium.       Admission      35
cents.
CLUB CANADIEN
Organizational    meeting,
Wednesday noon, Bu. 205.
COMPUTER CLUB
General    meeting,    Wednesday noon, chem. 250.
SWA
First   meeting   of   the   Stu
dents' Wives Association, Wednesday   8   p.m.,   Cecil   Green
Park.
MEN'S  ATHLETICS
First meeting of the MAA,
Wednesday noon, gym 211. All
student managers must attend.
VOC
First meeting, Wednesday
noon, Ang. 104. New members
welcome.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
One executive meeting, noon
today, Bu. 224.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon,  gym  lounge. All letter-
men   in   all   sports   urged   to
attend.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
General meeting, noon today, Bu. 214. New members
welcome.
PEP BAND
Anyone interested in joining
the Pep band go to Brock extension 155 anytime or attend
the practice Thursday noon in
Hut L-6.
UNITED NATIONS ■»
General meeting noon today,«
Bu. 203.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75$, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
 11
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
CAMPUS A - GO - GO. ITS THE BIG
ONE! ITS WILD! SAT. OCT. 7 ARMOURIES.   BE   THERE!
THE    "UNDERCUT"    WITH HANK
and    The    Hoboes    at    the P.N.E.
Showmart Building. Friday, Oct. 13.
Hard  Times.
BACK FROM THE BUSH BASH.
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30-1:00. Hallmark
Hall, 5550 Fraser Street. Tickets
$3.00  couple.   Room  112 G&G.
Greetings
Lost & Found
12
18
LOST. GOLD FRAMED GLASSES.
Call Barry at 321-8142. Urgent. |5
Reward.
LOST. HOME KNIT IRISH CARDI-
gan sweater. Last seen Reserve
Books Tuesday. Phone Susan Burns
732-6684.	
FOUND. CAR KEY IN SMALL RED
Case   found   in   A-Lot.    Collect   at
 Publications  office,   Brock Hall.
THANKS FOR RETURNING ~MT
Purse    to    Geology    office.     There
should be more like you.
Rides & Car Pools
,          14
CARPOOL NEEDED. BETWEEN
Granville and Arbutus on 25th Ave.
Phone  733-7963.
RIDE WANTED FROM 14th & ALMA
8:30   classes phone  Shirley  224-3692.
WANTED: SEXY CHICKS FOR
Swinging North Van. Car Pool.
Phone   987-1932  after  7  p.m.
NEED RIDE FOR 8:30's FROM Vicinity of Main and S.E. Marine.
325-243.
THREE DRIVERS NEEDED FOR
Carpool—Vicinity of 49th and Oak.
Phone Andy at 321-2851.
WEST VAN. CARPOOL IN BRITISH
Properties needs driver. Phone
Mike,  922-7871.
RIDE URGENTLY NEEDED. VIC-
inity of Number One and Westminster Highway, Richmond. Phone
Lorraine, 277-8576.
Special Notices
15
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W 10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
ZORBA THE GREEK WILL PER-
form in the Aud. Thurs. Oct. 5.
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,  8:30.
UNDERCUT TICKETS NOW AVAIL-
able from A.M.S. office and the
Forestry Undergrad  Society.
WOULD STUDENT WHO GAVE
coat to student in accident on Marine Dr. Saturday night please
phone   261-0820.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS ASSOCIA-
tion organizational meeting Thurs.
noon.  I.H.  Room  400.
GEOLOGY'S BIG BASH FRIDAY,
Oct. 13. 8:30 - 1:00. Everyone welcome.   Hard  Times.
Travel Opportunities
  _     _    16
EASTERN CHRISTMAS CHARTER;
going home for Christmas? Fly Inexpensively by delux Turbo Jet,
limited capacity. Information 224-
9841,  4-6 p.m.	
JOE MOCK SINGS BLUES AND
other neat stuff. Tomorrow. Noon.
Brock.
WILL BE DRIVING TO GRANDE
Prairie via Dawson Creek Thanksgiving weekend. Contact Traynor—
Math   Dept.
GREATLY REDUCED RATES ON
Chartered bus to Okanagan. Leaves
Friday, returns Monday. Phone
Dawn, 224-5742.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE: 1958 VW. GOOD SHAPE,
runs well, $350. Contact Frank,
684-0705 evenings.
FOR SALE. MECHANICS SPECIAL.
1940 Ford Pickup with broken transmission. $50.00 or offers. Phone 736-
5785  after 6.
1962    AUSTIN    850.    GOOD    VALUE.
Sports  Car" feel.  Phone 263-9141.
Automobile Parts
23
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles   -  Cars
Generators   -  Utility Units
New   and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O   ' S
R E
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
 32
JNPAINTED FURNITURE. SELEC-
tion of desks, drawers and bookcases. Bunk beds, complete with
mattresses, $49.50. Broadway Paint's
Ltd.,   548   W.   Broadway,   874-5424.
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235 West  Broadway,  Tel.
732-6811.
Rentals - Misc.
36
Scandals
 37
THE GREEK NAMED ZORBA IN
Aud. Thurs. Oct. 5. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30.  Adm.  50c.
BETTY, DON'T TRY GO-GO. DANC-
ing   for   Campus   A-Go-Go!   Dave.
THE YEAR'S BEST BASH. FRIDAY
Oct. 13. 8:30-1:00. Tickets $3.00 cple.
Room  112, Geology Bldg.
Sewing - Alterations
38
SEWING,     ^ALTERATIONS,       K_-
pairs.   Reasonable   rates.   224-7141.
40
Typing
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129.
WILL TYPE  TERM ESSAYS
RE 1-2664 — MRS. SHARP
ESSAY TYPING. REASONABLE
Rates. Phone 683-2859 between 9
a.m.  and 3 p.m.  Monday to Friday.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
Work Wanted
54
RETIRED   NURSE—GIVE  ALL DAY
care my home,  5 days week.  Small"
babies   especially,   UBC   area.   224-
7141.
> A Y I N G    PLAYMATE    WANTED
for our two-year-old. Campus Area.
228-8930.
INSTRUCTION
Music 62
ORGANIST   AVAILABLE   WITH
equipment   for   dance   group. -Ph.-'
John  224-3112.  Rm.   241.
63
Special Classes	
CREATIVE  ART   CLASSES   FOR
CHILDREN
Ages 5-8  yrs.: Tues.  3:30-5:00p.m.
5-8 yrs.:  Fri.   3:30-5:00 p.m.
9-12 yrs. Wed.   3:45 - 5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs.:Thurs.  3:45-5:15 p.m.
9-12 yrs.: Fri.   3:45-5:15 p.m.
Fees:  $8.00 per class for the full session.   All materials   supplied.   For  Information     and    registration    phone
228-2141,   local   118.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71,
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLINO
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block   from   gates.
FOR SALE
Hurry Girls to
"THE CAMPUS SHOPPE"
"etirement Sale, 5732 University Blvd.
(in   the   Village).   Prices   slashed   on
everything.  Do your Christmas shop-
ing now.
1REAT   FOLK   CONCERT   BY   JOE
Mock.   Tomorrow  Only  10c.   Brock.
RARE — 2 RACOON SKIN COATS.
Genuine full-lengths. Excellent condition.   Phone  Helen,   224-4697.
LOOKING
For    clean,    used,    guar,    appliances.
Also   complete   repair   service   for  all
makes and. models.
McIVER Appliances  Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181
GOLF CLUBS. 1964 WILSON STAFF.
2-9  Irons.  $75.  266-6503 after 6.
RENTALS 8. REAL ESTATE
Rooms  81
GIRL HONOR STUDENT WANTED
to exchange light duties for room
and   salary.   Professor's   home.  733-
6556.
ROOMS, ON CAMPUS CLOSE TO
meal services.   2250   Wesbrook.  Ph.
224-9662.         	
FEMALE       ROOMATE       WANTED.
Must be 21. Will have own bedroom
furnished.   Call   Barb    at   684-1808,
evenings. 	
FEMALE    STUDENT-REQUIRES
roommate to share s.c. ste.  733-7686.
ROOM   FOR   MALE   STUDENT~7~$467
Arbutus  & 19th.  731-1345.
MALE STUDENT, SGLE. RM., KIT.
Priv. use frig., bath, main floor,
non-smoker.   $40.   733-8778.
Male or Female
 53
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCB
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday.	
HELP! STUDENT IN DESPERATE
need of a first-year chemistry
tutor. Phone 277-9611 after 4 p.m.
Ask  for  Steve.
NICE BEDROOM FOR RENT. NEAR
Campus. No cooking. Private entrance and bath. Call between 6:30-
7:30.   224-0088.
Room & Board
82
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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