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The Ubyssey Oct 29, 1985

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Array By JEFF SHYLUK
Jeff, a self described first year student in confysiontTis-the^rfher of the second annual
Uyssey ghost story contest with his eerie talejenmt&l'fen Minutes: The Stary&fWurderahd
Murder Again. f     ..rffC       --**"*      "' - *-»»»,.,»....
The following is an excerpt from The Pko^tility iteport, a snipes of lectures dealing with the
UBC sponsored study of human deaths. Fietdlftg^questions is Dr. Patricia McGeer, who has
been nominated for the Ectoplasmic Award of Outstanding Research lor her studies in the
field of Post-mortal Spiritual Incidences, of "P.S.I.".
"Ten minutes," Dr. Pat McGeer agreed, "is the interval of atypkal P.S.I. I have yet to encounter one that exceeds this particular value."
A voice from the front row wanteds.Dr. McGeer to clarify her statement, "Could you explain
that in terms which are less confusing?"
"Certainly. The P.S.I, is a sort of measure of activity that the body produces after death.
Although we in the business of mortal studies,we«ld rather mot use the analogy, the P.S.I.
could be likened to one's soul. Whemhe tempera! body dies, the spiritual iOU? will usually continue to function for some time before it is lost to the ether. As I've said, the soul will live on
for about ten minutesafter the body. After that time, even I cannot guess what goes cm with
the P.S.I." .d'-"~
"What will a person's P.S.I, do during that ten minutes that it remains in ihe land of the living?" >" ( .     ...  .
"Ordinarily, it will simply do some sight-seeing as ^twere, just look-injr around for one last
time. However, in isolated events, the P.S.I, will try to emulate the body and perform a tangible action. A lot of these cases can account for you various ectoplasmic phenomena."
"Ghosts, you mean."
"Yes, ghosts . ...d-i-p-'   „„-' „„.,.,.
Welcome to the jeai»sfoxldv-the*fShd of the living, where things can be touched and seen as
they really are.     * ;i=?
Reality for Randy Weldir was that he was slowly running out of oxygen. Held inverted by
two pairs of strong hands, his hgad^was completely submerged beneath tire surface of the
water. He held his last breathf^ffms^QUth, his teeth clamped shut as if to ensure that his life
would not escape through his Sps. Randy's eyes were as open as his mouth wJ&blosed. Upside
down, he saw the bed of the fish pool as a solid ceiling against which the top of his head was
pressed. He could see^lgWmisjilbouettes of thejoldfish as thgyswam lazily past'his eyes.
Randy thrashed about ina panicked attempt to convinc#tJie4yf^fr*at brothers who ledhjm
submerged, that there was really nothing breathable aWfee bottom df^fte Nrtbbe Gardebfish
pool after all. He let a small bubble of air escape from hisjiosrite4o:frnpflasize the fact-
Roarke and Larry, ^g^^^^^^As^pas^iiM'iess a concept of reaJuy than their victim did. Both frat brother^wfrers^iaKhif drank, so that they remaifee^fhsensitive to the inverse Randy who cmdjttpgfealfiiSatter to save his-life. To thcfwo Zeta Zeta Zetajpeit, the
ritual half-drownin^nojEaieWjSjSies^in the pool at Nitobe was something of a pleasaitf game,
akin to a round otE^BEbj^racifcefrbrliiards. They would simply wateuntil the aquaphobic
Randy Welder wai^^:of^m.:bd[S^fit]Mnghim out. The frat recojrd* for holding one's breath
was an outstandin^^jnjteSfe^se|;flrt«r1ast year. Roarke and Larry had their hopes and their
wagers that Rand^wjpj^a^BC^^irftTmilcStone of non-breathjiig among, the Zeta Cubed's.
Randy had beensBdwSfoCTourjpiBtftes. Hi&Cface wag contorted with the effort of staying
alive. Stray bubblw^fiSEgfthis-inouth and/tricKied upwards', forever lost, ^ressirr^ ground
his ribs together, ifrM-l^£a«decf"that hisj$igs «ere<an tbfeyverge of j|ipturiiig, spilling their
bloody contents in-a red-mass that coul<j€lot in the chilly water of the po©I. H|s eyes "began to
bulge with exertion, as RandyrJ^Jhem slowly working their way ;loose-fromjjhe sockets.
Only a fraction of a breath left. ,-. tlie^ngue is^^'Jiltefe^assWe snake |»$hing itst
slimy way past mTte$fc. . . the^fijKSkt is ojj firj0.'y|t i(t£$es aSpy is a delugefc!' c6ql,\
clear water that woild$irt fiS^t^ blaze..fcf Visl^w i^J^fcr. T|>e impp||,is t^.o :
strong to resist. WitrusffifMt|ing bgmend yawn a^id i silenfiil}i^>|ream,'iRand|f:jpHBej|s
mouth opened for thelasj rime, arid the Killio^j&a,Usr, plungedjtl^ohis Itarved^ungsj H^^he^'
kept expanding, filling with-water as the aif w^^&en out. l!he'b6dy|foughe^ spas$|iodjealjy
and little eddies ot water pooled frortf" th^'nf^h 'before the lungs'^efeftifl. "k s v'^v^-i/Cl
When the body died, what was the jsou)* of ratfj^ttfelder relactajit^can* free^Jik* th\scab
from a fresh wound, JLenteredthe, ajien/reaton of'die living, yet'it did hot l|now v$||a|.t6 thin^
or do in this sudden disincarnation of its^'lJ^With something ak^Jto astonis|rnerjt a^d^Tnger.tt
regarded its dead shell of flesh.       J p. fh      ///  / v.\ •. :    \ ... V.,.. ,.,^
"What a waste of iife^to die so y6u4g! »Chr&, l ljad so' ihuch I wanted tdfcsife aiiS do. l^ve
never seen Europe. Not ctnce have I sHefit i\vith/a"iW^n^an. I neverhad aj^e^nceWreally LIVj^t I
wasn't even old enough to gelinto th^tfeeer ^ajg$si^ponsored!bythe\C%>n«Hcfe^Sr3?JJ-^St
pansion. ■ d'i:oid\"  I   i Kd ■ "r   ^Xs'^'^   " ^'« --t'J' -*
What would have been my future? wftaii if I had $een ajjle to finish m\
knows, my parents might have been rig|ltt<\r?biud'|^madi? thft. Presidents mismsio
address. '    V\ \   V   '& '  ' "'
cMt/tt»l:^h(int mv sfdpet "Snrrtue? Wd
My parents . . . I'll never see them again. ^y^Oodfl^f^OUt my s'fteet'SopI
good for each other, she and I. What will she\saV >feei
matter, would she even notice that I died? I'v-s be%h«tCl
haven't called her in the past few weeks anyhow, fsi
The soul drifted upward so it could see the rfaurde:
"Roarke ... Larry ... I know you can'thear pie or si ,  iN s     -
stupid to know that I even exist. You sure as hell don't ev6n rea%e wna^ you^jb d^ne.%ook at
my body. Even now it is becoming limp and heavy. Pretty spon, iiwillbe so clogge^ with water
that when you pull it out, water will pour out of the dead moutk and onto youiilshoes.
You will probably panic, but then there were no witnesses, were there? Just you two, and my
body, which is too dead to tell any tales. Your ecret murder will remain a secret among living
men, but you will remain blatantly guilty before the immortal tribunal of the sould of the dead
Randy Welder, my being as once I was.
As the prosecution, I proclaim you guilty of my murder. As the sole witness, I confirm your
guilt, and as the victim, I demand justice. As the judge, I condemn you to death, and as the executioner, I must cause you to join me forever, here in the land of the dead. The catch is, I've
only got about ten minutes to complete my revenge ..."
"Would you quit being so damn serious?" Roarke said, not addressing the ghost of the body
he was helping to hold underwater. Roarke was speaking to his friend Larry, "Welder is still
holding his breath. Look, there's no more bubbles, so he must be holding it in again."
"But he's getting kind of limp, Roarke."
"Sure, he's just trying to conserve his energy so he can beat the six minute mark. After all,
he's still get another two minutes down there before we pull him out."
"Hey, Roarke, something real strange is going on here. 'You ever see anyone hold his breath
with his mouth wide open?"
"Nope."
"Christ (.Welder is s^fe^8%,it rigi^txnow."
"Let>'^g^,hintou|^#^h|i^^Larry. tjje may be in trout^.^.jc-^sj,.^9
*Rand|j Welder. With a sucHiksa||^*fne body canie^out of
_j f looiye^dlike a|pale, dripping cabbage frrtheroght. Water poured out
nto the Ze&l Cubed's sneakers.
Holy spit! WlMer drowned.\J4c's dead!" Larry
Roarke, let's get the^hell out of here^hile we can!"
Running footsteps pqunded through"the..night air, accompanied by the gurgle and audible
lurch the corpse made as it-lack unsupporteXheneath the surface of the pool. In the distance, a
cSr's ignition whined and the engine turned with a muffled roar. Tires squealed, and the vehicle
recoiled from the corpse, "Come on
_:ioopHic: wejwercso      r> , _   ,_.>_ .ulvv.h -... _«• i_„^ ^.u:i- i>>
, qut,tnat/Kam 1
iusy.M,th in\niic
iSs\hje:.\s;';;.  \\\-
' 1%. r W    5W\X ki       "^Hth its cargo of murderers sped away.
twolpf y^are^ro^ably too     ^bafry^ '69 Thunderbird was a cranky old car, but as an impromptu get-away vehicle it had
no rival. Roarke sighed as he let his back soak up the padding of the passenger seat.
"You know, the cops will never pin it on us. How can they? In the next ten minutes we'll be
at the fraternity. The rest of the guys will cover for us, so we've got alibis, eh?"
Tight-lipped, Larry drove on.
"Hey, pal, you don't have to drive so fast. We're clear of the place."
"What? I'm not driving fast, Roarke. Look, my foot is nearly off the pedal."
"You moron, the speedometer is at sixty miles an hour! Look at it, we're accelerating."
"Christ, I'm not doing it Roarke! The old bucket is out of control. Damn it, I don't even
have the brakes!" Larry flipped off the ignition, but the engine did not quit. Instead, the old
T-bird was rocketing at ninety. The tires left rubber as Larry fought to keep the car on the
road.
"It never rains. . .," Roarke moaned as strident flashes of red and blue lit from the patrol
cruiser now pursuing them, "pull the hell over and hope he doesn't ticket us, Larry."
"I can't. Hell, I'm not even in control of the steering! The car is driving itself. I don't believe
this is happening!"
Larry let go of the steering wheel. The Thunderbird was doing a brisk hundred down the
center of the road. The cruiser doggedly followed. Roarke fancied that he could hear the roar
of the patrol cruiser's engine as it labored to overtake the runaway car.
See page 2: THE GHOST
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 15
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 29,1985
«*:£..a.
228-2301 Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29, 1985
The ghost of the Nitobe Garden fish pool
From page 1
In a blinding instant, the
Thunderbird was running through
an intersection, veering wildly as it
spun into the turn. Larry was pressed hard against the door of his car
while Roarke clung to his seat. The
wild car righted itself and sped
down its new heading. The patrol
cruiser, having had to slow down to
negotiate the turn was a mere
flicker of colored light in Larry's
rear-view mirror.
"This scenery looks awfully
familiar ..." Larry recognized the
approach to Wreck Beach, which
looked sinister and forbidding in
the moonlight. The car roamed off
the road and through some small
bushes. The bouncing wheels spun
plumes of sand as they hit the
beach, shocks screaming in protest.
The speedometer dipped back to
sixty, and Larry thought of jumping out before the car got wrecked.
The door, however, refused to
open. Larry screamed.
The ribbon of black ocean grew
in front of the car as it headed
across the beach. Madly, the T-bird
plunged into the foam, its searing
hot engine shrieking as it erupted in
a cloud of steam. Incredulously, the
two friends watched as the water
level around them rose in proportion to the car's distance from the
land.
Freezing water began to pour in
through cracks in the door and
chassis. Roarke was kicking at the
door with his feet and Larry was
trying to stop the flow coming in
through the air vents, yet the water
continued to rise. Waves began to
blot out the night sky as the sea
engulfed the windows.
Roarke and Larry watched as the
last bubbles of air were making
their exodus back to the world of
the living. The two men trapped in
the car were alike: both close-
mouthed, biting hard to keep the air
in. Their wide open eyes were like
billiard balls about to roll out of
their fleshy pockets.
Finished with its mission of
retaliation,   the   soul   of   Randy
Welder disengaged itself from the
car's engine. Swirling the water
around itself, it stirred up enough
underwater particles to form an image of itself: an inverted man shape.
The soul peered through the ??????
of the sunken car, interested to see
the men dying within.
At the point of death, Roarke
and Larry saw their executioner,
and suddenly, they understood.
The dead took revenge on the living, to pay for a life needlessly lost.
The   ghost   of   Randy   Welder,
satisfied in having driven the car
and its occupants to as watery a
grave as he himself had inherited,
used the last seconds of its ten
minutes to vanish irrevocably into
the ether.
When the souls of Larry and
Roarke emerged from the Thunderbird, their executioner was gone.
They spent their ten minutes
wondering if hell had patrol officers.
If it did, they were in for one
damned nasty ticket.
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(604) 736-3565 Tuesday, October 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Survey objects to underfunding
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Almost four out of five British
Columbians surveyed earlier this
month opposed Social Credit
government cuts to university funding.
Nearly half of those polled said
they would "be willing to pay
higher taxes to get more money for
universities."
"One would hope that the
government will re-examine spending priorities with respect to
universities," said UBC faculty
association president Sidney
Mindess Monday, adding the poll
"might minimize the amount of
university bashing" by the Socreds.
The province wide poll released
Friday which confirmed a late July
ABOUT 60 PEOPLE braved the rain at Thurlow and Georgia on October
26 to protest the U.S. intervention in Central America. The prostest sponsored by the Emergency Coalition on Central America hoped to raise public
awareness on the problem in Nicaragua.
Student aid to double
By KEN MAGOR
of Canadian University Press
TORONTO (CUP) — Student
aid will increase twice as much as
tuition fees next year, and grants to
post-secondary education will rise
eight per cent, the Ontario government announced in its first budget
last week.
The province has set aside eight
per cent more for the Ontario Student Assistance Programme
(OSAP) while holding university
tuition fee hikes to four per cent.
The budget did not break down the
OSAP increase into loans and
grants but colleges and universities
minister Greg Sorbara is expected
to announce the amounts soon.
In letting student aid rise above
tuition fees, the Liberal government
said it will "improve access to
higher education."
The four per cent formula tuition
fee increase means that in 1986-87
arts and sciences students will be
charged $1149. This year the figure
was $1105. Formula tuition fees are
the amounts set by the province,
although the fees set by individual
institutions can vary by as much at
10 per cent.
Funding to colleges and universities was the highlight of the
Liberal's first budget in Ontario in
40 years. A new budget will be
drawn up in the spring.
In    last    week's    statement,
treasurer Robert Nixon announced
that basic operating grants would
increase by four per cent for the
next two years, and would be supplemented in 86-87 by an $80
million excellence fund.
Of the $80 million, universities
will get $63.5 million; $50 million
for research, faculty renewal and
library improvements and $13.5
million for purchasing new
buildings and equipment and
repairing the old.
Ontario's 22 community colleges
will get the remaining 16.5 million.
Of that, $10 million will be for high
technology teaching equipment,
and $6.5 million for repairs. Colleges will also receive a regular
capital allocation of $8.5 million.
Universities will get $10.5 million in
normal capital funding.
The four cent basic increase in
funding is lower than 4.4 per cent
inflation rate cast for 1986.
However, Sorbara said the excellence funds would bring next
year's funding increase to more
than eight per cent. Last year the
Conservatives raised post secondary
spending by about five per cent.
In B.C. post-secondary education
funding has decreased.
Sorbara told Canadian University Press that this year's budget is
merely a "first step" in redressing
ten years of underfunding by the
Conservatives.
poll of lower mainland residents,
revealed:
• Two thirds of respondents who
reported voting social credit in 1983
disagreed with the provincial
government decision to cut B.C.
university funding;
• Over 90 per cent of those polled agreed any B.C. resident
qualified to attend university
should be able to attend regardless
of family income;
• Seventy-five per cent said
universities should admit more
students while 77 per cent called for
an increase in the number of programs offered.
UBC interim administration
president Robert Smith said Mon
day he hopes elected officials pay
attention. "The government does
read polls."
"I think it's a very compelling
statement about community support for universities," he said. "I
hope someone out there is
listening."
The 512 person poll should be accurate within four percentage
points, 19 times out of 20.
Ehor Boyahoesky, president of
the Confederation of Faculty
Associations of B.C., which commissioned the poll, said it contradicts provincial government
claims the public is not willing to
pay for more university programs to
greater access to universities.
"The public, the faculty, in fact
the whole province has been sold a
bill of goods," he said.
Universities minister Patrick
McGeer was unavailable for comment Monday and hasn't seen the
poll said his executive assistant,
Jane Burnes.
"The minister thinks that we
have three very fine universities and
it's a top government priority to
continue funding them," said
Burnes.
Smith said the poll result is a nice
introduction for David Strangway,
who replaces Smith as university
president Nov. 1.
"This has got to be a boost for
morale."
NDP leader blasts Socreds
By KAREN GMM
Canadian University Press
The biggest problem facing
British Columbia students is the
high cost of education says Bob
Skelly, NDP opposition leader.
"Tuition fees are high and the
government's financial support
programs are minimal," Skelly
said. "Universities are restricted to
those in the Lower Mainland (Vancouver) or those who are fairly well
off."
Skelly was at the University of
B.C. for MLA Day, an orientation
tour of the campus for members of
the legislature during National
Universities Week.
He said when the Social Credit
government wiped out provinicial
grants for financially strapped
students, they left a lot of students
with heavy debt loads in a time of
high unemployment.
Skelly said one ulitmate goal of
his party is to eliminate tuition for
post secondary education but he is
not prepared to promise it now.
"It's not realistic to get rid of tuition fees immediately," he said.
"We'd have to examine the issue
more carefully. We'd certainly take
steps to reduce the burden of costs
and the quickest way is through a
grant program."
Skelly does however see a solution for rural students who can't afford to move for their education.
"We should equalize costs
depending on where you live. The
government should be involved in
some sort of subsidy for people
from out of town."
Skelly would also like to create
more degree-granting universities in
rural B.C.
He said funding for education is
available now but the government
has other priorities.
"Where did they get the money
for Expo? Where did they get the
money for North East Coal? Where
did they get the money for all the
other mega projects in the province? The money is there," he
said.
But Skelly doubts money alone
will restore the quality of education.
"The problem with a government
systematically chopping programs is
that the system breaks down. I
don't think you can solve problems
by throwing money at the issues."
Careful study must be conducted to
determine priorities, he said.
Explaining why the NDP hadn't
determined their priorities already,
Skelly said his party is committed to
consultation but doesn't have the
money to tour the province
soliciting voter opinions.
One thing the party has determined is the need for broad representation on college and university
boards of directors.
"Right now the government appoints political friends to the college boards so you get a bunch of
yes people."
The NDP would have students,
faculty, administrators, and the
community at large elected to sit on
the board.
Students at UBC believe God exists
God exists at UBC.
That was the conclusion of an informal poll conducted after a
debate between a christian and an
atheist Thursday.
The poll, which was taken after a
debate between Kirk Durstan, for
God, and Mark Reimers, against
God, found that 55 per cent of the
300 hundred people at the debate
KIRK DURSTON . . . christian
believed in the existance of God.
Only 35 per cent supported
Reimer's argument that God
doesn't exist.
"God is a fabrication of
humankind's desire to control the
universe," he said.
"Christianity is based on a lack
of imagination. The word "God"
puts a cap on all the mysteries of
life, and I don't want to do that."
Durston, a member of the Campus Crusade for Christ, and a
believer, said even atheists believe
in God on a sub-conscious level.
"Every atheist believes that God
exists, at least subconsciously . . .
he just doesn't like the way God is
handling things and would do it differently himself," he said.
Audience reaction to the aural
joust was mixed.
Maureen Kinahan, Arts 3, and a'
MARK REIMERS . . . atheist
christian,  said  Durstan   won  the
debate hands down.
"Well, the atheist didn't prove
that God doesn't exist," she said.
But Mary Register, from the
school of nursing, disagreed saying
"the onus was on (Durstan) to
prove that God exists."
"There was strong sense of ser-
monism. Durstan used only the bible in presenting evidence."
•tar Wars program unreliable and unrealistic
By MAC GINTHER
The U.S. military industrial complex cannot be
trusted to give reliable opinions on the feasibility of the
Star Wars initiative, a former congressional advisor on
the program said Friday.
David Parnas, an expert in military software
engineering and a University of Victoria computer
science professor said the advertised goals of the
Strategic Defense Initiative cannot be achieved and
companies involved with the project only see the program as a funding source.
"I can tell you, as one who likes both money and
technical challenges, that these temptations are very
hard to resist. You will find it very hard to find unbiased expert opinions on this issue," he said.
Parnas made the comments to more than 400 people
in his lecture: Software Constraints on Star Wars:
Why Star Wars Won't Work.
The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization is
looking to new software techniques for "a magic
breakthrough" that will solve the problems the project
faces he said adding this was a "wish dream" of
military programmers.
"The SDIO reaction (to criticism) has not been to
enter into a legitimate scientific debate but to try to
confuse the public," said Parnas.
Software techniques which the SDIO is turning to
such as Artificial Intelligence, new computing
languages and module hierarchically structured programs are not sophisticated enough to overcome basic
limitations needed to construct the project he said.
Parnas cited several reasons why SDIO software can
never be made reliable:
• The U.S. lacks reliabe information on the target
and decoy missiles characteristics.
• The distributed computing system proposed by
the SDIO cannot work with unreliable computing
notes and communication.
• SDIO software because of its proportions cannot
be validated mathematically or in case analysis.
• SDIO software can never be tested extensively or
in a realistic situation.
"We've never gotten the softwear to be right the
first time before, it is very unlikely to be so here (in
SDIO software), Parnas said adding SDIO can only be
beneficial if we have confidence in it.
Parnas said a viable SDIO project is not impossible
but, "it is impossible that we know that it would
work." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29, 1985
The magic monarchy
If you were a monarch and nearly 80 per cent of your
subjects disagreed with post secondary education funding cutbacks, would you still be slashing university
budgets?
The Socreds have cut university funding by 23 per
cent in real terms over the past three years but a recent
survey by B.C. faculty associations shows nearly 80
per cent of the people don't like that.
King Billy used polls to develop his asshole image,
smearing the weak into the ground with an arrogant
claim that opinion was on his side.
Well here's a survey showing people across B.C.
have some pretty positive sentiments about universities.
Half of them are even willing to pay more taxes to
see universities funded properly. The overwhelming
majority say family income shouldn't decide whether
you attend university.
The funding cuts to universities stand for the record
— faculty members and staff haven't had a salary increase since 1982; UBC faculty haven't even had a
penny to recognize academic achievement. And student aid has been chopped down to a loan programme. This reduction makes a mockery of any
claims university attendance has nothing to do with
how much money your parents make. How many
young people could possibly want to leave university
with a $25,000 debt?
There are other examples of the squeeze on universities and students, such as mushrooming tuition fees,
but the point about neglect of post secondary education still stands.
If the Socreds have any committment to a civilized,
productive future for British Columbia, they will heed
this poll which shows that their subjects support
universities and easy accessibility to these universities.
Letters
Trinity Western defends itself
It's unfortunate that Karen
Gram's article about Trinity
Western University (critics scoff at
Bible college) has been released
through your pages and Canadian
University Press with many major
factual errors, when accurate information was available with a simple
phone call. It's not even long
distance to Langley from West
Point Grey.
The concept of a Christian
university is not generally
understood in Canada, because we
have not had many of them in this
country in recent years — although
some, such as Acadia, McMaster,
Waterloo Lutheran and several
Catholic colleges have made valuable contributions to higher education in Canada.
They are an accepted and
respected part of higher education
in the United States: almost every
major city has at least one.
It's really a continuation of tradition: the world's great universities
were originally Christian institutions. Consider Heidelberg, Cambridge, Oxford, Harvard, Yale . . .
all began with solidly biblical foundations.
The Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada has
welcomed Trinity Western after a
careful scrutiny of its academic
standards, which were found to be
uniformly high, meeting or exceeding every requirement of
AUCC.
The growth of a new Christian
university on Canadian soil, in fact,
represents a broadening of educational options for Canadians — a
real step forward in intellectual
freedom.
Please allow me to correct some
specific errors of fact in Gram's
story:
♦She calls Trinity Western a "Bible college," which it never was.
For 15 years TW was a junior college, supplying transfer students to
the public universities (where, by
the way, they constantly outperformed those universities' own
lower-level students in third and
fourth year studies.)
*She says TWU "became a
university last June."
Not so.
Trinity Western has been
chartered to grant baccalaureate
degrees for six years. The name
change in June only recognized this
fact.
*Gram writes, "opposition still
rankles."
What opposition? The bill changing Trinity Western's name was
passed by the B.C. legislature
without dissent.
Political opposition to any additional private universities in B.C. is
a matter of party policy, and has
nothing to do with Trinity Western.
Neither has the so-called "opposition"    from   the   Universities
Council of B.C., whose chair,
George Morfitt, has made it clear
that UCBC recognizes TWU's high
academic quality.
*Lorne Nicholson may find it objectionable that TWU stresses self-
discipline; that's his opinion, and
he has a right to it. But our students
aren't coerced. They prefer an environment free of drugs, alcohol
and promiscuity — some from
religious convictions, some because
they're seeking an environment
that's conducive to serious study.
But all by free choice. Since when is
that "stultifying?"
*TWU does not offer "what it
calls Christian Liberal Arts."
TWU offers recognized — by
UBC, among others — liberal arts
and sciences programs. That they
are equivalent in value to those
taught at public universities is attested    by    the    articulation
im
agreements with the publicly-
funded universities, and by the
achievements of our graduates in
careers and at graduate schools, into which they are readily accepted.
You may not agree with the
world-view that informs teaching at
TWU; but it would violate intellectual honesty to reject, without an
honest examination of the primary
data, its right to ensure the presentation of a biblical perspective.
Perhaps the most jejune aspect of
the Ubyssey story was the headline:
'Critics scoff at Bible college.'
What makes a critic? Merely a
prejudice and a penchant for scorn?
Who are these so-called "critics"?
TWU has been evaluated by its
pers — including UBC — and
found to be of high academic standard. Ron Gray
Director of Publications
Trinity Western University
m UBC
BARGAIN
BOUTIQUE
Oct. 29-Nov. 1
MAIN CONCOURSE
228-2348
im:
PIE & ICE CREAM, ON US!
COME AND LISTEN TO OUR OPINION, AND
AND THEN GIVE US YOURS!
"MOST PEOPLE REJECT THE CHRISTIAN FAITH WITHOUT EXAMINING
THE EVIDENCE AS AN ADULT."
TOPICS:
• HAS CHRISTIANITY EVER DONE THE WORLD ANY
GOOD?
• IS HUMANISM A THINKABLE ALTERNATIVE?
Open Forum Discussions at "The Fireside Room" on
Saturday, November 2, 9, 16, and 23 from 7:30 to 9:30 P.M.
at UNIVERSITY CHAPEL (a non-denominational Christian
Church) 5375 University Boulevard
JUST A FEW BLOCKS FROM THE VILLAGE
THE UBYSSEY
October 29, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Happy birthday!" screamed Stephen Wisenthal into Debbie Lo's ear. "AaaaarrrggghHM" shrieked
Debbie. Ronald Stewart asked, "So how OLD are you?" Gordon Clarke spoke, "Yeah, I've got a five-
spot riding on it." Gordana Rasic, Steve Woo and James Young were busy playing Trivial Pursuit.
Sleeping on the couch was Camille Dionne. Hold it! What's Mac Gither doing on top of her? "Outta the
way!" screamed Karen Gram, Nancy Lee and Nick what's-his-name as they raced around the office on
their souped-up office chairs. Wait! We don't have any office chairs!
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDAYS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
/
for men & women
Hi-Lights
agggtsiss^^'    -Vifc\ffiL*i
Women: 29.95
Men: 19.95
Our basic cut still 6.95
3621 W. 4th Ave., Van. 733-3831 Tuesday, October 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
+• pr»c
Wrong time for union threats
I'm angry. I just read that UBC's
Canadian University Employees
Union voted to work to rule until
they get a guarantee of job security
from the administration. Is it really
fair that this union threaten the administration in the midst of one of
the most serious economic crises
this university has had to face in its
history?
The cost of going to UBC has
jumped at least 70% for those
students who live outside the Vancouver area. The administration is
forced to operate on a budget not
finalized until long after the fiscal
year begins. This year, the Socreds
tried to slip by what they hoped
would appear to be a nominal increase (0.6%) in spending on the
universities; the allocation actually
resulted in a decrease of the operations budget by 4.5% — a whopping 14.9 million dollars. Couple
that with four years of cutbacks and
it's evident that this institution is in
serious trouble.
In fact, a recent province-wide
poll indicates that more than three
forths of those questioned disapprove of the Social Credit policy of
reducing university funding.
The desires of the voters and taxpayers have fallen on deaf ears,
however, and Victoria refuses to
reverse its destructive policies. It
seems everyone knows that UBC is
in economic dire straits — except
the union in question.
Now is the time to make the
necessary structural changes in the
university's  operations  to  protect
Arts 20 relay
huge success
Thank you to all of the people
who were involved in planning the
'Arts 20 Relay' for a fabulous social
sports activity.
I have been very impressed with
all of the intramural activities — the
Arts 20 was no exception.
Everything from pre-registration,
to bus transportation, to the muffins and coffee (to warm our wet
but not dampened enthusiasm) at
the Awards Ceremony was very well
organized.
Thanks, I had a great time!
Sue Caven
physical education
what is its 'raison d'etre' — us, the
students.
Students are finding this university is just not living up to its reputation as one of the most respected in
the world. Professors are beginning
to leave to higher salaries in other
provinces or south of the border,
and those lost to attrition are not
being replaced. Classes are becoming too large, equipment is becoming too old, and resources are
becoming more and more scarce as
the squeeze tightens.
That's why, when I see three
union men, a backhoe and a dump-
truck "cooperating" to rake leaves,
for example, I can say with conviction that there are inefficiencies in
the system.
Anyone who has been here long
enough has seen ample evidence of
that. Superfluous and inessential
jobs must be eliminated or workers
reallocated if this university is to
survive. The loss of essential
courses in the core programs is just
not acceptable.
The quality of our education is
suffering here and now, and the
union had better come to grips with
this fact. The union should
cooperate with the representatives
of the firm hired to do an efficiency
study — not be blatantly hostile and
difficult. The study is for their own
benefit as well as for those they are
really working for — the children of
this province who someday may
want to attend their university.
Steve McJannet
science 4
College
Pro®
earn more
than money
next summer.
SEMINAR NOV 5
HENRY ANGUS
ROOM 213
12:30-2:00
College Pro®
Success Breeds Success.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
MARGARET A TWOOD
Margaret Atwood, one of Canada's most well-known literary figures, has
established an international visibility for Canadian literature in her role as poet,
novelist, playwright, essayist, editor and critic. Ms. Atwood was best known in
her early career as a poet, with the works Double Persephone (1961), The Circle
Game (1966), which won a Governor General's Award, The Animals in That
Country (1968), The Journals of Susanna Moodie (1970), Procedures for
Underground (1970) and Power Politics (1971). In 1969 she published the novel
The Edible Woman, and in 1972 both the novel Surfacing and Survival, an
original critical survey of Canadian literature. Her latest works include Bodily
Harm, Second Words, Bluebeard's Egg, Interlunar and Murder in the Dark.
Ms. Atwood has received Canadian, American and international awards for her
literary achievements.
Friday, November 1—12:30 p.m.
"After SURVIVAL"
—In Frederic Wood Theatre
Saturday, November 2—8:15 p.m. Vancouver Institute Lecture
"Blood and Thunder"
—Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre
Th* truth •omMiffiM hurta. Tak* my mothw. Pimm, i und to bnt har whan I waa ■child.
Or did I dream It?
Hay. Dan, my clgarattaa malty aucfc — what brand do YOU oftand aaHrigtitaou* Ubyaaay
ttaffara with? Ware not marrlad to it. Mg guy. Let'* run It up th* flagpola and aa* if anyone
mlute*.
-J^-
^
Tues., Oct. 29
Talmud Study—11:30 a.m.
Hebrew Current Events Reading
Group—11:30
THE YOM KIPPUR
SCAPEGOAT — A Metaphor for
an Integrated Personality — talk
by Rabbi Daniel Siegel—12:30
Hot Lunch—12:30
Wed., Oct. 30
Dinner—5:30-7:00 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 31
Torah Study—11:30 a.m.
Network   Seminar   on   International Terrorism with  Prof.  K.
Holsti   &  Moshe   Ronen—12:30
BUCH A202.
Remember Holocaust Awareness
Day on Thursday, Nov  7
T7~
*-
(fjb CO-OP OUTDOOR
GEAR SWAP
qg?
Want to sell those hiking boots that
never really were your size? Buy the
gear you need to try Telemarking or
winter camping ?
The Co-op's 1st Fall Outdoor
Gear Swap is the answer. Call
872-7858 for more details. P.S. you
don't have to be a Co-op member
to participate.
Win a
Pentax
Telescope
When you come to the Gear ^^M cK HDA«MX
Swap be sure to enter to win a new M^^M CVafUIPIVIcNT
Pentax 15X Telescope to be given ^HHH CO"OP
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear Ppar Swan
Swap. No purchase necessary to ,«„„    nnu
wm. Telescope is courtesy of     Sunday, November 3, 10am-3*m
Pentax Canada Inc. 428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
ruBC bookstore"1
Author   Appearance
Margaret Atwood
The
Handmaid's Tale
MARGARET ATWOOD
Novelist and Poet
will be autographing copies of her new novel
THE HANDMAID'S TALE
at the UBC BOOKSTORE on Thursday,
Oct 31 from 12:30 - 1:00 p.m.
To reserve your copy call 228-4741.
Use Visa or Mastercard ($22.95)
BOOKSTORE Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29, 1985
TODAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorial assistance, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Brock Halt.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY UBC
Drop-in practice, 7 p.m., Aquatic Centre.
GAMMA PHI BETA SOCIETY
Fashion show, 7:30 p.m., Robson Square Media
Centre Theatre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Fall registration, noon, SUB 208.
JSA/HILLEL
Talmud Study, Hebrew Current Events Reading
Group, 11:30 a.m., Hillel House.
JSA/HILLEL
Rabbi Daniel Siegel,  talk,  noon,  Hillel House.
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
UBC WIND SURFING CLUB
Join the club! Office open noon, SUB 57.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture  on  Immunology  by  Dr.   Tingle,   noon,
Woodward 2.
WEDNESDAY
PSEUDO INTELLECTUAL STUDENT SOCIETY
General meeting, election, noon, SUB 212.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Discussion and video, noon, BUCH B212.
DEPT. OF GERMANIC STUDIES
Movie, noon, BUCH A106.
FILM SOCIETY
"Magick  Lantern  Cycle",  7:30 p.m.  and 9:30
p.m., SUB Auditorium.
PHILOSOPHY DISCUSSION CIRCLE
Kutt Preinberg speaks, 7 p.m., Gate 4 Lounge,
International House.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
General  meeting,  T.A.  Union office,   upstairs,
noon, the Armouries.
INTEGRITY INACTION CLUB
Guess speaker  Stan   Grindstaff,   noon,   BUCH
B221
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics:    1    hour   exercise   done   to   music,
5:30-6:30 p.m., SUB BSMT. I.
JSA/HILLEL
Dinner, 5:30-7 p.m., Hillel House.
JEWISH BELIEVERS IN CHRIST
Bible study, noon. Hut 0.21, behind Scarfe.
DEPARTMENT OF GERMANIC STUDIES
Film "Fact and Fiction: Thomas Mann's Death in
Venice", noon, BUCH A106.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General   meeting,   everyone   welcome,   noon,
HEBB 12.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship. 7:30 p.m., 1B68 Knox
Rd.
FIRST YEAR STUDENT'S COMMITTEE
General committee meeting, noon, SUB 260.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:  "Return of the Jedi",  $2, 7 p.m.,  SUB
Auditorium.   Film:   "Gremlins",   $2,  9:30 p.m.,
SUB Auditorium.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet Jazz de Montreal, lecture/.demonstration,
noon, SUB Auditorium.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting: Charles Jones on "Principles of
Dynamic Leadership", noon, Brock 302.
Aboriginal Peoples and the Law,
sponsored by the Native Law Programme in Lecture theatre 101/102
at 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Nov. 1, Professor Michael Jackson of UBC —
overview and update on hunting
and fishing cases; Nov. 5, Mr. Jack
Woodward, lawyer, Meares Island
— taxation and its affects on indian
people; Nov. 8, Mr. Wayne Christian, chief counsellor Spallumcheen
— the band experience in developing and using a band by-law to deal
with child welfare; Nov. 12, Tom
Berger, lawyer, previous B.C.
Supreme Court judge — Alaska
land claims commission work.
Shades of Orwell ...
The biggest dallies
might have colour cartoons of Nancy and
fTlary Worth, but they
wouldn't give you this.
For free yet.
Karen Gram, B.C.
bureau chief and
fieldworker for Canadian University Press,
will present a seminar,
"The Politics of
Language", on
Wednesday, Nov. 6 at
noon in SUB 241K.
nil Ubyssey staffers
and prospective Journalist types welcome.
We need news and
feature writers,
graphic artists,
photographers and
that rare breed willing
to help put the paper
to bed in the wee
hours.
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Jubilee meeting, noon, HA 328.
AMS PROGRAMS
Les    Ballet   Jazz   de    Montreal   in   a   lec-
ture/demonstation, noon, SUB Auditorium.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Free   video   showing:    "What's   Up   Josh?",
everyone welcome, noon, Scarfe 209.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Bronze class, noon, SUB Ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Noon hour meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr.   Johnson's  lecture on  prosthedontics  and
club origin, noon, IRC 5.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Film: "A Sense Of Family", noo, SUB 125.
STAMMTISCH
German conversation evening, 7:30 p.m.. Gate 4
lounge, International House.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Bzzr garden and anti-authoritarian films, 6 p.m.,
SUB 212.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Slide show and presentation on south Moresby
by John Broadhead, noon, geography 212.
AMS ROCKERS
Office decorating and  newsletters,  noon,  SUB
241B.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Halloween   costume   dance,   8   p.m. 1   a.m..
Graduate Student Centre ballroom.
The University of British Columbia
MBA
Information Session
Thursday, November 7, 1985
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Henry Angus Building
Room 425
Speaker: Dr. Bernhard Schwab
There will be a brief formal presentation followed by a question and
answer period
PUBLIC SEMINAR
INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM
DR. K. HOLSTI (Political Science)
MR. MOSHE RONEN
(North American President Network)
Thursday, October 31, 1985
12:30 p.m.
BUCHANAN A202
Network
CANADA
*
TELEVISION
Join us ror a
live audience taping 01
Downtown Saturday Night
starring Pat Bullard!
You'll get
rock music, real guests,
mega comedy, dumb
contests, silly prizes
and a talking host.
Tickets are Free!!
(Tax included.)
For this good time call
662-6603-or visit
CBC Reception at
700 Hamilton Street.
f)(Ht)$® is broadcast
SATU R D AY   SaturtWsat930pm,
IH'G'HT      CBC2/CaUe3,ij||;,
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Halloween costume dinner (pot-luck), 5 p.m. at
Trish and Ti's, see notice on club door.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
HEBB 12.
NETWORK
International terrorism panel with prof. K. Holsti
and Moshe Ronen, noon, BUCH A202.
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER SCREEN
"Libel"  starring  Dirk  Bogarde, $2,  noon,  Law
Building 101 and 102.
FRIDAY
FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Return of the Jedi", $2, 7 p.m., SUB
Auditorium. Film: "Gremlins", $2, 9:30 p.m.,
SUB Auditorium.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
208
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
New NFB film:  "Speaking Our Peace", noon,
SUB 206.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Bzzr garden and film showing, 6 p.m. 12 a.m.,
SUB 212.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Noon hour meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
NATIONAL LAW PROGRAMME
Series   of   law   lectures,    noon,    Curtis    Law
Building 101-102.
*THE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50; Additional lines 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
LOOSEN UP!
Free Public Lecture
STAN GR1NDSTAFF
producer/director/actor
Counselor in the art of
creative living
on
FREEING YOUR
CREATIVE NATURE
Wed., Oct. 30
Buch B 221
12:30-1:20
11 - FOR SALE - Private
HOMEMADE KING SZ. bed, Sealy mattress
very comfy, $100. Framed dresser mirror,
2'x3', $20. Moving Oct. 31st, must sell.
228-2022, 738-7514 (leave message).
'72 CHEV VAN. Very good cond., insulated,
radial snows, great ski van, bed. Rodger,
734-2977. $1250 obo.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
38th & Cambie. 321-4809.
SAXAPHONE LESSONS. Beginner to advanced. Reasonable rates. Professional
musician. Ph. John, 687-3003.
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Experienced, caring, energetic
babysitter, part-time, 8-4 p.m. for 18 mth.
old. My home Kits. 736-0572.
THE AMS FOOD & BEVERAGE Dept. is
now accepting applications & resumes for
the following positions: waiters/waitresses,
cashiers, doormen & cooks. Pick up applic.
forms at AMS Business Office, Rm. 266.
Return application AND resumes to Rm
266.
Success Breeds Success
College Pro Painters
Manager Recruiting
Presentation
Nov. 5 & Nov. 19
12:30-2 p.m.
Henry Angus Bldg.
Rm. 213
Earn More Than
Experience Next Year
35 - LOST
LOST: One Manila envelope (8x10). Mailed
to MSP (Pharmacare). Very important.
Phone: 228-9568 Pleasel
OPAL RING on Thurs., Oct. 17 in women's change rm. Aquatic Centre near locker
No. 76. Sentimental. Please return to
Aquatic Centre main desk.
65 - SCANDALS
GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN! Guys
tool So for a good time, call VOLUNTEER
CONNECTIONS at 228-3811 or come to
Brock Hall 200.
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
PEOPLE WITH IBM main frame, TSO,
Wylbur, JCL, VSAM files,
IMS/DB/DC/ADF call 294-6158 for contract work starting a.s.a.p.
DOUBLE DATE
ADVENTUROUS! Discover Doubledate.
You & a
friend, with someone else
£f a
friend. A
friendly foursome having
fun.
Hot  Air
3allooning,  Texas  BBQs,
Boat
Cruises.
736-4444
80 - TUTORING
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.!9:30 p.m.
SUB Main Concourse
Phone 228-3777
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Theses
rate, $1.50/dbF. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
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(5-7 p.m.). Tuesday, October 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Men's soccer team win west championship
By STEVE NEUFIELD
For the second year in a row, the
UBC men's soccer team won the
Canada West championship on the
weekend. On Saturday, the
Thunderbirds will play the Lauren-
tian University Vees — the Ontario
champions — at 2 p.m. on O. J.
Field by the traffic and security
building.
Friday's action on a snow-
covered field in Calgary began with
a Dinosaur goal at the 20-minute
mark. 'Birds' coach Joe Johnson's
substitution of Ken Moysiuk late in
the half paid off when Moysiuk
evened the score before half time.
Although the score remained tied
throughout the second half, the icy
field conditions provided plenty of
scoring opportunities that neither
team was able to capitalize on.
On Saturday, once again
substitute  players  provided  goals
UBC socs it to U of A
This weekend the UBC women's
soccer team fought to the end for
their third straight Canada West
Championship. Friday, against the
University of Alberta, Debbie
Nielsen from the 'Birds scored two
quick goals putting UBC in the lead
at the start. A goal from a controversial penalty kick near half-
time resulted in U of A getting back
in the fight. Despite strong winds in
the second half, UBC held Alberta
to the 2-1 final score.
Saturday's games proved to be
just as gruelling. In the morning,
Irene Cultum, Debbie Nielsen, and
Shiela Chondon scored for UBC in
a 3-1 triumph over Saskatchewan's
Huskiettes. In the final game
against University of Calgary Din-
nies, the 'Birds drew 0-0.
UBC's record of 2-0-1 captured
for them the championship while
Calgary and Alberta were 1-1-1 and
Saskatchewan placed last at 0-2-1.
An all-star team was chosen this
year, with three of UBC's squad
sharing the honors.  Chosen  were
X-country team
places second
on weekend
By JOEL SILVERMAN
Finishing second behind former
Olympic athlete Peter Butler,
UBC's Ed Booth established
himself as one of B.C.'s best
distance runners at the B.C. crosscountry championships in Victoria
Saturday.
With his impressive performance,
the UBC men's team claimed second place in team competition.
Booth's time for the 10-kilometre
course was 31:16 seconds, well off
his personal best of 30 minutes flat.
Booth's coach, Dr. Doug Clement said: "Ed's time today is a
good indication that we will likely
see a new PB (personal best) for Ed
over this distance when we get into
the road-racing season." When asked how he expects Booth to do at
the Canada West meet next week,
Clement said, "As Ed has shown
great consistency in his racing, I
look for him to do very, very well."
The men's team was brought up
by Eoin Fahy with a time of 33:06,
Larry Nightengale at 33:39, Joel
Silverman at 34:43 and John
Newlands posting 34:48 for the
race.
The women's five-kilometre
course was led for much of the way
by UBC's Sue Kainuleinen. As
Canada's seventh ranked women
marathon runner Kainuleinen has
some problem matching the other
women's speed over the final
kilometre of this relatively short
course. She hung on for a seventh
place finish in 18:32. By finishing
third with a time of 18:52 in the
women's junior event, Fredrique
Schmidt of UBC qualified herself
for the Canadian cross-country
championships to be held in Newfoundland in two weeks. Also competing for the Birds were Cara Haf-
fenden and Sharon Keogh,
After sipping champagne from
the team trophy, Booth said: "This
trophy will be a nice addition to the
team's trophy case."
striker Debbie Nielsen, with three
out of the Bird's five goals, hardworking midfielder Sarah James,
and the UBC goalkeeper, Sandra
Neill.
for the 'Birds, leading to a 3-0
defeat of the Lethbridge
Pronghorns. Jonathan Pirie opened
UBC scoring in the first half shortly
after entering the game. In the second half, Sean McLaughlin, who
had been ill, scored to provide the
margin of victory.
The Thunderbirds had many
good chances in the second half including a booming effort by Brian
Muldoon off the crossbar and
Kevin Reilly's rebound shot also
hitting off the crossbar. Terry Klim
added the final point on a penalty
k.ck.
In the nets, Brian Kennedy turned in another sterling performance
to record his sixth shutout this
season. Kennedy's goaltending
skills  deserve  credit   for  this ex-
FOR VERY BEST
SANDWICHES
ALSO
Homemade Fresh
Meat & Veg. Samosas,
Cornish Pastry, and
Chicken Pies
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Applications
are now
being accepted for
five (5) positions with the
STUDENT
ADMINISTRATION
COMMISSION
(SAC)
SAC is the 10 member body of the AMS
responsible for implementing policy set
forth by AMS Students' Council.
Applications open until Thursday, Oct. 29, 4 p.m.
Application forms available/returned at SUB 238
j\     The Vancouver Symphony presents
the great English guitarist and lutenist
JULIAN BREAM
(by arrangement with Harold Shaw)
"Mr. Bream scarcely needs more praise at this point for he has won all
the encomiums in the book and still deserves them..." --New York Times
in concert at
THE ORPHEUM
Tuesday, November 12 at 8 p.m.
Tickets:       $20       $16       $12
NOW! At all VTC and CBO outlets, Eaton's and Woodward's
CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444 E*,SM»^,dv«
(VTC and Orpheum surcharges applicable) •"" P .
cellent defensive record but the
deep defender trio of Terry Klim,
Gregor Young and Grant Harlow
must receive some recognition for
their efforts all season long.
Looking ahead to this Saturday's
national semi-final game, coach
Johnson expressed concern over the
health of his team after some pretty
rough play in Alberta.
"We still have a few people hurting and we'll have to see how to
respond to treatment before we
issue our starting lineup for Saturday," he said.
FINAL
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
Team
GP G
W
L   FA Pts
UBC
10   6
0
4 29   4 16
Victoria
10   6
2
2 22 14 14
Alberta
10   6
2
2 19 10 14
Calgary
10   5
3
2 20 13 12
Lethbridge
10    1
9
0   9 32   2
Sask.
10   1
9
0   7 36   2
Free pumpkin give-away!
On Friday, Oct. 31, the Great
Pumpkin Fun Run (3 km or 5.2 km)
will start at 12:30 p.m. Last year's
winners were: Women— Carolyn
Daubeny (P.E.) (3 km) and Marian
Craig (P.E.) (5.2 km); Men - John
Buckley (P.E.) (3 km) and Steve
McMurdo (Phi Delts) (5.2 km).
Dress up in your scariest costume
and get the spirit of Hallow's Eve!
You just might even win a great
pumpkin!
-&
Tres Hombres were voted best band
at the COCA '85 Conference
COSTUME CONTEST
$100.00 1st Prize Each Night
Advance Tickets: $6.00       Doors: 7:30
AMS Box Office or EUS Rep.
kinko's
kinko's copies
5706 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
IN THE VILLAGE Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
* # *     4Jf.x ¥• ~^* Tuesday, October 29, 1985
ASTROLOGY*
The Blueprint of the Soul
By GORDANA RASIC and
RONALD STEWART
"So what's your sign?"
This astrological phrase, one
of the most cliched come-
ons commonly used in
local bars unfortunately denegrates
a field based on thousands of years
of scientific observation to a
frivolous conversation starter.
If you are like most people you
probably know what astrological
sign you were born under. You
might also know a bit about what
that means and even what your rising sign is. But like most people you
have probably also felt rather skeptical about the whole topic.
One Vancouver astrologer, Dennis MacMillan, has been practicing
astrology professionally for 10
years. He says he began "out of
curiosity." What started as the simple glancing at an astrology book
while standing in line for a movie
became a life-long obsession for
him.
MacMillan's clients come from
Asia, Europe and North America.
He says he does not advertise his
service but his clients "come to
him." He also prefers his clients to
be skeptical rather than fanatical
about astrology.
"Otherwise they tend to be gullible and it shows they are not thinking," he says.
Why   then   should   one   accept
astrology? "Basically because it
works," says MacMillan.
"Astrology is a fact and it will work
whether you believe in it or not."
He strongly emphasizes astrology is
not a belief system: "A great
number of people do not believe in
income tax, but they make a point
to learn about it because it can be
very useful to them."
Sandy Hughes, a Surrey
astrologer and past president for
three years of the Surrey
astrological group Universal
Search, agrees with MacMillan that
astrology can be very useful.
"Astrology is not a belief system,
it's a tool — a symbol system for
understanding our reality," she
says.
Astrology involves much more
than simply looking up your daily
horoscope in the newspaper. To
construct an accurate, individual
horoscope, an astrologer needs
your time, date, and place of birth.
Your date of birth indicates your
sun sign, that is whether your a
Pisces, Taurus, etc. The time and
place of one's birth show the position of the horizon (what sign and
planet are rising; this may affect
one's personality as much as the sun
sign.
Hughes says sun sign astrology is
only one small part of astrology.
The sun sign defines the core of
one's personality; it may indicate
one's purpose, needs, and individual energy. Its importance in a
horoscope can vary from person to
person.
For example, if a person was
born Feb. 26, 1968, in Vancouver,
at 11:05 p.m., their sun sign would
be Pisces with a rising sun of Scorpio. In addition, moon and planets
(Venus and Mercury), would all be
in Aquarius. All these elements
together show strong humanitarian
characteristics, kindenss, sensitivity
and artist abilities. These
characteristics could all not be
found in the simple knowledge of
Pisces sun-sign and Scorpio rising.
When doing a birth-chart one also
looks for recurring themes of
characteristics.
Other elements, such as the rising
sign, the planetary positions, and
their relations to each other, must
be included in the make-up of a
horoscope or natal chart. These individualize and separate one from
other members of one's sun sign;
they can make the difference between a conservative Capricorn and
a flamboyant one. They are also
what   can   make  individual  natal
charts frighteningly accurate.
Astrologers can also use the
movement of the planets, and their
relations to their original positions,
to predict the life cycles and trends
of an individual. However,
astologers are not fortune-tellers;
their predictions can mean different
things to different people. For example, a knowledgeable astrologer
will never predict a person's death,
because it can mean any number of
things: a period of inactivity, a
radical change of lifestyle, a time of
bad health, the death of someone
close.
One's free-will and upbringing
must be taken into account as well.
Dennis MacMillan says, "the chart
indicates possibilities; the chart is a
lot like DNA — it determines what
you are, but your environment and
the conditioning you receive can affect or even disguise your true personality."
People often use astrology to
reveal their true personality, which
Hughes and MacMillan both say
has many practical applications.
"Not many people who come to me
are just curious," said Hughes,
"they have specific problems and
decisions to make, usually about
relationships or money."
Astrological analysis of love
relationships is called
synastry. It involves comparison of the couple's birth charts;
the astrologer looks for elements indicating compatibility or possible
problems.
MacMillan says, "couples can
consult me at the beginning of their
relationship to find out about possible future conflicts and how to get
around them."
Astrologers can also help when
problems arise. They can do this by
making suggestions according to
cycles and trends. These suggestions
might include visiting a marriage
counsellor. Astrologers can also
help with financial problems using
the process of synastry in business
partnerships.
One's natal chart can indicate
business opportunities, such as appropriate times for opening one's
own business.
MacMillan's clientele include
many business executives and even
large corporations. A corporation
can be an astrological entity as well
as a legal one, having a birth time,
natal chart, and life cycles and
trends.
Astrology may also be applied to
more individual financial matters
such as money problems, and career
decisions. The horoscope can indicate times for opportunity or for
caution. It can show appropriate
careers or career moves for individuals as well.
Astrology has an endless list of
additional uses: it may indicate the
necessity of a different educational
environment for those who have
difficulties with conventional
systems; it may assist parent/child
relationships; it may predict times
when a drug addict is most open to
therapy; it may even show the
political cycles of a country.
Most of MacMillan's and
Hughes' clients are 25 to 55 years of
age. MacMillan says they are "people who reach a point in their life
when the normal roads to success
are not enough and they are searching for a blending of financial
success and spiritual fulfillment."
If one is interested in having their
natal chart done, prices vary from
20 dollars to 150 dollars. There are
also other things one should be
aware of when consulting an
astrologer. Sandy Hughes says "if
you are looking for a good
astologer, get a recommendation
from someone who has consulted a
helpful one — astrology has its
share of quacks."
One should also be wary of
astrologers who give limited advice.
"If an astrologer gives you a black
and white definition, either get a second opinion or don't take it literally," said Hughes. "Astrology is a
tool which can be used constructively or destructively."
Even astrology has been affected
by computerization. Natal charts
can now be completely constructed
by a computer. This is fine so long
as the actual interpretation is done
by a human, knowledgeable, in
astrology, says Hughes.
If one is interested in learning the
process astrology, it's not a simple
matter. "I spent three years, 10
hours a day, studying astrology
before I began doing professional
charts — it's not something one can
learn quickly," says Dennis MacMillan.
MacMillan also says there is no
substitute for reading. However, he
warns against astrological 'cookbooks', which attempt to teach
astrology in the course of a single
text. "More than one book should
be sued — avoid dogma."
MacMillan recommends Noel
Tyl's series of books, The Process
and Practice of Astrology. You can
also join astrological groups which
often offer classes in the subject.
Scientists, in the past, have
repeatedly tried to discredit
astrology. However, computers are
now being used to vindicate this ancient practice. MacMillan gave the
example of a Parisian science team
which fed the birth-dates, times,
and places of thousands of actors
into a computer.
According to common
astrological theory, all those with
theatrical talent should have a
strong Jupiter influence. The computer results, said MacMillan,
showed these people did have this
common denominator in their birth
charts. The scientists tried the experiment again with different
groups who were supposed to have
similar astrological influences. They
found astrology could not be
disproved using computers this
way.
Experiments like this could not
have been done as easily before the
computer age, and for that reason
computers are actually helping vindicate astrology. Astrologers like
Dennis MacMillan and Sandy
Hughes realize that there are still
myths to be found in astrology but
they welcome their elimination.
When colleagues asked scientist
Sir Isaac Newton why he bothered
with astrology, he answered:
"Gentlemen, 1 have studied the
matter; you have not."

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