UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1986

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127852.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127852.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127852-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127852-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127852-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127852-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127852-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127852-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127852-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127852.ris

Full Text

 UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 13
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 21,1986
228-2301
Turner calls for third voice in B.C.
By JOHN EHINGER
British Columbians "want a party that is beholden to nobody," according to federal Liberal Leader
John Turner who addressed an eager
crowd in SUB auditorium Friday.
"They don't want parties that are
tied to unions or to big business . . .
they want a moderate, commonsen-
sical third voice," said Turner.
Turner began his speech, which
was scheduled as a publicity event
for provincial liberal candidates
Doreen    Braverman    and    Tom
,   - lCl88
Brown,  by  reasserting  his "'close
relationship" with students.
He complained about the under-
funding to education in B.C., and
said "both the provincial and
federal governments have to get
their   heads   together   on   how   to
rescuefihe situation."
"He/» moved quickly to blame
premier Vander Zalm for the problem.
"Mr. Vander Zalm started the
current trend of underfunding,"
said Turner. "I wish I could convince the premier that education is
not a cost to the taxpayer — education is an investment in the province
of British Columbia."
Turner called the Socred's history
of diverting federal funds earmarked for education to other areas a
"disgrace."
Pointing to a UBC report released from the presidents' office
labelled "the engine of recovery,"
which outlines the problems under-
funding has created for the University, Turner continued his condemnation of the Socreds.
"B.C. is the only province in
Canada that has not increased it's
operating grants to the universities'
in the last two years," said Turner,
adding as a result, average faculty
salaries have dropped from the top
third to eighteenth place in Canada.
He criticized UBC's tuition fees
for being higher than any other
university in Canada.
A federal Liberal party would ensure national standards of mobility
of students and accessibility on the
basis of need and merit, said
Turner.
During question period, Turner
was asked if a vote for the provincial liberals would deprive the NDP
of a vote and become a vote for
Socreds.
"1 think the time has arrived for
people to say polarization (between
the NDP and Socreds) has cost us
confidence . . . psychological
serenity . . . investment . . . jobs.
It's held us back," replied Turner.
Colleges suffer
WE SNUCK INTO the rear of the Barn and photographed the top-secret center of Project Moo Book. The CSIS
found this space alien grazing near the rural crash site of a U.F.O. and took it into custody to prevent mass
hysteria. The Aggies are skeptical, but are engaging in secret classified tests — the first attempting to prove that
feeding Ding Dongs to outer space visitors will make them produce chocolate milk.
By JENNIFER LYALL
The College-Institute Educators'
Association has launched a campaign against the Social Credit
government's education policy to
make the public aware of the difficulties faced by education today.
"The future will be grim unless
people recognize that we need more
than smiles and positive thinking
for education," said CIE president
Jplj&^aters.
He said the association's campaign is not so much "anti-Socred"
as it is a campaign to show people
what the record of the provincial
government has been, said Waters.
According to Waters, increased
government involvement in the administration of B.C.'s colleges is
transforming them into "economic
and political tools of the government."
College boards have traditionally
been elected from the community,
but since 1983, they have been made
up entirely of Socred cabinet appointees, who, Waters says, "see
their role as carrying out govern-
Faculty urges discussion on tangible issues
By EVELYN JACOB
UBC's faculty association took
out a quarter page advertisement in
the Sun newspaper to "make our
universities an issue" in tomorrow's
provincial election.
The ad, which appeared in the
Friday and Saturday editions of the
Sun, outlined the problems facing
education in B.C., and urged voters
to ask their candidates' positions on
university funding.
"We (the faculty association), as
does the president's office, feel the
quality of the universities should be
an important issue in the election,"
said faculty association president
Barrie Morrison, who is concerned
that the lack of discussion on
"tangible issues" in the election
undercuts the whole idea of an election.
"If the government refuses to
debate the issues, the people cannot
make a rational choice at election
time," said Morrison.
He said the idea behind the ad
was to make "some contribution"
to promoting debate among the
candidates, but added it is not a
"very realistic hope."
Since the provincial election was
called   September   24,   the   Social
Credit candidates have remained
overwhelmingly silent on education
issues.
Morrison said the candidates
should be asking "what is the role
of the universities."
The ad, which asks "Can B.C.
meet the challenge of increasing national competition with reduced
university budgets?", shows that
while total provincial government
expenditures increased by $2.1
billion in the past four years, funding to the universities' general pur
pose operating budgets decreased
by $29.3 million.
It also indicates that in 1985-86,
the provincial government spent
$66 per student on student aid,
while the national average was $689
per student.
Unregistered will still be able to vote
If you haven't already registered
to vote on October 22, it's not too
late, according to lawyer Mike
Bolton.
"A lot of students don't know
they can register on the same day as
the election," said Bolton.
Students who failed to register
for the provincial election are eligible to vote under section 80 of the
election act which provides for persons who claim not to be on the
voters list.
You must be 19 years of age, a
Canadian citizen, have resided in
Canada for the last 12 months and
in B.C. for the last six months, and
live in the Point Grey area.
If you fall into this category you
can vote providing you present two
pieces of identification at your poll
ing station, one of which must show
your current address.
In a case where a student does not
have I.D. indicating their address,
they may use telephone or Hydro
bills showing proof of residence.
If a student does not have either
of the above, they can sign an af-
fadavit confirming their residence
in Point Grey, or produce a valid
drivers licence or any other I.D.
with a signature and picture,
preferably both.
Bolton said that if students give
'their Point Grey address as temporary, they may not be eligible to
vote in that riding.
He advises students to avoid using the word "temporary" when
registering under section 80 and say
Point Grey is your home instead.
If you have registered in an electoral district other than the one in
which you currently reside, you are
entitled to cast an "absentee"
ballot for the district in which you
are listed. You will be required to
sign an affadavit indicating you are
registered in another electoral
district.
If you are unsure of where you
registered or if you do not
remember if you did, Bolton advises students to invoke section 80,
because province-wide voters lists
are not posted at polling offices.
If you have already registered but
have lost your voters card, you are
still entitled to vote.
Students living on or near campus may vote at University Hill
elementary school, which is located
at 5395 Chancellor Boulevard.
ment policy in their region."
College boards are the final
authority over the financial matters
of the colleges, and determine how
funding will be allocated.
As a result of government policy,
technical and vocational programs
are being funded at the expense of
academic programs because the
cabinet sees them as more
economically valuable, said Waters,
who thinks colleges should remain
"comprehensive intitutions."
"We agree that job preparation is
important, but there are other parts
too," he said. "Our view is that the
colleges are not providing the
courses that the students need but
those that the government wants."
The government also controls the
colleges through the provincial
government's Fund for Excellence
in Education, said Waters.
"You only get an allocation from
the Excellence fund if your project
is approved by cabinet," he said.
The kinds of projects most likely
to receive funding are not necessarily those of the greatest educational
value but those that provide the
greatest economic stimulus for the
community, said Waters, adding
these are legitimate services, but
"funds for education should be used for educational purposes."
College students are also suffering from funding cuts, high tuition
fees, loss of faculty and low participation rates, said Waters.
Andrea Robertson, Langara College student society president,
agreed that B.C.'s colleges are in
trouble. She said since 1981, student fees at Langara have tripled,
library hours have been cut
drastically, and 300 course sections
have been dropped.
Robertson said cuts to academic
programs will hurt college students
who need the prerequisites to continue their studies at a university.
Many students find it more practical to do the first two years of a
bachelors degree at a college
because it is less expensive or closer
to home, said Robertson, but that
decreases in goverment funding cuts
off the access to university for a
lot of people who want to go to college first."
"Colleges were originally designed so more people could get an
education. Now because of cuts,
fewer people/:an attend," she said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1986
Socreds ignore poll
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
A recent poll of three B.C. peace
groups shows that Social Credit
candidates are opposed to declaring
the province a nuclear weapons free
zone and reluctant in addressing the
question of disarmament.
And while premier Bill Vander
Zalm refused to reply to the poll, he
has previously been hostile to local
governments acting on issues of
world peace.
"Although we were grateful that
so many candidates in the provincial election took the time and effort to respond to the poll seriously,
we are disappointed with the poor
response rate from Social Credit
candidates," said Sheena Lambert,
coordinator of the End the Arms
Race Coalition, which organized
the poll along with the Physicians
for Social Responsibility and Project Ploughshares.
Only.four out of 69 Socred candidates, or six per cent of those running, replied to the poll. By contrast, 52 per cent ofthe Liberals and
NDP candidates, and 33 per cent of
Conservatives responded.
The questionnaire asked the candidates if they would support a
declaration by the legislative
assembly that B.C. become a
nuclear weapons free zone, and
urged the federal government to en-
corage the U.S. to join the
U.S.S.R. in a nuclear test
moratorium.
None of the four Social Credit
respondents supported making the
province a nuclear weapons-free
zone, which would prohibit the
manufacure, transport or deployment of such weapons in B.C.
With   the   exception   of   two
TA's fund Third
World unions
OTTAWA (CUP) — Teaching and
research assistants at Carleton
University will donate a penny for
every hour they work to help unions
in Chile and the Phillipines.
Between $2,000 and $2,500 may
be raised, says Doug Kropp, president of Local 2323 of the Canadian
Union of Public Employees, which
represents the Carleton assistants.
The money will be deducted directly
from each of the 900 members' pay
cheques.
The money, which will be forwarded through an international
development fund, will be split and
given equally to the KMU, which is
the May First Movement of the
Phillipines, and the Chilean
Association of Professional
Educators.
Money for the KMU will be used
to employ a full-time labour
organizer and his or her family. In
Chile, the money will be used to
rebuild a communications centre
destroyed by the military.
The decision will not only benefit
worthy causes, Kropp said, "It's an
educational process for us as well."
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Hoary puce Blorgs on this tiny
island kingdom are dropping like
puce ticks, a brief symtomological
run down: Heavin Weasleballs, the
high and dry heaves; Maniacle
Doberman, rabies and PES (post-
Expo Syndrome a horrible affliction that leaves the victim weak
near Alfred Sung leashes and
positively psychotic in the presence
of anything made of goose down or
beaver pelt); Sweatinajar Bomb-
tick, too many REMs
Frankpwnisitis; Moral Dogma,
Sunstroke; Gender Ina Pile, lum-
bagowinnebego; Rabid Vermin, intestinal forthitude; Neverend Day-
job, fish breath.
undecided Liberals, all other candidates said they would declare the
province nuclear weapons free.
But on the second question, excluding one undecided Liberal, all
respondents said they would urge the
federal government to act on the
nuclear test moratorium, which the
Soviet Union initiated last August and
has now extended until Jan. 1, 1987.
Since the Soviet decision, the
U.S. has conducted at least 15
nuclear tests.
Lambert said polling Social
Credit candidates was extremely
frustrating and they refused to state
their position, despite repeated
phone calls — premier Vander
Zalm, for example, was called five
times.
In the past, however, the premier
has opposed municipal disarmament campaigns.
In Oct. 1984, the Province
newspaper reported that Vander
Zalm, who ran unsuccessfully for
Vancouver mayor, criticized city
council for backing a plebiscite on
cruise missile testing and erecting
"useless" nuclear weapons free
zone signs in the city.
"I can't come out publicly
against peace and disarmament
because we know from the peace
march how Vancouverites feel,"
said Vander Zalm, referring to the
annual Walk for Peace, which drew
over 115,000 people that year.
But he added he didn't think it
was a civic responsibility to question cruise missile testing.
And in 1982, Vander Zalm, then
municipal affairs minister in the
provincial government, wrote letters to B.C. communities warning
that individual council members
could end up paying the costs of
plebiscites on nuclear weapons free
zones.
Currently 46 B.C. municipalities,
representing over one-half of the
province's population, have
declared themselves nuclear
weapons-free. There are provincial
campaigns underway for both B.C.
and Ontario to join Manitoba and
the Northwest Territories which
already have nuclear weapons-free
zone status.
YOU CAN VOTE
EVEN IF YOU AREN'T ON
THE VOTER'S LIST!
Many students were unable to register to vote in Point Grey before the
voters list closed.
BUT . . .
YOU CAN VOTE by bringing at least TWO PIECES of IDENTIFICATION to the Polling Station one of which must have your picture
and one which provides some evidence of your residency in the constituency of Point Grey ... a rent receipt, a signed note from your
landlord. University registration documents, a letter addressed to you,
a B.C. Tel or B.C. Hydro bill.
You may be required to swear an affidavit to be able to vote. The Liberal
Party will have a lawyer at the polling place to witness your affidavit
and to advise you.
WHEN YOU VOTE, MAKE IT COUNT FOR HIGHER EDUCATION.
In Vancouver Point Grey VOTE FOR YOUR LIBERAL CANDIDATES
DOREEN BRAVERMAN
DR. TOM BROWN
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.i
pmm*mmwmMmwmmmwwwmmwmmmvvvwvvv—M~
interested in
weight training?
Want to work on those muscles? Come to the
UBC Aquatic Centre. We are offering introductory weight training classes. Classes will be weekly Monday & Wednesday from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Cost: $20 for 4 hours of instruction.
Registration: At front desk of UBC
Aquatic Centre.
Maximum class size: 6 people.
Classes will cover basic concepts, exercises and
techniques with emphasis on using weights effectively and safely. Starts Oct. 27, 1986.
REGISTER NOW!
QXQ2HUIZI]
sxxxxmxxa
3 UBC OFFICE i
AUTOMATION
SHOW
October 22 & 23
SUB Partyroom & 207/209
10 a.m.-4 p.m. — 2nd Floor
228-2348
The new home of the Copy Centre is
\
WITH: DOWNSTAIRS
MORE Coin Operated Machines
MORE Full Service Machines
MORE Services —Binding, Reductions
MORE Card Readers
MORE Operating Hours
BUT Same Great Prices
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LOWER LEVEL
VISA
VISA AND MASTERCHARGE ACCEPTED
228-4388 Tuesday, October 21,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Fringe candidate speaks out
By RICK HIEBERT
The Point Grey candidate for
The People's Front admits he
doesn't think he'll win on Oct. 22,
but considers raising specific issues
his duty.
Al Soroka, a UBC law librarian,
is running for The People's Front
which "stands against both superpowers, against racism and fascism,
and for the democratic rights of the
people."
Founded in 1981, The People's
Front "works for unity between
people, promotes a united opposition to the attacks waged against
the people by the rich and their
government," said Soroka.
He says the other political parties
running in the provincial election
are basically the same.
"Both the Socreds and the NDP,
along with the other parties are parties of the rich. They say the system
just needs a little tinkering," said
Soroka.
"The NDP and the Socreds are
basically the same — they both
want to go into deficits, to finance
projects demanded by the rich. The
only difference is which project gets
the nod."
Soroka complained the NDP is a
"deceptive" party.
"The NDP talk like socialists but
their deeds are the deeds of
capitalism and exploitation. The
NDP sugarcoats its words with false
socialism," he said.
Soroka attacked the NDP's
education policy: "The NDP say
the government should pay for
education, which means our taxes
would go up. We (The People's
Front) say the rich, the users of the
hard-earned education of the
students should pay for it."
Soroka said the sons and
daughters of the rich should pay for
— rory a   photo
A MAN AND his dog. Out for an early morning stroll. But little did they know that this morning would be different. The dog's ears prick up. Something is moving, is alive, out on the athletic field this morning. And it is in
search of human blood . . . (Symphony music blares over the soundtrack and the title flashes on the screen:
Return of The Killer Canteloupes.)
their tuition, the poor's education
should   be   free.   He   added   big
businesses   should   pour   money
made from profits into education.
'The corporations who use you
lemon should pay for your education," said Soroka.
Soroka says he is a Marxist-
Lenninist, but adds you don't have
to  be  one  to  join  the  People's
and toss you aside like a squeezed     Front.
Proposed forum
pleases lobbyists
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal
government's proposed national
forum on post-secondary education
has garnered varying degrees of
praise from the country's major
education lobby groups. In its Oct.
1 Speech from the Throne, the
Mulroney government pledged to
sponsor a forum, "to be held early
next year." No other details have
yet been set, according to Nigel
Chippindale, educational policy
director in the Secretary of State.
The Canadian Federation of
Students, the Canadian Association
of University Teachers, and the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada have all
welcomed the forum. CFS and
CAUT are also advocating a review
of the current federal-provincial
funding arrangement.
"Some sort of national dialogue
needs to take place to more clearly
define the role the federal and provincial governments are going to
have," said CFS chair Tony
Macerollo, adding it is "crucial"
that students are allowed full participation in the forum.
CAUT president Allan Sharp
said if the government is to take the
forum — and thereby funding for
post-secondary education —
seriously, it must recognize two
things.
"One, that they recognize that
universities are crucial to Canada's
future, and two, they realize at long
last that our universities are in
crisis," Sharp said.
Both CFS and CAUT are calling
for genuine discussion and analysis
of education issues. "We know a
conference won't solve the problems of education," said Sharp.
"What we are looking for is
essentially a contract between the
federal and provincial governments," he said.
The AUCC is more reticent. "We
have no official comment yet, other
than we're very happy with what
was mentioned in the throne
speech," said AUCC information
officer Mark Giberson.
Comments from opposition
politicians are far from reserved.
Howard McCurdy, former federal
New Democratic education critic,
said the country's governments are
feigning commitment to education.
"It's extremely tiring to hear
governments give the same non-
solutions to the problems of post-
secondary education year after
year," McCurdy said.
McCurdy questioned the federal
government's motives in calling for
a forum, while it is planning to
severely restrict spending on health
and education through transfer
payments to the provinces.
Liberal critic Roland de Corneille
said he was "not impressed one
fraction" with the throne speech's
comments on post-secondary
education. "And I doubt that
Canadians will be, either," he added.
New evidence in
Barry Mah murder
By VICTOR WONG
Vancouver police believe a UBC
student found murdered last month
may have been with two prostitutes
the night he was assaulted.
Barry Mah, 26, who had been active in UBC's Maranatha Christian
Club, died Sept. 11 of massive head
injuries.
Morgan Gunderson, a police
detective working on Mah's case,
said police believe Mah may have
picked up two prostitutes and accompanied them to the Mount
Pleasant Community Centre parking lot Sept. 9, where he was beaten
to death.
"I don't know why he was there,
or what he was doing there," said
Gunderson. "I understood he was a
Socreds refusal to respond angers CFS
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The Social Credit government's
refusal to respond to a questionnaire on education issues prepared
by the Canadian Federation of
Students is irresponsible, said the
executive officer of the organization's pacific region.
"We contacted post-secondary
education minister Russ Fraser and
he said he would work on it (the
questionnaire). We talked to him
again, sometime around when the
election was called, and his
secretary told us he would be out of
the office for four weeks," said
Steven Scott.
Scott  said the purpose of the
questionnaire was to produce a
four-page tabloid outlining all the
political parties' positions on youth
and educational issues such as
youth employment policy, student
assistance, post-secondary funding,
representation of students on college boards, and services for
students.
Both the Liberals and the NDP
responded to the questionnaire with
firm positions on the minimum
wage, student grants and the
transferring of federal funds earmarked for post-secondary education.
"We basically wanted to present
the people with the information and
let them make up their own minds.
That way they could make an informed decision at election time,"
said Scott.
Both the NDP and Liberals promised to eliminate the differential
youth minimum wage as well as
raise the minimum wage. Both parties said they would reinstate student grants and the Liberals promised to increase provincial funding for education by ten per cent
for three consecutive years.
"The Socreds kept saying they
were going to do it and we kept
waiting until it was too late to do
anything. They really suckered us,"
said Scott.
He claimed he had contacted a
Social Credit policy official but had
been told that answering the questionnaire was too much work.
"He gave me a huge stack of all
the Social Credit party press
releases and told me to go through
them myself," said Scott.
Scott said he had difficulty
understanding the Social Credit's
silence because he was giving them
free publicity to let their viewpoints
be known.
"I am very upset. All political
parties have a responsibility to
make their policies known. The
Social Credit government is trying
to conceal their positions or policies
until after the election," said Scott.
religious person. I guess it doesn't
really fit in with what's known
about him."
Gunderson said Mah was attacked and robbed by a single assailant,
who used a large metal bar.
iGunderson said the assailant was
"large, very scared, very young —
but was unable to give a more
specific description.
"We've been chasing down a lot
of leads, but so far we don't have
any hard suspects," he said.
Keith Coleman, Maranatha
pastor and a close friend of Mah's,
sid the police's case was something
they had been assuming from the
start, "they don't really have
anything concrete at all," he said,
"they don't have enough facts
yet."
Coleman said the police had
earlier been considering two other
theories regarding the circumstances of Mah's death.
Mah's death has been made the
subject of a Crimestoppers television ad. "The police, the papers,
and the tv are trying their best to
find out what did happen, as opposed to what may have happened,"
said Coleman.
Coleman added students at UBC
who knew Mah very well
remembered him as somebody with
a high character.
"To say that he was doing this
when he was killed would really not
be in the best interests of students,"
he said.
Anyone with information that
could be relevant to Mah's death is
asked to call 669-TIPS. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1986
Bruins
in town
On September 24, a general provincial election was called.
The election campaign had kicked off Disney style. The Vander
Zalm smile and handshake were like gold — nobody could refuse it.
Meanwhile, Bob Skelly struggled along under the weight of an
overly critical, Socred sympathetic media, which found it more important to report on his public image problems than his beliefs.
Vander Zalm did everything — everything except debate the issues
which the election should be decided on. Everything was going
very smoothly.
On October 18, the Sun took an opinion poll. It was just like the
results of the opinion poll just before the Socred leadership convention — unexpected. The support of the NDP and Socred parties
differed by a mere five percent. Something had happened. People
had started to remember the Vander Zalm face, and realized that it
was the face of the same man who had started the demoralization
of education and labor. They remembered the mistreatment of
labor that almost escalated into a general strike. They remembered
the cutbacks that still plague education.
As students of this province, we must vote to maintain the value
of our education. The entirety of our lives have been dedicated to
learning. Now that we have made it to university, we cannot afford
to throw it all away, or find that it is meaningless.
As citizens of this province, we must vote to support a party that
will maintain the natural resources of this province that would
otherwise be carelessly exploited.
As humans we must vote to elect a party that will respect and
support our minority groups.
Your thoughtful vote in this election is essential — it will be a
close vote, and the future of B.C. depends on it.
•K /ffbh**^
The Ubyssey retires from polling undecided
I am appalled by the partisan attitude of The Ubyssey toward the
NDP. It is obvious that no Ubyssey
staffer has ever taken any elementary statistics course or has any
common sense. In the poll you took
of some two hundred students in
the SUB, you yourself mentioned
the large number of undecided
voters. Then you go on and subtract
the undecided voters as if they don't
exist and say the NDP will, or at
least your poll shows, win with a
landslide,   or  something  close  to
that. Unfortunately, undecided
voters and those who don't reveal
whom they will vote for are the people who decide which party will
win, especially when this category
accounts for more than 25% of
your poll.
Geer gives gross generalizations
There are times when plain idiocy
and nonsense distort any semblance
of reasonable political discussion.
These occasions more often than
not provoke some response and this
time I am complelled to do so. Jeff
Baturin's Oct. 17 letter "Geer blasts
avant garde NDP" is definitely one
of these times. Such rhetoric and
gross generalizations coming from a
high-schooler may be excused but
not from a supposed senior univesi-
ty student whom Jeff appears to be.
How I wish such good "free-
enterprise anti-socialists" such as
Jeff could come up with some
detailed analytical arguments opposing the New Democratic Party
— perhaps they might expound on
that party's relations with certain
labour unions or that party's stance
on such issues as abortion or fiscal
irresponsibility. But no; for while in
the process of stereotyping about
New Democratic Party members,
Jeff is really performing an exercise
of justifying those deeper values
which he perceives to be threatened
by a New Democratic philosophy.
From my experience, it appears
that such shallow criticisms are
merely a cover for the defence of
such values as the belief in the God
of "Mammon" — of money,
materialism and of the need to succeed and gain prestige. Implicit in
these personal goals are the societies
trends to continually expand —
hence the belief by most British
Columbians that our economy
needs to "grow". On the whole,
New Democrats reject these goals as
absolutes; although not wholly, of
course.
I would ask two things of Jeff: 1)
that he begin to question the validi-
I
THE UBYSSEY
October 21, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and .Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
All The Ubyssey staffers succumbed to poisoned Gorgo and went to Newspaper Hell. Svetozar Kontic was doomed to fit the head, "The Number of the Beast Child is 666" into a one-inch space. Evelyn
Jacob and Jennifer Lyall were writing page one stories at 5:30 a.m. and David Ferman was waiting to
edit them. James Young was writing a masthead with a staff list the size of the Manhattan White
pages and Steve Chan was doomed to proof it. Ross McLaren was doing his three billionth dummy
sheet — the infernal Editor in Chief had changed his mind again. Peter Berlin was translating the work
of staffers who wrote in Sanskrit into the Queen's English while Malcolm Pearson was waiting to
typeset them onto a marble boulder with a dull toothpick. Rick Hiebert thought that he was worst off
— being named editor of the Ruskin Daily Flash, but Victor Wong and Michelle Hartmann were worse
off, being locked in a cell with nothing but Hiebert's columns to read, and a person-eating cockapoo to
pet.
ty of all political perspectives, not
just the ones which threaten his own
comfort. 2) that as a Christian,
(which I believe from other persons
to be true) he question his own
value system so that he may at least
be tolerant of those who are poor
and native and seek greater justice,
and of those who stage demonstrations to seek greater peace. By the
way Jeff, be brave and vote New
Democrat.
Paul Allen
arts 3
The most you can say about your
poll is that it is random (that is you
don't go to a NDP or Socred headquarter and ask the two hundred
odd people there whom they will
vote for). You may even as to be as
bold as claiming that the two
leading parties are neck to neck,
with a margin or error (What is
your margin of error, assuming a
random poll?), but you can never,
never discard those undecided!
Furthermore, so far I have
assumed the randomness of your
poll, but how random is your poll,
actually? What are the backgrounds
of the people you polled? Are they
all students? If they are, then it
should be obvious to anyone that
your poll is at best a representation
of a special interest group. How
many you polled found a summer
job last summer? What are their
sex, age? Where do they live?  I
should tell you that your margin of
error in the facts depends not only
on the size of the sample, but, more
importantly, on the randomness of
your sample (remember Dewey-
Truman presidential election,
1948?).
As a final comment, I would like
to tell those reading, even the most
scientific, polls are only a snapshot
of the time the poll is taken
(remember Turner-Mulrooney?),
and only popular percentages
(Clark's minority government had
less popular support than Trudeau).
I would like to advise The Ubyssey
staff that in the future, please stick
to facts, make sure your interpretations are reasonably correct when
you do make them (i.e. seek
advice), and keep your emotional
blurbs in the commentary section
and state so.
Vincent Li
applied science 3
Lack of funds —or lack of talent?
I have been reading with interest
your publication's views on B.C.'s
universities being schools only for
the rich.
I am not rich. I am from the interior of B.C. There are other
students here from the interior of
B.C. who are not rich. My parents
are not rich. I come from a working
class family of seven children and
my parents (not retired) are on a
fixed income. Four of the seven
children in my family, who were not
rich themselves, have or will successfully complete their university
degrees. This appears to be
something of a paradox. (Okay,
you can turn off the violins now.)
Perhaps those who complain so
much about how they are unable to
pursue higher education because of
financial constraints, are merely
seeking a scapegoat for other, more
personal, inadequacies. Perhaps
those with a lack of motivation,
drive, or ability would like to
believe that their only constraints
are financial. Perhaps "I faced
financial reality" is a euphemism
for "I couldn't cut it even if tuition
was free".
On a final point, those who
criticize the Socreds for their lack of
funding for education should ask
themselves a couple of questions.
Firstly, if the Socreds were to suddenly restore education funding to
pre-restraint levels and index it to
inflation and reduce tuition fees,
and render a public apology to all
students while simultaneously
forgiving all of their student loans,
would you, yes the one with the
"Solidarity" button leaning against
the Volkswagen van, vote for the
Socreds? The answer is probably
"no". Secondly, do you think that
the Socreds don't already know the
answer to question one?
With a Socred victory looming,
NDP supporters are now faced with
the rather scary proposition that
those most able to influence the
government in favour of education
are people like Kim Campbell and
Pat McGeer. Perhaps if they ask
nicely, the president of the "Young
Socreds" might be willing to bend
the premier's ear on their behalf.
Now that's rich.
John O'Fee
law 3
Cappucino
comeback
I'd like to apologize to women,
Native People, and the poor for
Jeff Baturin's frothing remarks
(Friday) — you see he hasn't been
taught better. As for Jeff — what
do you know about Nicaragua? Try
a cappucino, and old Clash is great.
Your lack of taste is only exceeded
by your ignorance. Take a history
course and stop being such a goof.
Pat Booker
applied science 4 Tuesday, October 21, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
^y^ydy ■
Le£fc
*' *^r
-v
Mulroney was out to get Diefenbaker
We may all have heard about the
recent unveiling of the statue of
John Diefenbaker in Ottawa and
the ensuing bitterness between
Brian Mulroney and loyal Diefenbaker supporters. The reason for
this, on the surface at least, is that
Brian Mulroney was one of those
who conspired to have John Diefenbaker removed from office. Sounds
like the usual stuff of politics until
one realizes the injustice of it all.
Diefenbaker was a Canadian. He
felt that military matters should be
decided by the people of this country and not by another overbearing
power. Diefenbaker saw that unless
Canada took control of its own af
fairs now, the threat of American
manifest destiny on this continent
will become a reality.
So what did the establishment
do? Well, they did not like John,
for he stood proudly for a true
Canada, while they, the establishment, were only concerned about
the market place and profit in
which a continental branch plant,
Canada could serve best their own
interests.
How does our present prime
minister fit into all of this? He was
one of the ones who were out to get
John for his nationalistic goals
which did not fit very well into the
establishment's scheme of things.
Think-tank draconian
I recently overheard some UBC
right-wingers talking about the upcoming visit of Dr. Michael Walker
to the university. They said he'd
"kick some commie ass" and
"show those NDP scum a thing or
two about economics" in his
speech.
Perhaps it is the Socreds and
Conservatives who should be taught
a "thing or two about economics".
Under Myron Baloney, unemployment has risen to almost Depression
levels   and   his   idle   bleatings   of
Numbers
Including a last-minute surge of
fringe groups, a total of 236 candidates filed nomination papers by
today.'s deadline. That is an increase of just eight over the 1983
election, despite the addition of 12
new seats.
At dissolution, the Socreds held
32 seats in the 57-seat legislature.
The NDP held 21. There was one
Progressive Conservative and three
seats were vacant.
In addition to the 69 Social
Credit and NDP candidates, there
are 54 Liberals, 13 Conservatives,
nine from the Green Party, eight
from the People's Front, six Independents, three Libertarians, and
one each from the Libertas,
Western Canada Concept and New
Republic Party.
John Smyth
Jane Smyth
Vancouver
"Jobs! Jobs! Jobs!" have come to
amount to no more than a few
patronage appointments. And what
about Bill Bennett? At the urgings
of this Dr. Walker, Bennet has
taken B.C. from its traditions of a
mixed economy to a laissez-faire
wasteland of free-market oppression and corporate kings. Thanks to
Dr. Walker.
I hope that the UBC community
will unite to protest against the visit
of Dr. Walker, whose so-called
"think-tank", the Fraser Institute,
contributed so much to the scan-
'dalous draconian right-wing guru
and his Socred zealots that UBC
won't stand for the educational
genocide they endorse. Ironically,
Dr. Walker will visit UBC on election day, October 22.
Hugh Richards
graduate studies
This may explain why all the fuss
over Mulroney's unveiling of the
statue of John Diefenbaker and his
not being invited to a dinner in
honour of Canada's past prime
minister.
The two prime ministers are a
contradiction. Diefenbaker — and I
share these sentiments — stands for
a sovereign Canada, while
Mulroney stands for a continental
North American Empire that does
wonders for the profit seeking
capitalists who hold little allegiance
to our home.
The end result is that those of us
who recognize our friendship with
the U.S. but realize at the same time
that their politicies towards the
world are not what we want, will be
swallowed up into the cast of
Dynasty. Well, so one will say,
many of us are habitual American
television addicts and this is a fact
of life, but when we get down to our
core identity I would argue, we find
in ourselves a strong patriotism
which is much more secure in
nature than our neighbour's to the
South.
You see, we have all been brainwashed into feeling guilty if we
stand for anything Canadian for
this smacks of anti*-Americanism.
This is an idea that has got to go.
Canadians should no longer feel a
want to apologize if we think of doing something differently then the
Americans. It is the Canadian way
of seeing the world which is vital if
we are ever to get out of this mess
we are in now. So why not be proud
of it!
LOOK
BRAND NAME SOFT CONTACT LENSES
Daily Wear
Extended Wear
79.95
$180.00
All Prices Include Starter Kit, Follow-up Visits
CAMBIE OPTICAL
3302 Cambie (at 17th) 879-9494
r
f Boooo
4 The annual Ubyssey ghost
W story contest is back. Prizes will
R be awarded to the best ghost
R story and best scary graphic
K (photo or drawing). The stories
R must include: the B-lot gates,
J the clocktower pond, a head-
B band, Gorgo the tasty lime ^J
E space treat, Pat McGeer's specif tacles  and   Bill  Vander Zalm's
teeth.
The
stories    must    begin:
Whatever it was, it was too thick
and too green to be fog that
rendered the headlights of
Selma's Valiant useless. And the
smell . . .
First prize in each category
will be a dinner for two at The
Eatery Restaurant. Second prize
will be a hardcover copy of
Stephen King's new horror
novel It, from Duthie Books.
The winning entries will be
published in the Oct. 31 issue of
The Ubyssey. Entries will be accepted in SUB 241k until Oct.
24.
In closing, I would like to suggest
that we take a much closer look at
the free trade "issue" rather than
following the headlines of who's in
bed with whom. If we do not find
the strength within ourselves to take
control of our destiny, there are
others who will gladly do it for us.
I am proud of being a Canadian.
Duane Robert Burnett
political science 3
OPEN EARLY.
OPEN LATE.
kinko's business day starts early
and ends late so we're here when
you need us most—before an early
morning class or business
appointment, after an evening
meeting or seminar, and even on
Saturdays and Sundays.
Come by and see us. No
"Closed, Come By Again" signs
when you have a job for kinko's.
kinkcs
CRI Al copies c,ki:at l>[ ()I>1 I
5706 Uimersiis Hlul.
222-I68S
M TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 116
Community Sports
offers a 10 /O discount off
regular prices of all merchandise
to all UBC students, staff & faculty
SIX MONTH SKATE
SHARPENING PASSES FOR
36.00
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
OPEN 7DAYS A WEEK FROM9:30 A.M.
LSAT/GMAT/GRE
EXAM TRAINING
Taught by Professionals and Educators
Application Essay Assistance
Local Offices & Staff
Lecture Format
Tape Library
Weekend Courses (Fri.
B.C. & Yukon
(604) 684-4411
ALBERTA
(403) 278-6070
• Practice Tests
• Low Tuition
evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
Sexton
Educational Centers '?)
414-1200 Burrard, Vancouver
Student Aid.
In Point Grey, vote
Darlene Marzari,
Dick Gathercole.
Hear
OmocmtB
{*£> CO-OP OUTDOOR
*-' GEAR SWAP
Here's your chance to get rid of those
boots that seem to have shrunk a
half size or that pack which just
isn't big enough anymore or
maybe pick up some
experienced Tele skis.
The Co-op's Fall 86 Outdoor Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, 0<?. 26. 10 AM-3 PM
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21,1986
"^^
Vjl&Wi
TODAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Predict Mwion, noon. Ballroom or Partyroom.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practiot and cDnie, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic centra.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worahlp, an walcoma ragardtoaa ol
denomination, noon, Lutharan Campus Cantra.
UBC SKI CLUB
Sign up for Whiattor Hallowean party, noon-1:20
p.m., SUB 210.
TRACK AND FIELD
Harry Wilson, coach of world record holdar
Stave Ovett will speak at Woodward IRC 15,
12:30, on middle-distance running.
COMMITTEE AGAINST SEXUAL
HARASSMENT ON CAMPUS
Organizing meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the UBC
Women's Centre.
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY !!
to the best
salesperson
either side of
Bianca (Fran)
fQ   Love    ^
The Ubyssey
Staff
«
W
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion at 12:30 p.m. in Brock
304.
GREENS OF UBC
Will be holding a general meeting, noon in SUB
237.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on Forensic Pathology by Or. Ferris,
noon. Wood 1.
WEDNESDAY
• DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Reading and tatk given by Ralph Gustafson,
noon, Buch. penthouse, admission free.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study. 7 p.m., 1896 Knox Rd.
UBC MARXIST-LENINISTS
Marxist-Leninist literature table, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., front entrance Buch. A.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Recital by Martin Berinbaum, trumpet; Johannes
Somary, organ, noon. Recital Hall, Music Bldg.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tutorial, 5:30 p.m.. Brock Hall.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Fencing   practices,   new   members   welcome,
drop-in fee $3, 7:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Type-a-thon, 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., SUB main
floor.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch. D205.
UBC SKI CLUB
Sign up for Whistler Halloween party, noon-1:20
p.m., SUB 210.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Free film: Asian Images "Sri Lanka — Harnessing the Monsoons", noon, Buch. A202.
THURSDAY
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Theatresports, featuring the Vancouver
Theatresports League, 8 p.m., doors open 7:15
p.m., Graduate Student Centre, Ballroom.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Guest speaker: Cathy Nicholl, noon, Chem. 250.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Field trip to G.F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre,
for members, noon-2:20 p.m., Wood. G-30.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Ruthless People" starring Danny DeVito,
7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Aud.
UH6ER'
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
WO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF & TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
AUDITIONS  AUDITIONS  AUDITIONS
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
BY Moli ere
(to be presented January 14-24)
AUDITIONS
TIMES: MONDAY, OCTOBER 27-      12:00-2:00 p.m.
4:30-6:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28-       2.00-5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29-2:00-5:00 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
Audition material available in Room 207 Frederic Wood
Theatre or Phone 228-3880 to arrange an audition
appointment.
AUDITIONS   GET INTO THE ACT  AUDITIONS
TRAVELCUTS
Talk on "Student Abroad Program", noon, SUB
208.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,   noon.   International
House.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY
COMMITTEE
speaker from Peru: Commission of Families of
Disappeared and live Peruvian folk music with El
Condor, noon. Plaza North, basement of SUB.
THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS FOR TECHNICAL
EXPERIENCE
Information meeting, noon, CEME Bldg.  Rm.
1202.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, 3:30 p.m., Osborne Gym E.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, Rm. 211 SUB.
SLAVONIC AREA STUDIES CO-ORDINATING
COMMITTEE
Lecture commemorating the 30th anniversary of
the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, by Prof. J. Bak
and B. Czaykowski, noon, Buch. A202.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Wind  Symphony  —   Martin  Berinbaum, director and trumpet soloist, noon. Old
Aud.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
General meeting and guest speaker, noon, Buch.
B212.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Topical discussion group, all welcome, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Speaker: J. I. Packer from Regent College on
"Knowing God", noon. Wood. 4.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
UBC SKI CLUB
Sign up for Whistler Halloween party,  11:30
a.m.-12:20 p.m., SUB 210.
FRIDAY
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Running Scared", starring Billy Crystal, 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Aud.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,   noon.   International
House.
DEFT. OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Lecture:   "Citizens'   Peace  Movement   in  the
Soviet Baltic Republics", Prof. R. Taagepera,
noon, Buch. B320.
Foreign     i
O :
Nostalgia
Fine Cinema i
• • •
movie rentals &
espresso har
VCR&
Two
Movies
With \alid Sludi'nt Card
734-2233
3420 West Broadway
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
min mat
5747
SiivichATToRAh
r, Saturday
**$^   °clober 25
6:30 pm
lubavitch Center
5750 Oak Street
 Vancouver
Food! I'Chauim! Dancing!
Singing! Bring the whole family
and join in the most joyous day
of all — from start to finish!
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Wind Symphony — Martin Berinbaum, director and trumpet soloist, 8 p.m.. Old
Aud.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m., SUB 211.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m.-9 p.m., Partyroom.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West home opener vs. Manitoba Bisons,
7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC Stage Band — lan MacDougall, director,
noon. Recital Hall, Music Bldg.
CIRCLE K COMMUNITY SERVICE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC STUDENTS' FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
"What About the Russians?", talk by Simon
Dolby, SFU, noon, SUB 206.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC Boys and Girls Jr. High School Tournaments, all day, War Memorial Gym.
Are you concerned about the use
of herbicides in B.C.? Students for
Forestry Awareness is sponsoring a
lecture on this interesting but controversial topic. Dr. Frank Dost will
be speaking on "The Social Im
plications of Herbicide
Toxicology". Dr. Dost is a professor of toxicology at Oregon
State University.
The lecture will be held on Thursday, October 23, from 2:30 to 4:30,
in Room 166 of the MacMillan
Building, 2357 Main Mall, University of Britich Columbia. For further
information, please leave a
message at 228-6740.
Peruvian feminist and human
rights activist Argira Imana was a
lawyer for the Peruvian Peasant
Federation which has obtained the
freedom of more than 100 political
prisoners.
Now she is in Canada seeking
refugee status.
She will be speaking on human
rights and the political situation in
Peru at noon, Thurs., Oct. 23 in
SUB basement Plaza North.
Come and hear about life in parts
of Latin America that aren't
Nicaragua.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
[RATES: AMS Card Holders—3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional!
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi
tional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day\
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6J2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
A Public Reading
JOHN
LAZARUS
Oct. 24, 1986
1:00 p.m.
Grad Student Centre
Sponsored by Canada Council
DO HEALTH FOOD PRICES make you ill?
Cheque out AGORA FOOD CO-OP at
Dunbar & 17th. Save $$ Makes "
PROFESSIONAL RESUMES
at a reasonable cost
tel. 736-9351
TROUBLE WITH CALCULUS?
And a need to pass the course to
meet your program requirements?
We have  a  program  designed  to
meet your need at all levels.
$5/session       Tel: 686-3396 (Paul)
Leave message after tone.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
SONY WALKMAN WMF100 aut. rev.
am/fm. Metal Dolby turbo foldup HP
recharg. batt. Carrying case. Br new Musel
263-4767.
QUICK SALE to 1st offer. Volvo runs well
$750. Typewriter electronic like new $89.
Leather satchel $60. 222-0939.
1981   HONDA  CX500  custom  motorcycle,
fairing, raingear. Offers on $975. 685-5343.
20 - HOUSING
85 - TYPING
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.), or
call 228-2811.
ROOM AND BOARD. West 19th Ave. &
Arbutus. Furnished rm. full bathroom,
available imm. Ph 731-8702.
30 - JOBS
PT-TIME HELP WANTED - two quick,
hard workers to wash dishes, help chef &
tend bar for quality restaurant in Marpole.
18 hrs eve. Call 732-0004.
35 - LOST
KID'S WATCH. "Don't be too late" at pool.
Sat., Oct. 11. Sentimental value. 222-3179,
2759 Melfa Court, Family Housing.
MINIMUM  NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD PROCESSING. Writing, editing:
resumes, theses, reports, essays, letters.
Professional quality. 324-9924.
TYPING, photocopying, phone FAX and
Telex services, reasonable rates. Please call
946-0723 124 hours).
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
resumes, etc. UBC Village. Leave message
224-0763. Student rates.
STAR  SECRETARIAL  SERVICES  for  all
your word processing needs. 299-3061.
WORD PROCESSING - term papers, reports, etc. Will edit grammar & punctuation. Reas. rates, ph Betty 421-7101 or
689-3122.
WHY HAVE YOUR ESSAYS TYPED when
you can have your words processed?
$1.50/pg. Copies free. Editing service avail,
for $5/page. 877-0848. Gary.
40 - MESSAGES
JEWISH FEMALE doctoral student would
like to meet with other Jewish female grad
students for support & discussion of work,
ph. Hillel House 224^748.
DO-IT-YOURSELF
TYPING!
Rent a typewriter and station for
$5.00 to $8.00 per hour
Choice of IBM electric typewriter or
electronic memory typewriters
For more information call
 734-1612	 Tuesday, October 21,1986
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 7
Nobel research used in Star Wars
TORONTO (CUP) — A University of Toronto professor has won
the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, for
his pioneering research on
molecular reactions.
John Polanyi shared the award
with two American professors. He
becomes the fifth Canadian to be
distinguished with the award.
Ironically, Polanyi's research has
been used for laser technology that
will likely be used for the U.S.
Strategic Defence Initiative, to
which the quiet, modest Polanyi is
vehemently opposed.
"Yes, it is ironic," Polanyi told
an Oct. 15 news conference held at
U of T just two hours after he
received notice of the award. "And
I don't blanch if you say that there
seems to be a contradiction. But
basic research has always been used
for many, applications, some good,
some ill."
Polanyi explained that he and his
researchers had explored the ways
in which molecules vibrate and collide and found a certain reaction
which created "highly vibration-
excited molecules". His discoveries
led directly to the development of
the first vibrational laser in 1964,
and the first chemical laser in 1965.
The vibrational laser has been used to produce the first instrument
proposed in the development of
SDI.
Polanyi calls Star Wars "a
harebrained application" of his
research, but maintains that for
every such application, there are
twenty beneficial ones.
"Just this morning I got a call
from a young woman whose eyesight had been restored through an
operation with a laser," said
Polanyi. "She was calling to thank
U. of A. hits criminals
EDMONTON (CUP) — University of Alberta students may face internal disciplinary action as well as
criminal charges if they run afoul of
the law, says the director of campus
security.
"We, had a policy where we
would not proceed with internal
disciplinary actions against a student if civil charges were pending,"
said Doug Langevin.
But that changed when the campus law review committee decided
to back up campus security by advising that a student should be internally disciplined, as well as
charged by the police, he said.
The campus law review committee is responsible for the
university's code of student
behaviour, which governs both
academic and non-academic conduct. Under the code students can
be reprimanded, fined up to $500,
suspended, or expelled from university.
Langevin said that while the new
policy leaves the university open to
charges of double jeopardy, it
should have the right to discipline
its members like other institutions.
"It's a difficult situation but we
must have the right to discipline individuals. After all, private companies do fire employees in trouble
with the law," he said.
Gwilyn Davies, former president
of the Edmonton Criminal Trial
Lawyers Association, said there are
cases where the UofA should not
press internal charges on top of
criminal charges.
"A charge of theft (against a stu-
We Want
dent) should be of no.interest to the
university, but an assault case
where the presence of the accused
would endanger the university community would warrant some
legitimate university concern," he
said.
Wicked
Writing
Other beneficial uses for the
vibrational laser include microcir-
cuitry (making marks on
microchips), repairing leaking
blood vessels, freeing up clogged
arteries, and stapling detached
retinas. The laser has also been used
by tailors for cutting cloth, and in
the auto industry for welding.
Polanyi feels we should avoid the
"obsessive fear of the by-products
of technology", and that the
nuclear threat can be removed
through politics, not science.
"SDI is a gadget, and gadgets
will not save us. Only negotiation
and a new attitude toward the settlement of differences will."
Polanyi referred to the current atmosphere of underfunding which
he says is hurting researchers in
Canada. He hopes that his Nobel
Prize will help Canada to recognize
the "good science research which is
happening here. It has always been
here — we are just focusing on it
now. And being attentive includes
spending money, and that money
has to be consistent."
Geraldine Wallace, Chair of
Research Board at U of T and a
member of the Science Council of
Canada, said "Polanyi's
achievements bloody marvelous"
and stressed the positive applications of his research. "Let's be non-
Canadian   about    this.    Let's
celebrate some heroes."
Polanyi received his doctorate in
England, but has taught at U of T
for 30 years.
Polanyi was awarded the Nobel
Prize with Dudley Hershbach of
Harvard, and Yuan Lee of the
University of California at
Berkeley.
This is the second Nobel Prize to
be awarded at U of T. Frederick
Banting and John Macleod received
the prize for the discovery of insulin
in 1923.
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
at The Skyline
presents
1986 STAR SEARCH
WINNER
RICHARD
JENI
Oct. 21-24
Call 278-5161
for show times, ticket info.
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
**************************
J NEW YORK SELTZER presents *
; PUNCHLINES!! \
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
FREE COMEDY
WITH TERRY SIMPSON
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER 22nd-12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM - FREE
WIN $ $ $ $ $
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
¥
**************************
ACCEPTNO SCHNAPPSlrTUTES
The annual Ubyssey ghost story
contest is back. Prizes will be
awarded to the best ghost story
and best scary graphic (photo or
drawing). The stories must include:
the B-lot gates, the clocktower
pond, a headband, Gorgo the tasty
lime space treat, Pat McGeer's
spectacles and Bill Vander Zalm's
teeth.
The stories must begin:
Whatever it was, it was too thick
and too green to be fog that
rendered the headlights of Selma's
Valiant useless. And the smell . . .
First prize in each category will be
a dinner for two at The Eatery
Restaurant. Second prize will be a
hardcover copy of Stephen King's
new horror novel It, from Duthie
Books.
The winning entries will be
published in the Oct. 31 issue of
The Ubyssey. Entries will be accepted in SUB 241k until Oct. 24.
In the interest of
.public awareness we bring
you the complete
story of how to
recognize cool,
crisp Hiram
Walker Schnapps.
Highly decorative '
Hiram Walker coat
of arms.
An amazing 750
millilitres per bottle.
1858: The year in which
Hiram Walker, with .—
appropriate fanfare
and general hoopla,
pOjudly opened his
.first distillery.
Conspicuous by their
absence are the
designations of the
many flavours of
Hiram Walker Schnapps
such as Peach, Orange,
Peppermint, etc.
(not shown here).
Hiram Walker Sp Sons
denotes that the
Hiram Walker tradition of monstrously
good qualify lives on.
Transparent cool,
crisp f lavoqriul liquid
ideal for any sized
cylindrical object.
— Very clever "£-Z" opening twist- off style cap.
Ergonomically
 designed hand-sized
neck for foolproof
pouring.
Exclusive "Hiram
Walker" name seen
only on "Hiram Walker"
products.
The Hiram Walker
name and coat of arms
, boldly displayed,
/ twice, on each and
every bottle.
In this space go the
many illustrations
of the many flavours
/ of Hiram Walker
/ Schnapps.
"Schnapps", as in
Hiram Walker. The
• best selling Schnapps
/ in Canada.
"Liqueur": an unusually accurate descrip-
„ tion of the contents
herein.
Walkerville, Canada.
,The birthplace of
Hiram Walker Schnapps.
In order to complete
your Schnapps education may we suggest
writing to us for some
spellbinding Hiram
Walker Schnapps
recipes, PO. Box 2343,
Department S,
Brampton, Ontario
L6T3Y9.
Hiram Walter Schnapps.
Taste the Difference. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1986
Soccer men stomp prairie kids flat
By PETER BERLIN
The Soccer Thunderbirds clinched a place in the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union soccer
playoffs with a pair of home victories over prairie rivals on the
weekend.
On Friday I hey beat Saskatchewan three to one and followed
that up with a three to nothing victory over Alberta, their main rivals,
on Saturday.
"We didn't play very well on Friday. We knew we could clinch the
title with a win over Alberta the
next day and the players seemed to
have their minds on that match.
Still, we played well enough to beat
Saskatchewan." said UBC coach
Dick Mosher.
Ken Mulleney put the 'Birds
ahead in the first half when he stripped the ball from a Husky defender
on the edge of the penalty box and
advanced to score. Then Mullenev
set up Mike Allina's goal which
made it two to nothing.
Saskatchewan scored a goal from
a penalty kick to end Brian Kennedy's string of shutouts at six
games.
Mulleney rounded off the scoring
in the second half when he rose to
meet a cross from David Partridge
and head home his second goal to
put UBC ahead three to one.
The goal was Mulleney's sixth of
the season and carries him to the
top of the Canada West University
Athletic Association scoring table.
Allina is tied for second with four
goals.
"We came to play on Saturday.
It was our best match of tin year
with a total team effort. We defended as a team and attacked as a
team," said Mosher.
Even though Alberta is a much
stronger team than Saskatchewan
UBC still improved on the previous
dav's score winning three to
nothing.
The 'Birds went ahead from a set-
piece. Sieve Burns picked out tall
central UBC defender Alec Percy
with a corner kick and the target
man headed the ball home.
In the second half Burns set up
the second goal with another well
struck dead ball. He slashed a
25-yard freekick pa^t the defence.
The Alberta goalkeeper could only parry the blast and Byron
Gayford followed home to score on
the rebound, andrew Mardon made
it three to nothing on a turn
around, ripping the ball into the top
corner of the net from 18 yards out.
The win means UBC has won
the CWUAA title and will travel to
Ontario on November 14 to defend
the CIAU title they have won over
the last two years. They will play
the Quebec champions in the first
round.
This weekend the 'Birds round
out their season with a home match
against the University of Victoria
Vikings, traditionally their main
rivals in the West. But they go into
the match with the knowledge that
they can't be caught and are the
top-rated team in the country.
'Birds stay nested
B> GLORIA l.OREE
The UBC women's field hockey
team won two games and tied the
other at this weekend's Canada
West University Athletic Association Tournament held at UBC, but
it wasn't enough.
The 'Birds finished second in the
CWUAA standings behind UVIC
as a result of the tournament and
oddly did not qualify for postseason play because of some bizarre
manoeuvers on behalf of the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union.
In previous years the second
place team in the CWUAA was
challenged by the University of
Manitoba for a berth in the national's with the winner going on.
This year the national's were
scheduled to take place in Victoria
so both the first and second place
teams in the CWUAA would
automatically qualify.
Manitoba was thus advised to
challenge someone from the east,
which they did. The only problem is
that because of budget cutbacks the
national's were suddenly switched
to Toronto.
Despite being the number three
ranked team in Canada the 'Birds
will not go to the six team national
tournament because they will not be
challenged.
"No doubt about it, we should
be at the nationals. The way we
played this weekend we definitely
showed that we should be there,"
said player Leonie Plunkett.
On the field the 'Birds won their
first game two to nothing against
the University of Alberta on Saturday. The score at the half was one
to nil with UBC's Melanie Slade
scoring off a penalty corner.
It was an exciting match with the
'Birds having three goals called
back for off-side and two shots
coming off the post. The second
goal came off the aggressive style of
Leonie Plunkett — who scored in
free play.
The 'Birds second game was
against the University of Calgary on
Sunday morning. The cold air
seemed to put a chill on the 'Birds
aggressive style and the team had to
struggle to their two to nothing victory. Both goals were scored on
penalty strokes by the team's
stroker, Slade.
The final game of the tournament
saw UBC go against their strong
rival, UVic. It was one of the 'Birds
best games of the season. Despite
many scoring opportunities, neither
team was able to put away any
goals, and the game finished in no-
score tie. The tie was a slight victory
for UBC, however, as they had lost
one to nothing in their previous
games against UVic.
UBC's strength was also evident
in having four of eleven players on
the Canada West All-Star team.
Selected from UBC were Slade.
Jody Blaxland, Joni Franks, and
Jennifer Vanstone. UVic added
four players, two came from U of
A, and one from U of C.
The 'Birds will now play in the
first division ofthe Vancouver Field
Hockey League, with a home game
coming up this Saturday.
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
AGGREGATE STANDINGS
Team             W      L
T         Pts.
Victoria         8      0
1        29.00
B.C.                6      2
1        22.50
Alberta         2      7
0         7.50
Calgary          1       8
0         3.00
-rory a  photo
UBC SUPERSTAR JODY BLAXLAND tries to get ahold of the ball. Blaxland is a member of the 1983 and 1986
world cup teams as well as being a CIAU all-star. She is the leading scorer in the Canada West conference this
year.
Volley 'Birds just can't kill enough opposition
By DIANE LISTER
The UBC women's volleyball
team faced tough competition on
the Island this weekend as they
placed fourth in the six-team
University of Victoria Invitational
Tournament.
In preliminary pool play, UBC
lost to a strong UVic squad in two
straight games, and then went on to
beat Portland State University in a
three-game battle.
The 'Birds then went up against
the B.C. Canada Games team, easily defeating them in two games. The
squad lost their next two matches
against the Manitoba Games team
and University of Manitoba.
Semi-final play pitted the 'Birds
against UVic once again. The Victoria team, with its entire squad
returning from last year's season,
blasted UBC in the first two games
15-6 and 15-2.
Trailing in the third game 2-14,
the 'Birds came back strongly tying
the Vikettes 14-14. But with the
pressure mounting on both teams'
UBC served a ball into the net. On
the serve, UVic quickly pegged two
points, winning the game 16-14,
and taking the match.
"Being such a strong team, they
(UVic) are not used to playing
under a lot of pressure, . . . but we
really let them off the hook at that
point," UBC Coach Donna
Baydock said.
In   Bronze   medal   action,   UBC
battled the Manitoba Canada
Games team, losing three games to
one, and took fourth place in the
tournament.
UVic went up against the University of Manitoba in the final match,
and beat out the prairie team in
three straight games to win the tournament.
UBC power hitter Rhonda Sampson was selected to the all-star
team. Sampson led the 'Birds both
offensively    and    defensively,
smashing 74 kills into the
opponent's court over the weekend,
with 19 kills in the Bronze medal
match alone.
Next weekend, the squad faces
more stiff competition travelling to
York University and meeting eight
of the top CIAU teams in Canada.
"This tournament will give us an
opportunity to play these teams
before meeting them in CIAU competition, and to get used to playing
under pressure," Baydock said.
Bears eat rookie puck 'Birds
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC hockey team wandered
into a Bear's den this weekend and
paid the price losing its first two
games of the season in Alberta to
the defending Canadian champions.
The   rookie   laden   UBC  squad
Hockey kids lose string
The Varsity Men's Field Hockey Team was again unable to string
two wins in a row in Vancouver League play this Saturday.
After disposing of West Vancouver two to one last weekend, the
team was only able to salvage a four to four tie with Tsawassen in a
game played in Delta.
After falling behind two to nothing in the first ten minutes, the
team filially looked alive and managed to score before the half. Chris
Gifford scored two of his three goals early in the second half to put
UBC up three to two.
Several more defensive lapses enabled Tsawassen to take a four to
three lead. It looked like another close loss for UBC, but Spencer
Cotton scored with only five minutes left to save the tie.
Dave Ankerom's goaitending was instrumental in keeping the
goals against to four. Tony Boyd at right inside had a strong game
for the team as well. The Junior Varsity defeated Hawks B in Delta
three to one. Stan Worsley recorded the hat-trick for UBC.
The J.V. team was all over the younger Hawks but were unable to
finish many scoring opportunities or the score would have been
much higher. Henry Waldock was dangerous at right wing and set up
many good scoring chances.
The third team lost a rare game to the Grasshoppers three to
nothing at UBC. It was one of the poorer performances of the year
for the team which has greatly improved over last year.
received a rough initiation in the
1986-87 Canada West University
Association hockey season, trailing
the Bears three to nothing, less than
eight.minutes into Friday's game.
Alberta has 15 players returning
from last year's squad and are ranked number one in the nation. But
UBC outscored the Bears four to
three in the second period and went
into the third period only down two
goals, six to four.
Scott Fearns, Jeff Delgarno,
Mark Hentze and Steve Lapointe
scored for the 'Birds in the second.
But the 'Birds could not score a
goal in the third period while Alberta scored three more to win the
game handily nine to four.
UBC hockey coach Terry
O'Malley said the 'Birds demise in
the third period was a question of
experience.
"With so many people on the
team playing in this league for the
first time, we are a little behind the
eight ball. Alberta has an explosive
offence. Twelve of their forwards
from last year are returning," he
said.
On Saturday the 'Birds were trailing Alberta by only one goal, three
to two, with ten minutes remaining
in the third period. Then the roof
fell as the 'Birds took a rash of
penalties which resulted in two
powerplay goals for Alberta.
The Bears added two more goals
to win the game seven to two. Kevin
Griffin and Mark Trotzuk scored
UBC's goals in the first ten minutes
of the third period.
"We have a squad with a lot of
youth and I am optimistic about the
season. It will take them a little time
to get a feel for the intensity of the
game. Now the players know how
hard we have to push and recognize
the need to set their goals a little
higher," said O'Malley.
Craig Dill led all scorers with six
points for Alberta this weekend
while teammates Parie Proft and
Stacey Wakabayashi chipped in
with four points each.
Steve Lapointe and Mark Trotzuk led all UBC scorers with three
points each this weekend. Carl
Repp played both games in goal for
the 'Birds.
Lapointe is the only defenceman
with a full year of league experience
playing for the 'Birds this year.
"We have a really young defence.
That is one link in the game where
we will have to grow. From the people I talk to, I understand that
defence is the hardest part ot the
game to develop, so we'll have to be
patient," said O'Malley.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127852/manifest

Comment

Related Items