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The Ubyssey Mar 12, 1982

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. . .Victoria. . .
Special from the Martlet
VICTORIA — Six hundred students
heckled and booed universities minister
Pat McGeer on the steps of the
legislature Thursday, demanding more
funds for post secondary education.
Students from the University of Victoria and Camosun College marched
through the cold and windy city streets
to the legislature singing "Sha na na na
na na na, hey hey hey, Socreds
goodbye."
Speakers from student organizations,
unions and faculty associations addressed the rally, and finally McGeer agreed
to speak.
The militant crowd chanted "bullshit,
bullshit," when he promised B.C. would
continue its commitment to high quality
education.
When McGeer asked the students
where more funds for education could
come from, they suggested the B.C.
government's multi-million dollar northeast coal project or higher taxation on
corporations. McGeer said the public
wouldn't go for the idea.
"How many people here would oppose taking funds from the coal
project?" he asked. No one responded.
"Well, how many people would oppose higher taxes on corporations?"
Again there was no response.
UBC joins in the Canada-wide wave
of student protest today, when lower
mainland post secondary institutions
gather in Vancouver for march and rally.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 58
Vancouver, B.C. Friday. March 12,1982 48<
228-2301
. . .Edmonton. . .
EDMONTON (CUP) — It would
have been funny if it wasn't so typical of
government attitudes toward post secondary education.
About 2,000 students stood in heavy
snowfall at the foot of the provincial
legislature to protest cutbacks. They
came from universities, colleges and
technical institutes in Grande Prairie,
Edmonton, Red Deer, Calgary and
Lethbridge.
Both Premier Peter Lougheed and advanced education minister Jim
Horsman spoke to the crowd, but efforts by the Federation of Alberta
Students to bring in a federal representative produced a comical situation.
First, the federal government promised secretary of state Gerald Regan. He
declined, so they promised Regan's
secretary. The secretary turned into a
Liberal backbencher, the backbencher
into a telex, and the telex into a
telegram.
The telegram arrived late and had to
be read over the phone to FAS. It stated
that the federal government will maintain its commitment to post secondary
education.
Meanwhile, the unimpressed students
jeered at Lougheed and Horsman.
They chanted "snow job," and at the
rally's conclusion, "we'll be back."
.Nationwide. . .
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students in 22
Canadian centres made provincial
ministers of education very unpopular
Thursday.
They were marching, chanting,
meeting and picketing as part of the
Canadian Federation of Students national week of action.
In Halifax, students from the city's
three universities sent a direct message to
downtown legislators — they held a one
minute protest of noise, honking horns,
banging pots and cranking stereos
against underfunding.
In Montreal, about 3,000 students
marched on a provincial government
building howling "we're pissed off,"
and "we want justice." In Quebec,
universities have been asked to chop
three per cent from their operating
budgets in each of the next three years.
Another 3,000 demonstrators at
Toronto's Queens Park shouted "save
us from Davis," and were addressed at
the legislature buildings by labor leaders
who pledged union support.
Frank Drea, minister of consumer and
corporate affairs in the provincial
government, countered students hostility with, "You should be thankful to the
minister of colleges and universities, Dr.
Stephenson."
Other protest action is planned for
Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Moncton, Quebec City, Hamilton, Peterborough, Kingston, Ottawa, Thunder
Bay, Winnipeg, Saskatchewan,
Lethbridge and Calgary.
.Protest today, fpee buses leewe I pan. south side SUB. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 12,1982
JIM BYRNES BAND
THE PIT
Thursday, Mar. 11 — 7:00 p.m. $2.
Saturday, Mar. 13 — 7:00 p.m. $2
Special Matinee Performance:
Saturday, 4:00 p.m. $1
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Located at the back of the Village
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Open Tuesday through
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922 Kingsway — Opp. ICBC
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Bonnie Raitt — March 16
Killarney, March 17
Russ Morgan Orchestra,
March 19
Sly and The Family Stone,
March 26
B.B. King, March 27,
7:30 p.m. & 11:15 p.m.
Long John Baldry, March 31
City Nights, April 8, 9, 10
Tina Turner, April 23
Mike Warnke with Jamie
Owens-Colling, May 13
Odetta: A Salute to Paul
 Robeson, May 17	
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Fashion Focus, March 13
Toga Dance, March 19
Intramural    Awards    Banquet, March 19
Toast to the Grads,
March 20
MISC
A Night of Middle Eastern
Dance — March 20
Benefit Dance for El
Salvador, March 27
Lottery Tickets
Photofinishing Special
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Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
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THURS: Amateur
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC art
show
displays
Organic,
earthy
works;
folds,
flagelli,
skeletal
forms,
visceral
interiors
By ALICE THOMPSON
When a large group of artist's
works are displayed together, their
show often becomes disconnected
and diffuse because their vast
thematic and visual differences.
But in the third year fine arts
show, the intimacy of working
within the same faculty has given
these artists common themes. In
this show — currently in the SUB
gallery — the majority of the artists
share an interest in human and
organic form. The show teems with
folds and flagelli — visceral interiors and skeletal forms.
Lynette French's untitled collage
integrates skeletal forms, earth
strata patterns, richly drawn limbs,
torsos . . . and sewing pattern
tissues. The use of tissues adds an
MURAO
with 3 dimensional silkscreen sculpture, break from traditional methods
unrelated to the actual human
form."
Her work also displays i. strong
sense of materials. Particularly effective is the incongruity of combining dirt — pressed into the reddish
strata/skeletal areas of her collage
— with the fragile sewing tissues.
Joan Smith's untitled etching
uses forms reminiscent of skeletal
and shell forms. The deep blue,
gentle modelling of the image, the
small accent area of flesh color, and
the introduction of an actual paper
fold in juxtaposition with embossed
folds in the work, all add up to a
very deft, sensitive handling of the
etching medium.
Astrid Gaitanakis displays a pencil drawing with a centre motif
resembling a scientific illustation of
the female reproductive organ or of
the inner ear. But these are illustrations rendered wispy and fragile —
faintly coloured forms that melt
away into more abstract forms and
marks.
Wilnora Rosenfeld gives "a piece
of flesh" political overtones. Her
watercolour depicts an ambigious
oblong shape ... it is what a breast
looks like after it has been removed
during a masectomy operation.
Rosenfeld surrounds this object
with a series of differently toned
mat boards.
She says that "the multiple framing effect draws attention to the ob-
UHRYNUIKS .
self
intriguing visual and textural touch
to her work.
French became interested in using
sewing patterns in juxtaposition
with earth strata and the human
forms because of the interesting co-
relation between geological terms
and sewing terms — rock patterns
and tissue patterns.
French adds, "Basically I found
the pattern shape itself quite interesting, simply because it seems so
portrait with brick wall
ject quality of the breas:. The
viewer is led through a series of
diminishing perspectives to regard
an object . . . which is what the
breast is, an object. I hope t lis way
to make the viewer re-evaluate his
or her own views towards breasts,
female sexuality . . . basically to get
away from 'tits and ass'."
Sonia Ang — thougi less
political — also shows an awareness
of her own femininity. Ang includes
two self portraits: The Red Eox (my
Sister and I) and The Red Box (Self
Portrait),
The Red Box element — in one
work a painted perspective, in the
other an actual sculputural box —
refers to the female element in Ang.
The shade of red Ang uses is finely
balanced between a warm, effusive
red and an uncomfortable, burning
red.
ROCHESTER . . . with work
The two figures of Ang and her
sisters are hooked to the
background at the back of the
heads — a practical solution. Ang's
straightforward combination of
painting and sculpture suggests a
humorous, decisive attitude on
Ang's part that is quite
refreshing. The hanging of her large
painting/sculpture is quite effective
because its location allows the
gallery space to reinforce the picture perspective, adding to the its
drama.
Next to Ang's work are Andreas
Kahre's elegant pencil drawings; a
contrast to Ang's bold colourful
work. Kahre combines an 18th century concern for draughtsmanship
with a contemporary concern for
the connotations and associations
brougth forth by the subject matter.
Kahre has drawn devices which
combine machine-like and organic
form. Kahre admits a "fascination
with the combination of the two,
the skeletal with the
mechanical—the moral connotations of the grown and the man-
made." Kahre is concerned with the
automatic pegging that makes the
"natural and organic morally
superior to the "mechanical and
man-made." Kahre is attempting to
reconcile the two in his drawings.
Kahre also includes a sculpture in
the show, entitled Breathing. The
piece integrates a very contemporary material — plexiglass —
with the millenia old skeletal human
form. Kahre says "this piece is a
point of departure for me ... I
want to go on to join the material
and the subject matter ..."
Ginny Harris is another artist in
the show interested in the juxtaposition of organic form and geometry,
her Square Statement contains a
sensious treatment of checkerboards, grids, and curved organic
shapes.
Joanne Rochester expresses
similar concerns in her Lithograph
Number 3. Rochester explains, "I
was trying to get the contrast between the organic system of the
blown wash in the foreground and
the intellectual organization of the
checkerboard brings in the idea of
games . . . playing games and playing with art. I used the words
'Rorscharch test' to get people to
focus on the blob more than they
ordinarily would ... to explore the
permutations and the textural
subtleties.
Many of the artists use their personal experiences as a source for
their work. Vanda Sudic's untitled
mixed media drawing deals with her
childhood anxieties of the future —
an intensely personal subject.
Sudic draws a self-portrait from a
birthday snapshot of her childhood
days. The drawing of the birthday
cake, combined with Sudic's clock,
provide a focus for the look of anxiety on the child's face.
Sudic makes several meaningful
references to childhood. The
multiplicity of marks, form and col-
bluntly, "that's how I felt after my
summer job."
Lorna Mulligan also recalls
memories to make her untitled
lithograph/watercolor, depicts "a
memory image from England's
Neolithic stones . . . the feeling of
being inside, and going through a
passage."
Mulligan has associated this feeling with the birthing process, and in
her piece draws the stone post and
lintel structure in a womb shape.
The sky between the rocks is
rendered soft and fluid, contrasting
with the stone's rough texture.
Mulligan's other   entry  is   very
gestural and intuitive, showing a
concern   for   possible   marks   in
lithography. "I liked the freedom
S of  making   these   marks   on   the
\ lithostone  ...  a  very immediate
g process followed by the mechanical
1 process of lithography."
2 Mulligan adds her own marks
• and colours to each print, by hand,
5 making each piece an original and
therefore closing the door to any
mechanical mass production of her
prints. This is a deliberate move to
escape some of the more commercial aspects of printmaking.
Grace Murao also has a very interesting way of escaping the
restraints of traditional printmaking. Her large silkscreen sculpture
projects aggressively into the gallery
space. Murao has done away with
the two dimensional viewing of the
surface of a print and has rendered
her silkscreened paper into a three
dimensional object with strong
physical presence.
Her piece also escapes the
mechanical mass reproduction- of
silkscreening, as each piece is unique and unreproducable. Murao
has made each segment by folding
the papers and running the entire
set of folded papers through a
single color screening, drying the
paper, refolding and repeating the
process.
This puts screened color on both
sides of the paper, enhancing its
three dimensional, object quality.
In this innovative sculpture, Murao
has used silkscreen in the service of
idea, and has not let the medium
dictate the method.
FRENCH
ollages of strata and sewing tissue
ors in the picture represent the confusion and information overload
experienced by the child.
The words Anxiolytic Sedative
are written in child-like lettering, a
reference to the tranquillizers
Sudic was prescribed as a child.
Thin blue notepaper lines and handprints (the first artwork most
children make) add to the depiction
of the child's world.
All these elements combine to
make Sudic's painting the most
emotional and personal piece in the
show.
Brian Uhrynuik also makes a personal statement — but his is a very
humorous approach to his frustration. Uhrynuik paints a self portrait
from the back — and facing a brick
wall. The brick wall is used as a
literal statement . . . Uhrynuik says
Murao is one of the few artists to
present abstract work for the show.
The other abstract pieces of quite
different intent are Liss Midtal's
Equinox and Solstice. She presents
two lyrical interpretations of the
quality of sunlight ... at the spring
equinox when day and nght are of
equal length and at the shortest day
of the year (winter solstice).
Megan Faminow is an interesting
watercolor artist who presents an
untitled study of microscopic
forms. Faminow has attempted to
abstract and integrate a large
number of forms taken from
microscopic studies of insect
anatomy.
This well-executed piece is visually effective both when viewed close
up and when viewed from a
See page 4: THEMES Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 12,1982
Themes facinating
from page 3
distance. Faminow achieves this
through close attention to harmonious color and to the overall
abstract patterns created by the
light and dark areas of the work.
The result is an intricate yet resolved work of great appeal.
In contrast to this minute attention to detail, Ted Bergen uses
abstraction and rough, blocky
shapes to convey a mental state. His
Prompt to Adventure takes a West (
Coast forest and abstracts it into
tall poles under the dark folds of a
cloud filled sky.
The painting uses a dark centre
space and a hallway among the
poles to arouse your curiosity and
invite you to journey into the
'forest' and into the painter's inquiring mind. Bergen uses the
abstraction and the sexual imagery
very effectively to create the painting's ambience of mystery.
Cynthia Orser presents science
fantasy inspired ink drawings.
She is particularly effective
when combining archetypal, fantasy imagery with contemporary
elements — for example, in her
Funeral for Kynthos, Orser presents
two women as sirens on the rocks —
dressed in culotte rights and dance
shoes. The hair curlers and
Hawaiian skirts in Wifman's
Alienation are also quite startling
— this unique and unexpected combination of elements is the strongest
aspect of her work.
Christy Grace's Front Desk is
also good. The drawing is an interesting scale for the subject mat-
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ter, which is a collection of desk-top
articles such as a ruler, pencil, and
scissors. The larger than life scale,
and the drawings mottled shading
give the work presence.
It is the ambiguous space and the
abstract qualities of the drawing
which draw the viewer's interest.
Realism is an interest of Ausma
Banka. Though her drawing style is
conventional, her double protrait
displays a sensitivity to human personality and gesture.
An admirable feature of the show
is its overall professionalism — the
work is effectively framed,
displayed and lit. It is an easy show
to look at, and the visual and
thematic interrelationships of the
different artist are fascinating to
trace. For a last look at this excellent show, go to SUB gallery today, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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UBC MUSIC DEPT.
CHECK LIST OF CONCERTS
End of March
FRIDAY, MARCH 12
8 p.m. UBC Wind Symphony — music of Schoenberg, Hindemith — Old Aud.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
12:30 p.m. UBC Chamber Strings — music of Bach, Grieg, Vaughan-Williams.
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
12:30 p.m. UBC Trumpet Ensemble.
8:00 p.m. UBC Collegium Musicum — music from the Renaissance and Baroque.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
12:30 p.m. UBC Collegium Musicum (repeat).
8 p.m. UBC Opera Workshop — music by Mozart, Rossini, Menotti.
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
8 p.m. UBC Opera Workshop (repeat).
MONDAY, MARCH 22
8 p.m. UBC Wind Symphony - 1982 "Pops" Concert - SUB Ballroom.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24
12:30 p.m. Faculty Violin and Piano Recital — music of Mozart, Franck.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
12:30 p.m. UBC Choral Union — music of Vaughan-Williams, Stravinsky, Schaefer.
8 p.m. UBC Stage Band - Old. Aud.
8 p.m. The Cascade Consort — music from Baroque.
FRIDAY, MARCH 26
12:30 p.m. UBC Contemporary Players — music of Crumb, Chatman, Berio.
8 p.m. UBC Choral Union (repeat).
SUNDAY, MARCH 28
2:20 p.m. UBC Symphony and the Vancouver Youth Symphony Orchestra, conducted
by Kazuyoshi Akiyama — music of Moussorgsky, Ravel, Debussy.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31
12:30 p.m. UBC Piano Trio — music of Beethoven.
NOTE: All programs given in Recital Hall of the Music Bui/ding, unless
otherwise indicated.
FURTHER INFORMATION AT FRONT DESK, MUSIC BLDG.,
OR CALL 228-3113
IN SUB BASEMENT
FEATURING
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• HOT SNACKS
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NOW OPEN SATURDAYS 10:00 to 5:00 Friday, March 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Ensemble delights
ENSEMBLE HARPSICHORDIST . . . light, direct approach to music
Coleman's concert
a load of valium
By ALLEN STEVENS
The most controversial figure in
the history of modern jazz arrived
last week in Vancouver for a one-
nighter.
Ornette Coleman, jazz's enfant
terrible from the '50s and '60s, filled the Commodore ballroom to
near capacity, but for those who
came expecting to hear jazz music it
was an evening of unpleasant surprises.
The first shocker was that Coleman has given up the discordant,
atonal style (dubbed "free jazz")
that made him infamous twenty
years ago and earned him the eternal emnity of the jazz establishment. More stunning, however, is
his new musical direction. Coleman
is no longer playing jazz music at
all, and instead is now indulging in
lacklustre electronic discofunk for
dancing robots.
The evening opened with a set of
not very convincing polyester punk
rock by a local group named
Rhythm Mission. This ironic title
apparently stems from the fact that
the group has no rhythm whatsoever, and as far as its music is
concerned, it's clearly Mission Impossible.
Judging from their output the
group's main  inspiration is  John
COLEMAN . . . blah disco concert unimpressive
Denver, and their music effectively
bridges the gap between boredom
and monotony. While ths lead
singer postured inspidly the band
did great violence to their instruments; the overall effect was
amusing — when it wasn't tedious.
After about 20 minutes the band
mercifully left the stage, probably
because its repetoife was exhausted.
After all, you can only go so far on
three chords.
As the last member of Rhythm
Mission stumbled off the stage,
Coleman and his group, Prime
Time, began to set up. Talk about
double vision . . . Prime Time
consists of two drummers, tv/o bass
players, and two guitarists. (Later,
when they began to play, I could see
why Coleman needed doubles on
every instrument. These clowns
were so bad that it took two of them
to equal one ordinary music:an.)
At last Coleman and Prime Time
began to play. Every rumber
sounded the same: colorless, badly
played disco music with Coleman's
out-of-time saxophone noodling
around the lead. Nobody in the
band soloed much, probably
because if they had, the audience
would have known who to hold
responsible. Coleman, who once
blew a pretty mean alto, now
sounds as if he's been sedated by all
the Valium laced slop that the band
collectively dishes out.
Far more interesting than the
music were the band's costumes.
Coleman's suit looked like it had
once been a Christmas tree, and one
of the bass players wore a floures-
cent organge jumpsuit and carried
an instrument that looked like a
weapon from Star Wars.
As Prime Time ceased firing and
the audience left, I was reminded of
the first time I'd seen Coleman,
almost 18 years ago, at a concert in
Los Angeles. Admission was free,
but even that price was too high for
most of the audience, who began
walking out before Coleman was
halfway through his first number.
By the end of the performance there
were only a few of us left, and as we
stood up to go the man next to me
turned toward the stage, shook his
head hopelessly, and muttered to
Coleman "Hey man, what'd that
saxophone ever do to you?"
It's a shame to have to say it, but
his playing hasn't improved in all
these years.
By KERRY REGIER
One must maintain extremely intense concentration during any
Cecilian Ensemble concert,
something that was evident during
last weekend's performance.
It is not that the music was particularly esoteric or difficult. The
Bach D Minor Harpsichord Concerto, for example, is a reasonably
accessible work, and the Rameau
Piece de Concert No. 3 is very light,
easy music; the other works on the
program were similarly unchalleng-
ing.
The performances were not of
such grand and subtle stature that a
moment's inattention meant a failed experience. One of the most admirable things about the Cecilian
Ensemble is their light, direct approach to the music, never missing
an opportunity for real fun and
avoiding "scholarly" precision in
performance.
Not that their performances were
unscholarly, for they generally apply fine understanding of baroque
style to their richly sensuous performances.
The ensemble manages to bring
fresh enjoyment to 300-year-old
music with their emphatic rhythm
and passionate, dynamic phrasing.
While appreciating the fine messa di
voce that violinist Carlo Novi
displays, it is possible to have a lot
of good, simple fun.
This is where the concentration
becomes necessary. The members
of the Cecilian Ensemble have such
purely theatrical habits of gesture
and motion on stage that it is
almost impossible to watch them.
Novi's hip-rolling, or guest
violinist Christine Moran's almost
lordotic archings, or cellist Susie
Napper's aggessive thrusts with her
instrument — the intensity (and
idiosyncrasy) of these gestures and
the natural ease of their expression
makes them distracting.
Only by fixing my visual concentration on one anatomical feature is
it possible to free my attention
enough to fully enjoy the music.
But in no way must this be taken
to mean that they are not enjoyable
to watch. Most performers are so
entrapped by the ritual Of classical
music concerts that it is difficult to
distinguish them on stage.
Not only do they work hard to
look alike, that is like the ideal
classical performer in all their
Olympian calm; but they work hard
to sound alike as well. Violinists try
to sound like Perlman, singers like
Sutherland, and so on. And it is
dreadfully dull.
The fact of Novi's looking like he
should be playing bluegrass, his appearance of being a real human being on stage and not just a performing machine — this kind of individuality makes him, and the
Cecilian Ensemble, a real delight to
watch and hear.
Armatrading electrifying
By BRIAN BYRNES
It was obvious from her first
appearance on stage that Joan Armatrading had a surprise for the
sold out crowd at her recent concert.
Known for being shy and
reserved in concert, Armatrading
strutted on stage clad in a shiek
white pantsuit, with an impressive
electronic band. Backed by this
talented group of musicians, Armatrading presented a new sound
to coincide with her new image.
After opening with Walk Under
Ladders to introduce her album of
the same name, Armatrading
spent most of the first set doing
some of the soft and sensitive
pieces that have helped her accumulate a large enthusiastic
following and a number of gold
records.
In the concert's second set, the
band cut loose with a number of
upbeat rocking pieces including a
supercharged tune called Eating
The Bear. The audience loved it
and needed little encouragement
from Armatrading to leave their
seats and boogie in front of the
stage.
The audience was so taken with
Armatrading's energy that they
forgave a number of minor disappointments. These included the
performance by the opening
group, The Robert Cray Band
from Portland.
The band did a number of blues
pieces but none were particularly
memorable. Another slight irritation was the long wait between the
exit of the opening band and Ar-
matrading's entrance.
The last problem was the most
disturbing.    Armatrading's   new
sound utilizes synthesizers and at
times they distorted rather than
added to the band's crisp and
precise playing.
Armatrading closed with a sensitive rendition of Willow with the
audience joining in. And though
her new sound and driving backup
band are really exciting, this song,
with the band playing lightly in
the background, was symbolic of
an older Armatrading: an artist
who is powerful because of her
sensitive vocals alone.
ARMATRADING . . . combines rock, new wave, reggae
Glass shatters music myths
By GREG FJETLAND
The Phillip Glass ensemble has
cracked a few preconceptions about
music in this town. The Vancouver
New Music Society concert at the
Granville Island Arts Club theatre
played to a full house, and on the
strength of Sunday's concert could
play to many more.
Glass's music is unique and in
some ways international in scope.
In his compositions he uses such
diverse instruments as voice, electric organ, saxaphone (base, alto,
tenor and soprano), piccolo, flute
and grand piano.
The compositions have distinct
tinges of Oriental, Balinese,
classical, rock and jazz influences
and his work is somewhat similar to
the recent works of Brian Eno and
Steve Reich. But Glass avoids
Reich's preoccupation with percussion and is much more strident and
forceful than Eno, though no less
subtle.
The Glass compositions are characterized by a braided texture: rifts
repeated and transposed, repeated
and reinterpreted. It is often dense
wall of sound which prompted
some audience members to call for
a decrease in volume after the first
piece. Glass and the mixperson fortunately ignored the call.
The music is at first disorienting
and even maddening; after all, there
is no refrain or melody or beat, only
a frenetic pace of intertwined
repetitions. There is limited
development in most of the pieces
and the lengthy compositions sound
as if they begin and end arbitrarily.
But a curious thing happens after
while. Your wandering thoughts are
quieted, your attention is fixated
and the mind becomes as clear as
glass.
The questioning ceases and the
mind is fixated on the intricacies of
the ineffable music; listening for
that favorite rift, finding new sub-
rhythms, being shocked by an
abrupt change in the piece, being
tugged up and down the scale or being mesmerized by the chanting of
the vocalist Dora Ohrenstein. In
one piece she matches the sax note
for note for a good ten minutes.
When each piece abruptly ends, the
silence is like a splash of cold water
and the pause before audience applause is uncharacteristically long.
Indeed, the stamina of the entire
ensemble is worthy of comment
for all the pieces were at least 15
minutes long and they were played
at a frantic pace. The technical vir-
tuousity and sheer physical endurance prompted a nearly complete standing ovation at the concert's end.
The standing ovation was not
complete perhaps because audience
members were bothered by some
different aspects of the performance. The performance lacked
"showmanship," or personal
touch.
Glass spoke on only one occasion: to announce the release of his
new album in two weeks, and introduced the ensemble members. A
few words would have gone a long
ways to dispel his apparent aloff-
ness.
The works were also similar in
several aspects. At times the strains
of one composition could be heard
in another.
This is disconcerting considering
that the pieces spanned over ten
years in Glass's career. It is not too
much to hope that Glass would
have matured and developed artistically over the decade and yet
this is not readily in evidence. Still,
these are concerns beyond the experience of the music and on that
level, Glass succeeds. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Mai
UBYSSEY
PHOTO
CONTEST
T   T
u: i: i a
GRAND PRIZE PHOTO: JANICE PESHKE
ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPE: W. JAMES MORRIS
NUDES: JOSEPHINE MASSARELLA
THE PHOTOGRAPHER: ANDREW BALDWIN
UP CLOSE: LORENE OIKAWA
The Grand Prize, won by Janice Peshke, is a Chinon CE-4
shutter priority automatic camera with f 1.9 lens.
Each of the other winning contestants will receive a 16 by 20
inch framed colour enlargement of the photo of their choice.
Kits Cameras donated all prizes.
The Ubyssey staff thanks all participating photographers for
their submissions. Your photos can be picked up anytime at
SUB 241k.
So, the second annual Ubyssey photo contest comes to an
end. The response this year topped last year's — there were
approximately four times the entries for this year's contest.
Overall quality was better and the judges had a tough time
when it came down to the final decisions.
Hopefully this will be an exponential trend, and next year
we will be deluged with entries — maybe go on to a spin-off,
perhaps a movie . . .
See all you shutterbugs same time, same place next year —
at The Ubyssey, which has all the nudes that are fit to print.
i*'\
■J.'* ■:.
%.A
•%.<$,
I*. 112,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 12, 1982
[   VL<f^
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IMTReDoP
PUYIM6 GAUSS!
CANT fie JUST
TALK ?...
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The Ubyssey staff and millions of other students will be vigorously protesting this loss and the inadequate funding of post secondary education in B.C. at a rally today.
Free buses leave SUB at 1 p.m. The march starts at 1:30 p.m. at the Queen Elizabeth theatre at Georgia and
Beatty, leading to a rally at Robson square at 2 p.m.
Letters
Differential fees an unjust contribution
At present in Canada many provinces (e.g. Ontario) apply differential fees to foreign students attending university. Likewise in the
U.S. and Great Britain, visa
students pay dearly for their education. Countries such as France,
West Germany and other provinces
like B.C. and Manitoba do not differentiate between national and
foreigners when it comes to tuition
fees. In fact, West Germany offers
attractive   packages   to   foreigners
covering minimal fees, access to
residences, generously subsidized
food etc.
This brings us to James C. Burdon's letter of Feb. 26, in which he
goes into great detail with figures.
He suggests that by charging
foreign students at UBC differential
fees, the shortfall in the university's
budget of nearly $8 million could be
met.He expects the foreign students
to pay an extra $6 million in tuition
fees. That works out at an extra
$6,000 to $7,000 per student in addition to current tuition and the
related cost such as accommodation, books and so on which international students already contribute
to the economy. If UBC set tuition
fees at $7,000 to $8,000 or more for
American students, the figure of
less than 3.5 per cent of the university's total enrolment would
change dramatically, making UBC
accessible only to those who have
privileged  positions  in  their  own
Show impending cuts unfair
Recently the board of governors
approved an increase in our tuition
fees for next year, up an average of
32 per cent, while giving you less for
it in financial cutbacks in the
university budget which means laying off of teachers, teaching
assistants, staff, cutting back on
library budgets, etc. What will the
scenario be for next year?
The present economic picture of
B.C., Canada, and for that matter
the rest of the world is not good.
We are experiencing a deepening
world-wide recession which will
mean a million unemployed in
Canada this year. Inflation has
slowed down somewhat but not
enough. The American market for
our provincial lumber, which is the
largest source of provincial
revenues, is down dramatically. The
Socred government is following an
economic policy of cutting government expenditures.
Recently the premier announced
a wage increase ceiling of 10 per
cent for government workers. This
is only the first step in this policy.
The government axe is out, and it's
being sharpened for the vicious cuts
in government expenditures I fear
will come in the next fiscal year.
Post secondary education is the
most likely of the social services to
be chopped in the upcoming provincial budget. The future of many
young people will be affected by
these cuts when they become reality.
The trend has been set — there
will be continued cuts to post
secondary education. This will inevitably lead to higher tuition rates
Make business pay
for the students of UBC in the
future; the question is "how high?"
I fear that the Socreds are going to
savagely cut our funding unless
unless we are prepared to
demonstrate our concerns over the
developing trends.
We have to show these politicians
in Victoria, and Ottawa, that impending cuts are unfair and
detrimental to the interest of our
society. We must rally public support for our cause. We have to
register for the upcoming provincial
election. We have to become more
politically active. If we fail to do
these things, the future of post-
secondary education and the future
of our society will be irrepairably
harmed. If you care, march with the
students of this province at a rally
scheduled for Friday, March 12.
Let's demonstrate to the governments of Canada that we mean
business. Tefry Cox
director of administration.
countries and thus preventing those
students whose countries can most
use their Canadian Education from
obtaining it. By the way, the figure
of 3.5 per cent is not an estimate as
Mr. Burdon suggests, it is a fact,
available at the registrar's office.
According to Mr. Burdon, Ontario
and the U.S. are "right" and B.C.
is "wrong," "foolish" and "sentimental" in not enforcing differential fees.
By this "wrong," B.C. encourages foreign students to its
shores; foreign students from all
classes of society, from many different countries.
By this "foolishness," B.C. encourages an interplay of ideas and
culture between Canadian and
visitors to Canada.
By this "sentimentality," B.C.
encourages people of different
languages and of different flags to
get together in Peace.
"That Brotherhood May
Prevail" — International House
Motto.
"Peace Through
Understanding" — Rotary Club
Motto.
Unfortunately today, many
countries in the developed world
pay no heed to the above two mot-
tos and only look at particular bank
balances . . . "more cash needed
for defence, cut education, cut
welfare, cut Third World aid, cut
"Sentimentality," maybe, but if
we want our children to have
children and one of the most effective ways of doing this is in the creation and maintenance of a campus
which both welcomes and encourages the presence of an international community of scholars.
Syed Askari
(India)
Judy Bissoondatt
(Canada)
Yoko Sumida (Japan)
Eyob Goitom
(Ethiopia)
Kevin Shelly
graduate chemistry student
(Ireland)
Rainer Schams
(West Germany)
Felipe Gutierrez
(Chile)
El Salvador needs SUS
There have been a number of letters lately which have given support
to the government propaganda
campaign that foreign students
should be further attacked by way
of the imposition of differential
fees. The gist of these letters is that
foreign students have come here for
some sort of free ride. This is absolutely false.
The vast majority of foreign
students are no different from the
rest of us and have come to university to get the best available education in order to make the maximum
contribution to the world. They
must overcome numerous obstacles
to get here and have to face
countless difficulties over and
above those which Canadian
students already face. The reason
most foreign students have come
here to get an education is that in
their countries there are neither sufficient nor satisfactory facilities
available for training in the fields
they wish to follow. The reason for
that is not that these students want
a free ride but that the multinationals which have been draining
the resources of their countries for
so long have been getting a free
ride. While reaping maximum profit they have contributed nothing.
Not a very different situation from
that we face.
We must not allow divisions to be
made between Canadian students
and foreign students which will only
weaken all of us. The position we
must take is that the multinationals
must be made to pay for the education of students from
underdeveloped countries.
Garnet Colly
committee to fight the fee hike
As I'm sure you are all aware, my
country is having an election on
March 28. The trouble is my generals arw I are having a hard time
convincing the world that the election will be fair and democratic.
Even though our friends Ronnie
and Al have given us unlimited support in our quest for peace and justice, we feel we may not succeed.
Therefore we ask for your help. We
have heard rumors that the UBC
science undergraduate society is renowned for its upholding of democratic principles. Could a few SUS
members please come down and
help supervise our election to ensure
that it will be as democratic as yours
was? Thanks. How did you guys do
it?
Jose Napoleon Duarte
president El Salvador
And now it's time C
Sonfest, a tradition at UBC since
the 20s began as a strictly choral
contest. It has recently evolved into
a fast-paced and exciting musical
evening. The 1982 performance was
held last Friday, March 5'.
My thanks, on behalf of all the
performers, the United Way and
the Songfest Committee, to all the
UBC students who attended the
show. Through your support, the
fraternities and sororities here at
UBC managed to raise several
thousands of dollars for the United
Way of the Lower Mainland.
I trust that you all enjoyed the
show, and hope to see you in attendance this time next year.
Mark Hilton, Comm 3
Songfest '82
THE UBYSSEY
March 12, 1982
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It is important to write a good masthead, that is what this is, because after sports and grey boxes it is
the most read part of the peper. How one writes a masthead depends on how long one has been on the
paper. The six years plus people, like the failures last year, use a lot of drugs. The 3 to 4 year people use
a little drugs or a lot of beer. Second year types, like your agent, just write what comes into their
heads. It is the first year people you have to worry about. They ask questions like what should I say?
These rookies II know this is a tacky word but I lost my thesaurus and I have no time to look for it
because I have to get back to the frat to study my engineering) also think the masthead must be funny.
Then you have to explain that nothing they write will be funny as the fact that our province is being run
by a guy with a grade 12 education. The most important thing, you tell these first year reporters, is to
get all the names in. Friday, March 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Purists offended
King Lear tamed
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
King Lear — you know the name
of King Lear. You know the fame
of King Lear. Ten times too big for
the stage.
King Lear
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Donald Soule
At the Freddy Wood Theatre
until Feb. 13
Donald Soule tries to stress in the
program that King Lear is "too
huge for the stage." Indeed it is the
theatre's King Kong. It's too big
and too powerful to be controlled.
No one can predict when it will
grasp a helpless actor or director in
its huge paw, gripping them so
tightly they are unable to move,
limiting their freedom and preventing them from doing anything but
crying for help.
In terms of its magnitude it is a
monster work. There are so many
potential plays in every character.
The University of Victoria staged a
play this year called Edmund and
Edgar, which examined the relationship between the two brothers
and cutting all the scenes not essential to that particular subplot.
The Edmund-Edgar subplot
alone has enough material for a
substantial play.
In the main plot, Lear says much
about dignity, cruelty, trust, pride,
old age, love and so many other
aspects of our reality. But that is
Shakespeare, and Lear is possibly
Shakespeare's best.
The interesting question is, what
did the Freddy Wood production
do to it? First, Soule made a move
to offend Shakespeare purists, and
(gasp) tampered with the order of
scenes. He (serious gasp) added
things. He subtracted things. He
shortened Shakespeare's epic to run
only three hours with intermissions
(sigh of relief). And he had the Fool
and Cordelia, the loving daughter,
played by the same actor.
Set designer Terry Bennett turned
the stage into a wooden orange
crate with bars at the back, coat
rack tombstones dotting the floor
and an altar-like stone in the centre.
Add 18 actors of varying ability
and you've got Lear.
Leon Powell appeared comfortable as Lear, the foolish and "fond
old man" blinded by pride, overcome by madness and forced into
an early retirement by two thankless
daughters. He made the audience
care about Lear the man.
Catherine Stokes was successful,
though sometimes difficult to
understand through her thick accent as the Fool. But she was not
quite as loving a Cordelia as might
be expected. She seemed a bit too
distant from her" father, a bit too
cool. In fact, the relationship between Stokes and Pownall appeared
strained in both directions.
As for what Soule might have
been saying by having Stokes play
both parts, that's anyone's guess.
It's a student production (at least
partially) so is couldn't have been a
salary matter. Was he making the
cynical statement that any on s as
sincere as Cordelia is always a Fool?
Unlikely. Perhaps, he felt
Shakespeare intended the Fool and
Cordelia to be one and the same.
There is evidence in the script.
Shakespeare never has them appear
together. Kent wears a disgjise.
When Lear lifts the body of his
beloved daughter at the play's close
he sobs, "My poor little fool." Or
is there another reason? No wonder
the production is punctuated by
music that sounds like it was used
for an '80s synthesizer update of the
Twilight Zone.
There were some good performances in Lear and some acceptable ones. Kieron Jecchinis as Edmund was good. The bastard son
came across as callous and devious
enough to out-Machiavelli the big
Mach himself. Errol Durbach a; the
loyal Kent and Brian Parkinson as
the moral Albany also came off
well.
Stephen Aberle as Edgar,
however, was a bit too simpy to be
believed for much of the play. Near
the end he grew into a much more
convincing character. Stanley
Weese came across more like
Polonius than Gloucester in the early scenes and was completely unconvincing in his agony when the
fiery-tempered Cornwall (Jerry
Wasserman) plucked his eyes out,
but became more believable in late
scenes.
King Lear is easily the Freddy
Wood's best production since The
Caretaker and does a good jod of
proving that UBC productions
don't have to rely solely on equity
actors, as The Caretaker did. Still,
it is a production designed
specifically for people who already
know the play. Those who don't
must be content with the visual effects and the comfy seats. But at a
university it seems a fair risk to
take.
Soule knew just what tricks to use
to jump-start the audience as attention began to wane. His best
maneouvre was placing a high
energy battle in the middle of the
third act. This did a nice job of ensuring the audience would be con-
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scious enough too appreciate the
finale despite their movie and television conditioned two-hour attention spans. Some bright flashes of
light also helped.
Lear is a monster of a play to
produce, but Soule's apology in the
program was unnecessary. He and
his cast tamed it admirably. And
for their next trick they'll tray and
get it to climb the Empire State
Building. Would you believe,
maybe, the Ladner Clock Tower?
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TIME HAS COME . . .
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Check your mailboxes or pick up and application
from the
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
Applications must bo returned by
MARCH 26, 1982.
•All AMS Clubs eligible.
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7 days per week
Weekdays Weekends
Sheraton Villa, Bby 6:45 a.m.
Sheraton Landmark, Robson St.             7:00 a.m. 7:10 a.m.
International Plaza, N. Van.                      7:15 a.m. 7:30 a.m.
arriving Blackcomb day lodge approx. 9:15 a.m.
FOR RETURN TO VANCOUVER
Depart Blackcomb Day Lodge 4:15 p.m.
Depart Village Bus Stop 4:30 p.m.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE GRAY LINE BOOTHS AT
THE SHERATON LANDMARK AND HOTEL
311 Escape VANCOUVER 0R AT THE BUS-
1 ROUfeS       RESERVATIONS REQUIRED   BLACKCOMB
I* CALL: 430-2131 SNOWPHONE
(604) 430-21 31 (604) 687-7507
Leaving Weekends Only from S. U.B. in front of Bank of Montreal 6:30 a.m. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 12,1982
W
Fween Classes
r.
1
I ft.
TODAY
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for Storm tha wall (man and
woman) and iron man (woman), by 3:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym 203.
UBC va WHITECAP RE8ERVE8
Soccer game for the cfty championship, at a part
of open houaa festivities, come out and support
UBC against the CAPS, 7 p.m., Thunderbird
stadium.
PHY8ICAL EDUCATION OPEN HOUSE
Demonstration on motor control and motor
learning, i.e.. How your neuromuscular system
functions during physical activity, open house is
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. War Memorial gym,
LSM
Happy hour/cheap refreshments, 4 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
Worship with Rev. Ray Shuttz, noon, Lutheran
Campus centre.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth and letters for prisoners,
noon, SUB foyer.
BSA
Dr. Grant Mark lectures on Metaloprotein-elec-
tron transfer, noon, IRC G41.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Rami Raz, director of the Israeli Aliyah centre
and a panel of students will speak on opportunities to work, travel and study in Israel, noon,
Hillel House (behind Brock Hal).
FIRST YEAR ENGINEERING
Dance, 7-12 p.m., SUB party room.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
This month's newsletter with the election details
is now available. Election deadline is March 16.
Office hours are Wednesday and Thursday
noon, until March 16, IRC GX.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Bzzr Garden to meet the new executive, 4 to 7
p.m., SUB 212.
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
There will be music from 12 noon to 1 p.m., then
buses will transport people to the demonstration.
Buses and music at SUB.
CITR UBC
UBC Radio CITR is going FM on April 1. To herald in this new era of Vancouver radio, an Air
Pollution party is being held in SUB ballroom
with three bands: Popular Front, 54/40, and
Rhythm Mission. Tickets are $5 at AMS box office. Don't miss this event, door prizes awarded.
Party at 8 p.m.
Program: noon. Mini Concert, The Undertones;
3 p.m.. Dateline International, a look at the state
of the world; after 6 p.m. news. Campus Capsule, campus news roundup; 8 p.m., Mini Concert, Comsat Angels; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, the
neglected album: Modern Lovers: Back In Your
Life; cable 100 fm.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12 noon to 1 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CITIZENS AGAINST THE
UNDERMINING OF SCIENCE EDUCATION
A new talk every hour on the theme: Creation
"science" is non-science, 11 a.m. to 5p.m., Biosci 2000.
SATURDAY
CITIZENS AGAINST THE
UNDERMINING OF SCIENCE EDUCATION
A new talk every hour on the theme: Creation
"science" is non-science, 10a.m. to 9p.m., Biosci 2000.
INTRAMURALS
Outdoor adventure cycling tour, good exerciaa
and beautiful sights, aH day. Pander leland.
Men's Totem tennis championship, alt day, Arm-
oriea.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION OPEN HOUSE
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THE HISPANIC CULTURAL WORKSHOP
and THE SPANISH DEPARTMENT
The theatre production of Picnic on the Battlefield by Fernando Arrabal ia being shown at 4:30
p.m., at International Houae. Admission is free.
CITR UBC
Program: noon. Mini Concert, Jamea White and
the Blacks; 4:30 p.m.. Stage and Screen, film
and theatre reviews; 6-9:30 p.m.. The Import
Show with the infamous Terry McBride; 8 p.m..
Mini Concert, Bauhaua; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, the
classic album, Chris Spedding: Hurt; cable 100
fm.
ORIENTEERING UBC
Introduction to adventure running, a unique
combination of running and navigation, free admission, 1 p.m., Robert Burnaby park, Burnaby,
B.C.
SUNDAY
INTRAMURALS
Outdoor adventure canoeing trip, all day, Alou-
ett river.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everybody welcome, 10 p.m.. Aquatic
centre.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride, meet at south side of SUB at 9 a.m.
CITR UBC
Program: 8 a.m.-12 noon. Music of Our Time,
unusual, mostly modern, classical music; 12
noon-2:30 p.m.. The Folk Show, mostly Canadian, mostly traditional folk music; 2:30-6 p.m..
Rabble Without a Pause, a lunatic musical view
of the world; 3 p.m., Laughing Matters, a look at
the history and content of recorded comedy; 11
p.m.. Final Vinyl, CITR #1 playlist album: Various: Things are still coming ashore; cable 100
fm..
IVCF
Sound and Substance featuring Salmond and
Mulder, free admission, 8:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
MONDAY
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Seminar on The poetic language of Czeslaw
Milasz by professor Stanislaw Baranczak, department of Slavic Languages and Literatures,
Harvard University, 3:30 p.m., Buchanan 2230.
CITR UBC
Program: noon. Mini Concert, The English Beat;
3 p.m., The Melting Pot, a look at research at
UBC; 4:30 p.m., Everything Stops For Tea, cultural programming for the cultured masses; 7
p.m., Off Beet, try this one out: the world's
worst radio show; 8 p.m.. Mini Concert, Kate
Bush; 9:30 p.m.-l a.m.. The Jazz Show with
Shelley Freedman; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, a jazz album feature; cable 100 fm.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Justice T. R. Berger of the B.C. Supreme Court
will speak on: Federalism and Canada's native
people, noon. Law building 101/102.
Walker Stogan and Verna Kirkness speak on:
Native Indian traditions and contemporary Indian
issues, noon, Scarfe 100.
|       Hot Flashes       I
Rally against
education cuffs
The future of post secondary
education in B.C. is on the line.
Pretty heavy stuff, right? Well,
the Alma Mater Society and the
Student for an Accessible Education are doing something about it
by co-sponsoring a march and rally
this afternoon to show the Socreds
that students are annoyed at continual cutbacks and 33 per cent tuition fee increases.
UBC students will join those from
Capilano College, Douglas College,
Vancouver Community College,
and that other university across
town, at 1:30 at the Queen
Elizabeth theatre (Georgia and
Beatty), and march to Robson
square for a rally at 2 p.m. Buses
leave UBC at 1 p.m.
You don't have to be a radical to
participate. In fact, a few hundred
engineers, the last bastion of conservatism on campus, are expected
to attend.
UBC opens up
UBC is opening its doors.
In an attempt to show off what
we have, instead of what we don't
have because of cutbacks, the
university will be showing off the
"north end" of campus this Friday
and Saturday.
Displayed will be science,
physical education, arts, commerce, and law. There will also be
free admission to both the aquatic
centre and the museum of an-
tropology all day Friday and Saturday.
UBC will play the Whitecaps
reserves (not SFU as originally
scheduled) in soccer at 7 p.m., Friday   at   T-bird   stadium.
Staph meets
The Ubyssey is having another
staff meeting.
To be discussed: our current
autonomy drive, the proposed constitution, the budget, and the great
revolution.
Saturday, 1:30 p.m., Sanford-
Batdrey's place. Do other people
live in that house?
TUESDAY
CLASSICS CLUB
Lecture: The New Achaeans, all welcome, 8
p.m., Buchanan penthouse.
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Continuous showing of Helen Caldicotf s new
movie: If You Loved This Planet, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.,
SUB foyer.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture: Literature and censorship in contemporary Poland by Stanislaw Baranczak, department of Slavic languages and literatures, Harvard University, noon, Buchanan 203.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: A Time To Rise, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Yehudi Amichai, winner of the Israel prize for
poetry in 1961, will read his poetry, noon, Buchanan 106.
AMS CONCERTS
Punchlines; stand up comedy, noon, SUB auditorium.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Meeting to choose colors, noon. Bio 2449.
CITR UBC
Program: Mini Concert, Rockpile; S p.m.,
Thunderbird Report, UBC sports; after 6 p.m.
news. In Sight, UBC issues in perspective; 8
p.m.. Mini Concert, The Velvet Underground; 11
p.m.. Final Vinyl, a new album TBA; cable 100
fm.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Robert Sterling, director of education for the
Nicola Valley tribal council will speak on: Indian
culture and education, noon, Scarfe 100.
Yvonne Hebert and Joe Michel speak on: How
languages are similar and different: A look at the
Okanagan language, 1:30 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology theatre.
Dr. Mike Kew will speak on central coast Salish
art: Engraving on wood and horn, noon. Museum of Anthropology theatre.
CO-OP SOUP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12 noon-1 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
LSLAP
Free legal advice, noon-2:30 p.m., SUB 111.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Professor Sanders on Canadian Indians and the
Constitution: The politics of indigenous peoples,
noon. Law 169.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 237b.
WEDNESDAY
COMMITTEE TO FIGHT THE FEE HIKE
Meeting: Discussion on organizing the fee hike
strike, noon, SUB 213.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Slide show, noon, SUB 111.
CITR UBC
Program: noon. Mini Concert, The Ramonez;
after 6 p.m. news, CITR's Weekly Editorial with
the wonderful Joe March; 8 p.m., Mini Concert,
Brian Ferry; 11 p.m.. Final Vinyl, yep, another
new album; cable 100 fm.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Native Indian elders perform songs, stories and
dances, 1 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology, Great
Hall.
Native uses of the cedar tree, a demonstration by
Wally Henry and native students, 3:30 p.m., Museum of Anthropology theatre.
Native Indian education students drama presentation, 11 a.m.. International House.
Madeline Rowan gives an introduction to Using
the Museum of Anthropology, 10 a.m., Museum
of Anthropology theatre.
CO-OP KITCHEN
Cheap nutritious lunches, 12 noon-1 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
What does born again mean, anyway?, noon,
Hebb 12.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Wyne and cheese party, 3:30 p.m., Buchanan
penthouse.
Discussion group: Department members will discuss how and why they became interested in
history and their particular approaches to the
profession, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
CHESS CLUB
General meeting and election of executives for
1982-83 academic year, noon, SUB 215.
The original 10%
student break at
Monday through Wednesday only
(Student ID   required)
The leaders in hair design
Cuts — Men $15.00     Women $22.00
Perms — Men $35.00     Women $40.00 and up
Streaks, color, hennas and conditioners
also competitively priced.
[2529 Alma St. at Broadway Mon -Fri. - 9:00-7:30
[Telephone: 224-2332 Sat. - 9:00-5:00
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THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - t Idm, 1 day IfJfc
Commsfsiel - S Bnw, 1 day MJfc
waftJt
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advanea. DaadKnaia Kk30a.m. tha day baton pobMcadon.
PuUkatkm OHka, Room241. S.U.B., UPC Van., B.C YST2AB
5 — Coming Events
CUSO
GRADUATING AND
THEN WHAT?
ENGLISH-TESL-MATH/
SCIENCE-AGRICULTURE-
BUSINESS-HOME
ECONOMICS-PUBLIC
HEALTH-ENGINEERING-
MEDICAL FIELDS-ETC. ETC.
Think about sharing your newly acquired skills.
Sharing them with the people of developing nations in Africa, South East Asia, Latin America,
the Caribbean. CUSO offers involvement that
lasts a lifetime!
For information please contact the CUSO office-
International Houaa, UBC
Phone: 228-4886 (a.m.)
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. DENNIS CHITTY
Zoology UBC
Do Lemmings
Commit Suicide?
Dr. Chitty, a professor emeritus of
zoology, has received the Master
Teacher Award for his outstanding
lectures and research.
LECTURE HALL 2, WOODWARD
BUILDING, SAT., MARCH 13
AT 8:15 P.M.
DONT MISS THE STICKERS and the Foghorn Leghorn Band, Monday, March 15 in
the Hot Air Show at the Pit.
FORTEENTH ANNUAL UBC  BED  RACE
11:00 Saturday, March 27. Enter by calling
224-9620. Trophy, barbecue and following
mega party by Sigma Chi.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store full of ski
wear, hockey equipment, sleeping bags,
jogging shoes, soccer boots, racquets of all
kinds, and dozens of other items at very attractive prices. 3615 W. Broadway.
REBOUND EXERCISERS. Excellent quality
(2 year warranty) at student prices,
873-0812 days or 734-0448 eves.
11 — For Sale — Private
DRYSUIT TO FIT approx. 5'T1", 140 lb.
person. Tank, regulator, depth/pressure
gauge, compass, weights. All in excellent
condition. $750. Phone 734-5362 eves,
only.
69 MACH I MUSTANG. Custom paint and
body. 4 spd. Candy apple red. Flares,
spoiler mags, lowers, etc. Beautiful in and
out. Must be seen. $6000 obo. 669-5115 or
522-0884, Doreen.
LOVESEAT. excellent condition, $125. Gold/
Brown rug, 7V4x11V4, $95. Wallhanging,
$25. 732-0661, Ev.
'80 LASER w. extras, hardly used. Replacement $2340. Asking $1900. Dave,
738-1587; messages, 922-8228.
20 — Housing
REQUIRED for Summer Session '82 (July,
August) 1 or 2 bedroom apartment or
house. Will sublet or swap (have a house
one block from ocean in Qualicum Beach).
Write Box 792, Qualicum Beach V0R 2T0 or
phone collect 752-9734 eve. or 757-8487
days, Jennifer.
30 — Jobs
PERMANANT   PART-TIME    POSITION
working alternate weekends and holidays in
a residential program for young adults with
neurological disabilities. Must be able to
relate to people on one-to-one basis. Must
work well within team approval. Send
resume to 3812 Osier Street, Vancouver,
V6H 2W8.
THE NATIONAL
TESTING CENTRE
REGIONAL DIRECTOR
The National Testing Centre requires
a regional director to organize and
administer its LSAT, GMAT and
CAT review courses in Vancouver.
Candidate must work well with people and have exceptional organizational skills. This is an opportunity to
earn substantial part-time income.
To interview please call 689-1019.
50 — Rentals
LARGE  TWO   BEDROOM   APARTMENT
in downtown Montreal. Near McGill, Concordia. To sublet May 1st. Terms open.
Telephone 514-934-1709.
65 — Scandals
*25 PAID TO SMOKERS participating in
research !4 hour daily (sometime between
2:30 and 5:30), Mon.-Fri. for two weeks.
Call 228-8852 and ask for Jerry.
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
85 - Typing
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers
factums, letters manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.)
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
WORD PROCESSING. We prepare research
and term papers, resumes and reports in
several languages. Ask for our special student rates. Phone Ellen at 734-7313 or
271 6924.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Near campus.
266-5053
TYPING - Special Student Rates. Fitness
Ef Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670
Yew Street, Phone 226-6814.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING-$10.00./hr.
Equation typing available. Pickup and
delivery. Phone Jeeva, 826-5169 (Mission).
FEELING FRAZZLED? Let me type that
paper for you. Thoroughly experienced and
dependable. Call Iona in North Van.,
985-4929.
RESUMES. ESSAYS. THESES. Fast, pro
fessional typing. Phone Lisa, 873-2823 or
732-9902 and request our student rate.
90 - Wanted
YOU CAN BUILD a substantial income in
less than six months marketing AMS/oil
synthetic lubricants in your spare time.
Phone 874-4934 betw. 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous
GURU SHEV-IMPALA
Join the 4-H-O Fellowship and
learn about the Retread Retreat
and the Stream of Traffic Consciousness! Your membership
includes poster, button,
membership card and letter from
the Guru!
HILARIOUS FUN
Only $4.95
Send cheque or money order to:
Suite 136-810 W. Broadway
Dept. U. Vancouver, B.C.
V5Z 1J8 Friday, March 12,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
vista
I was down and out, looking for
a good time and decent entertainment.
The telly was broken, with a
splintered beer bottle where the picture tube used to be. Hell, the world
was going to shreds, and the events
of the past week did nothing to ease
me into the weekend. Even my
movie idol was found dead, having
choked on cocaine.
I decided to make a personal trek
across town, with the superlative
Vista column as my solemn guide.
Suddenly, I saw my life as a Fellini
movie, with women in white and
grotesque, peering faces all over the
place.
What was it about Fellini that
made him great? Come to think of
it, I had forgotten, with Satyricon a
vague memory. Fortunately, the
Hollywood theatre was presenting a
Fellini double bill this week, with
Satyricon and Roma as the two offerings. With an admission price of
$2.75, it was the best damn movie
bargain in town.
But then it was only last week
that Vista said Last Call was the
best thing playing in town. A Monday trek down at City Stage — pay
what you can afford night — proved disappointing; the polemics were
shallow, the arguments just
rhetorical. But people were still
praising it and liking it. The number
for reservations is 688-1436.
Support a student production,
I thought, and William
Shakespeare's The Tragedy of King
Lear immediately came to mind.
My Shakespeare prof was ranming
it down his students' throat; and I
felt compelled to support Freddy
Wood, despite the fact tha.t they
hadn't done any Joe Orton ir years.
A call to the person at the other end
of 228-2678 said the production,
which runs till tomorrow, wis sold
out, but some tickets would still be
available before showtime.
This being cutbacks protest Friday, I remembered that the Langara
theatre program had been hit badly,
with cuts up to 50 per cent. Why
not support their version of the
Ronald Reagan story, Equus, by
Peter Shaffer and try to erase the
bad memory I had of the Sidney
Lumet film five years ago? At
Studio 58 until March 20.
Also, the Surrey Art Gallery was
also presenting a photo exhibition
of Bill Brandt's works at the Surrey
Arts Centre, 13750—88th avenue.
More information could be extracted from Rose Ho, at 596-7461.
Musically speaking, I wasn't interested in any VSO concerts this
week, but my french prof did push
the Vancouver Opera club's Romeo
and Juliette, such in operatic
French with ushers doing English
mime. The production started
tomorrow, and as my Milton prof
would say it, the program seemed
positively barogue. 687-4444 was
the number to call for more information.
Nothing really tickled my fancy,
though. I still felt down and out in
Walter Gage. The next thing 1
knew, I was in the kitchen, staring
at a packet of cocaine, which was
right next to the white cockroach
powder in the Safeway plastic veggie bag. To tell you the truth, I
always felt close to Belushi.
Your hairs
on fire
Okay, so the headline's a lie.
But while you're here
just imagine our 15 monstrous,
gigantic, scrumptious, creative
burgers; our huge, crunchy
salads, and other great stuff, too!
Yummy
2966 West 4th Avenue at
Bayswater. Open 7 days a week,
from 11:30 a.m. till God knows
when.
Now the truth: there's a
hamster in your pants.
lit
SUMMER JOBS
INSIGHT EDITOR
— Produces a Student Handbook to be
given out at Registration.
— Responsible for Copy, Layout, Securing of Articles, Proof-Reading,
Etc.
PATHFINDER EDITOR
— Produces a UBC Events Calendar
Both Positions Are Paid
Applications Available SUB 238
CLOSES MARCH 24/82
II
Supervalu
3250 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER
HEINZ
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10 oz.
788
LANCIA PASTAS
$
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1.29
PERRIER WATER
24 OZ.
GOLDEN GROVE
APPLE JUICE
1 LITRE
ea.
NALLEYS
POTATO CHIPS
200 G.
COKE or CANADA DRY
CLUB SODA
2/OAc
750 ML
799
plus deposit
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES.
Vancouver's No. 1 Poster Shop
POSTER W§
We have the Largest Selection
& Lowest Price in Town
942 Granville Mall
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Round
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Phone 1604) 224-0111
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
/"""ffl^fflffl^^
[Warning: Frequent very coarse language
■EETMX    & Tc%l.      -LIVE ON THE SUNSET STRIP
I
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
RICHARD PRYOR
Showtimes: 2:25. 4:10, 5:55. 7:45, 9:30
^"jffl^HJB^^
CORONET
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Warning: some gory
violence. B.C. Dir.
Showtimes:   2:15,
4:40. 7:25. 9:40
Amateur
JOHN SAVAGE     CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
Warning: Some JACK NICHOLSON   n
violence; occasional nuditv and suggestive ——__ aBm^a*a.Haataa*''akB******'^A
BORDER
B 51   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Showtimes: 2:00, 3:55, 6:00, 8:00. 10:05
OQEON
(mature)
JACK LEMMON
881 GRANVILLE violence; some coarse language &
682-7468 swearing. B.C. Dir
Warning: Occasional     CICCV ODA/TI/
dlJNbAR
I
Showtimes:   Odeon   2:
DUNBAR at 30th 7:15  9:45; Dunbar 7:30, 9:40
224-7252	
m.«, missing.
BASED ON A TRUE STORY
(mature)
Warning: Some coarse language and
swearing. B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 7:00. 9:15, plus 2 p.m. Sat.-Sun
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
10 NOMINATIONS INCL.
"BEST PICTURE"
HENRY FONDA
olden
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Warning: Occasional swearing. B.C.
Director.
Showtimes: 7:30, 9:40
224-3730
^437^WJOth^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
^mfjBmmm^BS^^
■ *-r*^^^-V_ Warning: Some nudity &
I   suggestive scenes; occasional violence. B.C. Dir.
L
Warning: Frix*uent coarse language;
(MATURE) some nudity. B.C. Dir.
nctEOTs fy|L
UnwRTtttjjri
PETER USTINOV
MOGGIE 6MITM
DIRNP RIGG
DROAdwAV
70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1927
Showtimes: 7:15, 9:15
WILLIAM HURT
BODY
HEAT
DROAdwAV
70 7 W. BROADWAY
Showtimes: 7:00, 9:30
An ALAN PARKER Film
Written by CHRISTOPHER GORE
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
Cinderella
THE FILM VERSION OF THE BALLET
FEATURING THE BOLSHOI BALLET
SUNDAY AT 2 P.M. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 12, 1982
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complete natural sound system for only $599.95. The R300
receiver delivers 30 watts RMS per channel at 0.015% THD. The
P350 semi-automatic turntable is equipped with an ADC 0302
l cartridge. Pulling it all together are 2-way NS-80 speakers.
*599
95
COMPLETE SYSTEM
l-W
r
I
SS110-IC
A
D
C
A BSR COMPANY
$199
95
A 10 band stereo frequency that allows you to control the
overall response and sound of your system. 10 bands of
equalization for each channel provide an almost infinite
number of possible frequency response variations.
O YAMAHA
^Wr K350
When using the K350 for recording, a live band and the
tape speak the same language. The bass is tight and the
voice is alive. The K350 will accept any tape make including metal. The direct-access transportation system
assures easy loading and unloading.
$319
95
Prosonic
Sport
About
PC4001
A mini stereo cassette player with FM radio
gives fabulous sound from lightweight headphones. Carrying case included.
$169*
100 FST
New and improved EPI 100 Speakers. Practical
power range 15-90 watts. Features EPI's famous
linear sound. 2-way system.
1*124
95
EACH
©SANYO
M1001
Mini-size executive cassette recorder has one
touch recording for convenient dictating. Cue
and review allow instant selection location.
Pause control.
$8995
^
M9901
(Not exactly as illustrated)
Sanyo 9901 AM/FM portable cassette recorder.
Two speakers, two built-in mikes, plus LED
recording level indicator.
*139*
^^^^     j^       ^^L        YOUR TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE m
Q&Osouno
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

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