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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII.No. 22
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 22,1985
228-2301
Smith favors porn censorship
By SUE McILROY
Scenes of mutilation, ritualistic
slaughter and the ripping apart of
human bodies in connection with
sexual acts should not be available
to anyone, B.C.'s attorney general
said Wednesday night.
"The majority of people in B.C.,
even those with strong qualms
about it, support censorship of this
kind of material," said Brian Smith
to 120 people during a public forum
at the Justice Institute.
The forum, to discuss a proposed
video tape classification scheme,
was sponsored by the UBC Alma
Mater Society and the University
Women's Club of Vancouver.
Under the new scheme, all videos
would be vetted by the B.C. film
classifier and some material would
be censored.
Sara Diamond, speaking for the
Vancouver Artist's League, said the
proposed act was dangerous and
was the wrong solution to the pornography problem.
"The  material  which  the  new
legislation is aimed at, such as
violent sex and kiddie porn, is
already illegal under the criminal
code of Canada but is sold under
the table anyway," Diamond said.
Smith said he was aware of the
problems of censorship, citing past
examples such as the banning of D.
H. Lawrence's novels. "However,
some of the materials in these
videos would make D. H. Lawrence
throw up," he said.
Under the proposed legislation,
four types of video material would
be banned: explicit sex acts involv
ing coersion or violence; extreme
scenes of brutality, maiming, torture or dismemberment; beastiality,
incest or necrophilia; and sexual
conduct with persons under eighteen years of age.
Retailers who sold videos which
were not approved by the film
classifier could be fined or have
their licenses revoked.
The new act would also require
that all films classified as adult be
kept in separate areas prohibited to
children.
Tom   Sandborn   of   Vancouver
— istvan pinter photo
CREATURE FROM THE black lagoon carries book on black holes to physics class while thinking black thoughts on a grey day.
Quebec colleges threatened by book vandals
MONTREAL (CUP) — Mutilation of library books is reaching
crisis levels at some CEGEPs.
According to Arnold Spivok,
director of educational support services at Dawson College, tearing
out whole sections of library books
has become common practice there.
"It's on the increase," he said.
"The newest books on technology
and expensive art books with colour
plates are favorites with our blade
artists."
Sitting in front of him on his desk
is what remains of a two week old
computer handbook — the front
and back cover. "They left it in the
back of the library, like they'd just
devoured a fish and left us the
skeleton."
Student strangled
A UBC student became the 33rd
murder victim of 1985.
Police say Linda Ann Winkler,
24 was strangled to death, Monday,
Nov. 18. The motive is unknown.
Winkler's roommate found the
body late Monday afternoon in
their apartment at 207—870 French
Street in Marpole.
Police have laid charges of second degree murder against
Richard Lee Michaelides in connection with the death of Winkler.
Michaelides, 20, is presently at
St. Pauls hospital after jumping
from the Granville Street bridge
Monday afternoon. He was rescued
from False Creek by Laura Anderson, a Vancouver Arts Club
Theatre publicist.
Last year, one Dawson student
stole $5,000 worth of books before
he was caught, said Spivok.
"It's terrible," he said. "The
only thing we are going to be left to
do is treat people like airports treat
potential terrorists — search them
for knives and blades before they
enter."
Spivok thinks the problem is linked to the ever-rising price of books.
He said he understood that students
cannot afford many of the books
they might want, or need, but he
said that students don't understand
how much worse the situation is for
CEGEP libraries.
The Quebec government forces
all CEGEP libraries to buy books at
fixed prices from Quebec
distributers, in order to protect
these booksellers from competition
from other provinces or the United
States. "In Ontario, they would pay
25 per cent less than us for the same
book," he said. Universities are exempt from this law.
The cost of replacing mutilated
books takes money from an already
small budget for acquiring new
books. Dawson's budget is about
one tenth of McGill's.
Of the 6,000 books in the
photography section of Vanier College's library only two books have
not been marked up, or had pages
ripped out.
Beverley Sandler, coordinator
for media resources at Vanier Ste.
Croix, said they find about 150
mutilated books a year. "There are
probably many more we don't
know about."
Snuff show seller sued
MONTREAL (CUP) — Montreal city police are prosecuting a
store that rents a violent pornographic film which purports to show
the murder and dismemberment of a woman.
The film, Snuff, has been on the shelves of Five Star Video in
Beaconsfield for at least three years. It made its way to Concordia
University when a member of Concordia University Television
rented the video during an investigation.
According to Jean-Yves St. Laurent the Montreal police director
of the organized crime division, the film has been viewed by the
morality squad and several crown prosecutors.
"We will proceed with the matter in court on the basis that there is
sex and violence," said St. Laurent. "This case is much more
violence than sex in the film."
According to a May 9, 1985 Supreme Court ruling only three
criteria may be used to judge a film obscene; bestiality, sex with
children, or sex with violence. Snuff contains no explicit sex but
there are many sexual overtones in the film.
She gave the example of
Canada's Official Atlas which was
ruined. "People are hurting
themselves," she said. "Many of
these books are no longer available.
We can't ever get them again."
Books usually get destroyed when
students need them most. "Exam
time, or end of the term assignment
time is when the pressure is on and
when people get desperate," she
said. Students come up to her pointing to ripped out pages in a book
they depended on for their course.
"Even if we found out right
away, even if the book was still in
print and even if we could buy it
right across the street," she said,
"it would still take three days and
that's a long time during exams."
Forty per cent of Ste. Croix's
$25,000 book replacement and updating budget is spent on replacement of vandalised books.
"In the old days libraries used to
put mutilated books out on
display," she said. "It shocked people. It was like seeing a car crash."
"Books are not objects of value
anymore," she said. "Students today don't rely on the printed word
as their sole source of knowledge
and information about the world
the way I did."
"We buy some books knowing
they are not going to last a term,"
she added, "but we hope maybe a
few people might benefit."
Sandler agrees rising prices have
caused more vandalism. She also
said once the college got a security
system, theft went down but ripping
and razoring out parts of books
went up.
Men Against Rape questioned the
motives of B.C. s government in
proposing the censorship scheme.
He said several government
policies, such as the recent funding
cuts to the battered women's
shelter, discriminate against women
or children.
"If the government is so concerned about violence directed at
women, why are they making a
media star of Jimmy Pattison, the
fifth largest profiteer from pornography in Canada?" Sandborn
said.
Other groups had a more
favourable response to the new
legislation.
Kit Stevenson, chair of the national task force against pornography for the United Church,
encouraged Smith to "press for action on all levels to eliminate all sexual violence against women and
children". She suggested the
government tax pornography "one
hundred per cent" and use the profits to help victims of sexual crimes.
Janis Andrews of the North
Shore Women's centre said her
group has called for this sort of
legislation since 1983. She urged
Smith to take immediate action
against Red Hot Video. The store's
most recent brochure listed films
dealing with rape, incest, sadomasochism, and sex with very
young girls, she said.
"We expect to have a final proposal completed early in 1986 which
would be implemented as soon as
possible," said Smith.
Student urges
bus cash wars
A UBC student leader plans to
pinch Metro Transit with a penny
protest over bus fares.
Duncan Stewart, Alma Mater
Society external affairs coordinator, called for students to pay
the $1 fares with pennies beginning
in January.
Stewart said a similar protest
worked effectively in Toronto.
"The subway machines blew up,
the buses broke down, it was absolute chaos," he said. "The
students got a concession fare
within 12 hours."
The Greater Vancouver regional
district transit commission voted to
conduct a review of fares to examine the feasibility of reductions
for a number of groups including
post-secondary students, the handicapped and Unemployment Insurance recipients.
A transit commission official said
the review will be completed by
about May.
Stewart said the commission's
decision was the easy way out.
"The transit commission has
members who do not want students
to have concession farecards, and
they're using everything they can to
fight it. I suppose you could call
this a compromise, but it's not even
that."
The commission spokesperson
said introducing a student farecard
would cost Metro Transit $600,000
to $700,000 per academic year in
lost revenues.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students Pacific Region
chair, could not comment on the
commission decision but said granting reduced student fares could increase the number of bus riders and
increase revenues. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1985
We've tried gentle persuasion and thinly veiled
threats but here's the birdseye lowdown: The
Ubyssey can cover more issues better and with less
stress with more staffers. You too can help the
newswriting cause by storming into The Ubyssey's
corner view office, SUB 241k, any old time. Join
now or make writing for the paper one of your new
year's resolutions. Or we might burst with indignation.
7<UH*H#{fae4^cve/
This Week
November 18-23
DOUBLE FEATURE
Next Week
November 26-30
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Proper I.D. required for each ticket holder
For more info-call 228-5851
For other dates, tickets on sale as usual at AMS
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OfuC   /ntham/uw... /ot aooct gporto'/ Friday, November 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Facilities found for Acadia kids
By JENNIFER LYALL
A temporary facility has been
found to replace the soon to be
demolished Acadia Camp daycare
buildings.
The UBC Board Of Governors is
in the "final stages" of purchasing
facilities for the two daycares, said
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president of student services.
The facility, located on the
Acadia Camp grounds, will accomodate 37 children.
The old daycares will now be torn
down to make way for new Acadia
Camp family housing, due for completion next fall.
The new building will be a 5200
square foot prefabricated unit, said
Risebrough. Although portable, it
will be built on a "full concrete
foundation as a permanent structure," he said.
Don Holubitsky, student
representative on the board of
governors, estimated the cost of the
AMS Whistler
cabin picking
up business
Occupancy is exceeding projections this year at the Alma Mater
Society Whistler cabin which lost
over $50,000 last year.
The $400,000 cabin will lose
money this year but "it is expected
that it will break even in three to
four years," said AMS finance
director Jaimie Collins.
He said the AMS has no plans to
sell the cabin despite the losses. "As
long as the cabin and the property
(it sits on) appreciate, the AMS will
not lose on keeping the cabin."
AMS administration director
Simon Seshadri said the Whistler
cabin management committee,
which was chaired by Alan
Pinkney, has been disbanded in
favour of a part-time manager. "It
needed a more full time approach
that a student manager was not able
to handle."
"We had to abolish the committee because they were not able to
work to there fullest potential,"
said Seshadri.
The cabin is losing money
because students use it in the
winter, not the summer but
maintenance costs continue all year,
said Seshadri. With better
marketing techniques the cabin
could be used all year, he said.
Last summer a "phase two" project costing $10,000 improved
plumbing and drainage and upgraded lighting. Last year over $40,000
was spent adding, among other
things, a whirlpool, to the building.
Collins said rental rates at the
building haven't been raised for this
year because of "marketing conditions."
The cabin was built by students
for the use of students and rates
should remain relatively inexpensive," he said.
Pinkney said the AMS still has an
$80,000 bank loan outstanding
from when the cabin was built
several years ago. Cabin profits,
which have yet to materialize, were
to pay off the loan, he said.
unit after transportation to UBC
and renovations will be less than
$200,000.
"It is definitely cheaper to do it
this way than to build new
facilities," said Holubitsky.
"It's a good deal any way you
look at it," he said. "It's serviceable, it's well-made, it's cheap,
it's functional."
Holubitsky said he expects the
building to be useful for "a conservative 25 years; probably 40 years."
He said the daycare centre could
have been temporarily situated in a
renovated Acadia Camp hut for
much less money but that such a
facility would have had a much
shorter life.
The building will be owned by
UBC Housing but may eventually
become part of the UBC daycare
replacement program, said Holubitsky.
All present daycare facilities on
campus have been condemned by
the fire chief and must be replaced
within two years.
I GO TO great lengths for SUB coffee, says fuzzy pom pom topped heavily
bundled up UBC citizen in centre. Citizen hiked from the lots of B to grab
the essential morning wake-up liquid for many. Other less weather con-
— istvan pinter photo
scios students study sidewalks on their way to class anticipating snowflake
quizzes to take the place of more pressing midterms.
Feminists fear girls will face new oppression
MONTREAL (CUP) — After
years of battling the male-
dominated world, a generation of
feminists has come up against a new
and puzzling problem: North
American girls aren't interested in
feminism. They are bored by the
issues, alienated by the movement
and turned off by the feminists
themselves.
Feminists from all over the world
speaking at the International Conference on the Status of Girls, and
Betty Friedan, author of the
Feminine Mystique, touched on the
same theme.
The are worried that women will
, suffer a new wave of oppression if
today's girls do not tune in to the
urgency of working for lasting improvements in their political and
social conditions.
Benoit Groult, a French author,
told the conference that although
anti-feminist rhetoric used to come
from men, now it comes from
women.
"Born liberated, (the girls of the
70s and 80s,) have a tendency to
think that there is nothing left to
fight or conquer," she said.
When asked the question "Do
you consider yourself a feminist?"
Several young CEGEP women interviewed said they'd never really
thought  about  it,  or they didn't
CFS motion urges less funding
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Federation of Students almost
passed a motion at its semi-annual
general meeting last week calling on
the federal government to reduce
education funding by even more
than it is already planning to.
The motion from the National
Education Plan (NEP) committee
asked the federal government to
"make a minimum annual increase
to   educational   Established   Pro
grammes Financing (EPF) transfers
to five per cent a year for the next
five year, starting in April '86.
The inflation rate between Sept.
'84 and Sept. '85 was 4.1 per cent.
After a delegate noted, the motion would invite the government to
reduce transfers more than it
already does, the confused
delegates voted against it by a
margin of two to one.
care. One woman looked as if she'd
been asked if she were a dung beetle.
However, some young women
have though about it very carefully.
Caroline Maxwell, a student at
Vanier College, does not consider
herself a feminist. "I like wearing
make-up and I want to get married
some day," she said, "but that
doesn't mean I don't care about
equality because I do. Those are
things I want to do and I don't
think there is anything wrong with
that, but you can be made to think
there is."
Sonja Larson, a Dawson College
student, does not think her male
friends are the problem. "They're
doing the best they can," she said.
"Feminism isn't the real issue. It's a
system (or systems) where it's profitable to exploit women — in the
media and in the workforce." For
Larson, discrimination has to lose
its profit appeal.
Betty Friedan, who spoke about
her new book, The Second Stage, is
also worried about the impotency
of the feminist movement. She said
the movement isn't dead, but dying
and in grave danger. The feminist
movement's obsession with pornography and its internal power
struggles makes it irrelevant to the
majority of women.
Friedan compared the paralysis
of the women's movement today to
a similar "big sleep" after the
women won the right to vote at the
beginning of the century. "We
fought for 100 years to get the
vote," she said, "but after we won
it we went off on tangents of
women having mystical purity and
women fighting in the temperance
movement." "Get off pornography," she said, "and face the
real obscenity of economic poverty.
"The real shameful secret today
is not sexual at all. It's poverty and
increasing proportions of the truly
poor are women and children of
single mothers."
The older feminists have to listen
to young women and find out how
the problems and concerns of
women have changed, she said, if
we are going to get anywhere.
Young women are living with the
illusion of being a wife with
children and an exciting career just
as these dreams are being pulled out
from under them. "We are having
to try and save the rights we won
ten years ago; never mind move
ahead," she said.
"Hey you yuppies, or daughters
of yuppies who are dressing for success. You can't have it all unless
you begin to seriously restructure
the home and work."
Unless jobs are restructured from
the rat race of frantically climbing
the ladder all day, six days a week,
no one can raise a child and have a
career too, she said, when it is considered normal to spend part of the
week child rearing then women
might be able to make careers and
men can get some experience at nurturing, "so they can have contact
with more concrete values of life,"
she said.
Women should also be working
to get a housewife's labour to be
valued like any other job and have
it calculated in the gross national
product.
Most importantly though,
women need to get into office to do
all this, Friedan said, — women
with women's values. "They have
to run for elections, lose and run
again." Because women don't have
influence with corporations, nor
old boy's networks to raise campaign money, they must work on
building new fund ng networks.
Women won't rule the world.
We'll settle for 50 per cent, but we
must have that," she said.
Co-op is already at UBC
Despite suggestions made to the
contrary by Pat Carney, UBC
already has a co-op education program.
Carney, the federal energy, mines
and resources minister, said last
week that "UBC is one of the
targeted institutions" for co-op
education.
UBC in fact began its co-op
education program in 1978. The
government has been supportive of
the program, providing a Canada
employment grant to fund the
operation for the next four years.
Co-op education was developed
"to strengthen the present educational program by supplemental,
related work experience," said
Maryke Gilmore, director of cooperative education at UBC.
In Canada, 25,000 students are in
a co-op education program about
100 of them at UBC.
Valuable employment contacts
can also be gained during the three
summers of employment said
Gilmore.
The system involves the cooperation between the university and
employers to provide practical
training to students to help prepare
them for their future careers.
UBC's list of over 50 co-op
employers includes IBM, MacMillan Bloedel, Esso and Vancouver General Hospital.
The UBC co-op education program currently accepts applicants
from first year Agricultural
Sciences, Computer Science and
Engineering. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1985
Dal to consider divestment
HALIFAX (CUP) — A student
member of Dalhousie University's
board of governors, who has visited
South Africa, says he's putting a
discussion of apartheid on the agenda for a board meeting this week.
Stevan Ellis said he has "personal
experience with just riow horrible
the system is there."
"One institution should take a
leading role in the rest of the
business community by divesting,"
Ellis said.
Dalhousie has almost SS million
invested in companies that deal with
South Africa, Canadian University
Press discovered.
Ruben Cohen, the New
Brunswick lawyer who chairs
Dalhousie's investment committee,
said a move to divest would have to
come from the board.
"Our responsibility is to earn the
most money from the investments
we make," said Cohen.
But at least one of the six-
member investment committee is
opposed to the whole concept of
divestment.
"It (the issue) came up a few
years ago. We decided then that
we'd invest in whatever we decided
to invest in. We don't have any
direct investment with South
Africa," said Frank Covert.
"If General Motors had a plant
in South Africa and we decided to
invest in General Motors, that
wouldn't faze us a bit," he said.
Andrew MacKay, Dalhousie
University president and a member
of the investment committee, said
the university has the "second or
third largest endowment fund of
any university in Canada," so the
committee's work is "very important in terms of university financing
in the long term."
MacKay said he finds divestment
a "frustrating" debate.
"You can't start looking at every
company and its practices and
policies. Do you start looking at
every moral and ethic of every company you want to invest in? You'd
probably find that you'd have
reason not to make any investments," said MacKay.
Paul Huber, an economics professor at Dalhousie and the university faculty association's rep on the
investment committee, agrees with
MacKay.
"Some people would argue, and
I'm in this group, that there's no
way you can have clean hands and
invest. Somewhere, sometime, your
money is going to connect with
some government you don't like,"
said Huber.
"In an indirect way, investments
are always involved with politics, if
one thinks about it," he said.
The university also owns shares
in  the  following  companies  that
directly or indirectly do business in
South Africa:
•Interprovincial Pacific Limited
♦Seagram Company Limited
♦Trans-Canada Pipelines Limited
♦Canadian Pacific Limited
♦Canadian Pacific Enterprises
♦Gulf Canada Limited
♦Imperial Oil Limited
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Reading, Writing and Study Skills
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SUBS
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* passport pictures
• specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9        Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
TO: STUDENTS IN THE
FACULTY OF ARTS
REQUEST FOR VIEWS ON
THE B.A. PROGRAM
The Curriculum Review Committee of the Faculty of Arts would
welcome your comments on the nature and purposes of the B.A.
degree, and on the present requirements for the degree at UBC.
Some of the general questions that the Committee will be considering
are as follows: What is the proper relationship between breadth and
depth in the undergraduate curriculum? What are the best ways to
ensure breadth — distribution requirements, comprehensive survey
courses, a core curriculum, etc.? What areas of study should one expect a B.A. graduate to have encountered? What (if any) areas of
knowledge should one regard as essential for all B.A. graduates?
What is the proper relationship between the first two undergraduate
years and the last two?
Please provide comments by December 9, addressed to the Chairman
(BU.C154). Feel free to consult with any member of the Committee.
A. C. Cairns (Political Science, phone 228-3844)
J. A. S. Evans (Classics, phone 228-4063)
P. Jardine (Student)
H. Knutson (French, phone 228-4007)
A. J. H. Marriage (Anthro.Soc, phone 288-4982)
B. M. Morrison (Asian Studies, phone 288-5196)
D. Pincus (Fine Arts, phone 228-3281)
K. Reilly (Student)
J. Steiger (Psychology, phone 228-2706)
J. Winter (History, phone 228-5176)
J. L. Wisenthal, Chairman (Associate Dean, phone 228-3247)
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Fogg n' Suds has already earned a
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students to abandon their studies.
MASS EXODUS
Now, with Christmas exams upon
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TEMPTATION
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To tempt you even further, Fogg n'
Suds will cover all gratuities, and
organize international "beverage"
tastings for only $6.95 per person.
AND YOU THOUGHT THE SOCREDS WERE DESTROYING
EDUCATION IN B.C.!
For the sordid details contact:
Fogg n' Suds
3293 West 4th
Ph. 732-3377
Fogg on the Bay
1215 Bidwell at Davie
Ph. 669-9297 Shriekback: insane intelligence
By PETER BURNS
A sold-out crowd was treated to
one of the year's best shows Monday night by British eight-piece outfit, Shriekback. Bringing their
eclectic brand of humor, fun, intelligence and insanity to the Commodore, Shriekback, wrapped it up
into an almost cabaret-type delivery
which left the gyrating crowd shattered but satisfied.
The intensity of the show and the
mad-cap antics of former XTC
keyboardist, Barry Andrews, as he
hopped frantically through stage
and crowd, were enough to make
the show one of the year's
highlights. Not to be outdone,
however, Dave Allen (former Gang
of Four bassist) stepped out a beat
that kept the appreciative crowd
moving all evening, while guitarist
Eve Moon made her presence felt
with some fun little licks and a
bright smile.
It was a happy occasion as Andrews ran through material from
their latest disk, Oil and Gold.
Opening with Malaria, Andrews
quickly spread the disease so that
no one was left uncontaminated —
and the night turned into a
Shriekback tribal rite.
Andrews with his bald head and
raccoon eyes might have been singing Bella Lugosi's Alive, instead he
told the audience with a laugh,
"here's our intellectual song out of
the way," and launched into,
Health and Weather and
Knowledge and Power. Fom the Oil
and Gold disk, the brilliant,
Everything That Rises Must Converge and Fish Below the Ice left the
crowd panting for more; and they
got it in the form of this year's
dance floor fave, Nemesis.
Shriekback closed the evening appropriately with the tribal beat of
Lined Up from their '83 release,
Care. The healthy thrashing by the
funky eight-piece band produced at
once, both primal and modern patterns for people to move to and this
was the essense of Monday's show:
a group that can transcend the surreal while still delivering a
punishing (yet welcome) primitive
beat.
Shriekback delivered it all. The
only complaint was that the show
was too brief for the crowd who
wanted to go all night. However,
the band was opening for Simple
Minds the following evening, so
perhaps a little rest was in order.
Openers for Shriekback, 54/40,
proved in their tight set that the
band is definitely on the road to
larger success. Their guitar-oriented
songs have been expanded into
farther-reaching themes and have
earned their touting as one of Van
couver's next Big Things. Their new
album has been shopped around
stateside with a few nibbles, but
they're holding out for something
significant. Sire Records were a
rumored prospect ... in any case
hope it's out soon, whoever presses
it.
In other flashes . . . CITR, who
presented Shriekback, are bringing
Jonathan Richman and the Modern
Lovers to town tonight and tomorrow night at the Town Pump in
Gastown . . . Also next week K. D.
Lang brings her unique style of
nouveau country to the Commodore . . . Voted this year's most
promising female vocalist, K. D.
appears the 29th and 30th. reviews I
Top Girls complains
By EVELYN JACOB
Top Girls never quite made it to
the top on opening night.
The play complains a lot about
the ongoing frustrations of female
subservience i:i a male-dominated
world, and Caryl Churchill, Canadian playwright and author of Top
Girls, adds a new twist to a traditional theme by showing the
realities of what women must pay in
their blind pursuit of the star-
studded seat of success.
Top Girls
at the Dorothy Somerset Theatre
directed by Julie Akers
until November 23
The problem with the play is that
it tries to deal with too many issues:
abortion, job discrimination, child
psychology, and British politics,
just to mention a few.
By trying to pack in so many concerns, each of which is a profound
and serious problem in itself, Churchill's play skims over the surface of
these issues and ends up complaining, rather than offering any alternatives to the questions and problems it presents.
After a rocky start, the play gets
progressively better, and what saves
it from sliding all the way down
from the top is an intimate scene in
which Angie (Sue Elworthy) tells
her side-kick Kitt (Katey Wright),
about her plan to murder her
mother.
The scene is rendered with force
and electricity, and the power of
Angie's frustrations probes the
most sensitive threads of our emotions.
Another noteworthy scene centres around the character Marlene
(Cynthia Ford). A young and successful business woman who is
drawn to the great Mecca of power
and achievement. Marlene is blinded by the glitter and glory of the lofty position at the top of the business
world. The price she pays for success, however, is constantly thrown
up in her face, an unrelinquishing
guilt which takes the form of her
daughter, Angie.
Joyce (Claire Brown), Angie's
surrogate mother and sister of
Marlene, takes Angie under her
wing in order to remove the
obstacle that stood in the way of her
sister's   career   as   a   business
manager. Joyce is the uneducated,
unsuccessful sister, who has been'
molded by years of pessimistic experience; in spite of her ineffectual
life, however, she is the only one
who is able to see Marlene for what
she really is: independent but lonely, successful, but unhappy, and
ridden with guilt.
Both Brown and Elworthy must
be applauded for their acting which
at times makes it difficult to
distinguish between the reality of
the play, and the reality of everyday
life.
And so as Churchill warns
women of the emptiness of
materialism, about the blind zeal
through which success is achieved
— a pursuit which has been and is
traditionally carried out by men —
she inadvertently accuses men of in-
sensitivity and ruthlessness, an
assumption which borders on a narrow view itself.
Julie Aker's production of Top
Girls is presented with imagination
and precision, but it is the play itself
which presents problems: it asks a
lot of questions, but is unable to
provide any cogent answers.
Trial judged garish, pointless
By ERIK A SIMPSON
The Trial is a pointless, garish
play written from "a woman's
perspective" and "readapted"
from Franz Kafka's novel. The
piece revolves around a bank executive, Judith K. (Barbara E.
Russell), who is accused of an
unknown crime she didn't commit.
The Trial
directed by Morris Panych
at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre
until November 30
The tensest moments in the play,
which is advertised to have a mood
of terrifying mystery, occur during
the opening scene as Judith awakes
to be arrested by two yokel gas attendants. Judith's mother defuses
any terror the audience feels during
this farfetched scene by fussing over
a fried eggs breakfast.
The remainder of the play is far
from terrifying. It focuses on
Judith as she also fusses: over her
lawyer, her career, and her court
case. Meanwhile a cartoon strip of
characters moves through her life.
The play is an interminable comic
strip because most of the characters
are garish, painted cartoons.
Created by Ken Macdonald they
were intended to free the cast to
play many roles simply by talking
from behind the teadymade figures.
But their flat, two-dimensional
form produces flat, superficial
characters.
What is the point of the play?
After Judith alternately consults or
is threatened by a host of characters
she meets a priest who tells her the
parable of the doorkeeper. It is the
only meaningful message of the
play. Not surprisingly, it is "borrowed" from Kafka. The story
helps Judith somehow accept her
inevitable execution. But only after
an interminable death scene conducted to the "industrial sound"
music of Cevin Key from Skinny
Puppy does the play end, pointless-
iy-
The play, and Judith K., lack
conviction. Maybe because it's hard
to believe in a bank executive who,
among other incongruities, can vow
to regain her mysteriously disappeared mother simply by "getting
up bright and early" for her court-
Page Friday 2
BARBARA E. RUSSELL.
appropriately bland.
. chagrined, dismayed, shamefully lustful, in
case the following week.
The main role of Judith K., is inappropriately bland. But Russell's
acting is also incongruous. She acts
only dismayed when her mother
disappears, chagrined when her
lover cheats on her, and shamefully
lustful as a psychopath caresses her.
On the other hand, Morris
Panych, the director, makes clear
he can act and upstages the rest of
the cast. Despite the presumable
handicap of having to hide behind a
wooden board he fully utilizes his
voice and a dangling bracelet on
one wrist to vividly portray the
mother of two little terrors.
Panych transforms, like a
chameleon, from whining mother
to warped executive to deranged
psychopath. He's funny too, even
with one liners like that of the
rapist, who says to his victim,
"Thank you, did you buy that can
of mace for me?"
Despite the last minute injury to
one of the actors, Micki Maunsell,
the other cast members work
smoothly together. If only they had
a more meaningful script to work
from.
X
\&
^"
.vXi,
World Sax Que
By SHARIF AH BTE. ABDULLAH
The strangest thing happened at
the Robson Square Cinema Friday
night. The anteroom leading from
the outside to the inside of the
cinema was in reality a cleverly
disguised passage to New York.
This spatial displacement was a
direct result of the presence of four
of New York's most sublime
musical ambassadors.
The staff is comprised of David
Murray, Oliver Lake, Julius Hemphill and Hamit Bluett. The quartet
had it's start nine years ago in New
York under the name of The New
York Saxaphone Quartet,
however, another group of the same
objected so the name was changed
to "The Real New York Saxaphone
Quartet". After a letter from the
other band's lawyer, the quartet
decided to give them New York and
thus became "The World Saxaphone Quartet".
The whole attitude on stage was
suave and oh so cool. Hemple, in
his piece, One Waltz Time, has us
closing down the bars on Second,
staggering out on to rain slick
streets amid the haze and glaze of
3:00 a.m. New York. Moving on, to
Imaginative art expre
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Images and contrast seemed to be
the most enduring aspect of an exciting art exhibit featured recently
at the Alma Mater Society gallery in
SUB.
Fine Art students Jackie Koh and
Sue John displayed a series of colourful and imaginative works expressing many deep sentiments in a
forward fashion.
John seemed to express many
feminist ideals specifically dealing
with women being feminine rather
than masculine in trying to achieve
an effect. One painting featured an
icy blue sexless face. The lips were
pursed and the expression bland
against a dark blue masculine
background suggesting male
dominance in the world.
Some of John's other paintings
had geometrical figures opposing
natural figures. The triangles seemed to symbolize a progression of
society from primitive backgrounds
to more organized social spheres. In
another set of similar* paintings
there is less natural or swirl patterns
suggesting a sense of slight
withdrawal from society as an artist
but not to a crippling extent.
John had a woman's boudoir
with the typical satin and silk image
arranged against phallic symbols
such as a tube of gel and. a hair
dryer. On the floor was a broken
mirror suggesting the shattered narcissism of a naive woman. John was
also witty and satirical displaying
dead moths as the artist is trying to
capture the essense" of life.
Porkchops brought to mind the immediate impression of meat in the
sexual sense and the meat market,
night club atmosphere of the
eighties.
Koh had large paintings expressing what many immigrants feel is a
double cultural identity. When rejected by one world you run to the
other yet the harsh reality is that it
does not exist,
Strong bright colours accentuated all the paintings as Koh tried
to create a mix between oriental and
European art. A self portrait has
blonde hair symbolizing the North
American beauty standard and also
the traditional oriental colour. The
other dominant colours are black
which is rigid and non-permeable
and red which is fiery, emotional
and    passionate.    A    white
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22,1985 {reviews
Book on Tito stimulates
Kt-
irtet oh so cool
chris cameron photos
"Urban", Lake grabs us and
throws us head first into the
cacophony of downtown hustle in
the city of broken dreams. Sweetly
seductive sirens wail their mournful
tune as the incessant rumble of
mass movement drones on, intermitted only by random shrieks of
the traffic.
Great Peace, a collage of solo expression, on the part of each of the
members, though divergent, pulls
together to form a rich subtly intricate composition.
The highlight of the second set
was Murray's (Starcrossed) Lovers.
He weaves a velvet-steel web that
has us strolling arm in arm along
the Hudson, trying desperately to
recapture our lost illusions in a far
too fast world. Lake concludes our
tour with a visit to see The Matador
of 1st and 1st. He intersperses his
dirty gritty sounds with snatches of
his jazz-beat poetry to the effect
that the transition between the two
becomes strictly academic.
As the house lights came up, we
all filtered slowly back to Vancouver, invigorated by our brief
respite from the vacuum that seems
to envelope the scene here.
sses deepi sentiments
background is interestingly complex
in suggesting something submissive
yet strong.
The self portraits continue in a
jjUiouette form or hidden in the
background in three other paintings. Blue and red are the two contrasting colours with a strip of green
in all of them to suggest a type of
miscegenation or syncretism. In one
portrait the blue ripples through the
red suggesting a free flow of one
side into the other or free flow of
personality.
Possibly the best piece in the entire exhibit and certainly the most
interesting was again done by Koh.
In it there is a smaller self image in
th« background and a larger one in
the; foreground. The figures are in
icy: blue standing on a checkered
square done again in icy blue and
frosty pink. The columns of a ruin
stand as a phallic symbols against a
pale blue background.
The piece suggests so many things
it would be impossible to list them
all. Male versus female in the sexual
,role comes to mind; the icy blue
suggesting male impotence and the
frosty pink female sexual frigidity.
Platonic   ideals   of   a   sexual
sublimated relationship are also invoked along with male dominance
in the towering phalic symbols and
pale blue background.
The scene looks like a classical
ruin suggesting the destruction of
classical art and thought with the
woman fading into the background.
Yet, the woman in the foreground
represents the revival of those ideals
in the modern form arising from the
ruin of thoughts and male
dominance.
Looking at the piece from a side
angle gives a different perspective
of the two women as they seem to
be fading into each other. Reverted
onto a mirror the image is three
dimensional as the checkers are actually blocks with feminine pink
warring against masculine blue in
the traditional oriental philosophy
of the feminine passive yin and the
male aggressive van combating each
other. They combine to form all
that is to come.
Here that principle is applied to a
ameliorated modern sexual disposition. The outcome like most of the
works displayed by both artists is a
colourful contrast of many spheres
of socio-psychological thought.
By MICHELE BARKER
"Both a mastery of double-speak
and an appropriate international
climate were prerequisites for the
survival of Yugoslavia's communist
regime which to this day is underpinned ideological by the East and
economically by the West. "
—From Tito's Flawed Legacy by
Nora Beloff.
Tito's Flawed Legacy
By Nora Beloff
Victor Gollancz Ltd.
265 pp.
In this highly objective and
stimulating book, Beloff traces the
political evolution of Yugoslavia
from its creation following the First
World War and subsequent royal
government to one-party communist rule.
Beloff's objective is to reassess
the fundamental premises of the
Tito creed: the political structure on
which his power rested — the party
cadres, the secret police, the army,
the basis of Titoism — the partisan
epic, the principle of non-alignment
and his version of self-
management .
Beloff is successful in her attempt
to demystify the legend which surrounds the "great Yugoslav patriot,
political visionary, liberator and
unifier," Josip Broz — known to
the world as Marshal Tito.
The mythical nature of Tito's aggrandizement is evident in the
following description: he was the
grandson of a serf born in 1892 in a
.backward province of the Austro-
Hungarian Empire who was
' 'escorted to his grave 88 years later
by kings, presidents and prime
ministers, representing 120 different
countries and mourned by millions
of compatriots along the way."
In reassessing Tito and Titoism,
Beloff presents an objective account of the events and the people
involved. Tito's outstanding gifts
which contributed to his political
success are not overlooked: his
charisma, good looks, organizational flair, diplomatic skills and
physical stamina for example.
To bring Tito's wartime legend
into perspective Beloff presents
striking evidence which destroys his
sacrosanct reputation in the West
and in Yugoslavian history books.
Tito is portrayed as a man who
always put his cause — acquisition
of power — before the well-being of
his country. The Partisan resistance
movement, led by Tito in World
War II, was perceived by the West
as comrades-in-arms. In reality, the
Partisans spent more time fighting
fellow Yugoslavs than in liberating
their country from Axis occupation.
Other convincing evidence which
clarifies Tito's image is the
massacre of tens of thousands of
repatriated soldiers following the
Second World War: "mass graves
were prepared . . . prisoners were
tied together by wire and marched
in couples to be mown down." In
order to retain  his monopoly of
power following the war, Tito
ordered the secret police to rid
Yugoslavia of those who resisted
communist one-party rule.
Beloff justly accuses the West of
being aware ol the terror in
Yugoslavia and yet continuing to
provide military and economic aid
to Tito's repressive regime.
However, she exaggerates
Western responsibility for the
distress in this country. Although
the West's actions can in no way be
justified, Beloff should have more
fully considered the alternatives for
Yugoslavia and the international
scene. Would the Yugoslavians be
less terrorized and more
economically sound within the
Warsaw pact?
Beloff singles out the evolution
of Yugoslavia as if it were a rare
phenomenon. In fact, many cases
can be cited where the U.S. and Britain overlook the disregard for
basic human rights to enhance their
strategic and political positions.
The distress in present day
Yugoslavia is one of the many consequences of the Cold War.
Beloff through her assessment of
Titoism hopes to encourage a
radically different Western approach to such nations. Unfortunately, a just approach is unforeseen in a world which revolves
around super power rivalry.
Despite the weakness in Beloff's
thesis mentioned above, Tito's
Flawed Legacy is a book well worth
reading. It is writen simply enough
that previous knowledge of
Yugoslav history is not necessary.
Dream ballet enchants
By DEBBIE LO
Spinning on point slowly once,
twice, three times and more, I lost
count as the prima ballerina
demonstrated her perfected talent
which characterized the evening's
performance of the Pacific Northwest Ballet's Midsummer Night's
Dream last Friday.
Alaina Albertson who performed
during the divertissement of the
wedding ceremony looked like a toy
ballerina doll twirling on the tip of a
child's music box on the tiny spotlit
stage in the cavernous dark of the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre stage. The
scene took place in the second act
of the play and treated the audience
to a dance within the play which is
famous for its musical wedding
march.
A Midsummer's Night Dream,
one of George Balanchines ballets
adapted from Shakespeare's
original, portrays the king of the
fairies and his quarrel with the
queen. The king orders his servant
Puck to bring the flower pierced by
Cupid's arrow (which causes people
who comes under the flowers influence to fall in love with first person they see.
It is also the story of one couple
in love and another couple having
problems because one of the lovers
is in love with the woman in the
other relationship. Puck on his way
to the king trys to help the troubled
couple ith his magic flower.
Puck (Jacob Rice), radiated excitement. His high-kicking barefoot
sprints around the stage exemplified
an elf's swift, light deliveries
without the heavy gear and
bulkiness of Vancouver's local
mountain bike couriers.
The story revolves around Puck's
mistakes and the subsequent abuse
of   the   couple's   hearts.   Puck
mistakes the identity of one of the
lovers for the lover in the other couple and turns what should have
been an easy solution into a
sweetheart war. In the end Puck
puts both couples under a sleeping
spell and spreads the flower's magic
onto them all.
The richly coloured set of deep
red and turquoise dramatically set
the mood for the regal wedding
which took place in the second act.
The wedding costumes in cool
cream, blue and pink pastels coor
dinated perfectly with each other,,
except for the costume of third couple, the duke and his wife. The couple sported a dirtier than mustard
yellow costume which stuck out like
a grape stain on a pale yellow shirt.
Talent and discipline are required
to stage a precise performance. This
company preened itself and put on
a perfectly elegant display which
ended in a blue magical forest filled
with blinking fireflies. They had the
stuff to produce their own wonderful world closely resembling Disney.
Friday, November 22, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 Page 8
TO S€£ YOUR f (MCE
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1985
Cutbacks
What great towering figures of civilization have been
saddled with obese olfactory organs? J. P. Morgan.
Cyrano de Bergerac. Karl Maiden. My grandpa. Yes, all
true. But who stands supreme, above all the rest? Opus
the penguin.
Yes, that flabby figure of fowl, that far-fetched fan of
freedom, females and fast food herring has the greatest
schnozola of all time. Or had the greatest. He had until a
tragedy, dare we say, a 'malodorous massacre' befell
the polite penguin and nose hairs everywhere twitched
in sorrow.
What madness siezed Opus' creator you ask? Some
new viral infection? Prolonged subjection to comic ink?
Temporary insanity? Nay, say we. Yeah sometimes we
talk like that. Anyhow, nay, 'twas none of that 'twas
jealousy — plain as the you-know-what on your you-
know-what. Don't laugh. Don't even guffaw, it's true.
No one could compete with a nose like that. Jealousy,
that basest of emotions, is a natural reaction.
Berke breathed, so why can't Opus? Why must he
suffer? The nose is a magical meeting place, where the
outside world meets the inside. Opus' magic has been
diminished, and we swear if the nose goes we go!
Return the nose Breathed or we'll be all over you like the
stink of sardine. The S.P.C.A., Greenpeace, the Better
Business Bureau t. . . well we're desperate.
Desperate, desperate, desperate. We are desperate
for editorial writers and other people to put out this
paper. You think it's easy to do this stuff? You're right,
it is, so come up to SUB room 241 k and help us fight the
good fight. Small nosed persons need not apply.
Ubyssey places visit story appropriately
Thank you for giving front page
attention to Pat McGeer's official
visit to UBC, in the Nov. 19 issue
of the Ubyssey. It is front page
stuff, and those students who did
show up at the Faculty Club to voice
their concerns deserve much praise.
However, since the reception was
closed to the press and I was not interviewed   by   The   Ubyssey,   any
comments that you allege passed
between Pat McGeer and myself
must be hearsay.
Therefore let me clarify two
points. First, happy as I am to be
promoted by you to the position of
Law Undergraduate Society President, I am merely the external vice
president   of   the   Law   Students
Association. Second, Pat McGeer
declined to consider the notion of
meeting students in a forum or
(Pedersen-type) exchange, not as
your report indicates that to do so
would deny the pleasure to university and other students who do not
attend UBC. Rather, the reason he
gave me for not wanting to address
student  concerns  in  a  forum  on
campus is that such an activity is the
rightful perogative of Bill Strangway, UBC president.
Mr. McGeer's motives and his
reasoning remain no less mysterious
to me now than before our conversation. Nonetheless, since you also
report that he will be meeting the
AMS on November 29 it would ap-
Food shortage hungers for committed activists
The following letter was written
in response to the Nov. 13 headline
artilce of The Ubyssey entitled
"The Hunger Project A Financial
Feast". It was a satirical attempt to
shed some light on the inside
philosophy behind this educational
network which proposes to end
hunger. This letter has been held up
for one week, it is not my position
to conjecture why.
Bless me Father, for I have sinned. I was a briefing leader for the
Hunger Project. I admit that I
worked side by side with naughty
people who attended EST seminars,
although I never partook in such
warped activities. But even the pope
would admit to fornicators in the
Catholic church.
I am guilty of volunteering for
the naive group that dares to end
hunger without sending cans of
Spam to deserving Africans. Lord
forgive me for being there. I say
and did such terrible deeds: 1 watched while innocent yuppies were exposed to the shocking infant mortality rates of lowly foreigners. I
stood idle while my fellow comfortable Canadians were asked, "What
will you do?" Yes, 1 presented and
challenged my victims with the idea
that they could make a difference
. . . the responsibility must have
devastated them. I saw my fellow
misled members work long hours
without pay, I saw them laugh, cry
and wait in the rain for more innocent victims to trap.
I asked strangers for money, but
never bought Kenya-destined
Starkist tuna with it. I smiled while
practicing these seditious activities
... I didn't even feel guilt. I should
have stopped them all, after all
there is only one way to end hunger.
But no, I trained others to be briefing leaders like my own corrupt self
. . . and you know I'm glad,
because I believe in education . . .
for action.
The Hunger Project has come a
long way way since my shadow first
darkened their door. I'm sure it will
carry on fine without me. I hope it
has more success in awakening us to
the fact that hunger will end only
when everyone damn well decides to
do it, instead of pacifying
themselves with an annual $10
donation to some "shock it to me I
need guilt" TV documentary. The
existence of hunger today results
from a spiritual problem of our
"have it all and protect it" hearts,
as such, it will ultimately take a
change   of   heart   to   beat   this
nemesis. Does anyone want to, yet?
Oh yes, Father, for my penance
I'll donate to the Food Bank, but
forgive me if I feel good about doing it.
Greg Beatch
pharmacology 4
Washington woman whines
Young encourages new input
In Scott Lawrence's letter of
Nov. 19, he points out that'
Nanoose Bay is not the first place in
B.C. where people have been arrested for civil disobedience against
nuclear weapons as he himself was
arrested at the Comox Air Force
Base in 196S. I am glad to learn of
this earlier example and wish to
thank him for writing.
In researching the story, I checked this statement with members of
the peace community, including
people on Vancouver Island, but no
one remembers these earlier arrests.
I would be interested of other incidents at the Comox base or
elsewhere.
James Young
unclassified 5
I had the opportunity to visit
your fair campus over the weekend
and was generally impressed with
the layout, the fine facilities and the
variety of disciplines. What did not
impress me, however, was the chic
cynicism expressed in the Oct. 29
and Nov. 1 issues of The Ubyssey.
Just once I'd like to find a major
university newspaper secure in its
editorial policy with enough honest
and integrity to take an open look
at what people of faith are genuinely about.
Alas, no. Your sarcastic "will
fairy tales never cease?" attitude
when covering a faith debate or
fundamentalist philosophy speaks
of incredible intolerance for those
who have discovered a spiritual
reality. Too, it is packaged in a
sameness of language and reportage
style that is substantially no different than that to be found at the
University of Washington or, I
suspect, at Doonesbury U.
It's okay to be journalistically
courageous, to abandon "cookie
cutter" style for something more
original and informative — and
truthful. People expect it of a fine
school like yours. Some day we may
even get it.
Clint Kelly
2019 Virginia Ave.
Everett, WA 98201 —USA-
pear that Mr. McGeer will not be
able to avoid either students or their
concerns forever.
Tim Holmes
law council rep.
Dance!
Attention First Year Students:
are you being bogged down by
copious amount of homework?
Are you tired of walking all over
campus and not recognizing
anyone? Panicking about the coming onslaught of exams?
If you answered "yes" to one or
more of the preceding, then you.
should come to the F.Y.S.C. "Survival Dance" to be held tomorrow
(Saturday, November 23) from 7:30
p.m. to 12:30a.m. in SUB 207/209.
Now's your chance to meet new
people who are suffering through
similar problems; that and heavy-
duty dancing too! So buy tickets in
the Main Concourse at 12:30 p.m.
or at the door. Bring ten friends.
Door prizes available. Just show
up! Thank you again for your support.
Jeffrey March
president
first year students committee
THE UBYSSEY
November 22, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
As Steven Wisenthal, Michael Goberman, Debbie Lo, and David Ferman stepped out on the ice for
the Canadian hockey game against the evil forces of Sue Mcllroy, Victor Wong, Charlie Fidelman, and
Camille Dionne. But alas where -were Wade Gemmell, Sarah Millin, Svetozar Kontic. Oh replied
Michele Baker, Keith Stringer, and Erika Simpson they're in a little pink room looking at the stars.
When asked what she would do if Canada won the game and started a nuclear war Evelyn Jacob
replied "take a bath". The same organ music goes here as Chris Cameron, Peter Burns, Lise Magee,
and Jennifer Lyall enter their ty-fighters to go attack the plantet of SherifaJ ble. Abdulhal. Gordon Clark
sulked, punched a wall and tried, and tried to enthuse three tired staffers to go jogging again. Friday, November 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Hoopsters half hearted
By STEVE NEUFELD
The Thunderbird women's
basketball team continued its pre-
Canada west league non-conference
schedule last weekend playing host
to the Regina Lady Cougars on Friday and the Grads on Saturday at
War Memorial gym.
Friday night coach Jack Pomfret
saw his team fall behind 37-27 by
the half and then never get in gear
for the closing twenty minutes as
they lost 73-58.
The poor showing and loose
defense was buoyed by a great attitude and prospects of a winning
team in the future, said Pomfret.
Top scorers for the T-Birds were
Nadine Fedorak, who snapped out
of a early season scoring slump to
get 17 points while shooting a
sparkling 53 per cent from the field,
and Colette Pilloud who managed
10. Also scoring were Natalie
Johnson and Karen Dawson with
nine and eight points respectively.
In Saturday afternoon's Grad
game, the Thunderbirds gave the
oldtimers a real workout pressing
them full court throughout the entire game. This strategy resulted in a
66-52 win.
The Grads were led by two
former stars of recent years —
Cathy Bultitude scored 12 ponts
and Delia Douglas added 10.
Fedorak led all UBC scorers with
16 with Pilloud notching 14 points.
Next action for the Thunderbirds
is this weekend when they travel to
Saskatoon to play in the Canada
west classic. Featuring all six
Canada west schools, the tourney
should give UBC a good idea of
where they rank in the league with
the ten game conference schedule to
come after Christmas.
SPORTS   ]
Tennis team second
A successful weekend of tennis
for the UBC Men's team concluded
Sunday with a second place overall
finish behind the powerful University of Washington team.
UBC recorded daily scores of 1-8
Friday and 6-3 Saturday and Sunday against Whitman College and
University of Idaho respectively.
On the tournament system of
scoring a point for every singles or
doubles victory UBC received 13 of
27 points.
UBC's second seed Martin Lam-
pa won all his singles matches and
helped his teammates to points in
Students get kick from
B.C. karate championship
Time spent training in the ancient
Korean Martial Art of Tae Kwon
Do paid off for three UBC students
at the first B.C. Tae Kwon Do
Championships held in North Vancouver on November 2, 1985.
The UBC students faced tough
competition from across the province and Washington state.
Christine Tang won the gold medal
in the women's beginners
heavyweight division and the silver
tin the forms division. Sean Jaegli
displayed excellent kicking and
punching techniques to place fist in
the men's yellow belt middleweight
division.
In the yellow belt heavyweight
division, Ed Henriouelle took home
the silver medal, injuring his arm in
the effort.
The tournament was the first in
B.C. to be sanctioned by the
W.T.F. Tae Kwon Do Association
of Canada and of B.C. It was conducted in accordance with the rules
that will apply in international
amateur competitions, such as the
1988 Olympic Games, 1987 Pan-
Am Games and 1986 University Tae
Kwon Do championships.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Authentic Chirwst. 	
228-9114
10°- DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
VI..,. F.i   11 30 4 00 i. iv.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
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UBC V.lldge
Surprise!
So/AeTHiNQ MEW M VAMOOUMEB.
1 ANEWCOMCEFT IW^fOTAU
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Coming Soon To Vancouver
doubles play. Eric Honing also performed well for the Thunderbirds.
UBC coach Mike Kerr.said he
was generally pleased about his
team's performance and has a
definite plan for making the
T-Birds more successful in their
next tournament.
FANSHEN
a play by David Hare
directed by Jane Heyman
The story of how the peasants of a remote
Chinese village built a new world
PREVIEWS NOV. 27 & 28/2 FOR 1
NOV. 29-DEC. 8
Tues.-Sun. 8 p.m.
(Sundays 2 for 1)
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Warning: some coarse language
RESERVATIONS
324-5227
Langara Campus, 100 W. 49th Ave.
EARN
512,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELUNI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village,
on Campus
Think Snow!!!
Ski Whistler For $17
(Members only, regularly at $23, ticket subsidized by UBC SKI CLUB)
UBC SKI CLUB also offers:
Cypress passes at $11
Grouse passes at $11
Find out more about us at SUB 210
Monday thru Friday, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
missions
Ours is a Commitment
to live the Gospel in
a Broken World...
*   *
"Go out to the whole World,
Proclaim the Good News, to
all Creation." (Mk. 16:16)
Are you being called
to mission?
Write for our Booklet:
Who we are
What we do
Where we work
Why we go
Fr. Roger Brennan S.F.M.
c/o Scarboro Missions,
2685 Kingston Road,
Scarborough, Ontario M1M 1M4
Please send me your booklet on Scarboro's missionary work and
formation program. I am interested in:
□ PRIESTHOOD □ LAY MISSIONARY APOSTOLATE
Name	
Address	
TownyCity_
Age	
Prov._
Code_
Education. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1985
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
"After the  Geneva  Summit:   Where  now  in
U.S.-Soviet   Relations?"   Professor   Michael
Wallace, department of political science, UBC,
noon, BUCH A100.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners   Cantonese,    free   for   members,
noon-1:30 p.m., BUCH B317.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General elections, noon, SUB 215.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Model parliament — second resolution meeting,
noon, SUB 212A.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunch hour meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally and social afterwards, 5:30 p.m., meet
at parking lot B6, all cars *4.
PSEUDO INTELLECTUAL STUDENTS
SOCIETY
General meeting, elections, bring money, noon,
SUB 212.
CIRCLE K
General meeting, noon, BUCH D351.
MUSSOC
Technical persons sign up, noon, clubroom old
auditorium.
FILM SOCIETY
Films:  Mask at 7 p.m.. Desperately Seeking
Susan at 9:30 p.m., $2, SUB auditorium.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Slide presentation — Nicaraguan Organization
for the Disabled, noon, IRC4.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC men and women play host to University of
Lethbridge; women, 6 p.m.; men, 8 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West hockey game vs. Regina Cougars,
7:30 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
UBC ASTRONOMY AND AREOSPACE CLUB
Photo   night,    bring   along   any   interesting
photographs   or   slides.   Geophysics   and
Astronomy building.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Volleyball   challenge   against   microbilogy,
Osborne gym.
SATURDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Film: "The Mondragon Story", 7 p.m., call
738-3040 or check notice board for location.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
U8C inter-christian club prayer meeting,
everyone welcome, 7:30-9:30 p.m.. Chapel of
the Epiphany, 6030 Chancellor Blvd.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
The Survival Dance for first years (and everyone
else), 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., SUB 207/209. Bring
ten friends, door prizes.
FILM SOCIETY
Films; Mask, 7 p.m.. Desperately Seeking
Susan, 9:30, $2 each, SUB auditorium.
ISMAILI STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Ski  trip,   contact  Kustoni,  965-9436 for  more
details.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Canada West hockey game vs. Regina Cougars,
last home game in 1985, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird
arena.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC men and women play host to University of
Calgary;  women,  6 p.m.;   men,  8 p.m.;  War
Memorial gym.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Gym night and ball hockey, free for members;
gym  night,  7:30 p.m.;  ball  hockey,  8:30-9:30
p.m.. Gym B and Gym F.
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., 2845 Acadia — UBC
day care gym.
FILM SOCIETY
Films:   Mask,   7   p.m.,   Desperately   Seeking
Susan, 9:30 p.m., S2 each, SUB auditorium.
MONDAY
ENGINEERS
Speaker from Anatek Electronics, on "Thick Film
Hybrid Technology", 11:30 a.m., Macleod 228.
AMS STUDENT LOTTERY
Draw, noon. Pit pub.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners Mandarin conversational class, noon,
BUCH B317.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Robert Redford in "The Great Gatsby", $2,
7:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Production   of   Tuesday's   paper,   everyone
welcome   including   interested   newcomers.
Writing, during day; news meeting, 4:30 p.m.;
dinner, 6 p.m.; printers, 7 p.m.
TUESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon, Brock 304.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners Mandarin conversation class, BUCH
B317.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,   all   sexes  welcome,   7   p.m.,   UBC
Aquatic centre.
TRAVEL CUTS
David Smith of London SWAP centre will talk
about the student work abroad programme, 4
p.m., SUB 212.
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Lecture: Tito's Flawed Legacy, by British journalist Nora Beloff, noon, BUCH B212.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting, everyone welcome, noon, SUB
215.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Lecture by prof. Bernard Chandler of University
of Toronto on "The author, the material and the
reader in Promessi Sposi by Alessandro Man-
zoni", noon, BUCH B212.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Meeting and debate, noon, SUB 125.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Robert Redford in "The Greet Gadsby",
$2, noon, SUB auditorium.
UBC BOOKSTORE
Author Appearance
IRVING LATTON
will be at the UBC BOOKSTORE
Monday, NOV. 25 at 11:30 am-12:00 pm
to autograph copies of the first volume
of his autobiography
WAITING FOR THE MESSIAH
quote from his publisher
"...an utterly frank memoir containing all of the passionate
insight, courage and rage that has characterized his very
best poetry."
To reserve your copy ($24.95 ea.) call 228-4741
Use Visa or Mastercard
BOOKSTORE
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time
students to run for election for the following positions;
BOARD OF GOVERNORS-TWO students
SENATE —SEVENTEEN    students    (five   at-large   and
one from each faculty)
Nominator! forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrars Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Student Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association,
Nominations must be in the hands of the REGISTRAR no later
than 4:00p.m. on Friday, December 6, 1985.
You've got a date with peace and
laughter. Le Theatre Parminou,
from Victoriaville, Quebec, will present their new play "Peacing it
Together" to people who want to
laugh at the problems posed by the
arms race: Wed., Nov. 27 (English)
and Thur., Nov. 28 (French) at the
Blessed Sacrament Auditorium,
3050 Heather St. and again on Dec.
6 (English) at the Gilmore Community School, 50 South Gilmore
Ave., Burnaby. "Peacing it
Together" is the story of Jake and
Suzy who drea of creating a world
peace and travel around the planet
to learn how to achieve it. For further information, call Project;
Ploughshares at 733-0141. Tickets'
$5 general; $3 student. ■:-:-:-::::.:::::-:-:-:.:.:.:.:.:.::-::.:.:.:-::.::.:.>::::::-::.:-:-::-::-:-:-:-:-x^::-:::-:-::.:-
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
~~ Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
COLLECTOR'S GIFT SALE
Nov. 24, 103 p.m Royal Towns Hotel. 6*1
St 8- Royal Ave. New Weslrrinstsr.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 23
Dr. John HeUiwell
Economics, UBC
on
CANADA'S ECONOMIC
PERFORMANCE, 1955-1990
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
AMS
ART GALLERY
Susan John/Jacki Koh
Nov. 18-Nov. 22
4th year BFA Show
Nov. 25-Dec. 6
SUB MAIN CONCOURSE
Mon.-Fri.: 10-4 p.m.
EXOTIC DANCES OF
THE MIDDLE EAST
featuring
Egyptian Dancer
Nahida
Tony D'Sa
with a cast of 20
RUSSIAN THEATRE
4th & Arbutus
Sat., Nov. 23
8 p.m.
Tix at door or call 6*5-9932
Refreshments by Afghan Horseman
11 - FOR SALE - Private
2 ONE-WAY airfares, Vancouver-Amsterdam
for Dec. 18. Male & female, $375 each. Call
876-7962, ask for Nicole.
ENTERTAINMENT '86 coupon books for
sale. Only $38.00 gets you unbelievable savings. Call 261-4655/263-5221.
BOTTLE TYPE POP MACHINE with coin
mechanism available. Working order. $75
obo. Call Wayne at 224-9119.
1981 MAZDA GLC, 2 door hatchback. 4
gears, 51,000 miles, silver, rear defrost and
wiper, A1 cond. $4150, 224-1968.
15 - FOUND
NEW BOOK by Akasov - "Boyhood" in
SUB near TCU exchange machine. Handed
into SUB Proctor or go to lost & found,
Brock Hall.
20 - HOUSING
MARPOLE. Shared accom., clean 4-br.
house, washer/dryr, f-place, carport, $325
plus V, util 321-7335.
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information.
SINGLE AND DOUBLE accommodation is
available for male students in a fraternity
house. Call Colin 224-9119 after 3 p.m.
30 - JOBS
CP   HOTELS   CHATEAU   LAKE  LOUISE
is now taking applications for Xmas
employment. Positions available from Dec.
20 to Jan. 5. Please send resume & letters
of reference to personnel office Chateau
Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, T0L1E0.
PERMANENT PART-TIME receptionist re-
quired for Broadway medical office. Flexible hours. 224-7769.
TO START IMMED.: Part-time exp. salesperson, 2-3 days per week. Could lead to
full-time summer employment. Will pay
$5.00/hr. plus commission. Leave message
at 736-6711 or 263-0438.
40 - MESSAGES
FREE to good homes, world's best kittens!
5 weeks old, all colors and sizes. Phone
736-4002 after 6 p.m.
3 ATTRACTIVE FEMALES wish to meet 3
attractive males for fun, frolic and adventure. Take a chance — go for itl Send
photos and vital stats to Box 5000 c/o The
Ubyssey, SUB, Vancouver, B.C. V6T2A5.
70 - SERVICES
SPACIOUS HALL available for Christmas
& New Years parties, 43rd & Main. Phone
324-6532.
GOT A PROBLEM? Need to talk? Drop by
Speakeasy on SUB Concourse or Ph.
228-3700. Confidential, anonymous.
AEROBIC fir STRETCH
$3 Drop-In or $30/mo. Membership
2 for 1 Special
on membership with this ad
3214 W. 10th Avs.
Info.: 733-6706
Mon.-Fri. 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat.: 11:00-12:00 a.m.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings
at 10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
80 - TUTORING
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S
Parker, B.A., M.A.
733-4534                a
86 - TYPING
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type theses,  resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-ll p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables Et equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac
turns, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857,224-7351.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING: Spelling, grammar
expertise. Days, eves., wkends. Student
rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
TYPING. Fast Et accurate, $1.00 per page.
Call 879-3854.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays Et
resumes, 222-4661 (before 1 p.m.) 732-0529
(5-7 p.m.).
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
TYPING 8- W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpts., essays, tech. equa., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
YOUR WORDSWORTH word processing on
Wang Professional System by B.A.
English. Dictate letters, papers, etc. to dictaphone or drop off. Set rates. 980-2868.
TYPING, RESEARCH. Free editing, spelling check, carbon copy. 926-7752.
ADINA word processing. Student discount
High quality work. 10th & Discover. Phone
222-2122.
TYPING: Professional presentations for term
papers, resumes, etc. Competitive rates.
734-0650 (24 hrs.).
TRI WORD SPECIALISTS-Word processing experts; student rates, pickup Er
delivery. 438-0737.
TYPING IBM SEL II. Essays, term papers,
theses, mscpts. $1 per page. 263-4036,
261-7320, Ralph.	
FOR FAST RESULTS
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED Friday, November 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Come and help your
soon-to-be-fellow
Ubyssey staffers to
type, photograph,
design and Duck
hunt. SUB 241k. Be
there.
Night With Guests, an adult nursery rhyme
reminiscent of Kabuki and Punch and Judy, Firehall
Theatre (280 East Cordova 689-0926), until
November 30 at 11:00.
Trial, a theatrical adaptation of Kafka's novel with
a woman's perspective, Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (1895 Venables 254-9578), until November
30, at 8:30.
The Curse of the Werewolf, a 1920's style comedy/musical spoof, Douglas Collage (700 Royal
Avenue), until November 30 at 8:00.
Season's Greetings: A real, funny Christmas tale.
Queen E. Playhouse (872-6622), until December 29.
Peacing It Together, a date with peace and
laughter, English performances at Blessed Sacrament Auditorium (3050 Heather St. 733-0141),
November 27, 8 p.m.
Bubble Memory, a whimsical musical for the
whole family. Arts Club Granville Island, starting
November 30.
Going Down for the Count: a satirical fantasy set
in the tightly laced post-Victorian society: sounds like
a winner kids, opens Nov. 16 until Dec. 7, Firehall
Theatre, 280 E. Cordova, 689-0926.
Trial: In case you're wondering, that rambling, incoherent, confusing but somehow brilliant piece of
gibberish that ran a while back in The Ubyssey entertainment section, that was about the director of the
company that is putting on this production, yup, it
just had to be said, opens Nov. 15, Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables, 254-9578.
Love For Love: here's your chance to be seen by
your English prof, you remember, the one you
wanted to impress to get into grad school, yeah,
that's the one, ends Nov. 16, Freddy Wood
Theatre, 228-2678.
Top Girls: read Michael Groperman's scintillating write-up on the director of this play. Ain't that
Groperman something?, Dorothy Somerset
Studio, Nov. 20-23, 228-2678.
Who's Afraid of Virgin Woolf: not Michael
Groperman who saw it 20 times until he was — drooling with excitement, ooh wee, until Nov. 23, Q.E.
Theatre, 873-3311.
The Nuns: a poetic, expressionistic drama of great
intensity, whatever the fuck that means, opens Nov.
14, Kits House Hall, 736-3580.
Internationally Published Author
LATEST WORK Just Released:
Over and Under the Table
will work individually with beginning or rejected
writers; plotting, editing, revising, submission to
agent and/or publishers.
WRITE TO: KENNETH ORVIS,
Room 269-955 Burrard
Vancouver, B.C.   V6Z 1Y2
CDP-302 COMPACT DISC PLAYER
Sony's high
performance
Unilinear convenor
system
LI Full-function
wireless remote
control included
I    Linear motor
Iracking mechanism
L". Concentrated
fluorescent display
. 16-selecuon
Random Music
Sensor (RMS)
Direct Access™
automatic search
functions
$799
TCFX-600 CASSETTE DECK
il
Dolby B & C i . Digital Linear        f : Laser Amorphous
AM S  Locates,        Counter Head
Plays, Repeats    f    Two Motor Drive       Memory
$£2ff
$369
2053  WEST  41st   AVE.
VANCOUVER
263-0878
Huoc
Jonathan Rlchman, the world's cutest performer
with the Modern Lovers angst yes but not as neurotic
as Mahatma Wongski Town Pump, (November 22
and 23.
Koko Taylor and her Blues Machine, with
Johnny B. Moore probably not related to Johnny B,
Goode or Roger Moore, Town Pump, Nov. 29/30.
Vancouver Art Trio, starring three guys named
Bruce, well actually I lied only one is named Bruce,
Centre Cultural Columbian (795 W. 16 Ave.
734-2828), put on by the Pacific Jazz and Blues Fest,
Nov. 22, 8:00.
Music In the Gallery, Deep Cove Chamber
Soloists perform the works of Micheline Coutombe
Saint — Marcoux and Motorhead, well ok so I lied
about one of those two, (2913 Eddystone, 929-1117),
Sunday, November 24.
UBC RUGBY CLUB
DANCE
featuring
INNUENDO
SAT., NOV. 23
SUB BALLROOM
TIX. $5
PLAYERS OR
AMS BOX OFFICE
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
Perfumed Nightmare and Seventeen, a semi-
autobiographical account of a young Filipino's reaction against American colonialism and a documentary
account of the empty lives of two American teenage
girls, Vancouver East Cinema, (7th Ave. and Commercial 253-5455), separate admission required for
each, until November 28 at 7:30 and 9:20.
The Gods Must Be Crazy, (228-3697), either
November 21 to 24, or November 21 and 24, at 7:00,
added 9:30 on Sunday or Friday through Sunday.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS-$39
HAIR    STYLING
15% off any hair service
with presentation of ad. Expires Nov. 30
5784 University Blvd. Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) '/: Blk. Away 224-9116
TALK OJ THE TOWN     .
SUN.-WED. 10% U.B.C STUDENT CARD DISCOUNT
2043 W. 4th AVE.
Master of Public
Administration
Queens University
at Kingston
A one year (3-term) multi-disciplinary program,
with an emphasis on public policy studies, at
the federal, provincial and municipal levels of
government.
Admission Requirements B.A. (Honours), or its
equivalent, with upper second class standing,
all fields of study.
Information/Applications available from
School of Public Administration
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6.
Telephone (613)-547-3031.
PROFESSOR  GUMBOLD   HAD  SET UP A
MINOR DIVERSION  TO ENABLE HIM
TO   CONFISCATE  DICK'S  DIET  PEPSI
ADVENTURES IN NEW DIET PEPSr    NO. 6J   ©CLEM Baxter   1985
Suitable for carbohydrate and calorie-reduced diets "Diet Pepsi   and   Diet Pepsi-Cola  ai"e registered trademarks ol PepsiCo. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1985
Soccer teams finished first at the diaphragm
The second annual Intramural
Soccer Bowl at BC Place finished
last week after 36 hours of exciting
round robin play under the
"Dome". Sixty-two teams advanced to the final tournament after
three weekends of preliminary wet
and rainy rounds at UBC.
This years Handley Cup Soccer
League hosted 10 women's teams in
two divisions and fifty-two men's
teams in four divisions throughout
the fall season. Many teams returned to the UBC Intramural soccer
league in the hopes of competing
once again on the field at BC Place.
The tournament accommodated
four games per hour on the field.
Despite what would have been a
logistical nightmare, the event ran
very smoothly. "I am very happy
with this tournament" said Melodie
Hook, Sport Coordinator of Soccer
Bowl.
Throughout the three days the
tournament required three trainers,
15 staff to supervise and scorekeep
and 26 referees.
The Intramural Sports Administrators Melodie Flock, Jackie
van der Horst, Linda Wong & Brian
Beach can be credited with some
fine organization and many hours
of hard work.
Playoff games began Wednesday
evening at 6:00 p.m. in a single
elimination format. Spectators
(there was room for 60,000) were
treated to some impressive soccer
play.
In the final moments of women's
division two between Phrateres and
Agriculture, the players from
Agriculture were the decisive winners with a score of 6 to 1. In a hard
fought game in women's division
one the Kappa Kappa Gamma
sorority edged out Gage Residence
with a 2 to 1 victory.
The E.U.S. team easily defeated
Agriculture in a 3-0 score for the
men's division three title. Vying for
the division two victory both Commerce II and the Fiji I. teams played
off with a no loss record, but Commerce came out on top 3 to 0.
In men's division one, the Phi
Delta Theta fraternity emerged victorious over Arts III with a 2 to 1
score. And finally in Superleague
play, Law II was upset by a team
from The Pit, with a final score of 2
to 1.
B.C. PLACE
SOCCER STANDINGS
MEN-ROUND 2
TIER 1- LEAGUE A
1 Ski Club
2 Education
3 Phi Delta Theta
4 Biasing Caps
TIER 1-LEAGUF C
1 Kappa Sigma
2 I.V.C.F.
3 Arts 3
4 Chem. Eng.
TIER 1-LEAGUE E
1 Pit Staff
2 Chem Grads
3 Gage II
TIER 2-LEAGUE G
1 Arts Hotspurs
2 St. Andres's Hall
3 Science III
W L
3 0
2 1
1 2
0 3
3 0
2 1
1 2
0 3
2 0
1 1
0 2
f0#
THE AFFORDABLE RESORT
Celebrate Nousneau (pron. "New Snow")
and un-cork the winter season.
Saturday & Sunday,
Nov. 23 & 24
$150 per couple includes:
— 2 nights' accommodation
— Breakfast Saturday
& Sunday
— Saturday night
celebration dinner
— Special events all
day Saturday
Miles of cross country and downhill
skiing PLUS hearty food, crackling
fireplaces, and apres-ski
for the whole family.
Regular rates from $39/couple
(family rates available).
Por reservations:
Manning Park Resort
Manning Park, B.C.
VOX 1R0
(604) 840-8822
BASY CHAIR.
*159
RED
YELLOW
DL.UE
GrREY
e>LftCK
PEACH
FOGT5T00L
TO MfVTCR
oo
§asyj-ivjm&
3618 W- H1^ *GftR alma     758-05^1
4 Forestry I
TIER 2-LEAGUE 1
1 International House
2 Eng. Physics
3 Agriculture
4 SUS I
TIER 2-LEAGUE K
1 Civil
2 Mining United (9/7)
3 Geography (3/5J
4 Dekes 2 (3/9)
TIER 2-LEAGUE M
1 Fiji I
2 Totem—Dene
3 Gage I
TIER l-LEAGUE B
1 Phys. Ed.
2 V.S.T. I6/6)
3 M.B.A. (4/11)
4 II Caffee
2 0
1 1
0 2
3 0
1 2
1 2
0 3
TIER l-LEAGUE D
1 Forestry 2
2 Betas
3 V.S.T. 2
4 Music
1 Law 2
2 Arts
3 Pharmacy
1 Commerce 2
2 Science II
3 Georox- EUS
4 Geology
1 Mech IV
2 Z.B.T.
3 Arts I
4 Alpha Defts
1 E.U.S.
2 DekesI
3 Architecture
4 Commerce I
1 Physioiogy
2 Chinese Student's
3 Law I
TIER l-LEAGUE F
WOMEN-ROUND 2
TIER l-LEAGUE A
1 Kappa Kappa Gamma
2 E.U.S.
3 Gage Res
4 Commerce
TIER ll-LEAGUE A
1 Agriculture
2 Phrateres
3 V.S.T. Res
TIER II    LEAGUE B
1 Science
2 Law
3 Nursing
WOMEN'S DIV. 1 PLAYOFFS
1 Kappa Kappa Gamma
2 Gage Res
3 Commerce
3 EUS
MEN'S SUPERLEAGUE PLAYOFFS
1 Pitstaff 5 Betas
2 Law II 5 Education
3 Ski Club S Forestry 2
3 Phys 9 V.S.T.
5 IVCF 9 Kappa Sigma
MEN'S DIV. II PLAYOFFS
1  Commerce 9 C S.A.
2 Fiji
3 Mech IV
3 EUS
5 Arts Hotspurs
5 International House
5 Civil
5 Physiology
1 Aggies
2 Phraters
3 Science
WOMEN'S DIV.
3
5
5
MEN'S DIV. I
1 Phi Delta
2 Arts 3
3 MBA
3 Blasting Caps
5 Chem Grads
5 Chem Eng.
MEN'S DIV   il
1 Agriculture
2 S.U.S.
3 Dekes 2
3   Forestry
5 Science III
5 Commerce
S Alpha Delts
Totem —Dene
Dekes
Mining
ZBT
Eng Physics
Science 2
St. Andrew's Hall
II PLAYOFFS
Law
V ST.
Nursing
PLAYOFFS
II Caffe
VST 2
Music
Pharmacy
Arts II
Gage II
PLAYOFFS
Georox
Geology
Arts I
Law I
Architecture
Gage I
Geography
TIER 2-LEAGUE H
TIER 2-LEAGUE J
3 0
2 1
1 2
0 3
3 0
2 1
1 2
0 3
TIER 2- LEAGUE L
0
UBC
rr-» (E-X-C-E • L- L-E-N-D xr
Th e  eateri
1 FREE
LUNCH
or
DINNER
DAILY
SPECIAL
This is a terrific deal! Bring a friend or a sweetie, and
receive the least expensive entree FREE. This coupon applies to daily specials only, isn't valid for take-out or any
other coupon. HAVE A GREAT DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
DUTHIE BOOKS
With the rush of new books in the fall
it is understandable when paperback editions of last year's books don't get much
attention. Nevertheless, the prices of
new books being what they are, paperback editions are perhaps the more
significant arrivals in the marketplace.
The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci is
by one of the leading Chinese historians
of the West, Jonathan Spence. Spence's
book is a history of ideas, but a comparative one, examining the impact on
each other of Chinese and European
thought in the time of the Renaissance.
The memory palace of Matteo Ricci was
actually a mnemonic technique of the
Jesuits whereby ideas were memorized
by the act of imagining storing them in a
building, real or fictional. The contrast
of this technique of Western study, with
the methods used by the Ming
bureaucrats in studying for the state
exams, is how Spence starts this
fascinating cross-cultural study.
Sherry Turkle is a professor at MIT.
In her book, The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit, she explores all levels of computer culture
while trying to determine how the use of
the computer has affected the people involved. "The question of mind in relation to machine," she concludes, "is
becoming for us what sex was to the Victorians — threat and obsession, taboo
and fascination."
Every twenty of thirty years a subject
has to be re-examined in the light of current thought, and a new definitive work
appears. Richard Marius has attempted
this in his Thomas More. By the accounts of the More specialists, he has
succeeded, bringing to life the ambiance
of King Henry VIIPs court, that of London and Parliament, and recreating the
tensions of a time when heretics were
burned at the stake, and literature was
smuggled.
Evan S. Connell has addressed an ar-
chtypical myth of the North American
psyche in Son Of The Morning Star:
Custer and Little Bighorn. He has produced a work that will long be regarded
as definitive, but like all the books mentioned so far, he has also succeeded in
writing a book that is entrancing to read,
weaving together personalized accounts
drawn from letters and journals with a
basic narrative in a seamless and obviously skillful manner.
Two other books clearly show an important trend in English books: the production of foreign fiction in superb
translations which follow almost immediately after the publication of the
original. This has allowed English
readers to experience full force the amazing transformations of fiction by the
Latin American authors. The War Of
The End Of The World by Mario Vargas
Llosa is arguably the best novel published last year. A masterful work, it draws
comparison with War and Peace not only because it is an historical novel about
a war, but because it is so rich that
almost any human dilemma or emotion
imaginable is within. Gabriel Garcia
Marquez won the Noble Prize, but the
effect of his novel, One Hundred Years
of Solitude, was profound long before
the granting of the prize. The genre of
magic realism took shape in people's
minds ten years before Marquez was
made a Novel Prize winner, and while
many other Latin American novelists
practice it, Marquez was the one who
seized the imagination of foreign audiences. So the publication of his short
fiction to date in The Collected Stories
of Gabriel Garcia Marquez was greeted
with considerable interest. It, like all of
the books mentioned above, was
published last year, but is now available
in a trade paperback.
919 Robson Street
684-4496
Sunday 12 pm till 5 pm
Arbutus Village Square
738-1833
4444 W. 10th Ave.
224-7012
Sunday 12 pm till 5 pm
HOURS: Monday through Wednesday 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
Thursday and Friday 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

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