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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1965

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Array m umsH
Vol. XLVIII, No.  25
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY,  NOVEMBER  18,  1965
CA   4-3916
—norm betts photo
BOTTOMS UP, once again it is time, gentlemen, for the annual tryouts for the Mardi
Gras chorus line. Getting right into the swing of the occasion is Niki Norberg, arts I.
The tryouts continue at  noon today   and   Friday.
PEANUTS IS GOSPEL HUMOR
By SUE GRANSBY
The comic strip Peanuts is
an avenue of humour which
conveys the message of the
church according to a Lutheran pastor.
Pastor C .P. Pearson spoke
Wednesday   noon   in   Angus
110 on "The Gospel According
to Peanuts."
During the illustrated lecture he showed how the artist, Charles Shultz, tackles
the serious problem of religious   communication.
"The idea of man's human
predicament is often emphasized in the cartoons," said
Pearson.
An image he felt summed up
the whole gospel was that of
the filthy Pig-men standing in
the rain exclaiming, "Hats! In
one minute the rain has wash
ed away what took me all
day to  accomplish."
Pearson saw the dog,
Snoopy, as the "hound of
Heaven or the Christ figure."
"This character tries to
take away all the securities
that man clings to, symbolized by Linus' blanket," he
said.
The way man rationalizes
religion is also seen in a cartoon in which Lucy throws
a snowball which lands on
Snoopy's head.
She shouts: "You got in the
way."
The human predicament is
represented when Linus tries
to assert his independence
saying: "I don't need anybody. I'm independent. Lucy,
will you tie my shoelaces for
me?"
Pearson said "Man's ideal
ism is shot over and over
again  by people like Lucy."
In a number of cartoons we
see her taking joy in such
acts as kicking over Linus'
sand castles he said.
Man does not recognize his
alienation from God and man
according to Pearson.
"He is inext r i c a b 1 y in
trouble and unable, as is
Charlie Brown, to face up to
reality. He sees one snow-
flake and says, "It's snowing."
When we finally do "get
the kite up", said Pearson,
"somebody's bound to tear it
down."
Most of us react to this in
the same way Charlie Brown
does and say: "I can't stand
it,"  he said,
The meeting was sponsored
by the Lutheran Student
Movement.
Students
seek seat
on Senate
Student council is seeking representation on the UBC
Senate.
Student council Monday
night authorized AMS president Byron Hender to attempt
to arrange AMS representation
on the Senate.
Arts President Chuck Campbell read from the Universities
Act (article 23, subsection one)
as he made the motion for
student  representation.
ANY GROUP
The article lists the Senate's
membership as including "one
or more members, as determined by the Senate to be
elected by any group or society
or organization in the province
which in the opinion of the
Senate contributes in a significant way to the economic or
cultural welfare of the province."
The University of Alberta
has had a student representative on its Senate since the
1940s.
AMS  QUALIFIES
Campbell said the AMS and
its membership contribute economically and culturally both
to UBC and British Columbia
and therefore qualify by this
article for Senate membership.
AMS president Byron Hender said the Senate would be
up for re-election within a year
and the AMS should make its
move now.
He said that if the AMS joins
the senate it would not preclude further action.
"This is a step we could take
first for once," said Music Undergraduate President Cliff
Noakes.
73 MEMBERS
The Senate is composed of
about 73 members. The chancellor, president, the deans, the
registrar, thirty-nine faculty representatives, four members
appointed by the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council, fifteen
members elected by convocation, one representative each
from the B.C. Teachers' Federation, High School Principles
and Assistants, three representatives of the Board of Management of he Alumni Associa-
ion of the University and three
representatives from the theological colleges.
UCLA is
no Berkely
(See page Six)
GRAEME VANCE
. . . tuned up
Music
Union
off Key?
Alma Mater Society Co-
Ordinator Graeme Vance,
doesn't like the Musicians' Union.
"I'd like to wipe my
hands of them!" Vance
said Wednesday.
Vance said parts of the
agreement between the
union and the AMS were
unsatisfactory to the
AMS.
• •      •
Under     the     present
agreement, the union
must be consulted before
any musician or performer appears on campus.
The AMS must be careful in dealing with the
union, Vance said, because "they could blacklist us, and then where
would we be?"
Vance felt that although the present
agreement drafted in
1957 is reasonable to both
parties there were some
portions which needed
updating.
• •      •
He did not specify any
particular portion.
"But there can't possibly be any new agreement, until the New Year,
at least," he said.
Vance, AMS president
Byron Hender and treasurer Mike Somers recently discussed the terms
of the contract with union
officials. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November   18,  19651
Thurs<
++m mm>
^i
s£|
APPARENTLY THE Zoologists
are worried about cranes
becoming extinct but we
can't see that there is any
worry, this one hasn't gone
south for the winter because it has to stay here to
work on the new Dentistry
Building.
CUS SAYS:
Young World
shafts union
OTTAWA (CUP) — Patrick Kenniff, president of the
Canadian Union of Students, has charged that the Young
World Mobilization Appeal has misrepresented CUS by
claiming the union has placed its full support behind the
Appeal.
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian University Press is not
a front organization for the
Canadian Union of Students,
CUP president Jim Laxer said
here.
A special emergency meeting of the executive council of
the National Non-Conforming
Calathumpiums may be held
either in the near future or
later.
In an open letter Nov. 11 to
Norman Peterson, administrative assistant to the Appeal,
Kenniff pointed out that CUS
had endorsed the aims of the
drive.
UN APPEAL
But he objected to the claim
made by the United Nations-
sponsored Appeal that 10 students from various universities
who attended a meeting in
Ottawa were "CUS delegates."
About 125 students met here
Oct. 15-17 to launch the Appeal
which hopes to urge youth to
tackle problems of hunger,
disease and oppression in the
developing countries.
Kenniff charged that Peterson listed the 10 students as
CUS delegates "without the
Secretariat even being aware
of their names, without any
authorization   from   myself."
LETTER
He pointed to a letter sent to
the Appeal on Sept. 29 explaining that CUS would not
be able to send delegates due
to "heavy prior committments."
According to Kenniff the
vice-president of the student
council of the University of
Manitoba attended the meeting
but informed CUS that he was
representing neither CUS nor
his own university.
Kenniff's letter coninues:
"It should have been evident
to the organizers of the Appeal
that the delegates to the assembly were there in some cases
as individuals and not as
spokesmen for particular organizations."
NEWS STORY
His letter quoted a newspaper story which reported the
assembly as attended by 125
young people representing
more than 80 Canadian youth
organizations with memberships totalling more than three
million.
Kenniff commented:
"Whereas this method of presenting the story has great
value in publicizing and bolstering the Appeal, it is hardly
acceptable from a n ethical
point of view."
Fewer
UBC Frosh
Flunking
Fewer frosh are flunking
says UBC president John Macdonald.
In a statement released by
the president's office, Macdonald said failure rate among
UBC frosh has dropped from
26 per cent in 1961 to 15.4 per
cent in 1963.
A rise in admission standards,
and a steady improvement in
UBC teaching and student
counseling caused the drop, he
claimed.
High school students wishing
to enter UBC now need a 60
per cent average in their ma-
triculatory year.
The 1961 requirement was
55 per cent.
"The result is good for everyone," said Macdonald. "Young
people unsuited for university
are directed to other programs
where their aptitudes and abilities can meet with success."
GSM NEWS
Christmas Cards:
Christmas cards with an attractive picture of the
Graduate Student Center on them are available now
in the G.'S.C. Office at a cost of 10 cents each or 12
for $1.00.
GSA News Column:
Graduate Students or separate department associations
wishing to place notices of general interest to graduate students in this column may submit these notices
two days before the column date to the Public
Relations Officer,  Graduate Student Center  Office.
Graduate Student Center Dining Room:
The use of the upper dining room in the G.S.C. is
now approaching maximum levels during lunch and
supper most days of the week. If you plan to eat
at the center and can possibly go before peak use
times, ie. 12:30 for lunch and 5:30 for dinner, then
you would be wise to do so.
Special Notice:
The Dining Room at the G.S.C- will close one half
hour early on Wednesday, November 24, at 6:00 p.m.,
for the one time only.
Bridge:
Duplicate bridge is toeing played Tuesday evenings
at 7:30 in the G.S.C. lower lounge. There is still room
for a few more players.
Membership Cards:
Increasing control of the use of the Graduate student
center facilities by non-members is planned. This will
mean that you may be asked to produce your membership card befofe admittance. In order to save yourself
needless trouble and embarrassment, pick up your
membership today at the Grad. Center office. In
coming weeks, if you are asked for your card by a
member of the executive or by the porter, remember
that they are trying to eliminate the use of the already
over-crowded center facilities by non-members, so
that graduate students  will not toe denied their use.
CUS' Kenniff
gefs post
OTTAWA (OUP) — Patrick Kenniff .president of
the Canadian Union of Students, has been appointed
to a position with the International Student Conference.
He was named Nov. 6 to
the Research and Information Commission of the
ISC, which presents reports
to the ISC on various trouble
spots around the  world.
The last CUS congress
mandated the executive to
investigate the ISC's viability and reconsider the role
of CUS as a member of the
ISC.
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.
,   A Thursday,   November   18,    1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC McGOUN CUP debater, Jim Taylor, law I, Dave Amor,
arts I, Wolfram Raymer, arts III, and Richard Watts, arts I,
take on Victoria College Friday in the B.C. finals for the
coveted Canadian debating trophy.
A RUMOR that this pipe, now being buried along East
Mall, was to lead to a brewery as beer strike insurance for
the faculty club was quashed Wednesday by Flash Workman of B. and G., pictured on the right. "Ifs just another
damn sewer," he said.
AMS plans open forum
with B. of G. in hot spot
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The Alma Mater Society is
planning an open forum between students and the board
of governors.
In the forum, to be held
noon Nov. 25 in Brock
lounge, student councillors,
education action program representatives, and students
will quiz board of governors
members on their policies.
• •     •
The idea of the meeting
was originated by EAP and
passed by council Monday
night.
Meeting co-ordinator Tom
Mason said Wednesday the
program would consist of
four parts.
It will open with a synopsis of the brief AMS vice-
presiderrts Bob Cruise and
Peter Braund presented to
the Board of Governors in
August.
• *      •
A speaker for the Democracy in the University Community Committee, a sub-committee of the Canadian Union
of Students, will speak next
on how the split between students and administration
could be improved.
Members   of the  board  of
governors will then give their
views.
After the speeches a student panel made up of local
Canadian Union of Students
chairman Ed Lavalle, AMS
president Byron Hender, Education Action Committee
member Randy Enomoto and
a Ubyssey representative will
ask the speakers questions on
their stands.
"If   time   is   left,   students
CUSO shows
at IH house
Miss Judy Ramson, associate
secretary of the Canadian University Service Overseas will
show films on CUSO at 8 p.m.
tonight in International House.
The films will include a
movie produced for the CBC
program Observer.
The theme follows former
UBC student Beverley Bie
around her orientation program
at York University then on to
Ghana where she is now stationed as a teacher.
Miss Ramson has worked for
two years in India as a CUSO
volunteer.
will be able to ask questions
the panel has missed from
the floor," said Mason.
Mason said there was some
doubt as to how many governors would come to the meeting.
• • •
"All this depends on if they
come," he said, "AMS second
vice-president Peter Braund
is sending out the invitations."
Ghastly, ghostly noises
haunt girl's washroom
More noises were heard in the North Brock basement
stairway Wednesday.
The strange noises were first heard Monday morning by two co-eds.
"I'm afraid to go to the girl's washroom now," said
the co-ed who reported the incident.
"I get prickly all over when I go down there," said
another.
A spokesman in the Proctor's office said, "No, we
haven't heard anything. Maybe we've got a ghost".
"Very strange. No, we haven't heard anything. Maybe
we have a bogeyman," said an official in the co-ordinator's
office.
No official investigation is planned.
U. of Montreal student
protests  U.S.  policy
MONTREAL (CUP) — University of Montreal student
Michel Forand has resigned from the organizing committee
of the Company of Young Canadians to protest Canada's
support for United States Vietnam policy.
In a letter to Prime Minister
Pearson Nov. 4, Forand, who
worked as an associate secretary for the Canadian Union of
Students last year, stated:
"My resignation is motivated by the recent announcement of your government's
support of the military policy
of the United States government in Vietnam."
The CYC organizing committee was appointed by the
government last spring and
plans to present its report for
the formation of the Company
directly to the Prime Minister.
"The war going on in Vietnam is all the more reprehensible because it is waged by
those who proclaim loudly
their belief in democracy as "a
basis for world peace," Forand
told Pearson.
Student court
peers at AMS
- Student Court meets in the
council chambers at noon
today.
The hearing is open to
everyone and will decide the
legality of hiring Alma Mater
Society executives for summer work.
All students are entitled to
attend and are allowed to
state their opinions.
The court consists of seven
members: graduate student
Gordon Galbraith and six
law students.
opportunities par
*
dl jJdLLL ciIXlt7J. lUcUl
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana)
organiaztion, has several challenging career openings in the
Canadian Division Office in Calgary and in field operations
throughout Alberta. Graduating, Post-Graduate and Undergraduate Engineers are invited to:
INTERVIEWS NOVEMBER 22 and 23, 1965
Interviews for summer employment will also be conducted.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company in Alberta, offering
attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity for
rapid advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the Student
Placement Office. Company and Job information booklets are
available there.
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION mntsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Imc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1965
"Nobody shoots at a dead duck."
-W. A. C.  Bennett, Nov. 5, 1965
Pete and tygers
There is no time or season without men from
yesterday.
The cartoonist Al Capp is currently satirizing student protesters as swine.
Or, as he puts it, Students Wildly Indignant about
Nearly Everything.
And yesterday ex-wheel Mike Coleman seemed to
imply much the same thing when he lectured us all
on why the "horses of instruction" are better than the
"tygers of wrath" in Blake's proverb (which formerly
adorned our logo): "The tygers of wrath are wiser than
the horses of instruction."
Now both these men of yesterday are, metaphorically speaking, wrong. Swine may be unbathed, but
they are slaughtered without protest.
Mr. Coleman says horses can work together for the
general good. But he forgets that when a horse works,
not only is it either led or driven — it wears blinders.
No, we're putting our money on the tygers. Or,
as we like to think of them, The Younger Generation
Earnestly Reconsidering Society.
And if the word "earnestly" seems a little wide-
eyed or naive, that's part of it. For we consider that
the tygers are showing the same kind of wide-eyed
naivete that, say, cleared the country out of the woods
in the first place.
And the fact that these are "tygers of wrath" is
unfortunate, but by now a fact of life. They are not
pleased with the society — and that includes the university society — and are worked up enough to express
their displeasure.
And work to change it. But to work as tygers —
with eyes open — not as horses. In other words, not to
accept the situation as they find it, but to reconsider
every aspect on its merits.
Naturally, having tygers around sometimes discomforts the horses.
Many students here for technical training, who
come out on campus for classes and the library and
return home in the same ol' carpools, are bitterly resentful when tygers speak out in their name on issues.
But even our conservative law students association
president, Peter Hyndman, has hit the nail on the head
in the latter part of his article on the opposite page.
"Vocal minorities," he says . . . "deserve not only
the stage but the right to interpret unexpressed student feeling as they see fit."
Which is surely a justification of tygerism, for
which he deserves high praise.
!
Fog it! Study!
The fog is rolling in these days just as Sandburg
described it.
On little cat feet.
The leaves, all golden and tangerine, have been
raked and burned.
And the Bay's windows again reek of Christmas.
But the leaves of textbooks are still white and crisp.
And exams are also rolling near.
On little white sheets.
And grades will follow them.
With little expulsion sheets.
The fog is rolling in.
On little cat feet.
And let me tell you, boy,  your marks will disintegrate.
And marches  alone  won't  bring  Salvation.
—P. M. B. and R. B.
— from U. of Washington Daily
"Thafs my new draft card . . . made by the Ajax Asbestos Co."
Council a minority?
By PETER HYNDMAN
Law president
Our Tom Fletcher has lost
touch with student opinion.
This fact was made manifest
by his recent comment in The
Ubyssey.
Our Tom scores council for
the veto of the march. His
argument: "The student body
opposed the Brock types in
the referendum. Why was
council oblivious of student
opinion?"
Nuts to Our Tom.
Nineteen per cent of UBC
students, on a clear, sunny,
and exhilarating fall day, said
they were in favor of an "orderly academic procession".
Some student body!
Some referendum: just
what is an orderly academic
procession?
About 2,000 students voted
in favor of one. That's just
about how many different
kinds of orderly academic
processions there are.
And so, Terrible Thomas,
that referendum result is
hardly a useful subject of
analysis.
True it is that at one stage
council opposed the idea of a
march.
How unfortunate that no-
one knows why.
How surprising to learn that
some votes against the march
represented the view that
the march was "too easy" —
that instead, a blood and guts
job of door to door canvass
throughout the lower mainland would be a far more effective message of concern.
And so, Truculent Thomas,
it is worth your while to look
behind the council vote to
learn that many who voted
"no" did so in the hope of
implementing what they felt
to be even more effective
ways of spreading the message
of the march.
Why was Our Tom oblivious to these facts? Not be-
PETER HYNDMAN
... no fuel
cause of the type  of representation found on council.
This is consistent with Liberal philosophy.
Mayhaps Our Tom will investigate the merits of the
Conservative philosophy: progress based on experience, not
experiment.
Instead of experimenting
with a new system, let's first
try to improve the present
one.
There is just one thing missing from the present system
— the fuel to run it.
That fuel is the active interest of the entire student
body.
That fuel can provide a
meaningful referendum vote,
and more sensitivity in our
councillors.
As matters stand now, vocal minorities (council perhaps one such) hold the stage;
the moderate majority says
nothing,   does  nothing.
Until it does, vocal minorities — for their interest and
effort alone — deserve not
only the stage, but the right
to interpret unexpressed student feeling as they see fit.
Letters
Classic
wrath
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A recent article in your
paper spoke of the proper
roles of women: "barefoot,
pregnant, in the kitchen." Exactly why was this considered
worth printing?
Was it for its truth, its originality, its sympathetic insight, its courteous urbanity,
or its sparkling wit?
I cannot help thinking that
there is a remarkable lack of
consistency in the sensitivities displayed on this campus.
If somebody spoke of a non-
white race as essentially inferior to the Caucasian and
doomed by nature to permanent subservience what a howl
of protest would go up!
And nobody would be
able to plead that it was just
for a joke.
Surely the immunity that
is claimed by other races,
where insulting language is
concerned, might be extended
to the other half of our own.
"Divers weights and divers
measures are an abomination"
— and by no means unto the
Lord alone.
But I regret that the young
lady who replied to the article should have been represented as saying "Namo dat
quod non habat." A person
who did not know might be
led to think this was Latin.
GEOFFREY B. RIDDEHOUGH
Arts '24
classics department
WE'RE NICE
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The last few editions of The
Ubyssey have been very nice.
I liked all the good things
said about the nice people on
campus.
I am so happy that you are
not printing all the nasty
things that our awful AMS
members are doing. It's so nice
to know that The Ubyssey
stands for all the good things
in life.
MIKE SOURIS
Education III
CAMEL TALK
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your "Lebanese camel
driver" informed you correctly, there is no Arabic word
for "frosh".
Though it could be written:
rrf^o.
^r^rzi?
EDITOR:
Tom Wayman
Ron Rlter
News
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City        Al   Donald
Photo    _     Norm    Betts
•port* Ed Clark
Aaa't News  Dan Mullen
Richard   Blair   Robbi   West
Ass't City       Danny Stoffman
Page Friday   John Kelsey
Managing  _  Ian Cameron
Features
CUP
Mike Bolton
Don Hull
Good copy today from, Bruce
Benton, Kris Emmot, Little Sue
Gransby, Joan Fogarty, Craig
Tappings, Pat Hrushowy of The
Ubyssey, Peggy Stein, Sheila Dobson, Anne (Hi) Balf, Derick
Blackie, Doug Halverson, copy-
runner Carol, Dennis, Powell, Kurt
and Val in photo.
7
*^P
somewhat   similar   to   words
such as:
"farash" —
s7;
"J^
meaning a sleeping car attendant on the railway, or a
waiter.
With best wishes to you and
the staff.
A FORMER
CAMEL DRIVER Thursday,  November   18,   1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Los Angeles  solution to
administration problems
i*n\
The following story by
Joseph N. Bell is reprinted
from The Christian Science
Monitor.
Student-administration problems are not unique at UBC.
We are simply mirroring
difficulties which colour the
whole spectrum of universities.
Lack of communication between students and administrators is a major problem.
Here is how the University
of Los Angeles Division, has
dealt with it.
• •     •
Perhaps   UBC  can  find  a
moral in the story.
Six men have just gathered
for a regular monthly breakfast meeting at the home of
Chancellor Franklin Murphy
of the University of California
at Los Angeles.
Three were university administrators. The others were
students: the editor of the
campus newspaper and the
heads of the undergraduate
and graduate student organizations. These men talked together for two or three hours.
No subject was barred. No
views were watered down, no
images built, no apples
polished.
When the conference was
over, each understood the
others better. They may not
have agreed. But those twin
wellsprings of unrest—ignorance and fear — were absent.
• •     •
Dr. Murphy and his cohorts
are deeply concerned about
what seems, all over the nation, to be a growing gap in
communications between college students and administrators.
With a look over their
shoulders at Berkeley they've
determined to keep lines open
at UCLA, which has many of
the same problems at its sister
campus in the north. So far,
they've been remarkably successful.
"The one thing you shouldn't have on a university campus," says Dr. Murphy, a ruddy, genial man of great enthusiasms,   "is   an   inflexible
set of rules. They just get you
in trouble.
"Rules are not nearly as effective as a sophisticated administration. Administrators
write rules for themselves.
The only real peace of mind I
get is talking with these young
young people — and we try
to do it as much as possible1
here."
They do it in many ways.
In addition to the breakfast
conferences, a three-day convocation involving a much
larger group of faculty and
student leaders is held each
year at nearby Lake Arrowhead during the semester
break.
* •      •
In between such planned
conferences, Dr. Murphy or
one of his top associates is
always accessible. Students
with problems can get to
them. And administrators with
problems can get to the students, also.
Although many of the same
combustibles are present,
UCLA has had none of the
violence seen at Berkeley.
Admittedly, its location in the
lap of the plush homes of
Westwood and Beverly Hills
helps. So does its closer proximity to a large city.
But the coterie of political
activists at UCLA is nonetheless large and articulate.
The Free Speech movement
and all of the other activist
organizations in the forefront
of current student movements
elsewhere are evident and—in
some instances — quite strong
at UCLA. Where, then, is the
difference?
• •      •
"Before last year's crisis,"
the chancellor told me, gesturing restlessly in his comfortable office, "we got more
criticism than Berkeley. We've
had people speak here that
Berkeley wouldn't premit —
Malcolm X, for example.
"The whole issue on
whether or not a Communist
should be permitted to speak
on a University of California
campus was joined here. And
the point was won by petition
^^^y^^-^Sv^^-fe7107^ kim ifh& sneezes ^^.V^^yVjC:
itilrS^fiezSOLSe *be knows it ica^e^. '\:-*%*V«;
tum$ into a fiq~
not by
from this campus
riot.
"A riot does not necessarily
indicate vitality. More likely,
it indicates frustration or anger . . . We feel that the only
way to deal with this generation of students is to talk with
them. I won't talk with an ad
hoc group, but I will talk with
any legitimate group of students, any time, whatever
their mission."
During the abortive "dirty
word" episode at Berkeley last
year, a group of UCLA students asked the chancellor
what he would do if students
marched on his campus carrying offensive signs.
"They wanted to know if I
would have them arrested for
obscenity," recalls the chancellor. "I told them that I
wouldn't be sucked into an irrelevant debate on what is
and is not obscenity, but that
I would discipline them for
invasion of privacy and for
disrupting the operation of
the campus."
•     •     •
There were no such marchers at UCLA.
The same sort of on-campus
political solicitations that
started the Berkeley demonstrations took place at UCLA,
too. Instead of the offenders
being arrested, however, they
were permitted to operate before a Campus Review Board
(made up of two faculty members, two undergraduates, one
graduate student, and one administrator).
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Invites you to discuss
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interviews will be held on campus on
NOVEMBER 22nd and 23rd
For  information  applications and   appointments  please see  your
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
U)
The Altogether
Go Togethers
o
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Ld
It doesn't take much figuring to know
that this is the most important look
this season ... on campus and off!
A skimp of a skirt ... or a jazzy
jumper plus wild, wild stocking plus
matching topping! Instant "total
look" . . . instant success. Illustrated:
Argyle stockings and T-shirts,
S.M.L. Set  12.95
Hopsacking 20-in. skirt in navy or
berry, 5 to 13.
10.95 and 12.95
Wool Junipers in navy or berry, sizes
5 to 13.
16.95 and 19.95
EATON'S Young Flair Shop —
All Four Stores Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
%^».
^
r,«,
THERE   ARE   SEWER   and
sewer places on campus
where you can walk without getting your feet muddy. This section of John
Macdonald's Muck-up, Dig-
up campaign is for a new
sewer main down East Mall.
Socialist says
Grits unstable
People "wise to whigs'
support New Democrats
By JOAN FOGARTY
The recent federal election pointed up the instability of
the Liberals, a leading socialist said Wednesday.
Mrs. Ruth Bullock, secretary
of the League for Socialist Action told a meeting of the Soc-
alist Club the workers supported the New Democratic
Party because "they were wise
to the Liberals."
"The farmers showed their
lack of support of the Liberals
by supporting Diefenbaker,"
she said.
She felt the Social Credit
party had no significance on
the national scene.
• •      •
"A vacuum is developing in
politics in which a party which
can move forward with imagination and vigour could make
gains," she said.
She said socialists see campaigns as national forums for
the advancement of politics
and necessary in the propoga-
tion of the socialist point of
view.
"Elections are crisis within
the capitalist government affairs," she said.
Mrs. Bullock said the League
for Socialist Action supports a
multiplicity of campaigns because each one signifies a crisis in capitalism.
• •      •
"The league participated in
the campaign in support of the
NDP party, because they wish
to win the NDP over as a socialist party, a peace party,"
Mrs. Bullock said.
It wishes the NDP to support
the withdrawal of Canada
from the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.
She felt the NDP should be
advancing the question of public ownership and welding
labour and farmers together in
production force.
• •     •
Thursday, November 18,  1965
"The NDP must become a
party to change society, that
will not flounder in forming
a government," she said.
Mrs. Bullock termed the Organization of American States
a "devious organization set up
by the USA to control political
affairs in Latin America."
"Membership would not do
any good for our kind of politics," she said.
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.    RE 1-4531
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear Rentals
Tuxedos White &. Blue Coati
Full   Dress Shirts   &.   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue Blazers
Directors'   Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
OVER 2300 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608 Granville (at 10th)   4691  Kingsway (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by Sears)   HE 5-1160
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
MOTHER COURAGE
and HER CHILDREN
by Bertolt Brecht
English Version by Eric Beatley
Student Performance, Mon, Nov. 22,7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
Brecht's great anti-war play in the Epic Theatre style with
Marjorie Nelson, noted New York actress in the title role.
Tickets Available - Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
NOTE:  Some tickets at 75c each will  be available for
Tues., Nov. 23, Wed., Nov. 24 and Thurs., Nov. 25.
SUPPORT YOUR OWN CAMPUS THEATRE
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
iiftttiiiii ;*:
All she wanted was my high V pullover
And the amusing thing about it is ... it doesn't even fit her. But
you ought to see how it looked on me . . . Come to think of it, that's
how this whole thing started. It's a Woolsey from Scotland, of course
... smart new ribbed V neck and cuffs. In 8 colours . . . bone, peat
blend, fjord blend, mulberry blend, green sea, coal blue and sky blue.
Sizes S, M, L, XL. Each   22.50
The Bay Campus and Career Shop, second floor Thursday,  November   18,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
-powell hargrave  photo
THE LONG ARM OF THE LAW triumphed Wednesday as the law touch-football team
beat Zeta Beta Tau 1-1 in a hard-fought noon-hour inter-mural football game. Law
was awarded the tie game on the basis of having gained the most yards in overtime
play.
Demands pay off
in New Zealand
(CUP/NZSPA) Considerable success has been achieved
in a campaign to improve conditions for university students
in New Zealand.
Reacting to a build-up of
public opinion in favor of the
students' cause, the government finally acceded in the
last budget to part of the student demands.
Concessions gained included
an increase in the boarding bursary from $240 to $375, an
increase of $60 to $240 in fee
and allowance bursaries for
third year undergraduate students, and an increase in Masters' bursaries from $300 to
$450.
The government also agreed
to increase its share of capital
costs of student hostels from
two-thirds to 80 per cent and
to introduce a loan scheme for
hostels.
The campaign began with a
written brief presented to the
government. This was followed by a series of meetings to
arouse student enthusiasm and
generate public support from
outside the universities.
Finally mass demonstrations
were held in several cities.
Mussoc  hungry
for  make  hams
UBC musical society needs
a man.
In fact it needs two men.
Two male leads are required for the musical Take
Me Along, to be performed
Feb. 9 to 12.
Information can be obtained from the Mussoc club
room, in the auditorium, or
by calling 224-3242 local 50.
GO-GO
^Friday & Saturday - 9 til 2\
at the
dtid&away*
3607 W. Broadway
19   cramming   days   left
before Xmas exams start
There are only 19 cramming days left before Christmas exams begin.
And the icy chill of the seasonal occurance is already
being felt by the students interviewed by The Ubyssey
Wednesday.
Lorna Luttin, arts III, said, "Don't you think we should
abolish exams?"
"I shouldn't be here, said Dave Lewis, arts I.
"Exams — what exams?" asked a haggard Ubyssey
editor.
Classes end on Dec. 7 and exams begin Dec. 8.
The registrar's office hopes to have the exam timetable posted Nov. 22.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Studenl-s Court (Constitutional Hearing)
Date: todays
Time: 12:30 p.m.
Place: Council Chamber, Brock Hall
Please be advised that the Students' Court will hold
a hearing on the constitutional validity of Students'
Council's practice of hiring student officers for employment.
The hearing is open and all students are invited to
attend.
CANADA
EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
22nd, 23rd, 24th and 25th November
to interview  graduating,  post-graduate  and   undergraduate   students  for
positions in  1966.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT:  Preferred Disciplines:
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—8:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.»*
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —   Students .35<   Adults .601
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The  Centre will be closed all day Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:  Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
Mechanical  Engineering
Chemical  Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Engineering  Physics
Civil  Engineering
for openings as:
Development Engineer
Design  Engineer
Maintenance  Engineer
Process Engineer
Planning  Engineer
Industrial  Engineer
Industrial  Engineering
Chemistry
Commerce
Business Administration
Arts
Mathematics-Statistics
Technical   Analyst   (Research   Centre)
Process Chemist
Analytical  Chemist
Financial & Control Personnel
(at the plants or at  Head Office)
Marketing   Research   Representative
Technical Service Representative    Market Analyst
Development  Physicist Programmer-Analyst
Statistician
Locations: Montreal,  Shawinigan,  P.Q.
Maitland,   Kingston, Whitby,   North  Bay   and   Sarnia,   Ontario
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT:  Preferred  Disciplines:
1 year
Chemical  Engineering
Mechanical   Engineering
Electrical  Engineering
Engineering  Physics,
Industrial  Engineering
Commerce
Chemistry
from degree
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2 yean
from degree
X
X
X
3 years
from degree
X
for openings as:
(a) Assistants  to   Design,   Process  an'I
and
Development   Engineers
(b) Vacation  relief  in  Production,  General   Plant Office  and
the  Laboratories.
An appointment to see our representatives can  be made through your Placement Office where information booklets, application forms and   1966 position
descriptions are also available.
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
PERSONNEL DIVISION, P.O. BOX 660, MONTREAL, P.Q. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  18,  1965
THE
FRAT
RAT
By GORDON TAYLOR
Fraternity  Columnist
Something new is to be added to Radsoc programming.
The Inter-Fraternity Council will soon be presenting its
own program to be heard biweekly at noon Tuesdays and
on Thursday evening.
The program will serve an
informative role in telling
students more about the fraternities.
Fraternity activities and
news will be featured on the
program.
•      •      •
Construction on frat row
row of three new fraternity
houses will begin in the
spring.
Zeta Beta Tau, Phi Kappa
Pi, and Sigma Chi fraternities
are calling tenders on the
building of their houses.
The damage done to the
Psi Upsilon Fraternity House
by fire in October has now
been completely repaired at
cost of $8,000.
The Greek societies held a
two day united Appeal blitz
Sept. 27 and Nov. 4 and collected over $4,500 for the Red
Feather.
The Mardi Gras committee
is holding auditions for the
chorus line this week. The
last day for auditions is Friday. The time is 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. The place is the
Brock Music room.
All students are invited to
try for these parts.
EUS searches
for witnesses
" Engineering undergraduate society president Art Stevenson wants witnesses of the acid throwing incident at the
Tea Cup game Oct. 21.
Stevenson said Wednesday
he needs evidence to present
to student court.
Hans Klasser, science III, has
already lost the hearing in one
ear as a result of acid throwing, said Stevenson.
"We have good evidence as
to those responsible," he said,
"but we still would like further, confirming evidence so
that the matter may be taken
to student court."
Any student with information on this matter should contact Peter Hyndman, chairman
of the AMS discipline committee.
"If this information is not
forthcoming by the ned of next
week," said Stevenson, "we
will have no alternative but
to- turn over the evidence to
the RCMP.
"They are very much aware
of the case."
Television
extends UBC
UBC has extended its adult
education system to include
early morning television programs.
The weekly programs, part
of the University of the- Air,
start Friday at 7 a.m. on channels 6 and 8.
A series of 26 half-hour lectures on great Asian civilizations is being produced for the
programs.
"With the recent crises in
South-east Asia," said Prof. W.
L. Holland, Asian studies head,
"the need for a deeper understanding of the social and political forces is greater than
ever."
Other subjects include
French, psychology, history,
theatre and mathematics.
Universities in Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa, and Toronto
are also making programs for
the series.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
Today—Noon—Angus 110—25c
MICHAEL MYERSON
The graduate student from Berkeley, who after being
invited was refused the platform at the Toronto Teach-In.
He has recently returned from Hanoi and will give the
N.L.F. (Viet Cong) viewpoint.
Thurs. Nov. 25—Noon—Armories—35c
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
Conducted by Meredith Davies
In  a  special UBC   Concert,  made  possible  by  a  grant
from the Canada Council.
Coming Next Week
BRUCE SPENSER of S.I.N.A.
Founder of the Society for the Prevention of Indecency
to Naked Animals.
Time and Place to be Announced
UBC nuclear
sleuths probe
US. blast
UBC has a team of nuclear
sleuths working on campus,
headed by geophysics professor
Dr. R. D. Russell.
Russell said Monday the
American government detonated a hydrogen bomb Nov. 1
in a shaft 2,300 feet below Am-
chitka Island in the Aleutian
Islands.
"A preliminary study being
done at UBC on the Canadian
reports will take about four
months. When the results are
evaluated, a report will be sent
to Washington."
Broadway Gym Ltd.
Rates
Broadway at Kingsway
TR 9.9987
TO SEND FLOWERS
Anywhere in the World
Call
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
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AM  1-7271
THE BUSINESS END OF
THE TELEPHONE BUSINESS
NEEDS MANAGERS
GRADUATES IN: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCIENCE (MATHS &• PHYSICS)- MEN & WOMEN
Bell's telecommunications services are becoming ever more varied and advanced. It
follows, we continually need keen, capable
people who can develop into the intelligent
managers of all our business functions.
TALK TO THE   BELL'S
EMPLOYMENT   REPS
WHEN THEY VISIT
YOUR CAMPUS ON
NOVEMBER 29, 30 and
DECEMBER 1,2
Meanwhile, you can obtain informative
Career Booklets from your Placement Office.
Get one soon.
Bell Canada Thursday,   November   18,   1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9
—dermis gans photos
EXAMS ARE ONLY WEEKS AWAY and yet some students
seem to have all the time in the world to slack around. Hit
the books young man, it's later than you think.
Democracy campaign
to be run at UBC
Democracy will ride again
Peter Cameron, chairman of
the Democracy in the University Community Committee,
said Wednesday the committee
will be organized at a meeting
in the AMS council chamber at
7:30 p.m.
DUCC, a sub committee of
the Canadian Union of Students, roughly corresponds to
UBC's own Education Action
Committee.
Cameron said the DUCC
could do things EAP could not,
as it is budgeted under CUS
and does not have to report to
the AMS.
"We don't have democracy
on the campus now," Cameron
said, "and some basic changes
will be needed before we do."
tonight.
Downtown scribe
views election
An ex-Ubyssey staffer will
give his opinion of the Nov.
8 federal election noon today.
Jack Wasserman, now a
columnist for The S - - n
newspaper, will take part in a
panel discussion, "What happened Nov. 8?" in Brock
lounge.
Other panel members will
include political science professors D. V. Smiley and
Jean Laponce.
The meeting is sponsored
by the UBC Liberals.
MOTHER COURAGE'
Family play night
at Freddy Wood
It's family night at the Freddy Wood Friday.
A cast of professionals and
25 UBC students will stage
East Berlin playwright Bert-
holdt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children.
Well-known Brechtian actress Marjorie Nelson is
Mother Courage.
UBC'ers playing lead roles
are Pat Lidkea and Pat Wilson.
Miss Nelson worked with
Brecht and Charles Laughton
on the original Hollywood
production of Galileo.
Mother Courage is a strong
anti-war drama set in sixteenth century Germany during the Thirty Years War.
The English version is by
Eric Bentley with music by
Paul Desseau. Director is
Klaus Strassmann, assistant
professor in UBC's theatre
department.
Birds meet
Meeting for all T'Birds and
Jayvees in room 213, Memorial Gym at noon today. All
must  attend.
Play runs to Nov. 27 with
no performance Sunday, Nov.
21 and a student performance
Monday, Nov. 22 at 7:30 p.m.
All tickets are $2.50 at Frederic Wood Theatre.
Prof-politico
looks ahead
A UBC assistant education
professor who ran for the.
New Democratic Party in the
Fraser Valley Nov. 8 and lost
has high hopes for next time.
Mark Rose, who ran second
to Socred incumbent Alec
Patterson, said in an interview his chance will be better after redistribution.
He said the riding will be
divided   into   Fraser   Valley
West   where   he    scored   a
4,000-vote majority and Fra-
■ ser Valley.
SKI SWEATERS $29.95
QUILTED PARKAS $12.95
SHELL PARKAS $9.95
STRECHIE PANTS $19.95 & $21.95
GRESVIG and ERBACHER SKIS
TYROL, VAL D'OR and ERBACHER BOOTS
$32.95 & $39.95
SKI OUTFITS $29.95
Including Skis, Full Safety Harness and Metal Poles
SKI POLES $4.95 - $9.95
SKI REPAIRS and SUNDRIES
SKATES and HOCKEY STICKS
North
WESTERN SPORTING GOODS
Jimmy Couse Gerry Miller
Tenth at Alma Phone 224-5040
SIR    LAURENCE    OLIVIER
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THURS. & FRI.
NOV. 18 & 19
12:30, 3:30 & 7:30
Our doubts are traitors,
and make us lose the good
we oft'might win.
— Measure for Measure. Act I.
If you're looking for a challenging career opportunity...
where your professional approach to problem-solving will
be respected and rewarded ... Alcan is your answer. No
doubt about it.
Alcan is looking for enterprising university graduates
to meet expanding needs of the future, and to win
personal fulfilment in the productive environment of our
Company's diversified operations.
Your Placement Office has copies of "Alcan—A Growth
Company". Further information dealing with your specific
interests can be discussed during a personal interview.
Mr. T. L. Gibson and Mr. J. J. Lawless will conduct
on-campus interviews
NOVEMBER 22, 23, 24, 25, 1965
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING • MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING • ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
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THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  November  18,  1965
S
I
Vi Price Tickets for Students
Monday and Tuesday ot "THE MOUSETRAP"
Half price or 2 for one — $1.25
Be sure to see this exciting mystery by Agatha Christie
THE MOUSETRAP
At The Arts Club Theatre, 1181 Seymour St.
Tickets from the Vancouver Ticket Center, or at the Theatre
November 18th opening through to December 4th, 8:30
A great future could result
from a 20 minute interview
campus interviews
Nov. 22, 21 24, 25, 26
For fUrther information and interview appointment,
please contact your Placement Officer.
We need university grads ... top-notch university grads to help
us meet the challenges of development in every sphere of our
activity.
We need engineers . . . electrical, mechanical, civil, chemical
and metallurgical. We need B.Comm.'s, for accounting and
business administration . . . and B.A.'s for sociological and
economic studies, personnel work, public relations, and training
programs. We need B.Sc.'s ... not only honour grads, but
those majoring in chemistry, maths, physics and related
disciplines. And, because we're pushing into so many experimental areas, we need Master's and Ph.D.'s... people who can
spearhead the attack on the more complex problems that face us.
In short ... we need you! See your Placement Officer and
arrange for an interview with one of our recruiters.
Northern Electric
COMPANY LIMITED
An all-Canadian company with over 79,000 employees
6066-1BR1
FOR
THE
BIRDS
By DAN MULLEN
Simon Fraser introduced big time college football
to Vancouver Saturday.
At least that's what we read in some papers. Apparently it's been forgotten that UBC lost 16-0 to the University of Montana in Empire Stadium in 1963.
The Clansmen lost 30-6 to the Oregon State University freshman team on a muddy field made worse by a
steady rain throughout the game.
Before the contest, we read how tough both teams
were, and after it we read that Canadians know now that
they are as good football players as Americans.
This, of course, is nonsense. Canadians will never
equal Americans in football until they begin playing the
game young under reasonably knowledgeable supervision.
Canadians could be as good as Americans: but they
won't be until impetus is given to high schools in this area
to produce teams that develop players to the height of
their potential.
Admittedly, this contradicts the West Coast ethic
which permits dabbling in a wide range of activities and
forbids proficiency in any one field.
Much explaining done
Some interesting explanations for OSU's runaway
have been put forward.
At least two analysts have suggested that Oregon
State wore the locals down because of a weight advantage.
The game program shows each team had 17 players
at 200 pounds or more. The Clansmen had seven between
190 and 199. Oregon State had four in this category.
So much for that apology.
Actually, the Clansmen lost because Oregon State
had better football players and a better team. Really
very simple.
After OSTJ scored a fourth time, a fan near me in the
grandstand objected to the trite "Class will tell" refrain.
"Those American kids been playin' football since they
were 12 or so, haven't they ? How do you expect us to
compete with them?"
They've been playing longer than that, Charlie. But
whose fault is it if they have more experience and better
grounding in fundamentals than most Canadian players ?
It's obvious that coach Lome Davies and his assistants
have the football knowledge and the big league attitude
to bring Burnaby Mountain squads up to U.S. college
standards.
Compete with best
Eventually, Simon Fraser will be able to compete
with the best football teams on the U.S. West Coast.
But, as the SF brass will leam — if they haven't
realized it already — the red and blue jerseys of the
Clansmen can not be filled with three dozen Vancouver
high school products against OSU, Washington, and
others.
Nor will recruiting a few Canadians from the prairies
and eastern regions bring Simon Fraser out of the football
woods.
For the Clan to hit the big time on schedule (1968 or
1969), the school will have to attract U.S. players in large
numbers.
And if SF is ever to field a mostly-local football team
against even second rate U.S. competition (such as Idaho,
Idaho State, Montana, Montana State, the University of
the Pacific) B.C. high school football will have to improve.
Local prep gridiron aspirants will have to learn that
hard work on a practice field is more a part of the game
than the flashy uniform they put on Thursday afternoon.
Coaches will have to begin teaching the game or
make room for men who can and will.
The new school across the city will reach its goal of
big time athletics only if it provides the leadership that
UBC has so long failed to give high school athletic
programs. Thursday,   November   18,   1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
WOMEN'S
Athletic policy hit
Nancy Bain, president of
the Women's Athletic Association, suggests a long, hard
look at UBC's athletic policy,
beginning with an attempt to
ascertain what students want
in intercollegiate and intramural sports.
By NANCY BAIN
UBC's athletic system is
shackled by two outstanding
problems: a lack of funds to
provide a worthwhile program and a decline in student
support at the gates. Essentially these problems are distinct and unique; and must be
considered separately.
First some insights into the
funds vs. program case. Every
student who pays AMS fees
is contributing $5 to athletics:
$4.20 to men's and .80 to women's. Since each person
makes the same donation, it
seems only equitable that each
should have the same opportunity to partake in the sport
of his choice.
It is along this line that
UBC's athletic associations
have patterned their philosophy. Where sufficient interest
is shown, an attempt is made
to provide that activity.
If at any time the number
of enthusiasts for a team closely approaches nil, the team is
disbanded. In this way, increasing and decreasing trends
of interest in particular sports
are kept up.
All of this is ideal in theory;
but in practice, athletics are
broke.    Present    sources    of
funds aren't adequate to support teams for all who wish
to participate.
To cut down on the number of extra-mural teams or to
attempt to funnel them into
the intramural system would
be a giant stride backwards.
It would be an attempt to
compromise the highly competitive nature of extramurals
with the recreational nature
of intramurals.
The result: a great exodus
of athletics to off-campus
teams and a general lowering
of interest in campus sports.
An already bad problem
would be seriously aggravated.
The only reasonable solution lies in procuring more
funds, and thus be able to
have a good program for
everybody who wants to participate.
A confusion of commercialism of sport and excellence of
sport has led to many confused answers to the lack of
student support at the gates
problem. Merely injecting
more money into spectator
sports is no remedy.
The major sports were receiving less money several
years back when they were
drawing better crowds. The
matter goes far deeper than
just money and athletic scholarships.
It is finding an effective
combination of athletics and
entertainment. And to find
this, one must first find why
there is such wide spread
spectator apathy at present.
Perhaps we might logically begin by asking the students.
Birds battle Dinosaurs
for Owens  hockey trophy
UBC's hockey Thunderbirds battle some Dinosaurs
this weekend.
Bob Hindmarch's 'Birds host the University of Alberta
at Calgary Dinosaurs in a two-game total point series
which inaugurates the Intercollegiate Hockey Classic for
the John Owen's Memorial Trophy.
Games start at 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at the
Winter Sports Centre.
The trophy has been donated for annual competition
by the University District Lions Club.
John Owens, who passed away Jan. 1st of this year,
was loved by all during his 28 years as trainer on campus.
Ski film
Dick, Barrymore will narrate his new ski film, "The
Winter Spell", at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre tonight at
8:30.
Art exhibit
The UBC Fine Arts Gallery
will present an exhibition of
paintings and sculpture by
James A. Macdonald Nov. 18
to Dec. 4.
,        f VISIT
f  ARLBERG SPORT
HAUS
VANCOUVER'S ORIGINAL
"SKI HUT"
MEET THE NAMES:
HAUSER, IRIWING, WHITE
STAG,  HART,  KRASTLE,  ROS-
SIGNAL, MARKER, TYROLIA,
LIFT,  LATRAPER,   RIEKER .TYROL,
VAL LYOR.
,v      1966 STOCK IS NOW COMPLETE
SEE WHAT'S NEW
FOR THE BEST SELECTION
SEE US NOW
Complete Ski Repair Service — Now is the time to check
over your skiis and  get those needed  repairs !
Free Parking D.P.C. Lot, Pender & Hornby — Open Friday 'Hi 9 p.m.
ARLBERG
SPORT HAUS
816 WEST PENDER ST., MU 2-4288
BUDGET OR LAY AWAY FOR CHRISTMAS
ALMA   MATER   SOCIETY
FOURTH    ANNUAL
Charter  Flight  To  Europe
May 21 — August 6
$400
WHEN
— Leave Vancouver May 21
— Arrive London May 21
— Leave London August 6
— Arrive Vancouver August 6
COST
— $400 which includes :
— Return flight by CPA DC 8 Jet
— First class meals with complimentary dinner, wines
with flight.
— 44 lbs. baggage allowance
— Transportation from London Airport to London City
Centre
WHO IS ELIGIBLE
— All members of the Alma Mater Society
— U.B.C.  Faculty
— Members of immediate family of the above two classes
which includes:
— father and mother if living in the same household
— husbands, wives and children
— Members of immediate family do not have to be accompanied by member
APPLICATIONS
— Will be available on Tuesday, November 23
— Can be picked up at the A.M.S. Office
-Or write to TRAVEL DIRECTOR, A.M.S. CHARTER FLIGHT,
BROCK HALL, U.B.C.
— Applications will be accepted on a first come, first serve
basis
TRAVEL IN EUROPE
— World Wide International Travel has been appointed our
Travel Agents for the flight and information concerning
travel in Europe can be obtained through them or your own
travel agent
COMPARBLE FARES
— A person travelling by commercial airlines from Vancouver
to London and return would pay:
— in excess of $1,000 for first class ;
— in excess of $700 for thrift class
— in excess of $550 for 21-day excursion
AS THERE ARE ONLY 140 SEATS AVAILABLE
THOSE INTERESTED ARE URGED TO APPLY
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Page 12
THE     U BY SS E Y
Thursday, November 18,  1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Cong booster speaks
SPECIAL   EVENTS
A u d i t o r i-u m noon today,
Michael Myerson, Ph.D. student at University of California (Berkeley). Recently forced
off the. panel of the Toronto
teach-in because of his avowed
support of Viet Cong against
the United States. Admission
25 cents.
DEMOCRACY IN THE
/ UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY
A meeting to discuss the
functions and direction of this
discussion group will be held
in the council chambers at 7:30
tonight.
*    POETRY READING CLUB
Rona Murray reads from
her new book noon today in
Bu. 219.
U.N. CLUB
"A social and political spotlight on Greece," with Dr.
Malcolm MacGregor. Noon today in Bu. 202.
AQUA SOC
General meeting noon today in
Bu. 204. Large turnout requested.
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Meeting today in the Brock
Board Room.
UBC LIBERALS
Panel discussion noon today
in Brock lounge. Jack Wasser-
man, L. Joliet, Dr. Smiley, Dr.
LaPonce. "What happened
Nov. 8?"
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Field trip to Riverview leaves
the front of the Faculty Club
on Marine Drive at 12:30 p.m.
today.
,     NEWMAN CLUB
Leg auction at noon today in
the club lounge at St. Mark's
College.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Members who wish to go on
The modern way to see is with
CONTACT LENSES
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
MU 3-1816
705 Blrkt Bldg.
BAY
STARTS TOMORROW
What A Way To Go
Shirley MacLaine
Paul Newman
plus
The Amorous
Adventures of
Moll Flanders
Kim Novak - Rich. Johnson
STUDENTS  75c
DELTA
Nov. 19 & Nov. 20
The Ugly American
Marlon Brando
Sandra Church
plus
The Son of Captain
Blood
Sean Flynn > Ann Todd
a field trip to Jericho Hill
School for the Blind with the
pre-med club Nov. 25 sign the
list in Room 361, Brock Extension,  before  noon,  Friday.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Christian Science lecture,
"Awakening to the newness of
life." Noon today in Bu. 104.
Everyone welcome.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Ad hoc Symposium at noon
Friday in IH. Discussion by
William Bagwell from the
Quaker Program at the United
Nations. Co-sponsored by
CUSO, WUS, UN Club and IH.
Coffee served.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD
SOCIETY
General meeting noon today,
Hennings 200.
MARDI GRAS
Auditions for floor show:
females 11:30 a.m., 2:00 p.m.
today and Friday. Men Friday
in   Brock  252.   Practices   and
performances will take place
in January. Everyone welcome.
For further information contact John Foote, AM 6-8041.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last Minute Tickets for "A
Month in the Country" are
available for $1 in the AMS
office.
Vouchers for the Roger Wagner Chorale Nov. 25 and "The
Subject Was Roses," Nov. 29
are available in Room 225,
Brock Extension.
PHYS. SOC.
"Plasma P h y si c s," Grad
studies talk at 11:30 a.m. in
Phys. 204.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Archaeology lab open to 1-3
p.m. in basement of old Arts
building. Everyone welcome.
UNION COLLEGE
THEOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Dr. George Tuttle speaks
and shows slides on Kenya in
Bu. 100 noon today.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
FOUND. Sum of money on Oct. 5th.
Phone Chris, TR 6-5361.	
LOST. Man's gold ring with Jade
stone in vicinity of Bio-Sciences
Bldg. Nov. 9th. Phone 683-8955. Reward.
LOST. Calc. and Anal. Geom. Return
to Ubssey Adv. Office, Brock Hall.
Thank You.
WOULD PERSON TAKING Clive
Rush's Raincoat from HA 207 (BC
350) Tuesday, Nov. 9, please phone
922-7707.
LOST ON MONDAY vicinity Brock
man's black billfold. If found
please   call Pierre,   738-6771.	
LOST, RED PLAID JACKET in
Bu. 323 Monday. Phone 261-8888.
Reward offered.
WOULD PERSON WHO took wrong
coat after Comm. 281 Tues. please
exchange in class or call Cal
Johnson, 224-9755
FOUND — GREEN PENCIL CASE
Education Building, with loclret
and rulebook. Apply Adv. Office,
Ubyssey, Brock Hall.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY high auto insurance
rates? If you are over 20 and have
a good driving history you qualify
for our good driving rates. Phone
Ted Elliott,  224-6707.	
HAPPY   BIRTHDAY   Lower   Mali's
John Wood.
DANCE to The- Rogues in the Lower
Mall Ballroom, Friday, Nov. 19,
9 p.m. - 1 a.m.	
GREY CUP curling party, Sat., Nov.
27, 9-1. Tickets at $2.00 per couple
from A.M.S.  or curling executive.
OBTAIN CUS LIFE INSURANCE
now and you won't cuss later.
Enquire 12.30 p.m., Room 258,
Brock, Tuesdays and Thursdays,
or phone TR 9-2924.
Wanted
15
USED   JUDOGI    (JUDO    OUTFIT).
Phone 435-6470 after six.
Transportation
14
URGENT! RIDE NEEDED for two
from Fraser and Marine, 8.30's
every day Mon.-Sat.  327-7105, Ron.
RIDE WANTED from Rossland back
to Vancouver "on December 27 or
28. Will pay gas cost. Call Sheila
after 11.00 p.m., RE 3-5588. Must
have place for my skiis.
Automobiles For Sale
21
-53   ZEPHYR   SIX   for   sal.   Rebuilt
clutch, trans., steering,  new tires.
Priced   low  for   quick   sale.   Doug
or Al  at  261-3595 after six.
1957 TR3, excellent mechanical condition, $800 or best offer. Phone
261-1063 anytime.
1950 AUSTIN "A"40, in good running condition. Reasonable price.
Phone CA 4-5303.
GOOD TRANSPORTATION, 1952
Nash Rambler. City tested. Winterized, snow tires, $100. Phone
mornings, RE 3-3097, or after 6
p.m.   or Sunday,   RE 8-6666.
1962 B.M.W. 700 SEDAN. Leaving
Canada, must sell, $450. Phone KO
733-1664  or  228-3872.
'60 ENVOY DELUXE MODEL $425.
Call  Nicky,  736-0762.
MUST    SELL!     1957     PLYMOUTH.
.Good condition, radio.  Sacrifice at
$115.   Phone   263-6264   after   6   p.m.
1960 NSU PRINZ. Good condition,
low mileage, new tires. $200. Phone
325-5826.
Motorcycles
27
1964 HONDA 55 cc. SPORT. Like
new. Only 2350 miles. Sacrifice.
AM 1-6279.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322. 	
Typing
43
TYPING. All kinds. Mrs. Wood.  985-
5086.
THESES,      essays,     book     reviews,
notes. Phone 263-4530.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE, my
home. Essays, reports, etc. Low
rates. Phone 261-2996.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
l'IZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have cleai
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or,
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most con enient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Dow&town
and West Van.
PS:   New  outlet  coming  close  to
U.B.C.
FRIENDLY home offered to female
student in return for baby sitting
and light duties.  261-6105.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
"VOX AMPLIFIERS, CLASSICAL
Guitars, Gretch & Guild & Isabella Nylon Strings. Ward Music
Ltd. 412 West Hastings MU 2-
5288.
HIGH DENSITY desk lamps, $6.95
and $9.95. Drafting lamps, $14.95
(why pay more ?); Calvert-Craft
Hardware & Gifts (Post Office).
Interesting selection. 3209 West
Broadway, 738-2311 (Opposite
Peter's Ice Cream and Super Valu).
ALU METAL SKIIS FOR SALE
200 cm., with marker toe and
swivel heel, $65. Phone Eric at
AM 6-9321 after 6 p.m.	
TANDBERG STEREO -Taperecorder
used 15 hours. Asking $350. 224-
9001,  6-71 p.m.
Rooms
81
LARGE bed sitting room, private
entrance and bathroom, phone; in
quiet   home,   $45.00.   AM   6-8078.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD PRIVATE
Home. Excellent food quiet room
of your own 2735 West 14th. Phone
738-4552.   $80.
DEC. 1 OR AFTER XMAS if preferred: Attractive bedsit, rm. for
male student. Share bathrm. and
kitchen facilities with 2 other students. Use of laundry and TV. $45,
all incl.  AM  1-5059.
Jt-
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental and  Sales
TUXEDOS — WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
McCUISH
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
2046 W. 41st
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
PH. 263-3610
an invitation to
Graduating   Engineers
from a long-established leader in Canada's number one
industry; for career excitement, see your Student Placement Office about opportunities at:
6?
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
Vancouver, British Columbia
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
(Regular and Summer)
in
ACCOUNTING
(Commerce Majors)
and
GEOLOGY
(Honors and Arts)
with
PAN AMERICAN
PETROLEUM CORPORATION
(Calgary, Alberta)
for
Post Graduates
Graduates
Undergraduates
Interviews:
Monday & Tuesday, Nov. 22 & 23, 1965
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) organization, has several challenging
career openings in the Canadian Division Office in
Calgary.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company offering
attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity for advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the
Student Placement Office. Company and Job information booklets are available there.

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