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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1976

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Array Lawyer's ruling hits Murray
By CHRIS GAINOR
The Alma Mater Society has
obtained a legal opinion saying
non-students are ineligible to sit as
students on the board of governors,
throwing into question the position
of student board rep Rick Murray.
Murray was elected to the board
in the spring but is no longer a
student. He has taken a full time
job but has refused to give up his
seat.
The student representative
assembly, which had planned to
make a decision on Murray's
future as a member of the board
and the SRA, tabled a motion
Wednesday endorsing the legal
opinion's views after Murray
protested that he was not told of the
opinion before the meeting.
The opinion, written by lawyer
Donald Sorochan, said: "It is
therefore our opinion that to be a
member of the board of governors
under Section 20(e) of the
Universities Act, a person must
meet three requirements. He
must:
• "Be a person who is presently
enrolled in a university in a credit
course, or who is designated by
resolution of the senate as a
student;
• "Be a full-time student, and
• "Be a member of the Alma
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIX,  No. 5      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1976
,48    228-2301
ByLAWRIE McMAHEN
The possibility that UBC's
largest union will strike Oct. 7
grew Wednesday with the
disclosure that the university
administration's final contract
offer was met by universal
disfavor at a union general
membership meeting Tuesday.
Ken Andrews, president of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees local 116 Wednesday
released details of. the UBC offer
and said all of the 150 CUPE
workers who came to Tuesday's
union meeting reacted negatively
to the administration's proposal.
"The people didn't like it, and I
can't say I blame them," Andrews
said.
UBC administration offered the
1,500 members of local 116 a one-
year contract with a 7.5 per cent
wage boost retroactive to March
31, when the last contract expired,
he said. CUPE represents workers
in food services, residences,
physical plant and UBC patrol.
The offer is 4.5 per cent less than
the 12 per cent the union was
asking for during negotiations, and
half a percentage point less than
the' eight per cent which was
reported as the university's offer
during bargaining talks last week.
"It's   not   a   generous   offer,"
Andrews said, reaffirming his own
negative reaction to the university's wage proposal.
The administration made its
offer to CUPE Sunday in the form
of a written final offer, which has
the effect of forcing a showdown
with the union.
CUPE members will vote on the
Mater Society or of the Graduate
Student Society of the university."
The tabled SRA motion, sponsored by Moe Sihota, holds that any
board rep must meet the three
qualifications, and if accepted,
would force Murray off the board
unless it is challenged in court.
Sorochan's opinion, whioh did
not refer specifically to Murray's
case, also said: "In bur opinion,
the Alma Mater Society, on behalf
of the "student association" as
defined by the act, would have
status to seek a declaratory
judgment from the Supreme Court
of British Columbia declaring that
a person who is not a full-time
student at the University of British
Columbia is not eligible to continue
as a  member of the board  of
governors under section 20(e) of
the Universities Act, and could
obtain an order of the court
prohibiting any such person from
purporting to act and declaring
such office vacant."
When Sihota had finished
reading segments of the opinion to
the SRA, Murray said, "I find
myself a bit surprised by what I've
been told. I'm surprised by the
decision."
Protesting that he had not been
told an opinion had been sought,
Murray said he had obtained
several opinions from board
associates, including some
lawyers, and none had told him he
should resign.
A motion to table the matter for
See page 2: MEETING
Deans hit by
budget cuts
—mike miller photo
CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY takes place outside SU.B Wednesday as John Shaw, left, with severe
glandular imbalance, mistakes Maureen Carson forFayWray of King Kong fame. Shaw and Carson were signing
up new members for UBC ski club, and will be doing same today as clubs day hits SUB.
Campus strike looms ahead
contract   proposal   at   a   special
meeting Oct. 3.
A vote by the union in favor of
accepting the offer will mean an
immediate settlement in the
contract dispute, but a vote against
acceptance will mean immediate
issuance-of 72-hour strike notice.
See page 2: INFLATION
By HEATHER WALKER
Deans of the faculties of arts and
commerce said Wednesday their
budgets for the current year are
barely large enough to maintain
present standards of services to
students.
Both faculties face increased
class sizes, and have been unable
to include new courses in their
programs.
Stanley Hamilton, acting dean of
commerce, said the money the
faculty received represented "an
absolute decrease"   over  last
<*.    year's budget in spite of an ap-
;     parent eight per cent increase.
„£.       Commerce's budget for 1976-77 is
$3,077,795.
Hamilton said salaries for
faculty and support staff in
commerce and the rest of the
university increased by more than
eight per cent, and consequently
the actual amount of the budget
used for operating expenses has
decreased.
"We've had to increase section
sizes," said Hamilton.
"And we have four or five
courses which the senate has
approved which are not offered
this year. We could offer new
courses only if we cut back in old
courses," he said.
Hamilton said students would
suffer more from the increased
section sizes than the lack of the
planned new courses.
"Increased class size has a
material effect on the quality of
what we're offering."
Arts dean Robert Will said he did
not think the faculty would suffer
seriously from this year's small
budget "but we can't go on in this
way without the effect being felt.
We're not doing more this year,
we're doing less."
Will said his faculty's budget
increase of approximately eight
per cent was "less than the wage
increase."
"I think this is true for the
university as a whole," he said.
"We have less money to work with
this year than we had last year."
He said classes were larger this
year than last, but that the faculty
had not been forced to drop any
programs.
"There are a few courses which
maybe would have been given if
there was no (financial) problem,"
Will said.
But he said it was impossible to
tell what the total effect of budget
restrictions was on arts programs.
"Some courses wefe approved
on the understanding that they
couldn't go through without funding," Will said.
"And there was restraint at the
department level, and in people's
minds," he said, adding that
faculty members . may have
decided not to submit proposals for
new courses because they felt the
courses could not be funded.
"Sometimes new things can be
done at the expense of old
See page 2: CUTBACKS
Staff, please
Help! The Ubyssey needs you as
a reporter, sports writer, review
writer or photographer.
Come join the campus intellectual elite and hone your
writing skills while having some
good, wholesome, Mom's apple
pie, down home fun (Bring your
own booze).
UBC s purveyor of truth for 59
years needs new talent to maintain
its tradition of journalistic quality.
That means especially first year
students.
And if you're not impressed with
the Ubyssey and think we're a
bunch of stuck up, cynical sticky
bicks (we're not really), come in
and you may be able to change
things. We're run democratically.
^V!*.-.-
'•; i\
rv~%y
***«£'-.
No pinkos at Birch Society U
By STEVE HOWARD
The right-wing John Birch Society is planning to build a new university to lead the fight
against collectivism and other "un-
American" activities.
The society, which warns of an international communist conspiracy against
the United States, is looking for a site in
California where it can build a liberal arts
university.
The society decided to fulfill a long-time
dream of setting up its own university
because it believes post^econdary education
in the U.S. is inadequate, CO. Mann, administrative assistant to the society's
president, said Wednesday in an interview
from John Birch Society headquarters in
Belmont, Mass.
The university will model itself after the
highly-regarded University of Vienna, Mann
said.
Foreign applicants and members of all
races are welcome to apply for admission.
"Blacks are human beings too," Mann said.
Socialists are free to attend "but they'd
better understand that we won't be teaching
any socialism," he said.
"We don't see it as a collectivist university.
We are opposed to all forms of collectivism as
un-American."
There will be entrance exams. "High school
graduates these days can't even read," said
Mann.
The university will be built with individual
donations, Mann said. There will be no
government funding and as little government
interference as possible, said Mann. He
refusecHimM^ltete about the total cost of the
The John Birch Society motto is: "less
government, more responsibility, and with
God's help a better world."
The university will start on a small scale,
but a library, student residences and food
services are planned. There will be no intercollegiate sports, Mann said.
"We believe students should make their
own financial arrangements. We are considering possibilities of some form of
financial help."
The actual curriculum is still in the planning stages, but the proposed courses include
liberal arts, law, engineering and mechanics.
The projected opening date is September
1979.
Mann said he does not know yet whether the
university will offer accredited degrees. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23,  1976
Inflation to blame
SUB FILMS   presents
From page 1
One source told The Ubyssey
that union executives and members who are especially displeased
with the university's offer will be
attempting to convince the CUPE
members between now and Oct. 3
to vote for a strike.
Local 116 voted by an 80 per cent
majority Sept. 12 to strike if
necessary to back up contract
demands.
And union president Andrews
said Wednesday that the continuing rise in the cost of living
justified the wage hike CUPE was
asking for.
Other details of the university's
contract offer show that the administration has proposed to clear
up some disparities among various
CUPE campus workers.
For instance, Andrews said,
UBC has offered to make changes
in the relative pay for some
clerical, gardening, traffic, and
patrol workers. In some cases the
changes consists of allowing
employees in these categories the
same night shift bonus already
given to other workers, Andrews
said.
On other issues in the contract
dispute, the administration has
offered a "watered down version"
of CUPE demands for job security.
Andrews also said the final
contract offer allows campus
maintenance workers 90 per cent
of the "paid" wages of off-campus
trade workers.
Cutbacks go on
From page 1
programs. That is not necessarily
bad, as the old programs may have
had their run. We can have new
programs if we cut back on another
area of endeavor.
"But.this is not a time when we
can   think   of   innovative   new
Meeting stalls
decision on
Murray case
From page 1
one week then was quickly passed
after a short debate. Murray
refused to^ay after the meeting
what action he would take,
although he said in the debate he
did not want to go to the expense of
hiring his own lawyer.
SRA president Dave Van
Blarcom said he had just been
given the opinion Wednesday
morning. He said the opinion was
obtained on the suggestion of AMS
general manager Bern Grady after
the Murray question was placed on
the agenda.
A new board member could only
sit for one meeting before facing
another election campaign, said
Murray, because the soonest an
election could be held if he
resigned now would be late October or early November. His term
runs out at the end of the year.
But Van Blarcom said the AMS
has a legal opinion challenging the
right of the registrar to hold
elections for student board reps, as
he has until now.
Sihota said he had assumed
Murray had been informed of the
opinion and'its findings.
The opinion notes that education
minister Pat McGeer, while in
opposition, had the following objection to the Universities Act:
"What I'm afraid of," said
McGeer, "is that putting two
students on the board of governors,
we're likely to have just-two more
students who aren't students at all,
but are merely attending
university for the purpose of sitting
on the board of governors."
'DECORA TE WITH PRINTS'
programs. It's not that we've
stopped in our tracks, but it's not a
time to , implement new
programs."
Neither Hamilton nor Will said
how much money they asked for to
operate their faculties this year.
But Hamilton said the amount
commerce received was "smaller
by a considerable margin" than
the amount they wanted.
"Traditionally, faculties ask for
more than they receive, but this
was definitely less than we expected," he said.
Hamilton said the faculty had
asked for increases in every
category of their budget, including
increases to allow for more faculty
and support staff.
"But our net increase over the
previous year was more than
accounted for in salary increases,"
he said.
And the faculty is faced with
another problem,  Hamilton said.
"We've had a substantial increase in the number of students
enrolled in the faculty," he said.
Need Some Wheels?
Call
BRENT LEAIMEY
our man on campus
REDUCED PRICES
Financing O.A.C.
For U.B.C. Students & Staff
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
(opposite Super-Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Thoto Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
[DECORA TE WITH POSTERS
The union president said
students would support the aims of
any eventual CUPE strike as much
by coming onto campus and dirtying up buildings as by boycotting
classes.
"I believe bring them in and let
them dirty up the buildings,"
Andrews said.
"Empty buildings stay clean a
lot longer," he said.
But other union sources have
suggested that student support in
the form of observance of picket
lines and co-ordination of campus
support would be most helpful to
CUPE's cause.
One campus group has set a
meeting for Friday in order to
prepare for student and faculty
support of any CUPE strike.
The Committee for a Democratic
University, a coalition of students,
faculty, and campus labor formed
last year to combat the conservative attitudes displayed
during the Association of
University and College Employees
strike, will meet at noon to begin
co-ordinating support for any
upcoming strike.
The 1,476-member AUCE has
voted to observe CUPE picket lines
if the strike occurs.
ALLIED ARTISTS presents
STEVE Dusnn
imcQUEEn Hornmnl
ma FRANKLIN J. SCHAFFNER film
PflWLum
ThisThurs.,Sun.-7:00 |
&Fri.,Sat.-7:00/9:45
Plus: Ch. 2 of the     .
Phantom Creeps
Fri.,Sat.-7:00
CLIMBING SEMINARS By
CASCADE ALPINE
CLIMBING SCHOOL
WEEKEND TECHNICAL
SESSIONS ON MT. BAKER $20 |
20% DISCOUNT ON
EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE
TO PARTICIPANTS
WRITE OR CALL
Alpine Climbing Center
1124 High St. 206-671-1505 |
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100s of New
and Used Cars
to choose
from.	
1969 Mustang
— Convert.,
maroon.
54,000     miles
1974 Nova -
blue, 8 cyl.,
auto. Super
sharp.
1971 Cougar -
2 dr. hdtp.,
green vinyl
top.	
1976 Chevettes
-1 New and
Used from
$3,150.
1976 Cutlass-
2 dr. hdtp.,
red. 8-track
demo
DICK IRWIN
CHEVROLET OLDSMOBILE LTD.
345 Marine Drive. North Vancouver. B
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Don't let your
hair get out'
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Keep it in place
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APPOINTMENT
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731-4191
3644 WEST
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THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
FREE SATURDAY NIGHT LECTURES-UBC
FALL LECTURE
PROGRAM
September 25
The Honourable Thomas O. Enders
American Ambassador to Canada
AN ENVIRONMENT SHARED;
CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
October 2
Professor Harry Hinsley
St. John's College, Cambridge
THE FUTURE OF THE EUROPEAN
COMMON MARKET
October 9
Professor Harold E. Edgerton
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
USE OF ELECTRICAL METHODS
FOR UNDERWA TER DISCO VER Y
INCL UDING THE LOCH NESS MONSTER
October 16
THE DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURE
Mr. Harry H. Schwarz
Member of Parliament, South Africa
POLITICS AND SOCIAL CHANGE
IN SOUTH AFRICA: THE ROLE OF
MULTI-NATIONAL CORPORATIONS
October 23
Professor Thomas C. Hall
Director, Cancer Control Agency of British
Columbia and Professor of Medicine, U.B.C.
EMERGING UNDERSTANDING OF
CANCER CAUSATION
October 30
Mr. Martin Best
Guitarist, lutenist, singer
A TROUBADOUR FOR TODAY
November 6
Ms. Doris Anderson
Editor, Chatelaine Magazine
CANADIANISM IN PERIODICALS,
FILMS AND BOOKS
November 13
The Honourable Mr. Justice W. G. Morrow
Appeal Court, Alberta
LAW IN THE NORTH
November 20
Dr. Kaye Lamb
Dominion Archivist (retired)
MACKENZIE KING AND HISTORY;
USE AND ABUSE OF HIS DIARIES
November 27
Professor H. W. Janson
Institute of Fine Arts, New York University
THE ROLE OF CHANCE
IN ARTISTIC CREATION
December 4 •
Dr. Roger Gaudry
University of Montreal
SCIENCE POLICY AND THE FUTURE OF
RESEARCH IN CANADA
Vancouver Institute lectures are held on Saturdays at 8:15
p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre at the University of British Columbia.
Admission to lectures is free and the public is invited to
attend.
■clip for future reference! Thursday, September 23, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Council and BoG mull cutbacks
By HEATHER WALKER
UBC's board of governors met
the provincial Universities Council
Sept. 13 but, as usual, information
on the meeting is incredibly hard to
get.
The meeting was billed as "a
way for the board and the council
to get to know each other better,"
but it was more than that. It had to
be — after all, board and council
members have more important
things to do than socialize over tea.
After the members eyes each
other up and down for a few
minutes, they got down to more
serious business, such as the
university's budget for 1977-78.
The important thing about next
year's budget is that it's going to be
small — probably much smaller
than the amount the university
administration will ask for.
And board members, while not
saying the council is specifically
asking them to cut back in any
area of university spending, say
there was a tendency at the
meeting to discuss ways of keeping
expenses down.
"It's the overall philosophy of
the new government, and it's
obvious they'll try to cut back
wherever they can," student board
member Basil Peters said in an
interview Monday.
"I think the last thing they need
to do is cut back (on university
spending), and it's ridiculous to
even talk about it," he added.
"They asked where we could cut
corners, and we said we couldn't,"
said   board   member   George
Paltry TA raise
to be discussed
at meet today
A UBC teaching assistant has
organized a meeting to discuss an
eight per cent raise many TAs
failed to get this year.
Dave Chapman, a second year
physics TA, said the meeting will
be held at noon today in the
graduate student centre's committee room.
"Unionizing UBC TAs could
prove to be a waste of time considering assistantships are not a
full-time occupation, but
organization is important,"
Chapman said.
The UBC board of governors
voted last June to increase TA's
salaries by eight per cent, but most
TAs say they received only a four
to six per cent increase. Many
were not even aware of the size of
the raise they were to get.
Board secretary William White
said Wednesday he did not know if
the right per cent increase was on
an "across the board" basis to all
faculties.
And board member William
Webber said he could not
remember the board's June 1
resolution, but, he said, "if voting
was involved, I was present."
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny could not be reached
for comment. Kenny is also a
board member.
Geography department head
Robert Smith said decisions
concerning TA raises are made by
faculty deans.
He declined to comment about
the raise for geography TAs
because he said he knew little
about it.
Smifh said his responsibility to
TAs as a department head was to
ensure an equilibrium between
them.
"I handle TA situations on a one-
to-one basis and make every effort
to provide a uniform work load for
each TA," he said.
Some deans were attending a
conference in eastern Canada and
could not be reached for comment.
Hermanson, who described the
meeting as a "fishing expedition."
Another member, Pat Chubb,
described the tendency to reduce
costs as "a general trend".
"It's not just the Universities
Council," she said. "I think
everyone is conscious of the anti-
inflation board."
Board secretary William White
said the meeting was called "at the
request of the council to hear the
university's requests for coming
fiscal requirements."
White indicated the possibility of
cutbacks was discussed at \he
meeting.
"The Universities Council and
the university are interested in
efficient operation. They're interested in finding ways of making
the best use of funds," White said.
But he said that either the
council or the board had indicated
cutbacks might come in any
specific areas.
But education minister Pat
McGeer feels differently. He told a
Socred constituency meeting
Wednesday that his department
intends   to   give   emphasis   to
education aimed at jobs. And he
plans to de-emphasize arts and
science programs.
This means cutbacks in the arts
and sciences departments. And it
may mean funds from these
programs could be redirected to
other, more "practical" areas.
Cutbacks in any form are bad.
Cutbacks which apply^ more to one
section of the university than
another are worse. Should the
education department be able to
choose what areas of study deserve
most funds?
Universities  Council   chairman
William Armstrong said the
council was not trying to identify
possible cutback areas.
"Some board members may
have got that impression from
some of the questions we asked,"
he said.
"We have to justify our requests
(to the provincial government).
And we have to cut pretty close to
the bone to justify them.
"I'm sure we sometimes ask
questions I'm sure they wish we
wouldn't ask, but we must back up
our requests to the government,"
he said.
PRACTICING UP for when he'll be going after clients reluctant to
pay    his   exorbitant    bill,    law   student   Doug   Nuyts   sets   choker
—deryl mogg photo
Wednesday    during    forestry   demonstration   outside   SUB.    Nuyts
managed to wrap 80-pound steel cable around log in 14 seconds.
Democracy prevails — elecfion set
The student representative
assembly reversed itself Wednesday and decided to hold elections for two vacant student spots
on the UBC senate, two weeks after
deciding the positions would be
filled by appointment.
The election will be held in
conjunction with a referendum on
an Alma Mater Society fee increase, slated for Nov. 8 to 10. The
terms expire in April.
Most SRA members agreed the
plan to appoint the senators would
go against democratic principles,
and most of the discussion centered on the timing of the election.
The person who most strongly
favored appointing the senators
was Gary Moore, himself an appointed senator representing
commerce students.
The two vacancies in the senator-
at-large positions were created
after the resignations of Brian
Higgins and David MacKinnon.
Several SRA members had said
last week they would appoint
retired science senator Ron Walls.
Walls, who is now a medicine
student, was apparently not
prepared to campaign for the
position.
In other business, the SRA voted
to endorse National Student Day
Nov. 9, which is being sponsored by
the National Union of Students and
the B.C. Students' Federation. The
SRA also voted to spend $500 on
activities planned for the day.
Bailey grabs vending bucks
Undergraduate societies will lose an important
source of revenue because food services head Robert
Bailey has decided to enforce a long forgotten
regulation.
Bailey has reinstated an old regulation set down by
the UBC board of governors, stating all revenue from
vending machines not located in common rooms
should go to food servicves.
The board made the regulation because of fear the
halls of university buildings would become cluttered
with vending machines.
But undergraduate societies have been collecting
the revenue for the machines for years and at least
two of the societies affected are angry about losing
the money.
The commerce undergraduate society is being
forced to give up $6,000 in revenue from machines in
the Henry Angus building, and it intends to fight the
food services takeover.
CUS rep Dave Johnstone said Wednesday food
services is taking over some of the machines in the
I building's new addition because a tiled area where
they are operating is not a lounge area.
Johnstone said CUS was receiving about $6,000 a
year in commissions from the machines. He said CUS
could move the machines to the Henry Angus common room but new wiring would be needed.
Most campus vending machines are owned by
Vancouver Enterprises Ltd. which gives a commission to the groups that lend it the space for the
machines. The commission is seven per cent of total
revenue for candy machines and 15 per cent for hot
drink machines.
Eva Villeneuve, president of the home economics
undergraduate society, said Wednesday moving the
vending machine in the home economics building to
thebuilding's lounge would cost the HEUS more than
the revenue they would receive from the machine.
Villeneuve said she received letters during the
summer stating that unless the HEUS moved the
machine to the lounge by September, food services
would start collecting the machine's revenues.
But the HEUS could not afford the new wiring that
would have been necessary for the move, so food
services started collecting the money in September,
she said.
And the arts undergraduate society doesn't know
yet whether food services will expropriate the
commission from the machines on the lower floor of
the Buchanan building, AUS rep Dave Jiles said Wednesday.
Jiles said the AUS is in a particularly difficult
position because food services already runs an outlet
in Buchanan lounge, so the AUS can't move the
machines there.
Jiles said the AUS gets about $3,000 a year in
commission from the machines.
Before the vote NUS fieldworker
Eddy Abel told the SRA that NUS
will focus an information campaign on student issues for the day,
and individual campuses across
Canada will be able concentrate on
issues of importance to them.
NUS is representing students in
Ottawa, ABel said, where decisions
are made about funding of post-
secondary education, student loans
and grants, and housing. "It's
important that students scream
with all the other interest groups
there or students will end up on the
short end of the stick."
The SRA voted to give the
Pacific Life Community, which has
been leading protests against the
Trident nuclear submarine base in
Bangor, Wash., $200 to send a
delegate to a fast in Washington,
D.C. to protest Trident.
The motion was passed after a
debate over the merits of supporting protests against Trident.
Science rep Aksel Hallin said
Trident is necessary to maintain
world peace because a balance of
arms ensures peace.
But several other SRA members,
spoke against Hallin's position,
including SRA president Dave Van
Blarcom, who said the AMS supported the Trident protests of last
year, and said Trident poses an
especially great danger to the
Vancouver area.
Bill Broddy, an arts senator, was
selected as SRA secretary-
treasurer after defeating arts
undergraduate society president
Bev Crowe 14-10 for the position.
Broddy has held the position in a
temporary capacity since the
resignation last summer of Ellen
Paul. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23,  1976
Organize!
UBC's teaching assistants have an opportunity to
meet at noon today in the Graduate Student Centre.
A number of TAs interviewed recently by The
Ubyssey have said they're getting a raw deal from the
university.
They've said they haven't received an eight per cent
salary increase approved in June by the board of
governors.
They've said their work loads are far heavier than the
12-hour week they're paid for. And they've said
they're bitter about the way they're treated by the people
they work under.
What The Ubyssey would like to say to them is — if
all of what they say is true, those TAs had better be at that
meeting today.
The only way the conditions they gripe about are
going to improve is for them to get organized.
There are 600 full TAs at UBC. If the majority of
those people organize themselves into a union or join an
existing union, they'll be well on their way to changing the
conditions they complain about. They will not be — as
one TA put it — "powerless to buck the faculties."
So it's cheers to physics TA Dave Chapman, who's set
up today's meeting.
Now for the boos.
While we're on the subject of TAs, we'd like to say a
few angry words to those shifty, irresponsible
administrative types who didn't want, or couldn't be
bothered to explain the situation to a Ubyssey reporter
Wednesday.
We don't expect board of governors members to have
all kinds of information about specific items on the tips of
their tongues.
But we don't think it's too outrageous to ask them to
look up facts that are near their fingertips.
For example, we think it's downright ratty when
someone like William Webber, a board member and
anatomy professor, tells us he's not prepared to look up an
old board resolution which he voted on. And we're tired of
hearing that administration president Doug Kenny is
perpetually unavailable for comment, and too busy to ever
return our calls.
In other words, we don't like getting the run-around
we've got on the TA salary situation.
But the apparent unconcern of these and other
administrative figures may turn out for the best as far as
TAs are concerned.
Because if TAs begin to realize how minor the issues
important to them seem to be to the administration,
perhaps they'll be more willing to organize and fight that
lack of concern.
The best of luck to them.
Pity the poor biker
For shame.
Do cyclists using university roadways
have to wait until one of their kind is
mercilessly flattened and scraped off the
road before the University Boulevard cycle
path is completed?
Ever since the Chancellor cycle path was
completed two years ago, there have been
vague plans and promises to complete the
University Boulevard path.
But nothing has happened.
No one appears to be concerned about
these meek, environment-conscious souls,
who quietly commune with the fresh air as
they tune their bodies on their way to
campus.
Implicitly, the administration encourages
the use of sterile cars by creating ever-more
parking spaces for the cold machines.
But does anyone feel concern for the
cyclists?
And although the university detachment
of the RCMP says there have not been
serious accidents caused by the lack of a
cycle path for the three-block stretch — it is
only a matter of time before some slothful,
day-dreaming driver knocks a non-violent
cyclist straight into never-never land.
The Ubyssey humbly urges immediate
completion of the cycle path. And we urge
watchful concern for cyclists on the part of
all drivers on campus.
Letters
Literary-
advice
Following up on your editorial
advice of Sept. 14, allow me to
expand on your list of dos and
don'ts where the library is concerned :
• don't create sound waves.
Most people like a quiet library,
and complain to us when it's noisy.
• don't reshelve books in the
wrong place. A book in the wrong
place is a book lost, and students
waste a lot of time searching for
them in vain.
• don't keep books overdue. In
fact, it's better for everyone if you
return them early. And you avoid
fines. There's a new loan policy
which will allow you to borrow
books which aren't in heavy
demand for an extended period.
Loan periods are short for heavily
used books, and it's important to
other students that you return
these on time.
We don't like the fines (and the
library doesn't get the money), but
that seems to be the only way to
make some people co-operate.
Let's have fewer fines, because
that will mean books have been
coming back in time to be used by
more students.
• don't mutilate or steal books.
It hurts your fellow student when
the book or article isn't there to be
used. And we have to spend money
and time which we can't afford to
repair the damage. Besides, theft
is a criminal offence.
• do let us know when you
change your local address. There
are change-of-address forms
available at the circulation desk in
all branches. If we don't know
where you are, we can't call in
books when other students want
them; and if we call them in and
you don't get the notice, the
overdue fines begin to pile up.
All of which come down to one
thing — when you use the library,
remember that you're sharing it
with thousands of people. Mutual
respect and consideration keeps
the place working better for
everyone.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
university librarian
Ski cabin
Your article about the UBC ski
cabin closure in the Sept. 14 issue
of the Ubyssey contained some
misleading and • misinformed
statements that we would like to
clear up.
Yes-indeed, the UBC Whistler
cabin has been closed down by one
building inspector, but this is only
temporary. As soon as the needed
improvements are made the cabin
will be opened up again.
This should not take any longer
than Oct. 1, or shortly thereafter.
We will be using the cabin on the
Thanksgiving weekend, assuming
Mr. Murry (the local building
inspector who is riding shotgun)
does not hassle us any more.
The fact that the cabin does not
have a fire alarm and smoke
detection system is not something
new, nor does this mean that it falls
drastically below fire, or any
other, safety standards.
It has never had these systems
since it was built in 1964, and no
other cabin up at Whistler will
have as much in the way of these
systems as we will have. This also
applies to all other buildings, including hotels and government
buildings, up at Whistler.
It may sound simple to say a fire
alarm system should have been
one of our first priorities when
undergoing renovations, but it is
also very naive.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 23, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
Sitting around the printers one night in a drunken stupor The Ubyssey
staff decided to pull up its collective stakes and move away to the new John
Birch University in sunny California. Deb van der Gracht, Steve Howard,
Doug Rushton and Marcus Gee decided to enrol in red baiting 105. Chris
Gainor, Ralph Maurer, Sue Vohanka and Heather Walker decided to take
Communism and Water Fluoridation 315 and Geoff Wheelwright, Lindsey
Corbett, Charlie Micallef and Ian Currie thought they'd major in racism, with
a minor in rugged individualism. The pinkos of the group, Doug McMullin,
Matt King, Deryl Mogg, Mike Miller, Doug Field and Bob Kneger decided to
sneak in as fascism students and blow the place up. And Bill Tielman, Mike
Bocking, Doug RushtonLawrie McMahen,. Wade Nott, Rod Chant, Jackie
Landry and Ted Davis all took anti-semitism 220.
During the renovations there
was a lot of structural change that
would have rendered the smoke
detection system useless. It would
have been like putting a roof on a
house that hasn't been built yet.
Murry's sudden concern about
this issue worries us. Our plans
were approved by him last fall,
before we started any renovations.
At that time he informed us that he
would like to see a fire alarm
system installed sometime in the
future, and we assured him that we
would have one installed before
1978.
We have realized the fire hazard
at the cabin for a long time; hence
we have always had strict no
smoking rules for the dormitories,
an abundance of fire extinguishers
and a fire hydrant installed this
year. There are also many fire
escapes.
When the cabin opens again in
early October we will be able to
boast about the fantastic improvements; adequate electric
heat, hot water, showers,
washrooms, enlarged kitchen,
refinished lounges, partitioned
sleeping areas, septic system, new
water main, improved wiring, a ski
repair shop, and much more.
Charles Lightowler
president
Ken Goodwin
membership chairman,
UBC ski club Thursday, September 23, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Tridont protest grim, tense
Ubyssey staffer Ted Davis
covered the Pacific Life Community protest Sunday in
Washington at the site of the
Trident nuclear submarine  base.
In the following article, Davis
details how his attitudes toward
the protestors changed.
By TED DAVIS
BANGOR, Wash. — It took the
sight of protestors being hauled
through the fence and dragged
across the dirt road of the Trident
nuclear submarine base here to
make me finally realize the
seriousness of Sunday's anti-
Trident demonstration.
The protest, at which 21 people
were arrested, was staged by
Pacific Life Community members
from the Vancouver and Seattle
areas.
To cover the protest I spent the
weekend with the community, but I
viewed its fence-cutting action
with amused skepticism until it
was actually under way.
Driving to Seattle with members
of the community Saturday afternoon, we had been anxious
about being turned back at the
border, which some thought quite
possible. But when customs waved
us through I began to view the
community members as slightly
melodramatic, taking themselves
too seriously.
The feeling increased at the
house in Seattle which was the
headquarters for Sunday's action.
Located in the 'red line' area of
Seattle's Capitol Hill district, it is a
Catholic worker house as well as
the local PLC centre.
Several families live there, with
a number of small children, and
the resulting confusion and
disorder of the house didn't fit the
image of a dedicated band taking
on the U.S. navy.
But Sunday's preparations for
the protest lulled me into being
unprepared for the grim tension of
the action that afternoon.
We all met in Kitsap Memorial
State Park for a 'non-violence
training session' and 'role plays' of
the fence-cutting.
The atmosphere combined
elements of a Sunday school picnic
complete with sing-along, and a
last huddle of early Christians
about to go on stage at the Roman
Colosseum.
Hearing more than 70 people,
most of whom didn't intend to
Letters
Wishing
I wish you guys would send a
reporter to the student
representative assembly
meetings. Had you send one to last
week's meeting you could have
avoided all these "second-hand
information" stories that showed
up in last week's papers.
I'm sure that one of the senior
editors still remembers where they
are held. But just in case, it's in
room 206 at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
Bill Broddy
student representative assembly
Apology
This is to notify any students on
campus who were confused by the
statements made about the
Chinese Student Association on
page 62 of Insight 76.
To clarify the matter, let me
state that the club welcomes
membership to all UBC students of
any ethnic and cultural
background.
The club engages in numerous
cultural activities such as the
choir, the Chinese muscial instrumental group, the Chinese folk
dance group, as well as the
publication of the Overseers — an
English and Chinese magazine.
I apologize for any and all
confusion.
Moe Sihota
editor, Insight 76
Spectacle
Step right up folks, to the.
stupidest spectacle on earth.
Yep, only on the UBC campus,
year after year, can you see the
perverse spectacle of the student
newspaper grasping at any straw
to discredit its publisher as a bunch
of scheming hacks.
Latest example: The matter of
by-elections to appoint interim
student senators.
Now, the Ubyssey didn't send a
reporter to the student
representative assembly meeting
where the matter was discussed
freely and openly — nope, they
decided to go around afterward to
ferret out a story.
Know what? Go around to the
"backrooms" looking for a story,
and youcome up with a story about
backrooming. It works every time,
because you don't have to get
everyone's opinions, just the ones
you need. And all of this has to be
done in the context of substantiating a shady motive —
that's  "investigative  reporting."
Result: Students who have
worked long and hard at senate in
the students' interest lose
credibility; the student position,
already weak, is weakened still
further.
Now, criticism of any level of
government is the message which
keeps it healthy, aware. However,
the student newspaper has the
additional role of promoting the
student interest, which happens to
coincide with the role of student
politicians.
So, Ubyssey staffers, if you
should find a scheming rat in
student politics, then step on him;
not because it makes a good story,
but because that kind of "politico"
eventually discredits the students
anyway — then you're protecting
the student interest.
But, please, make damn sure
that you've got a rat — nine times
out of 10 it will just be some politico
.tripping over his mouth.
Finally, a riddle: If the student
paper spends most of its time
discrediting the student union, and
the student union spends most of its
time in internal squabbles, who has
the last laugh? (Hint: it isn't the
students).
Let's pull together.
David Van Blarcom
president,
student representative assembly
The Ubyssey is not interested in
weakening the credibility of
student senators or the position of
students by hunting for "scheming
rats" to discredit.
And we don't continually try to
discredit the student union.
But we think it's in the best
interests of students to elect their
own student reps to senate. And we
don't think it's in the best interests
of students to let their student
society set a precedent of appointing students to positions
which they should be elected to. —
Staff.
No padding
In reply to Ken Dodd's letter
concerning the shrinking number
of padded chairs in Brock Hall, the
study area in Brock Hall has never
been and is not now the responsibility of the library to supervise
or maintain. It is simply hot part of
the library system.
Furthermore, the library has not
removed padded chairs in the
study area and replaced them with
perform acts of civil disobedience,
singing "You can lock us in your
prisons, You can lock us in your
jails," struck me as ludicrous.
At the time, no one had any idea
that 21 of them would spend that
night in the Tacoma city jail.
The role-playing was a major
part of the morning's preparations
and although its worth was later
demonstrated, it initially appeared
to be a naive mass self-delusion.
The soon-to-be demonstrators
split into such groups pretending to
be guards, fence-cutters, support
groups, and media people. They
planned different strategies and
acted out their idea of the afternoon's protest.
After the first role-play they
reformed into different groups for
a 'debriefing' at which they
discussed improvements for their
plan.
After a general discussion the
role-play was repeated with the
plan's revisions acted upon.
I saw little value in enacting a
situation which few of the role
players knew anything about.
Watching and participating in
them only increased my skepticism.
Even on the trip from the park to
wooden ones. Although some of the
chairs might have been removed
by other university departments,
the library is not one of them.
When the area was first set up in
the 1960s, before the construction
of the Sedgewick Library, in order
to deal with a severe shortage of
study space, it was fully equipped
with padded chairs.
The great majority of them have
been stolen, outright. It's unfortunate, but because the area is
not supervised and is open over a
long schedule. I believe that if the
university went to the expense of
purchasing more padded chairs,
they too would disappear.
Dodd is correct in saying that the
same students study there day
after day. In many instances, that
is because students take over
carrels and made personal
territories out of them by leaving
books in them, effectively denying
their use to other students, who
have complained to me about the
practice.
In the beginning, the Brock Hall
study area was a pleasant, comfortable location.
It isn't now, with a carpet
scarred by cigarette burns, soft
drink stains, and with a random
collection of old and tired chairs. It
could be that students themselves
bear some responsibility for the
situation.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
university librarian
-/\.m\/m\l      m\/m\, *
Xxxxx xx xxxxx Xxxx'x xxxx, xx
X'x xxx xxxxxxxx. *'!/<§>-&#.
Xxxxxxx xxx xxxx XX X xxxxxx XX.
xxx'x XX.
XXXX! @/&)*#! Xxxxx xxxx
xxxx xxxx Xxxx, xx xxxx XXX XX
money?
Xxxx xxxxxx Xxxx Xxxxxx
xxxxxxx
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.
the Bangor base that afternoon, it
was hard to get serious about the
situation. In the second car of the
convoy which made the trip no one
knew quite where the first car was
going so we just followed blindly.
At one point the lead car took a
wrong turn which took us at least a
mile out of our way.
Although the PLC had earlier
alerted the base to the protest, the
time and location were supposed to
be a surprise. But as luck would
have it, the base guards saw the
cars as we were driving around the
base.
As a result, the place which was
going to be struck already had
guards at it when we arrived.
We kept on driving, exhilarated
and mirthful at the sight of the
guards driving past us on the other
side of the fence,and at the thought
of what we would soon be doing.
Finally we stopped near a corner
of the base and the 80 protestors,
after a few minutes of silence and
contemplation, formed three lines
in front of the fence.
Ten feet away, on the other side,
stood more than 20 guards,
photographers and naval investigating officers, carrying guns
and truncheons. They didn't say a
word, and when the fence-cutters
began to snip through the fence the
guards handled them with grim
efficiency.
That was when I began to take
the protest seriously. The first
woman arrested had cut only the
top three strands of the fence when
a guardgrabbed her and pulled her
over the rest of the strands.
Other protestors were dragged
across the dirt road of the base to
be handcuffed, although they made
no move to resist.
As each cutter was arrested two
more demonstrators climbed
through the hole in the fence as a
gesture of support — and they too
were arrested.
Within 10 minutes,the action was
over. A grey security bus came to
take the prisoners away. One
protestor was dropped on his head
as the guards carried him.
Under the gaze of the guards the
rest of us dispersed, to meet outside the main gate of the base
where the arrested protestors were
taken. There we learned that they
would not be released, as they had
been during earlier protests at the
base, but would all spend the night
in jail.
The 10-minute protest left me
shaken. The grimness and
roughness of the guards was
something I had not expected.
The preparations of the
demonstrators — which to me hard
seemed amusing — had accounted
for the order and calmness of the
protestors when faced with the cold
hostility of the guards.
I cannot say that such demonstrations will affect the construction of the Trident submarines, which are backed by the
vast riches and great paranoia of
the U.S. military establishment.
But they may help preserve a
sense of humanity in the face of the
U.S. military system. The hostility
and callous roughness of its
members whom we encountered
Sunday is only a small indication of
the way that system works.
DR. BUNDOLO
FIRST SHOW OF NEW
SEASON
S.U.B.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
12:30 p.m.
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
CBU 690 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1976
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
ANTS ASSOCIATION
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Ph. 224-4513
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Ph. 224-4241
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THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1976
U of T council dumps
on Oct. 14 labor protest
Canadian University Press
The first Canadian student
council to make a decision on
whether to support the Canadian
Labor Congress's Oct. 14 day of
protest has refused to support it.
The University of Toronto
student council made the decision
at an early September council
meeting.
But two student federations, the
National Union of Students, and the
B.C. Students' Federation, have
decided to support the anti-wage
and price controls protest. NUS
executive members voted to
support the protest in" an August
executive meeting and BCSF
delegates voted to support the
protest at a Sept. 17-19 conference
in Victoria.
UBC student council will not
make a decision until Oct. 7, just a
week before the protest is to take
place.
U of T vice-president Doug
Gerhart called the protest "large
scale organized civil disobedience
aimed more at undermining
democratic rule in this country
than as a legitimate protest
method with the intention of
gaining economic goals."
Another executive member said
council called for support of the
day pointing out the common goals
of labor and students.
"We are part of the work force,"
she said. "We have worked with
- CUPE
One hundred and fifty members
of the UBC local of the Canadian
Union of Public Employees — the
largest union on campus — voted
unanimously Tuesday to support
the Oct. 14 day of protest, being
organized by the Canadian Labor
Congress.
Local 116 president Ken Andrews
said Wednesday support for the
protest against the federal
government's wage and price
controls program was given by all
union members attending
Tuesday's general membership
meeting to discuss the university's
"final" contract offer (see
separate story, page  1).
CUPE represents 1,500 employees in physical plant, food
services, residences, campus
patrolandother ancillary services.
AIB protest growing,
CLC president
OTTAWA (CUP) — Support for
the Oct. 14 national day of protest
is gaining momentum, and all
indications are that it will successfully demonstrate public
opposition to federal wage controls, Joe Morris, president of the
Canadian Labor Congress, told a
press conference here Sept. 15.
Morris said it is "too early in our
campaign to make any definite
predictions" but that' 'after a cross
country tour during which officers
of the congress met with many
groups in all provinces, it is
evident that the campaign is
gathering momentum and that on
Oct. 14 Canada will witness a
manifestation of popular dissent
seldom seen in this country."
The president of the 2.3 million-
member labor central spoke to
reporters following a two-day
meeting of the CLC executive, the
first such meeting since the
executive named Oct. 14 as the day
of protest.
He said that reports received by
the council "show every indication
that the protest will be an effective
one all across Canada."
Aussie offers
self as pet
SYDNEY, Australia (ENS/CUP) — A 46 year-old man here
is offering himself as a household
pet.
Joseph Holman, who says he's
been unable to find employment
for the last two years, said he is
willing to "perform tricks like a
pet for my master and mistress."
The cross-country tour of
congress officials over the last
three weeks saw group after group,
in province after province, pledge
their' determination to join the
protest, he said.
These included "public employees, steelworkers, machinists,
auto workers, marine and dock
workers, bus drivers, postal
workers, letter carriers,
teachers,students, telephone
workers, policemen, taxi drivers,
woodworkers and people in many
other walks of life."
The only CLC-affiliated union so
far to publicly oppose the protest
action is the Public Service
Alliance of Canada, representing
federal   government   employees.
Morris said, support has also
been forthcoming from non-CLC
unions, such as the Ontario-Public
Service Employees Union and the
CNTU and CEQ labour centrals in
Quebec.
He lashed out at. the federal
government's $1.1 million campaign launched in early September
to convince the public to support
the wage controls program, which
recent polls show does not have the
support of a majority of
Canadians, Morris said.
He said the CLC's organizing
campaign for the day of protest
will cost less than $100,000, and that
the "million dollars of taxpayers'
money the federal government is
currently spending on its advertising campaign in a futile
attempt to convince these same
taxpayers that wage controls are
good for them, will only add to
their indignation."
USC KARATE CLUB
(SHOTOKAN)
GYM E WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
Women's Self-Defence every Tues. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Practice every Thurs. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Practice every Sat. 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
New Members Welcome Anytime
labor in the past and will probably
look to them in the future for
support."
•CLC spokesperson Lou Melchier
denied that the day of protest
would be a breakdown of collective
bargaining. He said the federal
government broke down the
collective bargaining system by
imposing wage controls.
Despite the council's refusal to
support the day of protest by 20-9
margin, it vqted 16-12 in favor of a
motion opposing the present
federal anti-inflation program.
In a joint meeting in August, the
CLC and the National Union of
Students agreed that students and
labor shared common areas of
concern over the federal government's anti-inflation program.
While there are no plans for a
nationally co-ordinated campaign,
the organization suggests in it's
new newspaper, The Student
Advocate, that member councils
will likely "include anti-controls
material in their regular work."
U of T is a member of NUS.
ARTS UNDERGRADS
NOMINATIONS FOR ONE SRA ARTS REP
OPEN: SEPT. 24   CLOSE:   OCT. 1
BY-ELECTION:   OCT. 5, 1976
NOMINATION FORMS AVAILABLE BUCH. 107
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
INVITES
STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
TO A SPECIAL
SERVICE OF WORSHIP
SUNDAY, SEPT. 26 AT 3:00 P.M.
At the Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.
We celebrate
a Decade of Mmistry at the Centre.
Two decades of ministry at U.B.C.
QUICK
♦ ♦ ♦
When placing a long distance
call, is it cheaper to:
have the operator place the call? □
or direct dial ? □
Answer correctly this
and three other questions about
long distance and you could
WIN ONE OF THREE
HONDA CIVICS
Full details are
in your free
personal telephone directory
available at your
campus bookstore. ^
IN THE
LONG DISTANCE
SWEEPSTAKES.
Trans-Canada Telephone System Thursday, September 23, 1976
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 9
—mike miller photo
PUTTING HER FOOT INTO IT, Kathi Worden does her bit Wednesday for cystic fibrosis research by getting
her shoes brushed at Shinerama stand outside SUB. Lisa Perrault does the buff bit while Ed Nedokus
patiently waits for financially strapped students to cough up some dough and give a helping foot.
Laval prof strike continues
MONTREAL (CUP) — Talks
have resumed between striking
faculty and the Laval University
administration as a dispute affecting 20,500 students enters its
third week.
The 802 professors walked off the
job Sept. 7 after voting 83 per cent
to reject the Quebec City university's latest contract offer. The
strike stopped registration and
classes for the students.
Negotiations broke off after the
professors went on strike.
The faculty have been
negotiating their first contract for
almost a year. Issues still in
contention are salaries, job
security, implementation of a
faculty salary structure, participation in establishing teaching
criteria and creation of a
grievance procedure.
The university refused last year
to renew the contract of nine
professors serving their
probationary period. The
professors' union is demanding
more input into the establishment
of tenure and hiring guidelines.
The campus itself, located in the
Quebec City suburb of Ste. Foy, is
virtually deserted. The professors
have set up picket lines blocking
access to the campus. All
classrooms, libraries and student
service facilities are closed. But
the university is in the process of
setting up an interim loan and
bursaries office to certify students
applying for government aid.
Generally, the attitude of
students has been to sit and wait it
out. Most of the out-of-town
students have returned home
leaving only about 250 students still
in residences.
MP demands grants
OTTAWA (CUP) — A federal
MP has called on the government
to finance post-secondary
education for low-income students
with the money saved by the
elimination of summer job
programs.
John Rodriguez, NDP member
for Nickel Belt (Ontario), said in a
press release Sept. 14 that the $36
million saved when the government cut the Opportunities for
Youth (OFY) program this year
should be awarded as grants to
poor students who could not find
work this summer.
Without some form of government aid, many students are
unable to return to classes this
term, the MP said.
Rodriguez also echoed the
demands of student organizations
in calling for the elimination of
tuition fees as a "long term"
solution, thus making post-
secondary education accessible to
students from low-income
backgrounds.
He said his demands are a
response to the federal government's "uncaring attitude towards
student unemployment and its
inability in creating student
summer jobs."
Student unemployment ran 15 to
20 per cent this summer, he said,
repeating figures from his summer
study used as background for an
opposition document on summer
unemployment.
(The exact number of unemployed students is impossible to
calculate this year because the
department of manpower and
immigration refused to fund a
special Statistics Canada survey to
determine that figure.)
Rodriguez said a soon-to-be-
published secretary of state study
shows that students from $15,000
per year income families are three
times as likely to attend a post-
secondary institution as those from
families earning $6,000 yearly.
A government study last year
showed students from the latter
income bracket had only a 25 per
cent chance of attending university
if they were unable to find summer
work, and a 47 per cent chance of
attending other post-secondary
institutions at all, according to
Rodriguez.
ECKANKAR
ECKANKAR, the Path of
Total Awareness, has been
taught as the most direct path
to God-Realization for several
million years. It is an
individual path based on the
EXPERIENCE of higher
realities, to the Ultimate
Reality.
The ECKANKAR Campus
Society welcomes all
interested individuals to visit
our booth during Club's Day
for more information, or call
Mike McGinnis at 224-1585
(evenings) for information
about our campus activities.
ECKANKAR
CALCULATOR
REPAIRS
ALL MAKES AND MODELS
FREE ESTIMATES
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
4861 Kingsway, Burnaby
trmance
Special O        p  f
Frederic Wood Theatre
WHEN YOU COMIN' BACK
RED RYDER?
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
by Mark Medoff
8:00 p.m.
Box Office: FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Room 207
Reservations: 228-2678
Referees Wanted
for Intramurals
FLAG FOOTBALL, SOCCER, SLOW PITCH,
HOCKEY, BASKETBALL
Please contact men's office room 308 War Memorial
Gym 228-4648 and women's office room 202 War
Memorial Gym 228-5326. (GOOD PAY)
U.B.C. Film Society Invites You
To An All-Nite Rock Film Festival
Fri. Sept 24th 8:00 P.M.   $2.00 cheap
in Old Auditorium
(1) Beatlemania
(2) Cream — Eric Clapton
(3) Hendrix At Berkley
(4) Gimme Shelter — Rolling Stones
(5) Fillmore —
Grateful Dead, Santana
| Come and go as you please, bring food, bring
blankets and pillows but bring yourself. For
further info call
228-3698 or visit SUB 247
E]ElE]E]E]E]E]E]E]E]E]G]E]E]E]E]E]E]E]i]E]
El
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El
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El
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El
El
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El
El
El
El
El       WE ALSO SERVE
El
El
El
El
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CANDIA
TAVEMA
NOW
SERVING
FINE GREEK FOOD
MEZEDES
Fetta, Taramoslata, Spanakopita
TISORAS
Sikotakia, Calam arakia, Keftedakia
SOUVLAKI
Lamb, Beef, Chicken
CATSAROLAS
Moussakas, Gemista, Giouvetsi
PSARIKA
Lithrini, Kavouri
PASTA DISHES - STEAKS
AND
SPECIAL DESSERTS
LICENSED PREMISES
4510 W. 10th AVE.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - 4 P.M.-2 A.M.
228-9512 or 228-9513
13
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WW WW IE BBIala WW LE WW IE Is IEEE WW WW WW WW WW WW WW Page  10
T H E
UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23,  1976
,-i,   mx>smr4j&
Clubs day
today
Today is clubs day at UBC.
Most campus clubs will have
booths in and around SUB. If you
want to get involved in some
activity besides studying, come in
and shop around the various
booths.
Most clubs have booths in
either the SUB main foyer, or
upstair in the ballroom. Other
clubs have displays in SUB
207-209, the party room, in the
upstairs halls or outside SUB.
And while you're upstairs,
drop in to The Ubyssey's clubs
day   "booth:"   our  office,   room
Hot flashes
241K,   is  in the northeast corner
on the second floor.
Whatever you do, join
something.
Movies
In honor of clubs day, Filmsoc
will be showing three free films
today in SUB theatre.
The films are Garden of Allah
with Marlene Dietrich at 11 a.m.,
Room Service with the Marx
Brothers at noon and Bank Dick
with W. C. Fields at 3 p.m.
Brown
Today at noon in SUB mall the
forestry undergraduate society
will   hold   its  annual   boat races.
The boat races, for those who
don't know are malt beverage
drinking contests Four people
make up a team and "a huge
thirst" is required.
Dive
Tween classes
The UBC skydiving club is
looking for thrill-seekers. Their
first jump course begins Saturday.
An organizational meeting for
the course takes place noon
Friday in SUB 215. For
information phone Peter Robbins
at 271-1770 or 228-4453.
More §lt€ks
The science undergrad society
is finally sponsoring an event.
National Film Board films will be
shown free noon today in Hebb
Theatre.
TODAY
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Men's    contract    mile,    12:35    p.m.,
Harry Logan track
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Meet Pender Guy, 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m., SUB party room.
MY JONG-KUNG  FU CLUB
Registration and practice, 5 p.m. to
7 p.m., Place Vanier ballroom.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing display, noon, SUB
party room.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Choir practice, 7:30        p.m.,
International    House   lower   lounge.
HILLEL HOUSE
Herman     Lebovitz     speaks,     noon,
Hillel House.
KARATE CLUB
Meeting,   7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Winter
Sports Centre gym E.
MEN'S SWIM TEAM
Organizational meeting,  1 p.m., War
Memorial Gym room 25.
HOCKEY TEAM
Meeting   for   returning   varsity   and
junior  varsity  players,  noon. Winter
Sports Centre dressing room.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Regent      College      professor     Clark
Pinnock   speaks,  noon,  Chem.  250.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Organizational   meeting,   noon,   Hut
07.
SCI-FI CLUB
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
216E.
PRE-VET
General     meeting     and     elections,
noon, McMI 160.
FRIDAY
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Joggers'   two   mile  run,   noon,  War
Memorial Gym.
SORORITIES
Introduction    to    sororities,    noon,
Cecil Green Park main lounge.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Organizational meeting,        noon,
International   House  upper   lounge.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Forum   about  the  future  of   China
after the  death   of  Mao Tse-tung, 8
J.m., 1208 Granville.
— ADVERTISEMENT —
TO RAZOR CUT OR NOT?
At the U.T.S. we maintain that
on most hair styles, a razor cut
is superior to a scissor cut. It
has been pointed out that the
razor removes the bulk of the
hair more efficiently than a
scissor ever can, which proves
especially beneficial for
difficult to handle hair. The
style looks better and lasts
much longer, with less upkeep.
To help restore poor quality
hair to its original strength and
beauty, the U.T.S. have the
latest reconditioning
treatments, which improve the
hair not only for a few days,
but for many weeks. And of
course, we are always pleased
to give free advice on home
hair care. Bring this article to
Upper Tenth Hairstylists, and
get a bottle of Savanol 151 for
$2.29. This special offer
expires October 15, 1976.
Upper Tenth Hairstylists
4574 W. 10th Ave. 224-6622
■ ADVERTISEMENT
SATURDAY
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's    golf    tournament,    12    p.m.,
university golf course.
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Men's   outdoor  tennis  tournament,
all weekend, outdoors courts.
SUNDAY
UBC  INTRAMURALS
Men's slo-pitch,  10 a.m. and 4 p.m.,
Thunderbird Park.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Women's   slo-pitch.  1  p.m.  to 4:30
p.m., John Owen field.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S GOLF TEAM
Organizationa I    meeting,    8    p.m.,
at coach's home.
voc
General  meeting, noon, Angus 104.
(S/yiarleqe'S
^Boutique
Beautiful fall fashions
for all occasions
3673 W. Broadway
738-6323
NEXT WEEK IN INTRjUILRALS
Co-Rec Volleyball
THURSDAY, SEPT. 30 7:30 - 9:30
War Memorial Gym
Jogger's 3 Mile Run
(GATES AND RETURN VIA UNIVERSITY BLVD.)
FRIDAY, OCT. 1, 12:35 p.m.
START - FINISH - MEMORIAL GYM FIELD
REGISTRATION DEADLINE FOR
MEN'S & WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEY
FRIDAY, OCT. 1
REGISTRATION DEADLINE FOR
WOMEN'S BROOMBALL FRIDAY, OCT. 1
CO-REC 4 GOLF, SUNDAY, OCT. 3 - 1 p.m.
UNIVERSITY GOLF COURSE
HILLEL HOUSE THURSDAY LECTURF
Sept. 30, 1976 — 12:30 p.m.
RABBI YITZCHAK WINEBERG
will speak on
THE ORIGINS OF CHASSIDISM
Rendale
Apple bee
Wrangler
Lee
Levi's
Big Blue
Seafarers
Brrrtania
Place for Pants
CANDIA
pizza factory
4510 W. 10th Ave.
1 228-9512 I    or    ) 228-9513 |
FAST FREE DELIVERY
Open 7 Days A Week, 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
TH€ CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:    Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
60 — Rides
HARD TIMES DANCE. This Saturday,
8-12:30. Come and have a great time.
$4.00/cpl.   at UNDERCUT.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
3rd YEAR POLITICAL SCIENCE student
would appreciate a ride for 3930's,
(Tues., Wed. & Fri.) from New West.
(Eighth Ave & Cumberland.) Phone:
521-8409 and ask for Peta.
FRAME IT YOURSELF — complete
instructions — Do-It-Yourself Picture
Framing, — 3657  West Broadway.
11 — For Sale — Private
ONE  SINGLE  METAL   FRAME   BED  and
mattress — $40.00.  946-1405.
1972 240Z. Excellent condition, automatic One owner. New muffler,
brake's, shocks. Phone 731-6482 or
731-5111. $3,500.
66 ROVER 2000 T.C. Clean, runs weU,
std., radio, ciebe's. $1200 O.B.O. Dan,
224-9700.
70 — Services
DOES SMOKEY really smoke. Find out
at UNDERCUT HARD TIMES, 8-12:30,
Saturday, Sept. 25.
FOR HEALTH, happiness, peace and
long-life, learn proper exercise,
breathing, relaxation, diet & thinking.
Beginners, intermediate courses, open
classes. Also retreat with YOGA
master S'wami Vishnu Devananda.
Oct. 15-17. Call 683-3031. Sivananda
Yoga Center.
85 — Typing
15 — Found
EFFICIENT SELECTRIC typing. My
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat, accurate work. Reasonable rates. —
263-5317.
A GREAT PLACE TO DANCE the night
away UNDERCUT '76. Only $4.00/cpl.
See you there!
90 - Wanted
20 — Housing
SLEEPING ROOM, with light breakfast
only. For rent. Non-smoker preferred.
Call 738-1174 eves.
MALE, 22, needs person (non-smoker
preferred) to share two bedroom
suite. Large kitchen, living room,
bright. 15 minutes from campus. Call
Steve, eves.  327-3993. $125.00 plus.
COTTAGE NEAR UBC for $25.00 manth;
semi-furnished In return for preparation of evening meals and some
child supervision. 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at
our home on same property. Non-
smoker preferred. 224-5036.
GIRL WANTED — Haircutting model
for B.C Masters' Championship by
professional stylist. Phone: 324-6122
after 6 p.m.
ROOM AND BOARD in exchange for
evening care for handicapped female.
West End apt. Phone 682-4319 or
263-3334.
ASSISTANT CUB and scout leaders for
Kerrisdale group. Call 261-8458 (eves.).
STUDENTS — Third year engineering
physics students need you to help
with a.n optics experiment involving
colour photography. Come and have
your picture taken by some great
gears. Phone Doug at 224-9585	
99 — Miscellaneous
25 — Instruction
KARATE (Japanese Karate Association)
Shotokan Japanese instructor: Accepting new members. Call: 224-4242 —
228-0438 — 876-6659 (days).
EARN $10.00 by participating in a
psychology experiment. For more information call 228-2287 or 732-1066
(evenings). Involves approximately 4
hours completing personality assessment   questionaires. Thursday, September 23, 1976
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 11
AMS to hold new fee referenda
By MIKE BOCKING
The Alma Mater Society will
again try to have student fees
increased in a three-day
referendum Nov. 8-10.
The proposed increases would
include a $3 to $6 increase for the
AMS, as well as levies of $1 for
membership in the B.C. Students'
Federation and the National Union
of Students, AMS external affairs
officer   Moe   Sihota   said   Wednesday.
Students turned down a
referendum for a $3.50 increase in
AMS fees last November.
Sihota said an AMS committee
has been formed to determine the
exact amount of the proposed fee
increase, but he said it will
probably be $3 to $6.
Bus passes sought
The Alma Mater Society and the
B.C. Students' Federation have
formed a committee to push for
bus passes for Vancouver-area
university students.
The committee will meet with
B.C. Hydro representatives Sept.
30 to discuss terms, Herb Dhaliwal,
finance director for the student
administrative council, said
Wednesday.
"It looks really promising," he
said. "They (B.C. Hydro) are
looking into either a token system
or a straight pass system. I'm
going for the pass system — it's
more convenient."
Students would purchase passes
for about $30 a term and would be
able to use them seven days a
week, he said. "The program
would run on an experimental
basis to see if people used the bus
service more," Dhaliwal said.
He said passes would reduce
transportation costs to students,
help solve UBC's parking problem
and ease traffic snarls in general.
"With the high cost of car insurance and increasing gas prices,
these bus passes should be a really
good thing."
University of Victoria students
now can get passes for $30 a" term.
The administration subsidizes the
Bikers ignored-
path incomplete
Despite two years of complaining by UBC cyclists a cycle
path along University Boulevard
has not been completed.
The cycle path along the
boulevard comes to an end at
Toronto road, three blocks short of
the UBC campus.
Cyclists travelling to UBC are
forced to cross the road at the end
of the path and continue either on
the boulevard itself or on the
pedestrian sidewalk that runs
parallel to the boulevard.
Cyclists have complained that
riding on the boulevard is hazardous and that the sidewalk is in
poor condition in addition to being
constantly used by pedestrians.
University Endowment Lands
manager Bob. Murdoch, the man
responsible for the cycle path,
could not be reached for comment.
passes at $7.50 a student, Dhaliwal
said.
"Weneed student support on this
one,'' he said. "We probably will be
conducting a short campus survey
to see how many people would use
such a service."
Dhaliwal said that if students
took advantage of the passes the
bus service to UBC would probably
improve. "If more students were
using the buses, B.C. Hydro would
make service better."
He also said the group would be
approaching different levels of
government for subsidies. "The
government owes students because
of high transportation costs.
They're already facing high living
costs."
Students currently pay $34 in
AMS fees, but only $9 of this ever
reaches AMS coffers. Fifteen
dollars goes to pay for SUB, which
will not be paid off for approximately 30 years.
Five dollars is an athletic fee
which goes toward UBC's extramural athletic teams, and
another $5 goes towards the hole in
the ground which may one day
become a covered pool.
UBC pays the lowest student fees
in Canada, said Sihota, and AMS
activity fees have not been raised
since 1949.
The November referendum
failed to get a quorum of students
to vote, and those that did were
only 54 per cent in favor of a $3.50
fee increase. Fee increases must
pass by a two-thirds majority.
The proposed referenda on
the fee increases for BCSF and
NUS, would be the same as the
referenda which were narrowly
defeated by UBC students in
March.
In order for the fee increases to
be approved, the referendum
requires a 15 per cent voter turnout.
The purpose of the fee increases,
said Sihota, is to provide sufficient
funds for the BCSF and NUS to
mount effective student lobbies in
Victoria and Ottawa.
The BCSF was instrumental last
summer in pressuring the
provincial government to open up
600 extra positions for students in
the government's work in
government program, said Sihota.
BCSF and NUS lobbying in other
areas of student concern, such as
Canada   student   loan   policy,
student housing, and educational
policy in general, have earned the
students' support for the fee increases, Sihota said.
In the March referenda, 57
per cent of the students who voted
were in favor of the BCSF fee increase, and slightly over 50 per
cent favored the NUS levy, also of
$1. The referenda required 66
per cent to pass.
FOAM!
Mattresses
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Foam Chair
Orthopedic
Wedges
Camping
Pads
MADE TO ORDER
Open Six Days a Week
9 a.m. - 5:30 P.M.
United Foam 1976 Ltd.
3696 W. 4th
738-6737
MOVING* TRANSFER
f^LB   Reasonable
[_OPJHJ      Rates
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
Loan system works
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
FROSH DISCO & COFFEE HOUSE
SEPT. 24th, FRIDAY  SUB. 207 - 209
ALL ARTS STUDENTS WELCOME
UBC's assistant librarian said
Wednesday he will recommend
that the new library loan policy
introduced on a temporary basis in
January become permanent.
Doug Mclnnes said the indefinite
loan policy —borrowers don't have
to return some books until they are
requested by someone else — has
been a big success.
He said since the new policy was
introduced, borrowers are
returning books faster, less fines
are being assessed and borrowers
are paying their fines faster and
more consistently.
"I think it's a good system for
students," he said. "I hope we will
be able to retain it."
Mclnnes said he is confident
UBC's senate will make the new
policy permanent once the trial
period runs out in December.
"Since they allowed us to go
ahead they will probably confirm
it."
Mclnnes said the library will
submit a report about the new
policy to the senate library committee before the end of the year.
With the new system, a book
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
classified an an indefinite loan
book need not be returned until
someone requests it and after that
the borrower has a week to return
it.
Books with a definite loan period
are due on the date stamped on the
book but no fines are assessed until
someone requests the book. But
once the request comes in the
borrower has to pay $1 a day
starting the day the book was
called in.
The library staff members also
like the new system because they
spend less time processing overdue
notices and looking for overdue
books, Mclnnes said.
With the old system it was hard
to get books returned and fines
paid, he said.
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apn ^
and
LZZCL
Free
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r PHONE 1
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I 224-6336 |
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Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
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ectn grouse
Fully Licensed
Pizza in 29 Styles
Choice of 3 Sizes
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to 2 a.m.
- Sunday 4 p.
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FACULTY, STAFF AND GRADUATE STUDENT
INTRAMURAL PROGRAM
For the first time an Intramural Division for Faculty, Staff and Graduate Students has been organized.
This year, volleyball will be the only activity organized. Registration closes on Friday, Sept. 24 with play starting in
early October and continue for the entire year.
For further information and submission of entries contact:     Mr. FRANK MAURER
Hut B-8 Room 100F
Phone 228-4329
EVENT
Volleyball
DEADLINE
DATE
Friday
Sept. 24
COMPETITION
Round Robin
TIME
6:30-11:30 p.m.
FACILITY
Gym A
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
FREE TO ALL
Mn^Dmtrich Garden of Allah
MiT™os    Awn Service
12:30 p.m.     ______
W,cn^ie,ds  Bank Dick
3:00 p.m.     _-_-—_--.
SUB THEATRE
CtUBS DAY, THURS., SEPT. 23
Come and See what the Film Society has to offer
FORESTRY 11ERGRADUATE SOCIETY PRESENTS
UNDERCUT >76
dress: hardtimes
place: SUB cafe
time: 8:00 — 12:30 p.m.
Saturday Sept. 25, 1976
Band: SLA\
Only $4.00 per couple
VA of couple must hold valid A.M.S. card) Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1976
Hitchhiking potentially dangerous
.. but cheapest way to get around
The following article is reprinted from
Images, the monthly publication of the
Kootenay Women's Council based in
Castlegar. It is compiled from a discussion
among members of the Images collective.
By THE IMAGES COLLECTIVE
Well, what about hitchhiking? A bunch of
us sat down one day and hashed it out,
throwing out our various thoughts, opinions
and ideas..
On the one extreme there were a few of us
who never hitchhike ("Never will! I'm too
chicken!'' and "Nope, I don't hitchhike at all
— I've got my own car, ha ha!").
On the other was the woman who commented that although she had gotten beaten
up and raped in the "safety" ofMier very own
living room, her experience of hitchhiking
had been on the whole a good one, and she
had never undergone anything other than
verbal harrassment.
We all agreed that, yes, hitchhiking is a
potentially dangerous situation. There is the
ever present possibility of being mauled, or
raped, or murdered.
Even so, many women do hitchhike in
spite of the risks' involved.
Some do it because of poor transportation
facilities in their area, some because they
find that it is the cheapest way to travel.
'One woman travelled half-way across the
country and back with no more than $8 in
her pocket).
Still others felt it was a fun, exciting way
of getting around and felt that it was interesting to get to know the people they met
in their journeyings.  This last  group of
women reported feeling a great sense of
freedom in being able to take off wherever
they wanted to go whenever they felt like it.
However, our hitchhikers all agreed that
in order to make hitchhiking a safe and
pleasant experience, a modicum of
discretion and a whole lot of common sense
must be used. A certain amount of intuition
also helps.
Here is the advice they have for people,
especially women, new to hitchhiking.
It's generally better to go hitching with a
friend, preferrablly a woman friend. ("Men
slow you down.")
Never tell drivers where you are going.
Take the initiative amd ask them first. This
will give you a chance to size them up.
If they seem suspicious in any way you
can then decline the ride by saying that,
sorry, they are driving nowhere near your
destination.
Once you are in the car but are still unsure
about the driver, mention a "friend" 10
miles down or so whom you might want to
visit. If, after the 10 miles the driver checks
out as an all-right person, you can "change
your mind" about looking in on your friend
"after all" and continue on the rest of the
way —seeing that you have a ride and rides
are so hard to find and all.
Another variation of this theme is to tell
the driver that your mom/-
dad/husband/brother/sister are expecting
you to arrive at a certain time and would
worry unduly should you not show up on
schedule.
Generally, don't get in with a group of
men or sit in the middle between two men.
Talk a lot about Mom and Dad and
Grandpa and Grandma even if you are an
S'-^ES^^rffifi^^^'^iS^^l^*' 'i&'^i&S
fa%rite &!*'! is to pick her nose an
th en r ub lier f inger o n tier left pant leg
s$^-?jii£82^^
orphan and were miraculously dropped into
this world by some passing stork.
Keep the conversation as general as
possible. Reader's Digest type anecdotes
would fit in fine at this point, or if you are not
a Reader's Digest devotee, there is always
the weather to talk about. (Yawn!)
Offers to buy you food are generally innocuous but be wary of offers to buy you
drinks.
There are places where you simply don't
hitchhike. Places in Europe like Spain,
Portugal and Italy, or in the U.S. many of
the southern states and cities like Detroit or
New York.
In such places you would almost
inevitably get into trouble because of the
cultural conditioning about loose women
hitchhikers. Our seasoned hitchhikers said
that on the whole they felt good about
thumbing rides in Canada.
Watch out for leading questions and/or
comments. Questions like:
t How old are you?
A lesson on how not to hitchhike
• Don't you get scared/lonely travelling
all by yourself?
• Have you ever lived in a commune?
• What do you think about free love?
And be especially wary of comments like:
• My wife doesn't understand me.
. • My girl friend is too old-fashioned.
• My wife's had this operation, see, so it's
too painful for her to...
Then there are the self-proclaimed
"photographers" who offer you
"modelling" jobs.
An aside here. One woman told of a ride
with an honest-to-god porno salesman. Soft
porn, he said. No whips or anything like
that. But he never tried anything. Seems it's
the phonies you have to watch out for!
Beware of the fellow who tells you that he
is celibate for whatever reason.
One man said he had to practice celibacy
for a number of years for religious reasons
but found himself led by his sexual desires
"like a dog on a leash." "Then unhook
yourself!" said our hitchhiker. "For God's
sake, unhook yourself!"
"Smell" out the liquor situation before
getting into the car. Is there hard liquor
around? Don't get in.
One woman mentioned that she felt quite
comfortable if she saw that the driver had a
bottle of beer in his or her lap, but some
women don't feel comfortable with any kind
of liquor — soft or hard — in the car.
Look as asexual as you can. One woman
used to disguise herself as a boy, although
you would not likely have to go to such an
extreme!
Another never goes without her in-
dispensible steel-toed boots which are good
for putting an intruding knee out of joint as
well as not being the most attractive of
feminine footgear.
If you think your driver is going to lead up
to anything you don't want him to lead up to,
do something repulsive.
One woman's favourite trick is to pick her
nose and then rub her finger on her left pant
leg. She has assured us that this has turned
off more than one would-be "wolf". (Not too
many snot fetishists, we don't think — at
least we've never heard of any...)
And now some tips about good
driver/hitchhiker relations.
Don't for heaven's sake hide a friend or
two or three in the bushes — or worse yet,
your pet great dane.
The driver may let the bunch of you in but
the frosty silence and feeling of resentment
on his or her part will do little to make the
ride an enjoyable one.
When thumbing stand in a logical stopping
off place. (The middle of a bridge is
definitely out!)
Take only a minimum of luggage.
If you want to smoke ask the driver's
permission first. (Some people suffer from
various allergies — some simply can't abide
smoke at close quarters.)
If the trip is a long one and the driver is
beginning to nod off, offer to take over the
driving or else keep her/him awake with
conversation.
A lot of the hitchhikers in our group
agreed that they found being picked up by
women a rare and delightful experience- in
many cases too rare — and expressed the
wish that more women would pick up
women on the road.
For those of us who hitchhike, it's as much
an adventure as an economical way of
getting around. There's not a woman on the
road who doesn't know that hitching can be
dangerous, but there are certainly a lot of
places we never would have seen if we
hadn't just stuck out our thumbs.

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