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The Ubyssey Mar 24, 1972

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^Vol. Llll, No.
66
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY,
MARCH 24,
1972
°^OS
_»48
228-2301
Group seeks
new union
— kini mcdonald photo
GROVES OF ACADEME, bedded in mud and algae, provide study spot for student in tilvoes of pre-exam
neural dermatitis. Small garden spot near library ain't whot it used to be, but it's still partly there.
By SANDI SHREVE
A group of about 20
non-unionized UBC office
workers struck a three-member
committee to draft an
independent union constitution at
a meeting in SUB Thursday.
The workers also nominated
Lori Whitehead, international
relations institute secretary, to
explore the best methods of
sending a questionnaire to all
campus workers asking them what
union they want to join.
The choices will include the
Canadian Union of Public
Employees, the international
Office and Technical Employees
Union and an independent union.
The group met to discuss the
feasibility of forming an
independent union as opposed to
joining the OTEU or CUPE, which
are now in the process of
organizing campus workers.
Several of the office workers
withdrew from the OTEU
organizing campaign after
investigating allegations by labor
organizer Madeline Parent in a
March 9 talk that American-based
international unions use
Canadians for their own benefit.
Meeting chairwoman Katherine
Taylor told the group she and
other workers who examined the
OTEU constitution found it was
undemocratic.
After much debate on whether
it would be advisable to impose its
own ideas on other office workers
rather than waiting for more
support from them, the group
voted strongly in favor of drafting
an independent constitution.
Taylor called for co-operation
among the workers to draft the
constitution and to begin a drive
for organizing an independent,
certifiable union.
"We can fall flat on our faces
unless we work and work now,"
she said.
To be eligible for certification
by the Labor Relations Board,
which would give the union
bargaining rights with its
members' employers, it must have
the support of 51 per cent of the
non-unionized workers.
There are, according to OTEU
statistics, about 1,200 non-union
campus office workers, said
Taylor.
It was agreed at the meeting
that the constitution drafted not
be binding.
Whitehead, one of the
constitutional committee
members, said it would be taken
before their next meeting to be
discussed by all members.
The other committee members
are library assistant Mary
Patterson and academic planning
secretary Rayleen Nash.
The workers also arranged for
three sub-committees to
supplement the constitutional
Committee in researching other
independent union constitutions
and the legal aspects involved in
drawing-up a union constitution.
Whitehead said their
questionnaire should be sent to
campus workers by Thursday.
The OTEU has mailed
referendum ballots to the 400 or
more campus workers who have
indicated an interest in OTEU
representation.
But the office workers who
met Thursday decided not to
depend on the OTEU results.
"We want our own answers
rather than having to rely on the
OTEU's," said Whitehead.
The workers will hold a general
meeting at 5:15 p.m. April 6, in
the Lutheran Campus Centre.
One more!
There's 66 down and one to
go-
That's the score on The
Ubyssey as you read this
second-to-last issue of the best
campus newspaper west of False
Creek.
So if you've got letters, scoops,
scandals or Tween classes notices,
get them in to SUB 241-K by
Monday noon or they wait until
next September.
No Skagit flooding — Davis, IJC report
By JIM JOLY
Environment minister Jack Davis said
Thursday the International Joint
Commission report on the flooding of the
Skagit Valley confirms the Canadian view
that the flooding should not take place.
The IJC report, tabled in parliament in
December, indicated flooding of the Skagit
Valley would have far-reaching permanent
effects on the environment of the valley in
Canada.
In a prepared statement, Davis said the
report provided a good basis for
reconsidering the proposed Seattle City
light & Power project which, by creating a
reservoir behind the Ross Dam in the U.S.,
would flood eight miles of the British
Columbia valley.
The IJC indicated three years would be
required to make a thorough assessment of
the fisheries, wildlife and forest resources
which would be affected by the Ross Dam
project.
Davis said he takes this conclusion "very
seriously indeed."
"The International Joint Commission
has said that no thorough ecological
evaluation of the effects on the valley
exists at the present," he said.
"Failure to obtain this information
would, in my view, constitute good and
sufficient reason for rejecting the project."
Davis said he expects U.S. authorities to
take the views of the IJC and the Canadian
government into account.
But Jeanette Williams, vice-chairman of
the Seattle city council utilities committee,
said she considers Davis' statement to be
premature.
She said she was looking to Washington
hearings by the U.S. Federal Power
Commission to examine the Ross project
fairly and with the "emotion which
surrounds it at present."
But Williams said her position on the
flooding question was determined by the
side of the border she found herself on.
"There are major benefits from the Ross
Dam project to this country," she said.
"I'm always concerned with the
environment, however."
She said she was not in favor of the
IJC's recommendation for a three-year
study of the environmental effects of the
Skagit flooding.
"There have been a great deal of studies
already," she said.
MLA Will iam Hartley
(NDP-Yale-Lillooet), whose riding takes in
the Skagit Valley, told The Ubyssey he sees
nothing in Davis' statement which indicates
the government will actively oppose the
Ross project.
"It is a weak statement," Hartley said.
"I'd like to see him come. out more
strongly on the issue."
He said, however, that any statement is
better than no statement.
"Any authority speaking out against the
project at this time would aid opposition
to it," he said.
Derrick Mallard, executive director of
the Scientific Pollution and Environmental
Control Society, supported Davis'
statement.
"I should hope Jack Davis would
confirm this viewpoint," Mallard said.
"I think it is the least he can say."
Mallard said he would like to see the
federal government state that no province
should, on its own, enter into an agreement
with a foreign country.
He said B.C. should never have been
allowed to negotiate the Skagit agreement
with the U.S., as it did, in the first place. Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972
In the classroom
By RICH TREETHORNE
Forestry 419, forest economics, is the only
required course for fourth year forestry students at
UBC. It's a required course because no one would
take it if it was an elective.
Professor David Haley attempts to explain forest
economics as it concerns the forest industry in B.C.
and the provincial government's outdated forest
policy.
He tries to explain common-sense economics
using a multitude of graphs and equations,
thoroughly confusing the students whose interest is
low at the best of times.
Interest in the class is shown by attendance,
which sometimes climbs to 50 per cent of the
students enrolled in the course.
Most of the class time is spent deciphering
the profs writing and attempting to translate his
array of chalk marks (diagrams) into notes.
Few of the students really understand what is
being taught, the result being seven failures at
Christmas. Many students are worried about the
course's final exam even though it is the only
written exam many of them have.
The leadership of tutorial class Thursday
afternoons is usually handed over to a grad student
in economics, who tries to discuss problems raised
earlier by Haley and explain the answers. He fails
miserably to enlighten the class.
A highlight of the March 16 tutorial was an
argument between the grad student and the prof
over how to do a problem.
Neither was really sure how to do it, wasting
nearly 15 minutes of the class's time while they put
their heads together to come up with a plausible
answer.
Three weeks ago a class evaluation form was
filled out by the students for the benefit of the
professor, faculty and future forestry students.
Results of the evaluation showed that the course
is badly taught, the students are gaining nothing
from it, and it should be an elective rather than a
required course.
One question on the form asked students to
suggest anything the professor could do to improve
the course.
The answer from many of the students -
"retire."
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"Adult Entertainment"
Warning: nude scenes throughout
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NOMINATED FOR
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SHOW TIMES: 12:00, 1:40
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Warning:     some     swearing
and coarse language. ADULT 1NTMTAINM1WT
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ETER BOGDANOVICH
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Tickets on sale at Box Office at
Odeon Theatre, 881 Granville St.
For Phone Reservations Call 688-2308
Daily 11:30-7:30 —Sunday 1:30-7 p.m.
CAMBIE al   _8th
876-2747
NOMINATED FOR 6 ACAMEDY AWARDS
"Nicholas and Alexandra"
AMS food action pushed
Hyland
KINGS'Y at KNIGHT
876-3045
Tickets on sale at Box Office at
Odeon Theatre, 881 Granville St.
For Phone Reservations Call 688-2308
DAILY 11:30-7:30 —SUNDAY 1:30-7 P.M.
Alternate food service operator
Lyle Osmundson said Thursday
his outlet may pull out of UBC
completely if negotiations
between the Alma Mater Society
and the university administration
over control of SUB cafeteria are
not underway by the summer.
Negotiations were slated to
begin following passage of a
student referendum on AMS
control of the SUB food outlet,
currently run by the
administration food services.
However, AMS co-ordinator
Rick Murray said he doubts the
AMS could take over SUB food
services before next January.
TRAVELl
Osmundson said he is upset
that the AMS executive led him to
believe negotiations would start
soon after the passing of the
February referendum.
"If it looks like negotiations
are underway during the summer,
we'll stay on," Osmundson told
The Ubyssey.
He said the service would
remain at least until the end of
the term in any case.
Osmundson said the main
purpose for his campus outlet is
not just to provide students with
better food at cheaper prices,
"but to put students in a position
to negotiate for some control over
the price and quality of the food
they eat here.
"We want to create an interest
in the food service, which we
think we've done, but it hasn't
gone far enough yet.
"As for the service itself, well I
could probably make more money
on welfare," he said.
He said his service is currently
$468 in the red, with more bills
coming in this week from the
present completion of renovations
to his bus.
He said after many weeks of
bickering with the AMS and the
traffic office, he has been granted
a permit to park on the SUB
plaza.
ENGLISH
SUBTITLES
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Official representatives for travel to the U.S.S.R.
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at 10th Ave.
.----_._.__.....____.----.__.- .J Friday, March 24, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
CONCRETE  FRONT of new undergraduate  library takes shape as work proceeds
behind    construction    barricades.    Structure    faces    main    library    and   disappears
— kini mcdonald photo
underground below Main Mall. Head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs dreamchild is due for
completion sometime in 1973.
Fatuity exec 'reasons sweetly'
The faculty association executive held a "sweet
reason and general co-operation" meeting at noon
Thursday.
That's how faculty association president Robert
Kubicek described the meeting where, he said, members
agreed on everything.
He said the agenda boasted only two items, the first
dealing with the executive elections.
Nominations for the positions of president, vice
president, secretary, treasurer and two members-at-large
closed today, with the first two positions taken by
acclamation.
President is civil engineering professor Richard
Spencer and vice-president is law professor Leon Gretz.
Secretarial candidates are Anne Turner, main library
catalogue preparation head, and political science professor
Philip Resnick.
In the running for treasurer are political science
professor Donald Blake and computer science professor
Richard Rosenberg.
And grappling for memberships-at-large are commerce
Graduating class gives gifts
After three votes and three recounts, UBC's
graduating class has finally allocated its gifts to the
university.
Topping the list is a $4,600 grant to the Crane
Library, which will provide a number of braille textbooks
for blind students.
The move to cover Empire Pool was advanced $6,000
with the second grant by graduating students.
Third on the list is the urban vehicle project which
requested $10,000 to compete in an international
competition of engineering students in Detroit this
summer.
However, a class spokesman said there may be less
than the $20,000 originally set aside for the gifts because
of increased expenses for grad photos.
He said the urban vehicle will get what money is left
after the first two gifts are presented.
Religious school asks for UBC affiliation
A UBC senate committee is now considering an
application by Regent College to affiliate officially with
UBC.
The committee, which was struck at Wednesday
night's senate meeting, is chaired by academic planning
head Robert Clarke.
Regent College, already an affiliate of the Vancouver
School of Theology, offers a one-year diploma course in
Christian studies for post-graduates, about 40 of whom
are now studying at its facilities in the VST building on
the UBC campus.
Economics professor Peter Pearse opposed approval
of the committee, saying it would mean senate approves,
in principle, UBC's affiliation with the evangelical
institution.
"I have no objection to this sort of college but I don't
think the university should endorse the principle of
affiliation with such an institution," said Pearse.
"In addition," he said, "Regent College is already
affiliated with the VST which is affiliated with UBC, and I
fail to see how such duplication of affilations would be of
any help to either body."
Clarke said the college's request was based on a desire
for parity of academic standards with UBC and it was felt
this could be best achieved by affiliation.
He said that merely approving the committee did not
mean acceptance or approval of the idea of affiliation
with an evangelical institution.
Commit fee looks at gear-prof hassles
A  special  committee  has
chairmanship    of   computer   si:
Kennedy   to   investigate   charg
intimidation    and    harrassment
students.
Applied science dean Liam F
Wednesday and will meet with K
how many members will sit on
they will be.
been set up under the
;ience   professor   James
es   by   math   profs   of
by   civil   engineering
"inn announced the move
ennedy shortly to decide
the committee and who
The student-faculty committee will investigate the
charges during the next two weeks and will draft a report
of its findings.
The report will then be discussed with the math
professors and engineering students to determine the
validity of the charges.
The faculty council met Thursday to discuss the
charges, but adjourned early to meet again today.
professor Walter Winiata, English professor Hilda Thomas
and economics professor Curtis Eaton.
Kubicek said the elections will be held by a mail
ballot beginning "sometime" next week, with the final
results being available at the next executive meeting April
6.
All UBC faculty are eligible to vote in the election.
The second item on the agenda was a "general
activities report" from the Canadian Association of
University Teachers executive-secretary Allan Berland.
Kubicek labelled the report a "general greeting to the
executive" that listed CAUT's recent but
non-controversial activities.
He said Berland told the executive CAUT is working
on academics' taxation problems, created by the federal
government's January tax legislation and announced its
status of women committee is "quite active in various
fronts.
"But his talk was just a general commentary; he was
not specific about anything."
Grads back down
Members of the graduate student association met
Thursday to try to gain a student majority on the grad
centre's board of directors, but ended up amending their
proposal to keep the B.C. liquor control board off their
backs.
GSA president Gina Quijano said the proposal to
amend the centre's constitution to provide for six student
and four faculty directors was amended to five student
members, an increase of one from previous years.
Faculty membership on the board remains at six.
Quijano said the proposal was amended because of
concern expressed by classics department head Malcolm
McGregor over the centre's liquor licence.
She told The Ubyssey that McGregor said the LCB
will revoke the centre's licence if there is a student
majority on its board.
"This was sprung on us and we had no time to check
it out with the LCB," Quijano said.
"But if we find out this is not the board's policy we
will call another meeting and bring up our original
proposal."
She said liquor sales at the centre result in profits of
about $14,500 annually. The money is used to pay off the
mortgage on the building.
A proposal on the centre's membership was also
approved at the meeting to allow graduate students not
registered in the faculty of grad studies to become
members.
"This would include students in education, law,
medicine or any students with bachelors degrees in any
field," Quijano said. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972
To Steve
First of all, we'd like to apologize for the delay in
printing your letter. Our budget isn't as big as could be
expected so we're often stuck with large stacks of letters
which we're unable to print because of a space shortage.
Hopefully things will improve next year. (Aldridge, Dick
et al take note).
Second, we're sorry you feel the way you do. We
don't mean about getting ripped off for $13. Naturally
you're pissed off. Any of us would feel the same way in
your situation.
What we're sorry about is that fact you feel
compelled to leave behind your "childhood ideals" and
come to the conclusions stated'in your letter.
Consider asking yourself why someone would want
to rip off the $13 in the first place. Probably because he
needed the money. But why did he need the money?
Very likely because at some point in the past year or so
he needed a decent job and couldn't find one,
something which is fairly common nowadays.
Now ask yourself if it makes sense for someone to
be out of work in a country as rich as Canada. It's not
very rational, is it? Something's wrong and we suspect
very strongly that it's the economic system. It's obvious
that the economics of this society are based on
competition. To survive you're forced to look out for
yourself and say to hell with the other guy. Although
we're forced to put it in rather simplistic terms, this is
probably the reason you're out thirteen bucks. Our
interpretation is that some guy needed the money and,
because society has already instilled the attitude in him
that he should watch out for himself, went ahead and
ripped off the money.
Hopefully you can see from this that capitalism has
produced both the need and the attitude.
You might object that other people who have been
brought up in this society also need money but do not
resort to stealing. But the fact remains that everyone has
to compete. When they compete, they try to take
something away from someone else. It only remains to
be seen to what level people are forced (or trained) to
descend in their attempts to take care of themselves.
The obvious solution to this mess is to eliminate the
present economic system and substitute it with an
economy based on co-operation. It's already been done
in places such as China with such success that you can
now leave your wallet in any men's (or women's) locker
room in the country without having to worry about it
being ripped off. We'd like to be able to do the same
here.
J. A.
Coming
At last I have had to discard
my childhood ideals. I have also
lost all faith in my own generation
and what they have advocated.
Wake up friends, there is no such
thing as love but simply
self-interest.
On Monday, March 6, I
participated in in intramural
volleyball game at War Memorial
M UBYSSEY
MARCH 24, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
• Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"Eeeeeeaaaagggghhhhcccchhhhfffff" belched Mike (crooked cue)
Sasges, the demon of dummies. Satanical Sandi Shreve shot her forked
tongue at snoozing Sandy Kass, while Leslie Plommerted on Mikee Finlay
due -to the absence of pretty Paulie. Meanwhile, Lesley Krueger
convinced the crew a celebration was in order. Monkey-face McCune,
arisen from the dead, agreed. Kent Spencer scoffed at the idea but was
outnumbered jollily by jumpin' Jim Joly. Gary Gruenke and Kini
McDonald photocopied each other with John Andersen demoted to chief
ashtray for the collective. Jim Adams bemoaned the distress of Gord
Gibson who was seen jocking off in a tree. The echos faded, the shadows
passed. But Vaughn Palmer reminded all goons to meet in the office
Monday noon to mess together a Maclown's for the final biggie Tuesday.
LOTS ^S^$,40 r\%. TA       fa'J ****** £*-<- M"1 P«e»>
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-Gucrnlla/LNS
Letters
Gym. Having not abandoned my
innocent state as did Adam and
Eve, I left my clothes and wallet
in a locker in the proverbial men's
locker room. Needless to say,
when I later reached into my
wallet for some much needed
money, I found that I had been
ripped off. Thirteen bucks, would
you believe! To some wealthy
students that may not sound like
much but to most of us at this
time of year that's a lot of hi tad.
To those of you who are
inclined to steal from others, give
mankind a break and try asking
when you need some bread. You
see, my friend, that money could
have been my dinner for next
month.
Steve Benson
Commerce 3
P.S. Hopefully you spent it
wisely.
Proposal
An open letter to all students:
The quality of student life is in
part determined by the Special
Events, Speakers, and Education
committees. The underlying
philosophy of how these are
organized is being discussed at this
time. To date these three
committees have mostly centred
around spectator activities. Wc. as
interested students, consider this
approach an example of the
continuation of non-education at
this university.
From the indication given to us
at Wednesday's council meeting
(March 22) the new student
executive wishes to continue this
non-involvement    as    shown   by
their desire to have controlled
chairmen and split committees.
We believe the committees are so
inter-related that the possibility of
separation is ludicrous. The more
complimentary the committees
the more we would be able to
co-ordinate our activities and
extend to this campus an
organized continuous program of
events.
Our proposal is that these
committees, the Special Events,
Speakers and Education
committees be considered as a
whole. Implementing a wholistic
approach to campus life, our
proposal aims to co-ordinate
"celebrative and cerebral"
happenings on campus next year.
This program would he run as a
co-operative and would be open
to participation by all interested
students. Utilizing the concept of
decentralization, events would be
staged not only in SUB but other
buildings across campus, including
residences. These programs would
be undertaken in conjunction
with events in existence presently
and in the future.
In order to facilitate increased
student participation,
representation   of residences and
undergraduate societies, we
believe, is necessary. Rather than
the common, single unrelated
noon-hour programs, cohesive
long-term events would be the
primary focus. Concentrated
support will be placed upon the
concept of special weeks involving
fewer resource people for
increased time periods. This will
encourage the use of qualified and
relevant campus personnel.
Although we do not mean to
imply motives, it is interesting
that the deadline for applications
has been continually extended.
Our proposal has been in for two
weeks.
Penny Newman
Margaret-Jean Feser
Gary Birch
on the behalf of
25 interested students.
Praise
Congratulations on another
fine year of Ubyssey publications.
This is probably by far and away
the best fuckin' year of Ubysseys
we've seen on campus ever.
Luv,
Michael Thomas,
Arts 4 Page Friday
Racism in sociology
Of all the vulgar modes of
escaping from the
consideration of the effects
of social and moral influences
on the human mind, the most
vulgar is that of attributing
the diversity of conduct and
character to inherent natural
differences.
-John Stuart Mill
The oppressed peoples of
Canada and the United States
have begun to organize
against their oppression.
Their realization that the
political, economic, and
social machinery of their
society works against their
interests has put the
government in a strange
predicament. How are
government officials, without
totally destroying the facade
of the "Just Society" going
to keep people from
organizing to change their
present situation? As people
become more conscious, how
will the continued
inequalities in education,
housing, and wages be
explained? These inequalities
must be explained in such a
way that our society as it is
presently structured does not
appear at fault. One way of
explaining these inequalities
is to show that they reflect
the 'natural' potentials of the
people of that society. If
equality is to be seen as
merely a Utopian dream
because people are
fundamentally not equal,
then racism, sexism, and
anti-working class ideas must
be given scientific support.
Society in its present form
must be shown to be the only
possible society.
One way of justifying the
inequalities of the established
political and economic
system is to demonstrate that
socio-economic factors play
only a minute role in the
forming of individuals within
a society. These ideas must
then be firmly planted in the
people of the society in such
a   way   that   they   will   be
uncritically accepted. The
social sciences provide the
'qualified' experts to carry
out this task.
Richard Hernstein is such
an expert. He is the head of
the psychology department at
Harvard. In an introduction
to his article in the
September, 1971 edition of
Atlantic, the editor states
that "The Atlantic believes
that it is not only possible
but necessary to have public
discussion of important,
albeit painful, social issues.
The subject of intelligence is
such an issue — important
because social legislation
must come to terms with
actual human potentialities,
painful because the actualities
are sometimes not what we
vainly hope." What in fact we
are being asked to do is
rethink our concept of
equality.
In our society today,
Hernstein begins, "there is a
powerful trend toward
'meritocracy' — the
advancement of people on
the basis of ability, either
potential or fulfilled,
measured objectively." One
of the central points of
Hernstein's argument is that
class differences cannot be
changed because they reflect
the actual potentials of
people. Hernstein states that
"The vision of a classless
society was the keystone of
the Declaration of
Independence as well as the
Communist Manifesto,
however different the plan
for achieving it." Against this
background, the main
significance of intelligence
testing is what it says about a
society built around human
inequalities. The message is so
clear that it can be made in
the form of a syllogism: (1.)
If differences in mental
ability are inherited, and (2.)
if success requires those
abilities, and (3.) if earning
and prestige depend on
success, (4.) then social
standing    (which     reflects
earnings and prestige) will be
based to some extent on
inherited differences among
people . .. The first two
premises of the syllogism
cannot sensibly be challenged
for they are true to some
extent now and are likely to
become more so in time ...
Greater wealth, freedom,
fairness, and educational
opportunity are not going to
give us the egalitarian society
of our philosophical
heritage." The message of
Hernstein is indeed clear.
People occupy their position
in society because of innate
characteristics. If someone
does not make enough money
to live on it is because he or
she does not genetically
deserve it. Hernstein is very
explicit when it comes to
questions such as
discrimination against Black
people. He comments that
"to the extent that variations
in the American social
environment can promote or
retard I.Q., blacks have
probably been held back. But
a neutral commentator (a
rarity these days) would have
to say that the case is simply
not settled, given our present -
state of knowledge."
Hernstein minimizes almost
to the point of denial three
hundred years of slavery,
oppression and discrimination
in order to be 'neutral' and
true to biological
determination.
Hernstein is a follower of
Arthur Jensen, professor of
educational psychology at
Berkeley, who peddles his
racism in journals ranging
from the Harvard Educational
Review to Life magazine. He
quotes Jensen as concluding
"that the genetic factor is
worth about eighty per cent
and that only twenty per cent
is left to everything else — the
social, cultural, and physical
environment, plus illness,
pre-natal factors, and what
have you." The argument is
simply this; And individual's
capabilities are primarily
determined by his or her
particular genetic makeup.
Because society rewards
individuals according to these
capabilities, an individual's
social and economic position
within the society will also be
determined by genetic
makeup. It does not matter,
then, how the society is
structured because it has less
than a twenty per cent
chance of influencing the way
in which individuals within it
behave. According to
Hernstein, "There are simply
fewer potentially competent
physicians than barbers. The
gradient of occupation is,
then, a natural measure of
value and scarcity. And
beneath this gradient is a
scale  of inborn ability." As
for the future, Hernstein
predicts that "in times to
come, as technology
advances, the tendency to be
unemployed may run in the
genes of a family about as
certainly as bad teeth do
now."
Genetic determination
explains to people that reality
is beyond their control and
comprehension. This is
exactly the type of ideology
that is needed at a time of
crisis in a society. These
theories of genetic inferiority
are very important tools for
shifting the blame for social
and economic inequalities
away from those who control
the society to those who
suffer from these inequalities.
The statements of Jensen
and Hernstein do have a
positive side. Their arguments
and conclusions are so
blatantly unscientific and
biased that they readily
expose how the social
sciences can be utilized as a
tool of oppression. The
negative aspects obviously
outweigh the positive. Their
'findings' are used to mould
public opinion against
workers, welfare recipients,
women, and people who are
racially oppressed. Students
are trained to accept
Hernstein's garbage as
objective social science.
Probably mere important
than either of these factors is
the direct political
application of their theories.
Life magazine (June 12,
1970) states that Jensen's
123-page article in
the Harvard Educational
Review was reprinted in full
in the Congressional Record
at the request of a Southern
Congressman. The report was
also used in a Virginia
courtroom as defence
evidence against
desegregation. Jensen believes
that his theories are beginning
to carry more weight. In Life,
he said, "The kind of research
being funded and some of the
appointments being made
reflect in subtle ways some of
the ideas in my Harvard
Review article."
Jensen is not the only
social scientist who is being
used by the U.S. government.
Edward Banfield (currently a
professor at the University of
Pennsylvania and former head
of the Presidential Task Force
on Urban Affairs) has been
very influential in shaping
U.S. government internal
policy. His book, Unheavenly
City is used at many U.S.
universities and will probably
soon be in Canada. In
Unheavenly City Banfield
makes very clear his position
on the working class. He
states "In the chapters that
follow, the term 'normal' will
be used to refer to that class
culture that is not lower class.
The  implication  that  lower
class   culture  is pathological
seems  fully warranted both
because of the relatively high
incidence of mental illness in
the    lower   class    and   also
because human nature seems
loath to accept a style of life
that   is   so  radically  present
oriented." (page 54). William
Shockley     of    Stanford
University and Banfield both
recommend sterilization as a
means of dealing with people
they consider to be of low
I.Q.  Shockley has proposed
the 'Voluntary Bonus Plan'.
Under the V.B.P. poor people
would be given a bonus of
one thousand dollars for each
I.Q. point under one hundred
if they submit to sterilization.
This has not yet come into
effect but similar legislations
have. A bill has recently been
passed by the Indiana Senate
that forces women who have
two   or  more   children   and
who live on welfare either to
be sterilized or to be taken
off welfare.  Mississippi and
North Carolina  are  working
on   similar   legislation.   This
type  of legislation is being
considered   at   the   Federal
level in the U.S. The Boston
Globe and Mail (January 28,
1972)     reports,     "Roger
Freedman,    (a    follower   of
Banfield),   a   former   Nixon
aide who is currently a senior
staff member at the Hoover
Institute for War, Revolution,
and Peace, testified recent l\
before   the   Senate   Finance
Committee.   He  argued  that
they should 'consider taking
children    away   from   some
mothers    on     welfare    and
raising   them   in   a   well-run
government    instituion'.    He
called on them to think over
offering   a   'cash   bonus   for
parents     on    welfare     who
volunteer   for  sterilization'."
It   must   be   remembered
that   Jensen,  Hernstein, and
Shockley   are   not   the  only
social   scientists   that   share
these views on the nature of
human    reality.    They   have
been mentioned because they
represent a major trend in the
social sciences. This does not
mean that there are not social
scientists  who  disagree with
them.    Although   there   are
many     who     have     firmly
opposed the Jensen clique on
scientific-methodological.
political  and social grounds.
there   are   many   more   who
have    supported    it    either
actively  or by their silence.
What   is   happening   in   the
social sciences in the U.S. is
reflected in Canadian branch
plant     social      science
departments.     The
Jensen-Hernstein syndrome is
most   probably  more  firmly
implanted     in     Canadian
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I
SUB ART GALLERY
SPECIAL EVENTS
continued from pf 1
universities than we realize.
One example at UBC is
Werner Cohn, professor of
Sociology, who teaches
'Ethnic Relations'
(Anthropology 201) and
'Sociology of Education'
(Sociology 466). Dr. Cohn is
not nearly as influential as
Jensen nor is he as well
known. Dr. Cohn follows
Jensen and uses Jensen as
source material in some of his
lectures but he has made his
own contribution to the
literature. We criticize Dr.
Cohn more thoroughly than
Hernstein, Shockley, or
Jensen not because he is more
important but simply because
he is at UBC. It must again be
pointed out that Dr. Cohn is
not unique but is an example
of a type of thinking that
everyday becomes more
prominent in the social
sciences.     The     Union     of
Radical Social Scientists has
on two occasions invited Dr.
Cohn to discuss his ideas in
an open forum on the biology
and sociology of race. He
refused. In a letter to The
Ubyssey we explained that
we felt it was very important
that he discuss his views in an
open setting that was free of
the authoritarian classroom
atmosphere. We further
indicated that we felt it to be
very important that he
personally present his
position in order that he not
be misrepresented. He did not
answer our letter. (It is
interesting to note that
neither Jensen nor Shockley
will publicly defend their
positions.) We believe that
controversial viewpoints,
especially those held by
educators, should be publicly
stated and publicly criticized.
This is essential to the
development   of knowledge.
We believe in freedom of
speech but we also believe in
the right to criticize.
In order to indicate the
nature of the sociology in
which Dr. Cohn is involved
we shall examine his
contribution to a small
debate in the journal Current
Anthropology. The debate
began with his book review of
Michael Banton's Race
Relations. Dr. Cohn asserts,
"As far as American Negroes
are concerned, there is good
reason to believe that white
people, together with all their
prejudice and irrational
racism, also experience
physical fear of Negroes, and
that this fear, if one is to
judge by murder rates, is
related to the Negro's much
greater propensity to kill. In
general, the Negro murder
rate is perhaps eight times
that     of    whites.     It    is
continued pf 3
URSS Manifesto
The URSS was founded by a group of
dissident social scientists who sought
through collective study and work an
alternative to either copping/dropping out
as individuals or making it as bourgeois
academics. We could either use our skills to
advance ourselves (at the same time
providing information and analysis to those
who control this society), or we could do
meaningful work to serve the people.
Our place of work is the university, so
the first location of our struggle is here.
The first situation we face is that there are
four social science departments, yet society
is a coherent whole and to know fully one
part without the others is impossible. We
ask: what is the historical character of this
dividion? Is its primary function the
limiting of understanding? We see the vital
need for a unified social science to give a
wholistic view of society, and call for the
development of a unified social science
department.
Most of us first went into social
science because we felt that here, more
than any other place, the real world of
people in society would be studied; and
further, that the knowledge discovered
would be actively used for the progressive
betterment of the human condition. But
we have found that we were regretably
wrong on both counts, the social sciences
do not seek an understanding of the whole,
but only of its smallest parts; and social
scientists are primarily engaged in
competition for status and serve the status
quo.
Yet the social  sciences are  more in
tune with current social trends, such that
they take on a modern look and faddish
appearances — they beguile us (and
themselves) with 'contemporary relevance'
and 'radical methods' — but the most
important questions, why do you do what
you do? and who does it seek to serve?
remain, not unanswered, but rather
unasked. We have raised these questions —
in our "Storm Warnings" about first-level
courses, in our Learn-in on the "Two
Roads of Sociology", and in our Open
Hearing on "The Social Sciences and the
Working Class". We plan to continue these
challenges to the complacency of the social
sciences.
The social order we live under is based
on oppression and exploitation: of one
class for the benefit of another, of national
and racial groups by others, and of the
Third World by U.S. imperialism — yet
attempts are constantly being made to
convince us that we live in the 'best of all
times'. This social order is corrupt and
decaying, and is propped up by cynical
self-serving academics who are the
producers in the ideological factories of
capitalist society, the universities. We
challenge the work of these 'end of
ideology' and 'value-free' ideologues — the
social sciences are on trial and the jury is all
humanity.
All people sincerely interested in
working to challenge the present dominant
ideology in the social sciences and to do
collective work towards a radical social
science are invited to contact us at AMS
Box 149, SUB.
U.S. NAVY DUNGAREES
NOW AT SOUL SELLERS
tan §ntmmdl
autiqnz
1779 W. GEORGIA at DENMAN * 609 ROBSON at SEYMOUR
683-8097 687-2021
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972 continued from pf 2
fashionable to 'explain' this
difference by reference to
socioeconomic conditions but
this type of explanation is
traditionally no more than
apologetics. A decent social
science would have to free
itself from the moralistic
notion that murder is 'bad'
before it could honestly and
scientifically investigate this
area of Negro-white
relations." (Current
Anthropology, vol. 10, p.
203). The structure of this
statement is essentially this:
1.) White people are racists
and prejudiced — this
behaviour is irrational. 2.)
White people fear Black
people — this is rational
behaviour, 3.) Black people
have a "much greater
propensity to kill" than
White people, 4.) This
'propensity' is reflected in an
objective manner — "the
Negro murder rate", 5.)
White ■ people are aware of
this objective data and are
therefore able to make the
rational decision to fear Black
people, 6.) Socioeconomic
explanations are
unsatisfactory and
traditionally apologetic and
must be accompanied by data
that is other than
socioeconomic. The
implication is that this other
data is biological since the
'propensity' to kill cannot be
explained in a socioeconomic
framework.
Dr. Cohn's presentation of
this situation is not only
blatantly anti-Black, it is alto
anti-White. He does not state,
for example, some (or most)
White people are racists who
fear some Black people. He
paints his picture in terms of
static absolutes that do not
correspond to reality. Taking
his framework of analysis,
white people would even have
to fear Black babies. And
where would the children of
black-white marriages fit into
this scheme? Perhaps they are
bbound to self destruction
because of their combination
of killing propensity and
racist fear of themselves. And
how would one explain the
Black gourgeoisie's fear of the
masses of Black people? The
point is that Dr. Cohn has
begun his argument in terms
of biological categories rather
than sociological categories
with a class analysis. In Dr.
Cohn's scheme, behaviour is
identified with skin color.
Sociological categories that
are open -to change reflect
reality. Static biological
categories reflect racism and
this racism is a product of a
racist social structure.
Explanations of this sort
serve to strengthen that social
structure. Dr. Cohn's
description also functions to
drive a wedge between White
and Black people who share
sim.lar socioeconomic
situations. It would be
extremely difficult for white
people if they accepted any
part of the argument that Dr.
Cohn puts forward. People
who are divided are weak and
cannot hope to combat their
common oppressor.
Dr. Cohn's argument also
states that wWhite people
fear Black people because of
this 'propensity to kill' which
is proven by the higher
murder rate. He stated that
"the Negro murder rate is
perhaps eight times that of
whites." In a letter in defence
of his position published in a
later edition of Current
Anthropology (Vol. 12, p.
82) Dr. Cohn reveals the
source of his data. The data
was not collected from
agencies like, for example,
the American Civil Liberties
Union who might have some
claim to objectivity, but
rather from the F.B.l.'s
Uniform Crime Reports for
1968. Many of us might tend
to question the reliability of
data gathered by this agency
which has contributed so
much to the genocide of the
black community. Dr. Cohn
attempts to brush aside
objections by stating, "The
facts are fairly 'hard' because
unlike other crimes, murder is
both well defined and well
investigated in all
jurisdictions of the United
States" (C.A., Vol. 12, p. 82).
The important question here
is who defines the murders
and  who   investigates  them.
continued on pf 6
Beyond stereotyping
Jean-Paul Sartre Search for a
Method, Vintage Books, 1963.
Istvan Meszaros Marx's theory
of Alienation, Merlin Press,
1970.
"Men make their own
history, but they do not make
it under circumstances choiSn
by themselves, but under
circumstances directly
encountered, given and
transmitted from the past. The
traditions of all the dead
generations weighs like a
nightmare on the brain of the
living."
- Karl Marx, The 18th
Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte.
It's March again. With essays
and exams looming, we outline
just one more study timetable
which will be inevitably
ignored. Deadlines for papers
become more insistent. The
months of days chopped into
55 minute segments with
nights periodically jarred by
"produce on demand"
assignments typed into the
early hours of morning are
remembered somewhat
nostalgically. That month again
when we become certain that
the next couple of weeks must
be endured alone. All the days
and weeks that went before are
to be simply prelims to that
moment of truth as we slide
into the desk, glance to the
clock on the front wall, then
focus a little unbelievingly on
the typed page before us. So
it's come to this.
We actually weren't much
more together in October than
we are now. Back then it was
more of a dullness, a vague
irritation. We were just a bit
unravelled- not strung out
taut as we feel now. But then
everyone knows that each of us
has to weather the
uncertainties as best we can.
And we have to do it on our
own. That shrill moment of
panic that sometimes strikes is
just part of the human
condition that each of us must
face alone. We do realize that,
don't we?
But this knowledge didn't
fall from the sky. It has more
than an incidental connection
to the fact that exam time is
the period when the demands
made upon us by the university
are the most incessant. The
obligation we produce
accordingly to narrowly
determined norms forces us
into a position increasingly
more confining.
Ironically, the moment in
which we are most conscious
of our discomfort is the very
instant when we seem least
able to recognize the external
source of our oppression. We
are frightened with the
recognition of our common
isolation, yet refuse to search
for an explanation outside
ourselves. We would rather
suffer the burden separately
than place the blame on the
world in which we live and
move collectively to remedy it.
It is understandable why
employers want to hire persons
who have college degrees. Over
a four year period, we have
exhibited our ability to
conform and to passively
accept all the demands which
are made of us. The formal
education and personal growth
gained while on campus are of
secondary importance to our
proven worth as model
workers. We do what is asked
of  us   and keep  our  mouths
shut.
Five separate courses with
fragmented days to match,
essays and exams to be of a
certain length and to be
written by a certain time,
assignment topics which may
be personally chosen but on
the basis of a reading list which
was predetermined— the
opportunities for
self-determination are
negligible. Occasionally, a
token, concession in the form
of a "progressive" programme
such as Arts I is made, but even
the freedoms 'permitted' there
are unilaterally defined by the
administration. Besides, it is an
effective way to isolate
potential dissidents in one
corner of the campus and to
delude them into thinking that
they have control over their
own lives.
It is not surprising that we
indulge in escapist pleasures
and retreat to the refuge of our
private worlds when faced with
the daily barrage of courses at
best only mildly interesting
and assignments as a rule
downright alienating. Mindless
diversions and an obsessive
preoccupation with privacy are
inevitable responses to an
unresponsive institution which
denies us the opportunity to
express ourselves as the unique
individuals we are.
What we fail to recognize is
that our personal withdrawal
will not remove our sense of
powerlessness and frustration.
Our personal happiness and
self-realization cannot be
separated from the society in
which we live. The question of
alienation  is inseparable from
the concrete relations which
confront us constantly in the
form of the social institutions
in which we attempt to express
ourselves through our activities
and projects.
The anxiety we feel around
exam time is not the same as
the sense of anonymity we
experiences months before,
during registration week. Yet
the origin of our discontent
remains constant. It's me right
here trying to negotiate with
them out there and attempting
to keep my sanity - let alone
my humanity — in the process.
So we've located the cause
of our problems. Now we have
to move towards changing
those social structures in order
to permit some breathing
space, some room to grow at
our own speed and in a
direction plotted by each of us.
Self-determination. Control
over our lives. Freedom from
oppression.
Freedom from oppression?
Sounds like a socialist slogan
and we all know that follows
on the heels of that idea. The
grey presence of the
U.S.S.R. — joyless labour,
faceless regimentation, and all
those other depressing facts
that we've been taught since
elementary school. But perhaps
it's time we stopped and
figured out exactly how the
Soviets screwed up. After all,
we really can't go back to what
we've come from, so we have
to try to learn from the
mistakes of others.
Among Soviet officials,
there is a tendency to perceive
the world as though men were
simply markers pushed along
by    the    relentless    flow   of
History. This view is common
throughout the Communist
countries of eastern Europe
where social planning is
undertaken by idealogues
within massive bureaucracies
who fully expect material
reality to submit to their
whims.
A student or a worker is no
longer a living being who is
altered through contact with
everchanging circumstances yet
capable of some degree of free
will. For the bureaucrat, the
individual exists as a Platonic
idea, with relatively fixed
qualities but possessing a
degree of malleability which
lends itself to behavioural
conditioning.
Government agencies have
taken on a life of their own,
spewing out proposals and
directives which deny the
existence of unique people
with sensitive natures and
profoundly human needs and
desires. This failing is best
illustrated by .Sartre who
points to the notices plastered
on Warsaw factory walls in
1949 which proclaimed:
"Tuberculosis slows down
production." These reminders
were undoubtedly prompted
by the best of intentions yet
they blatantly revealed how
the individual had been
sacrificed in ■ terms of
government policy. The Soviet
officials had obviously
determined that there was a
significant correlation between
the incidence of illness and the
output of goods. Yet in this
slogan, the tubercular worker
was     not     even     granted
continued on pf 6
Friday, March 24, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 By MICHAEL MYERSON
The Guardian
Last of three articles
British propaganda seeks to neutralize
foreign opinion sympathetic to the Irish
freedom fighters by mystifying it with
simplistic notions of a Catholic-Protestant
holy war or, conversely, with complicated
pictures of diverse, seemingly unrelated,
elements at play. In either case, outsiders
are led to throw up their arms at the
"silliness" or the "complexities" of the
problem. In fact there are diverse
elements at work here, but they are very
much related.
British control is obviously shaky. To
surrender Ulster to Paisley means to opt
for outright fascism, which would bring
certain civil war. Westminster has chosen
rather to exert direct control of the
Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC), with
its own regular army taking an
increasingly active role as they move
toward direct rule of the six counties and
the abolition of the Stormont
government.
Irish republican writer Brendan Behan
once described Stormont is "a kind of
superior municipal corporation. The
result is that political discussion there is
like parish pump politics and, having no
power even in social welfare legislation,
where they have to tag along after
England, they can't look forward but
only backwards.'" With the British
elimination of surrogate military control,
British troops are being used against the
Irish for the first time since the relief
riots in Belfast in 1932.
But the direct involvement of the
British has worked to increase and
consolidate the already growing
republican sentiment in both the North
and the 26 counties of the south. Since
last August's political crisis and the
subsequent internment, every
commentator on the scene has
observed the vitually complete republican
sentiment among Ulster's Catholics.
Westminster's strategy is bringing about a
crisis which will "force" it to dissolve
Stormont altogether. This strategy has
been all but openly declared by Labor
leader Harold Wilson.
The Tories are caught in the
contradiction of British imperialism on
the decline: how best to control. England
could itself abolish the partition and
bring the six colonial counties into the
"Free  State" of the south, creating a
mi
D»i« m tit* r*«
iitivxc go nainS"1*^
■u    oopi*   fS*|Mi*   .
r, no l«r  *n  irptw
GENERAL   ELECTION.
XT
comprising persons chosen by  Irish  c nstituencies at the supreme
ish people, aod to develop Ireland's social, political and in-
manifesto to the Irish People.
HE coming General Election i» fraught with vital possibilities for the futort of our nstkw.    Ireland it facvd wttbtbc
question whether this generation wills it that she is to march out Into the fall sunlight of freedom, or is to __*______*!•
in the shadow of a base imperialism that has broafht and ever will briar *• *u train naught but evil for oar raca.
Sinn Fein gives Ireland the opportunity of vindicating her honour and pursuing with rtoewed confidence the path of
national salvation by rallying to the flag; of the Irish Republic.
Sinn Fein alms at securing the establishment of that Republic.
I. By withdrawing the Irish Representation from the British Parliament and by denying the right and opposing the will
ol the British Government or any other foreign Government to legislate (or Ireland.
z By making u-jc of any and every means available to render impotent the power of England to hold Ireland in subjection
by military force or otherwise.
3 By the establishment of a constituent (
national authority to speak and act in the name of tht Ins
dustrial life, for the welfare of the whole people r,f Ireland
4 By appealing to the Peace Conference for the establishment of Ireland as an Independent Nation At that conference
the future of the Nations of the world will be fsettled on the principle of government by content of the governed.
Ireland i claim to the application of that principle in her favour is not based on any accident il situation arising from
the war It is older than many if not all of the present belligerents It is based on our unbroken tiedition of nationhood, on a unity in a national name which has never been challenged on our possession of a distinctive ft iona I
culture and social order on the moral courage and dignity of our people in the face of alien aggression, on the fact
that in nearly every generation, and five times within the past 120 years our people have challenged to arms the right
of England io rule this country On these incontrovertible facts is based the claim that our people have beyond
question established the right to be accorded all the powers of a free nation.
Sinn Fem stands less for a political party than for the Nation ; it represents the old tradition of nationhood handed on
from dead generations ; it stands by the Proclamation of the Provisional Government of Easter, 1916, reasserting the
inalienable right of the lush Nation to sovereign independence ; reaffirming the determination of the Irish people to
achiev<   it. and guaranteeing within the independent Nation equal rights and equal opportunities lo all its citizens.
Believing that the time has arrived when Ireland's voice for the principle of untrammelled National self-determination
should be heard above every interest of party or class, Sinn Fein will oppose at the Polls every individual candidate who
does not accept this principle
Ihe policy of our opponents stands condemned on any test^ whether of principle or expediency. The right of a nation to
sovereign independence rests upon immutable natural law and cannot be made the subject of a compromise Aay attempt
to barter away the sacred and inviolate rights of nationhood begins in s^jkonour and is bound to end in disaster. Tha'
enforced exodus of millions of our people, the decay of our industrial life, the ever-increasing financial plunder of our
country the whittling down of the demand for the " Repeal of the Union," voiced by the first Irish Leader to plead in the
Hall of the Conqueror to that of Home Rule on the Statute Book, and finally the contemplated mutilation of our country
by partition, are some ol the ghastly results of a policy that leads to national ruin.
Those who have endeavoured to harness the people of Ireland to England's war-chariot, ignoring the fact that only a
freely-elected Government in a free Ireland has power to decide for Ireland the question of peace and war have forfeited
the right to speak for the Irish people Tbe Green Flag turned red in the hands of tbe Leaders, but that shame ta not to be
laid at the doors of the Irish people unless they continue a policy of sending their representative* to an alien and hostile
assembly, whose powerful influence has been sufficient to destroy the integrity and sap the independence of their representatives Ireland must repudiate the men who, in a supreme crisis (or the nation, attempted to sell her birthright for
the vague promises of English Ministers, and who showed their incompetence by failing to have even these promise*
fulfilled
The present Irish members of tbe English Parliament constitute an obstacle to be removed from the path that leads U
the Peace Conference. By declaring their will to accept the status of a province instead of boldly taking tbeir stand upon
tbe right oi tue anion, they supply England with the only subterfuge al her disposal (or obscuring th« iuae is the eye* ul the world
By their persistent endeavours lo induce the young manhood ul Ireland Io don ihe uniform of onr seven-ccatary-old oppressor, isi*
place their Ii»*> *< the disposal ol ihe military machine that holds our Nation m boadage, Ihsy cAdcavomr to barter away aad evea to
use agaimt it_tcll the onr *real asset still ld( to our Nation alter the havoc of ccBtones.
Sins Fein goes to the polls handicapped by alt Ihe arts ipj contrivances that a powerful sod unscrupulous enemy can use agalast us.
Conscious ol the power of Sinn Fein to secure the freedom oi Ireland the British GoveruBcat woald destroy ii. Sinn Fcia loverer
goes to the polls confident that the people of this ancient nation will be true to tbe old cause aad will vote for the atcn who stsad by
Utc principle* of Tone. Emmet, Mitchell, Pearse and Connolly, the min who disdain to whiae tc thecaemy for favours, the asea
who bold thai Inland must be a> free as England or Holland, or Switzerland or Fraaot, and whose iliwmil is that the only Massa
befitting this ancient realm is the status ol a tree nation.
TR&ISSL
Issued by tha Standing CommittM of 8lnn Fain.
more manageable 32-county neo-colonial
Ireland, which could in turn be brought
into the European Common Market with
England. Such a move could perhaps set
back by a generation the revolutionary
movement in Ireland.
This is the meaning of Harold Wilson's
recent proposal to exlore the possibility
of a reunification of Ireland, over a
15-year period, a proposal the
Conservatives have taken under
advisement. This is also the meaning of
the ruling Fianna Fail government in
Dublin, through prime minister Jack
Lynch, taking a more active public role in
the discussion.
The Paisleyites (Paisley himself has
recently considered the possibility of
unification under certain conditions) and
the Fianna Fail-backed "Provisional"
split-off from the IRA are both useful to
England, since both are providing the
crisis England needs to fulfill that
strategy.
The Provisionals are a right wing
splinter which refused to accept the
socialist goals of the "Official" IRA in
1969.
Receiving arms and money from
elements of the Fianna Fail, the
Provisionals have been conducting most
of the terrorism in the North, without
any obvious program, save the'
elimination of the border with the south.
(When the regular IRA rejected a deal by
Fianna Fail in 1969 to drop its socialist
programs and certain of its leaders in
exchange for money and arms, the
Provisionals walked out and made the
deal for themselves.) The officials have
feared for years that the Provisionals
would provoke a clash which would
strengthen sectarian division and
encourage massive British presence,
before the republican movement was
sufficiently prepared to do battle.
With British atrocities, supported by
the Unionist fiefdom, on the increase, the
Provisionals have at times received greater
support in the North than the Officials.
But their loose organization, combined
with a lack of ideology, will probably not
'hold up under a sustained British drive.
The Official IRA continues to make
demands geared to mobilize masses.
Through the civil rights movement which
it leads, in alliance with Communists and
other unaffiliated Republicans, it has.
reawakened in Ireland the spirit of the
1916 Rising for an Irish Workers and
Small Farmers' Republic.
The civil rights movement plays a
potentially revolutionary role in a
pre-revolutionary situation — where the
masses are no longer able to accept the
old way of living and the bourgeoisie is
not longer able to rule in the old way —
because   of   its   integration   with   the
working class. The difficulty has been to
sustain Catholic working class support
while simultaneously winning or at least
neutralizing the Protestant workers.
To this end, the movement has
achieved only limited results. One leader
explains: "When you say to the people in
the Bogside (Derry's Catholic ghetto) that
they are being exploited because they are
workers, not because they are Catholics,
they are not very inclined to believe you.
All their lives they have been told by the
Unionist party that this is a Protestant
state for Protestant people and that
'pope-heads' will be beaten into the
ground if they dare to open their
mouths."
Nevertheless, the Irish left has again
raised the need for a united socialist
Ireland.
Irish Marxists are buoyed by a history
of armed insurrection and the
revolutionary tradition of Republicanism.
The idea of revolution is ingrained in the
Irish mind, surrounded by the glory and
the martyrs of 1916. Says one young civil
rights activist: "What we have to do is to
complete the national revolution by
making the theoretical and practical link
between what we are doing now and what
was fought for in 1916."
The closest allies of the Official
Republican movement and the only left
force with ties to the Protestant wording
class — the majority in the North — is the
Communist party. Like the Republicans,
the Communists are based in the working
class; while small in numbers, many
Communists hold leadership positions
from shop to national level in the trade
union movement. While a single party of
the Left is premature, a single program is
today possible and that program is civil
rights. The Communists hold that the
only way to win or at least neutralize the
Protestant working class or a section of it
is in the day-to-day isssues which bring
that class into conflict with British
imperialism.
During violent times, the CP militants
at the shop level work to prevent the
sectarian pogroms from spreading over to
the point of production. But trade union
The illustrations on this page are rep
Sinn Fein movement for Irish independent
censored version is on the right. The electi
out of a possible 105. More than half of ti
of the election, which was something of a
1919 and declared Eire's independence frot:
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Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972 leadership is not in this case political
leadership, so that Protestant workers
who will work alongside Catholic workers
will at night go hunting with guns for
those same workers. The party sees armed
sefl-defense as a necessity and armed
struggle as a possible eventuality, but
presently relies on its Republican allies to
supply the means and manpower for such
struggle.
The civil rights movement has been
transformed into a national rising of the
working class, certainly of its Catholic
component. Time and again, its
spokesesmen rebuke suggestions that it is
a religious struggle: "This is a class
struggle; many Protestants are as badly
off as we are. This is a fight against the
Orange junta in power."
The Official Republican movement is
far more than its armed wing, the IRA,
as its leadership of the Civil Rights
Association testifies. Many Republicans,
operating openly despite internment and
a 5-to-14 year prison term for
membership, are conducting a campaign
for decent housing, jobs and other
popular needs. The rent strikes in Bogside
and the Lower Falls following the
implementation of the internment policy
were virtually complete. The Sinn Fein is
determining the people's desires and
agitating for their demands, while
simultaneously showing the people that
the present system cannot meet their
needs; that short of "physical force"
decisive change is not going to come. The
Republican movement is pictured by the
British and Stormont (and the American
mass media) as "trenchcoat and
bullets-and-bomb men" without
distinction made between the Provisionals
and Officials. But most emphasis at this
time is being placed on social agitation, as
the recent mass marches in Derry, a town
of 60,000, have rallied as many as
10,000.
' There is of course a great chance that
the Protestant workers will instead follow
Paisley in hopes of a "Rhodesian
solution". An IRA leader in Belfast says.
"We have to win at least a section of the
Protestant workers and drag the rest by
iductions of a poster put up in 1918 by the
. The original poster is on the left while the
n resulted in the Sinn Fein winning 73 seats
i Sinn Fein members were in jail at the time
precedent. The parliament met in Dublin in
Britain.
the scruff of their necks into a socialist
republic and show them that
Republicanism is not 'Green Toryism'."
"Green Toryism" — that is, Irish
bourgeois control of the six counties in
place of British bourgeois control — is the
alternative posed by the Provisionals and
the Fianna Fail, in the opinion of the
Irish left.
To assuage Ulster Protestant working
class fears of a merger with the present 26
counties of the south, Sinn Fein president
Thomas MacGiolla says: "We would not
wish that fate on anyone. We ask the
people of the six counties to join with the
people of the 26 counties in abolishing
both states which serve only British
imperialism and in establishing a
democratic socialist republic for the
whole island in which the workers who
create the wealth will decide how and
where it is used." The simultaneous rise
of workers and small farmers in the six
counties of the North and the 26-county
Republic is the strategic goal of the
Official Republicans.
Since 1964, the Republican program
has been outspokenly socialist and
anti-imperialist. Itself containing aspects
of a national liberation movement, the
IRA feels solidarity with the Cuban and
Vietnamese revolutions. Composed in the
main of young workers, the IRA is
prepared to carry through what was
started in Easter week 1916 and full scale
guerrilla war cannot be excluded as a
future possibility.
Certainly it would not be the first
time. After the six-year war that ended in
1922, the IRA was declared illegal; but it
has continued to operate both as an
adjunct to the Sinn Fein and,
sporadically, as a regular army.
Unfortunately, in the absence of the
left cadres, IRA leadership fell into the
hands of a right wing, which abandoned
Connolly's socialist perspective and
limited its goal to the elimination of the
border with the North. A guerrilla
campaign from 1956 to 1962 to this end
failed badly. With the release from prison
in 1964 of Cathal Goulding, IRA policies
began to resume their revolutionary
character. Goulding, who has spent 17 of
his 49 years in various prisons for IRA
activities, soon became chief of staff and
he remains today the commanding figure
of the Official Irish Republican
movement. It is in large part due to
Goulding's leadership and example that
the movement has once again become the
leading revolutionary force in Ireland.
Goulding, in opposition to his
Provisional opponents, holds that politics
is primary; but that, without a military
wing, the struggle for power is futile; that
armed struggle will be necessary to take
power and that  armed actions in the
present phase help the movement go
forward.
In fact, because of the tinder-box
atmosphere in the northern six counties,
there is actually as much social action in
the south, although news of this rarely
reaches outside Ireland. Hardly a week
goes by without a series of important
actions: scab trucks destroyed trying to
break a strike; large land estates
destroyed (or threatened) when bought
up by capitalist combines at the expense
of poor farmers; British rail or airline
offices taken over in protest of Irish
political prisoners being held in England;
a mass fish-in movement against the
robbery of national lakes and streams by
British and American estates; homeless
squatters settled in unoccupied apartment
buildings until the government will care
for them. With massive unemployment in
this, the poorest country in Europe
except for Portugal (over 20 per cent of
the population is forced to work in
England to feed their families at home),
unemployment councils are being
organized.
British internment in the North is a
failure. Since August, over 150 have been
killed in sporadic warfare. Threats of
internment in the south by the
government against the Republican
movement will also fail.
From time to time, the Official IRA
has put forward the possibility of a
national liberation front in the 26
counties, together with the Communist
party, the movements of fishermen, small
farmers, unemployed, homeless and
poorly housed, etc. With an effective
national liberation front in the south
complementing the movement in the
North, the IRA believes that the 32
counties could rise together eventually to
win the stated goal of an Irish workers'
and small farmers' republic. Only a
simultaneous rise, it argues, can bring a
Republican victory. Such a front would
of course include an armed wing, a new
Irish Citizens Army. Thus, with the IRA
today and a national liberation front in
the future, Ireland has the only
revolutionary movement in Europe with a
military component and a strategy of
armed struggle.
Ci[\...__   T>0   Cup  go -DC* p.\nl.iimenc Sd|»dn.\ ; ^S^P ** feun.iO   50 Dputl   t>e   Cf..pc n.i   or   CefOe.it AJ   Ut.i£.}l
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THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT AND SINN  FEIN.
lb? .-_._---.ifs of Sino Fein conu-riffl that tin- Bntuli ...i.v.-i nmen t w* nnxi-Mm to help
Hno Ki-m. An <-t-.H-|>l-- as U> ho» _._■- Uritin-i (iov.-rnim-ut .i.-l|.-. Sypn Keiti ».:.> It* t**n
1mm llic iiinimiT in uti.rii t-w ^inn Ki-in Mum It-* 10 for ih«- Cn.-m! fcWcliui. is .nulil-iuxl '•»
t*M-   (H6_i«_   Bmi.-i   Prt-sa   (Yn_-.r   m   this   t-oiinlj-)
General Election.   Manifesto to the Irish People.
(Al  PAUED   BY  CENSOR.)
Th<- c-flTinnM (ito*raI Elation t* fraught wilri uu! jx>«*i..i]___tir-fc *ur tin- iuturi- ul our nation
Iroiuod ifc f«-*-(T with tin- qUfstujn * liether Hit ^em-ralion wilts, il that *h»- it to niar.h on:
into th«* fail imniiylit ui fmxloiu, nr it u» ninam in thi' 4ia<U>'
«t_tma< »"i »5 l)u> Mipr.-rm- n.iti'.nnt aitln.rilv ;o *p. itlt an<\ .ul ill i
pwpl? ami to 'li'vfloj, In Ijrvl s iu> m!. ;_..lit.< al it ml mdii-trtat
t)i>' itt.nlr people of Ireland
4 fly »|>p«*»lin)( t" tht> (Vaov < onff'r«>nvf r,i tin' i^LatilisUim-nt <J lrvl.mil .i« mi ln<("i»'_ucU'm
Nation At ihsl <-<iof.-r^m*' Lht> tutur* »,) :)•■■ N^h.tts <jf [h* *._l.i -ill !*> Minimi on
tin* pnnripW til K^'^'wix-nt 'n cuii^eni "t ih<- p-vimM iriUmi ■■ ilsim t.> the ap}ili<%_
ticm of that ;Tini iplw m 1«t favmii i-. ri"5 tia**il nil »m a. ■ ult-ni-al -ir>_L.ii"!i »ri*ing ircmn
tl,f   ».-if      It   ix,M.r  ti.an   m..in   if   n<.t   _i!l   <4   th.    }.r. ..in   U-lliy.- '	
Siun
natioiLtK
i-AauMTunK  tlw  inalienat.Ir- r_nM
<^'U*rniina-tioo of  thf Irtuli   j**<>i>l*   u» aihu-tf  it    "ml ,<i;i
equal   rijrht« ami  .^nal  njuKirtiiniUi'*   i>- all   it- - mxens
IMnMiiji  th*t  tiK- tiiiw  h"*  nrnvod   wtn-n   I r.■i.unl ■
I Hflf-tM^rniinBtMn  aliculr?  U- W.<r,)   ,il..,.,.
ac   the   P>,:;^   ?*<!,    :n.liw(li]M!
n  iml. pcntlfni *■     r>-jillirniinp tl>
«ni<-<-iiij; wtihtn itit* Intl^poti.U-nt S»uoti
Toit-f for t'ii   jMiiiripl* of  \intr*mtfi4'Il."i
tvrv   nit.-icit   of   [.a.'lv   hi   ,-]»s\.   Sinn
11..   .!<.< •     U.K.   :»(*ftl>t    'hi-    nriiK l|>tr
Teio  »ifl  imjviv ac  the  Pi.l.-i  *.»-.-:.   ;!i.liwdi]«!  - .. n-i-Ui.-   wit.,  «!..■-   n-t  :u-*-«i»t   'hi-   nrm. ijilr
Tin-  \xAf\   »f t»ur  ftjiyniw-nts  htamU  ■ .in-li-'n rir.1 _^.ii_ .i'n_t_'->t.   whfth'-r .-f l'.r'.i'.;'i.'.'!l.^^]il^l!
H__HH_HHBHBBlH__HHMHMHHfl|W
Anv   attempt.  Ui  lurwr   *v,iiv   tin- ha.t.'.I  -«n.i   m, miv..    i^ht-,   ..f   nati-.nhyo'l   U-«in>   in   rlx.lwjnoi
1   U-tfin^   in   ili-lionoui
[H„|.I".      I*!-        WS>      .if
Anv   altj-upt  i.riiartfr   »w;i\   tin- s*iTf<!  -«ri'i   •■»- ">hT.«    i^'litn   ..f   nati
and is honn-1 to end in iliia?«>r     Tlw t-nl->r< t-it . \<-\u»   of   nillion--   i'f
our imiiisi-,a! hit-. t>,. i-wr-inrr^sink: fin.*m *»i pbin.lt. of our .rmntrv thf wl.itllmy ilom >.f
Vh.- <U'ni4n.i ft-r ihr ' lUj,.*! -rf the Vnion. " v. .> il ».v ti..^ n-nt Irish I^-a-l.-r i<. pi.a-l in th.
Halt of th» (Vin.|ucror to ihtA of Hnnit- Idili -n il.. Mat iU- ».k.k «n■! iinalU th.- . nnton.pI_n..(
imitilatiun of our i-onntrv by partition, air °»m> .»f id.- KiimtU r.-stiits .iJ t, ]»■'">■ ttut lead-
to n»ti"
■■Batmrnj-JiHiJimuiiirj
<hnijinrl   i^  thai  tin- nnlv   -tHtu* }>• tttini;  tin*, an    • r,i   r-a.
tHi'n    T
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IMUIO   IV  THE   STANDING   COMMITTEE   OF   SINN   FEIN.
■in   nj  '
in   T.ufc  t>o   Cup   ma   %ca\   jp   n_4ipun-_iT6   in   -Domain,    Ma   )iiJ.ppflCrji    tjo   ■0cine.n)_4]i    tun    T-.p
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Friday, March 24, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Sartre
continued from pf 3
recognition as mediator
between the disease and the
number of products
manufactured.
The Soviet example has
been attacked by critics of the
left and the right. For our
purposes, Sartre's criticisms are
the most incisive for he directs
his assault on the U.S.S.R.'s
refusal to consider human
beings as other than
stereotyped 'peas in a pod'.
Sartre attempts to develop a
theory which will enable us to
make sense of our own
particular reality. The key to
understanding ourselves
without doing violence to our
idiosyncratic nature is to
consider our individual
biography as well as our
position in a specific period in
history and our inclusion in a
distinct class.
Sartre claims that most
theorists are mistakenly
concerned only with the realm
of adults. They regard the
experience of alienation and
reification — or objectification
— to first occur when we are
involved in a work situation. In
the university or the factory,
we are required to create things
which do not gear the imprint
of our particular humanity. In
both circumstances, we submit
to the dictates of someone
other than ourselves. Sartre
agrees that this constitutes
alienated labour, yet he
maintains that alienation was
actually first lived as a child.
We are the products of our
parents" design and we are
never fully able to surpass this
early distortion of character.
What Sartre proposes is the
integration of existential
psychoanalysis with Marx's
social theory. Our experience
as members of a particular class
is grounded in our early history
as children in a specific family.
Sartre's psychoanalysis
endeavors to illuminate this
insertion  of the individual in
society by examining the
function of the family as the
point of mediation between
the individual and the class as a
whole.
Our behaviour is a reflection
of the general conditions of
our social class. Yet to fully
comprehend our behaviour, it
is necessary to combine a
recognition of the class nature
of society with an awareness of
the influences of our childhood
experiences on our present
conduct. For it is within the
family that children, groping
about in a confusing world,
attempt to play the social roles
which adults impose upon
them. Existential
psychoanalysis will reveal
whether the child will be
stifled, totally assimilated, or
able to escape this early
conditioning.
Many of our prejudices,
irrational fears and resistances
to reason are artifacts of these
childhood events. R.D. Laing
has provided some valuable
insight to the understanding of
these dynamics and has
underlined the realization that
politics is not something 'out
there'. All of us have been
affected by legislation within
the home. We all bear the
marks of oppression.
Our anxieties and worries
are not simply the consequence
of direct contact with
inflexible social institutions.
We repeatedly manifest
distortions which were
implanted years before. For
example, the need to do well in
school to win mother's
affection may become
internalized as the necessity to
compete and succeed in order
to maintain our self-esteem.
Ironically, a double bind is
produced in this situation for
thy healthy conception of self
worth needed in order to love
another person is forthcoming
only when we feel ourselves in
a position to surpass the other
person through competition.
Thus, the capitalist credo of
competition     has     been
transmitted from one
generation to the next with the
same crippling results.
By examining these
dynamics, Sartre's approach
uncovers information vital to
the understanding of the
personal predicament which
confronts each individual.
Operating within a dialectical
framework, this technique
refers on the one hand to the
objective structures, the
material features of class
society, while on the other, it
takes account of the action
directed upon our adult life by
the childhood we never wholly
surpass.
Without such
self-knowledge, we are doomed
to perpetuate the same
unresponsive institutions and
dehumanized relations of
production which plague us
daily. It is essential to look
critically at the perspectives of
commodity-society which we
have interiorized in the past
due to coercive tactics of our
parents. Once we begin to free
ourselves from those binders,
we must understand that we
will be able to realize our own
potentialities only if there
exists outlets for them, only if
the social climate is receptive
to them.
Marx considers a society to
be free only insofar as the
conditions exist which enable
each of us to constitute
ourselves — to develop at our
own rate and to personally
control this growth.
"Self-constitution is possible
only if the individual takes an
increasingly active part in
determining all aspects of his
own life, from the most
immediate concerns to the
broadest general issues of
politics, socio-economic
organization and culture."
With this in mind, it
becomes evident why Marx was
opposed to making a
distinction between the public
sphere and the private one. If
we are faced with reified
bureaucratic   institutions,   the
Sociology
continued from pf 3
Remember Fred Quilt? Dr.
Cohn must have been aware
that this data might be
questioned for he adds,
"factors such as racial
prejudice are not known to
have much bearing on arrests
or prrosecutions for murder
at this time" (C.A., Vol. 12,
p. 82). Perhaps Dr. Cohn
believes this but Bobby Seale
and Angela Davis, not to
mention thousands of less
famous Black people, might
have slightly different
opinions as they walk
through the corridors of
American justice.
Dr. Cohn sees
socioeconomic explanations
as 'apologetics' and
'moralistic'. He was
questioned on the use of the
term 'propensity' and in his
reply to this criticism he
stated that his choice of
words was 'unfortunate'. He
continues to say that "there
are no very simple answers to
the Negro's higher murder
rate; together with the
biological theories, those
which speak only df
frustrating poverty,
discrimination etc. can all be
shown to be inadequate"
(C.A., Vol. 12, p. 82).
Michael Banton points out
that Dr. Cohn's actual
position has not changed but
that he has attempted to iron
out the rougher elements.
Banton states, "Cohn now
says that his use of the term
'propensity' was
'unfortunate' but is this
retraction sufficient? He still
refers to 'the Negro's . . .
murder rate". Has it been
established that there is a
Negro rate distinguishable
from that of other Americans
living in comparable
circumstances? Cohn still
believes that there are
biological theories which
account in part for a
distinctive rate. Presumably
he sees the 'African
background' as related by
unidentified genetic processes
to contemporary Negro
American homocide despite
the low rates in West African
cities." (C.A., Vol. 12, P. 82).
If anyone would like
copies of Hernstein's of
Cohn's article drop a note to
the U.R.S.S. Box 149 SUB.
F. Engels in his Introduction
To a Critique of Political
Economy (By Marx and
Engels) does an excellent
critique    of    why    eugenic
theories develop in times of
economic crises. It is
applicable today. To follow
the continuing adventure of
Hernstein, Shockley,
Banfield, and Jensen and the
struggle against racism on
U.S. campuses see New Left
Notes. Subscriptions may be
obtained from SDS, P.O. Box
443, Prudential Centre,
Boston, Mass. U.S.A.
THE VIKINGS
HAIR DESIGNERS
Open All Summer
For Your Convenience
Student Prices
ON CAMPUS
UBC VILLAGE
2144 Western Parkway
For Appointment
Call 224-5540
process of self-constitution, or
self-mediation, becomes an
impossibility. Socialism's task
is the development of
responsive structures which
will allow the self-mediation of
the individual. Existing
institutions must be
transformed so that they will
reflect the humanity of the
persons who come in contact
with them.
The social agencies present
in capitalist and rigidly
bu r e aucratized socialist
societies are reified to the
point where they are no longer
instruments used to effect
human ends. They have come
to control us instead of being
controlled by us.
We must now move to
exorcise ourselves of this
nightmare. Individually, the
impact of our personal history
must be reflected upon and
some attempt must be made to
recognize the fundamental
deviations precipitated in
childhood which prolong our
oppression   to   this   day.
From our personal
experiences of alienation and
estrangement, we must trace
our connection to the plight of
society as a whole and become
familiar with the forces which
prohibit our freedom as an
independent country. The
former U.S. secretary of state '
John Foster Dulles defined the
situation as accurately as
anyone: "There are two ways
of conquering a foreign nation.
One is to gain control of its
people by force of arms; the
other is to gain control of its
economy by financial means."
The warping of our
humanity can only be
alleviated by actively struggling
to rid ourselves of the blanket
of oppression which is
apparent at every turn. This
presence must be removed if
we hope to fulfill ourselves as
truly human beings.
Announcing
G.S.A. ANNUAL
GENERAL
MEETING
12:30 p.m.
Thursday March 30
BOARD ROOM
Grad Student Centre
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972 LOOKING for a SUMMER JOB?
We have many  interesting positions available or long
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A division of H. V. Chapman & Assoc.
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Phone 682-7764
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For arrangements for your
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Travel in North America this
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FPR UBC 54
The Native, an original
Canadian play at the Playhouse
Theatre, March 9 to April 1.
Merv Campone, playwright,
Neil Dainard, director, and the
cast of seven men and one
woman have produced one of
the more overtly racist, and
sexist pieces of theatre since
John Wayne and Ronald
Reagan stopped making movies
together.
The play attempts to
denigrate modern technological
society, where people are
dehumanized objects, alone,
unloved and unloving. It raises
in its place the "primitive"
society of the native, where
people are not alienated and
human and nature are one.
The main character is Joe, a
disillusioned young man,
sickened by modernity and
longing for the simpler things
in life. Technological society is
represented by the Custodian
who is the controller of
movement between the
dominant society and the
"primitive" society, sealed off
from each other to prevent
mutual contamination. He
summons Pal, the Native who
is paid by him to escort the Joe
back, to be his guide, mentor
and pal. As Joe leaves he hands
to the Custodian the symbols
of his present culture, his
watch and identity cards. All
the while the Custodian
exhorts him to realize that his
decision is final, there is no
returning. If he can't succeed
in the Native society he will be
left in the forest — and no one
survives for long alone in the
forest.
The remainder of the play
concerns itself with Joe's
success in the Native society.
Like those cowboy flicks
referred to earlier, he emerges
as the good-guy-leader-who-
gets-the-beautiful-woman. The
highlights of this success are
when he realizes that each man
contains all knowledge within
himself and once this
realization takes hold, that he
has found honour.
The Custodian
throughout the
different costumes
theories to match,
integrates
Custodian
more ridiculous, culminated in
a long speech as an
absent-minded academician.
There seem to be two purposes
for these intrusions: comic
relief in the heavy scenes of
''self-discovery" a,nd
reinforcement of the somewhat
belaboured point that nature is
where it's at.
reappears
play     in
—    with
As   Joe
more    fully,    the
is made to appear
The Sun's Drama critic, in a
glowingly facile review March
11, says "The primitive men
that the social dropout joins
may or may not be Indians.
Certainly they represent man
as he was at an earlier stage in
his history, when life was in
closer touch with nature and
laughter flowed more easily."
and "We need a re-awakened
vision of our place within the
context of existence, a greater
understanding of the unities of
life." He then tells us Campone
says these things in a quiet and
non-assertive way. Our own
reaction, particularly during
the prolonged periods of
howling — supposedly
authentic native chants yet
composed by Pat Rose — was
to alternate between
calculating the time till
intermission and quelling an
overwhelming desire to yell
"stuff it" at Joe.
The Native, appearing to be
a protest against
dehumanization, alienation and
aloneness, and a plea for unity
of people with nature and each
other, is in fact a complete
expression of support for the
very ideas which justify
American imperialism. It
mythifies a culture destroyed
by colonization. In doing
this the play reduces the
culture's complexity while
denying the struggle of all
humanity to improve their-
material conditions.
Unconsciously the play sees
the technological society as
being superior, for Joe, its
product, becomes transformed
from the helpless, frightened
creature into the leader and
director of the tribe while
telling Pal he couldn't make it
in Joe's society.
The play is a glorification of
dehumination. It denies the
humanity of the other male
natives — who remain nameless
— servers of Joe's
transformation. Even more
blatant is its treatment of the
woman. Her role is classic —
earth mother, nameless giver of
comfort in food, caresses, and
sexual pleasure. Again,
however, "Sister" exists for
Joe and Joe alone.
Only the Custodian, despite
his comic-villain role, speaks
truth. There is no going back,
no retreat. The human cannot
survive alone in any kind of
forest and closing one's eyes to
the reality will not make it go
away. Collective struggle in
which each individual's
humanity is recognized and
respected is the only route to
liberation.
PEN
DER ftU0.337PEN.MAR &S
7+9 ADM tl PRKBY EYEBflOKtCKS V
Friday, March 24, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 pfads
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Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972 Friday,  March  24,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  13
Letters
Beagle
At the risk of appearing
over-scrupulous I would like to
suggest that Wednesday's abortion
repeal referendum was very badly
worded.
If the federal parliament
accepted the result of an
affirmative vote and repealed all
those provisions in the criminal
code relating to abortions the
effect would be to remove all
restraints on obtaining abortions
that now exist. The obvious
consequence would be that
anyone, including a non-doctor,
would be free to set up practice as
an abortionist. Not even the most
ardent supporter of 'free abortion
on demand' could look forward to
that result without feeling uneasy.
The value of such referenda is
questionable at the best of times,
but especially so if those who are
responsible for their wording
over-state their case and make it
logically impossible to vote 'yes'.
Yours   truly,
K.  B.  Affleck,
Law 2
Links
I would like to thank Michael
Wallace for his prompt reply to
my earlier letter. Since I am still
unclear as to the reality of Mr.
Wallace's research, I will discuss
this with him in his office as he
suggested.
There is, however, one point in
his letter that 1 would like to
discuss at this time. Mr. Wallace
stated that the U.S. "National
Science Foundation has no
connection with the U.S.
department of defence or any
military agency whatsoever, and
its grants are administered by a
committee of scholars in a fashion
similar to the Canadian National
Research Council."
This erroneous statement needs
correction. The National Science
Foundation was created in May
1950 by the National Science
Foundation Act, when it was
approved by U.S. president Harry
Truman. The first section of the
act stated, "there is established in
the executive branch of the
government an independent
agency to be known as the
National Science Foundation."
One of the most important
functions of the foundation was
outlined in the act. That is, the
foundation, "at the request of the
secretary of defence, is to initiate
and support specific scientific
research activities in connection
with matters relating to the
national defence by making
contracts or other arrangements
(including grants, loans and other
forms of assistance) for the
conduct of such research."
Another important activity of the
NSF is spelled out in the House
Report No. 1219/1960. This
function is the "support of fact
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gathering and analysis to aid the
National Science Foundation in
its planning of internal operations
policies and to aid other agencies,
the President and Congress in
their planning of national policy."
The National Science Board is
the administrative committee of
scholars which oversees the
operations of the NSF. The
National Science Foundation Act
of 1950 clearly states that "the
twenty-four members of the
National Science Foundation
Board are appointed by the
President by and with the advice
and consent of the Senate."
A final point, "The Foreign
Research Council, created within
the Department of State, was
given the task of reviewing all
government-sponsored research
related to foreign affairs" (I. L.
Horowitz, The Rise and Fall of
Project Camelot).
Thank you,
E. Kravitz
ROYAL BANK
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TRANSFER OF ACCOUNTS
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University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Mgr.
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General Meeting At Hillel House
TODAY at 12:30 p.m.
(behind
Brock)
TO DISCUSS AFFAIRS AT HILLEL - and
FUTURE PLANS FOR HILLEL
Elections of Officers for  1972/73 to take place TUESDAY,
MA RCH 28th at 12:30 P.M.
NOMINATIONS ARE NOW BEING TAKEN
GRADUATE
SECONDARY
TEACHERS
TEACH in
VICTORIA,
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FLY FREE TO
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a Free air tickets to Melbourne,
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dependants.
o You contract to teach until
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o A special flight of selected
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1972. Fares paid from capital
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o A free residential Orientation
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SALARIES
In the range approximately
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No Australian taxation payable by
visiting Canadian teachers.
QUALIFICATIONS
Successful applicants will require a
degree with a major study in
Mathematics or a branch of science,
plus twelve months of teacher
education courses.
APPLICATION FORMS
Are available at the campus
Placement Office (Office of
Student Services).
INTERVIEWS
On the basis of written
applications, selected students will
be invited to interviews at the
Placement Office from April 4 to 7.
ENSURE YOURSELF
A TEACHING
APPOINTMENT
AND TRAVEL
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village)
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228-9414 Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 24, 1972
Hot flashes
Puppet show
in SUB
David Andersen, of Vancouver
Street Theatre fame, will bring a
new show complete with puppets
to the SUB ballroom Thursday
noon, as part of an arts and
politics program.
On Tuesday, former Alma
Mater Society president Steve
Garrod, of metro-media, will talk
about communications in arts and
politics at noon in Buchanan 106.
WheeUhair rate
UBC's school of rehabilitation
medicine is sponsoring a
wheelchair wheelathon open to all
disabled persons on Sunday at
Stanley Park.
Wheelers and pushers will meet
at the zoo parking lot at 8:30 a.m.
and travel to Brockton Point to
raise a scholarship fund for the
school.
Protest letters
All letters protesting the
development of Village Lake
Louise Ltd., Banff National Park,
described in March 14 consumer
column, have to be to Ottawa by
April 4.
Therefore, people interested in
sending a letter should mail it to
the Committee for an
Independent Canada (Kits
branch), Box 4402, Station D,
Vancouver 9 in time for them to
be sent on to Ottawa by April 4.
Cosmic speech
Michael Murphy, president and
co-founder of the Esalen Institute,
a gestalt therapy unit in
California, will speak at UBC
Thursday on the Western
Transformation of the Image of
Man.
He'll be in Hebb at 8:30 p.m.
as part of the centre for
continuing education's . winter
program.
Cost for the lecture is $1 for
students, and $2 for others.
Rinse cycle
The play Rinse Cycle, created
by the acting company Troupe,
will be held over to Tuesday
because of good attendance.
It will be performed nightly at
8:30 p.m. at the Intermedia Hall,
First and Semlin.
NDP fair
The Burrard New Democratic
Party is sponsoring a spring
pleasure fair on Saturday
featuring      home      baking,
Tween classes
TODAY
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion with an Action Canada
representative at noon in SUB 111.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Social; music jam with
refreshments, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. in IH
upper lounge.
HILLEL CLUB
General meetings for students to
discuss affairs at and future plans
for Hillel at noon in Hillel house
behind Brock.
UBC ABORTION
ACTION COMMITTEE
Referendum     victory     meeting     at
noon    in    SUB    224.    All    women
welcome.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting on senate election,
organizing for summer, at noon in
Arts I blue room.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
More     club"  racing
Kitsilano yacht club.
at     10    a.m.
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
Two famous guitarists, in IH upper
lounge. Free, all welcome.
CLUTCH?
ELECTRICAL?
TRANSMISSION?
Any repair problem on a
VW, Mercedes, Volvo or
Porsche we can fix at
reasonable rates. NO
JOB TOO BIG OR
SMALL.
P.S. Did you know we can
also fix your B.M.W.?
HAPPINESS IS . . .
Living better for less in '72.
Manufacturers samples and subs.
Sizes 7 to 20 at great savings.
Happiness is Boutique, 4576 West
10th (across from big Safeway)
228-9931.
5% OFF FOR U.B.C. PEOPLE
handicrafts, fortune telling and
music.
Admission to the fair at 1855
Vine is free from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m.
A 9 p.m. dance will be held at
the same location, costing $2.
URSS forum
Do intellectuals have a role in
changing Canadian society?
That's a question the Union of
Radical Social Scientists hope to
answer at a noon forum April 4 in
Angus lounge.
Canadian author and
sociologist Marjaleena Repo will
address the forum.
Lost, found
The Alma Mater Society is
holding its annual lost and found
sale, featuring all sorts of goodies
you've been missing all year.
It's happening Wednesday
beginning at 12:30 p.m. in the
SUB alcove, between Speakeasy
and the art gallery.
Radical Union
Reliable sources revealed today
that the Radical Union, scourge of
the capitalists, will meet tonight
at 8 p.m. at the Lutheran Campus
Centre. Union members are urged
to bring tea and cookies.
at   noon in Buch.
TUESDAY
SAILING CLUB
General   meeting
104.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Michael Robinson, AMS and Karl:
What ought to be the goal of
student government?, at noon in
SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
LOST AND FOUND
Sale of unclaimed articles at noon in
SUB south alcove (between
Speakeasy and art gallery).
4430 W.
x    BOUTIQUE
J          Handmade Clogs
J             Local Pottery
V    Open 9-5:30 Mon.-Sat.
'                 till 9 Fri.
.10th              224-4513
Dreams of love . . . symbolized by
the brilliance of a diamond. Our
specialized training, our technical
precision instruments and our long
experience help us to help you
make the perfect diamond choice.
Come in and see how we can turn
your dream into a brilliant reality.
Engagement rings from 100.00
c
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
BEAT
BICYCLE THEFT!
GET    INSURANCE
CABLE   LOCKS
"MATCHED PAIRS"  - USED BICYCLES
Top Value in 10 Speed —5 Speed
Special Discount to U.B.C. Students
3771 W. 10 Ave. 224-3536
CLASSIFIED
Rate*: Campus — 3 iinas,  1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
.Commercial  — 3  lines,   1   day $1.25;  additional
lines 30c? 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline ia 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S,U.B., VBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LAST   DA.NCE   AT TOTEM   PARK
Sat.,    March     25. 9;00-l:00.    Full
facilities.      $3.00 couple.       Band
Sunshyne.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: BEIGE TUOKE IX CAFE-
teria, Wed. 22nd. Sentimental
value, reward, Please phone
Pru<%   73i_-7J62,	
LOST: PAPER BAG CONTAINING
misc. odd looking equip, in Rm
203, SUB, March S. Please return
to   Lost  and   Found.
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent furnished condominium op-
posite Gondola,  224-0657  evea.
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested phone 224-1910 or 684-
7750.	
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE-
ness — 1 day introductory workshop — Individual — Groups.
Psychologist.    One    year    Esalen
929-3662 mornings.	
HOLY   WEEK    AND
EASTER    SERVICES,
CAMPUS   CHURCHES
PALM SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.—Holy   Communion   at   St.
Anselm's.
9:15 a.m.—Mass,   St.   Ignatius',    at
St.   Anselm's.
11:00 a.m.—Morning   Prayer   at   St.
Anselm's.
11:00 a.m.—Communion    Service    at
University   Hill   United.
11:00 a.m.—Joint   Church   School   at
University   Hill   United.
12-30 p.m.—Mass.   St.    Ignatius',    at
St. Anselm's.
THURSDAY,   MARCH  30
7:30 p.m.—Mass,   St.   Ignatius'.
GOOD   FRIDAY,   MARCH   31
10:00 a.m.—Mattins  at  St Anselm's.
3:00 p.m.—Mass    at    St.     Ignatius'
(St.   Anselm's)
SATURDAY,   APRIL   1
10:30 p.m.—Easter   Eve   Service,   St.
Ignatius' (St.  Anselm's).
EASTER   SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.—Holy  Communion   at  St.
Anselm's.
9:15 a.m.—Mass,    St.   Ignatius',   at
St. Anselm's.
11:00 a.m.—Family  Eucharist  at  St.
Anselm's.
11:00 a.m.—Easter   Service   at   University Hill United.
12:30 p.m,—Mass,    St.    Ignatius',    at
St. Anselm's.
LOOK    HERE
3 FOR $1.00
Why pay this much for your
prophylactics? We will mail you
24 Assorted Prophylactics for
only $2.00, by return mail in
plain sealed envelope. Enclose
this ad for additional bonus oi
3  prophylactics.
POSTTRADING
BOX   4002       VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special (homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
UNIVERSITY   TRAVELLERS
CLUB
Travelling this summer? Stay
overnight free! Stuck at home?
Host travellers. Meet friendly
people. Exchange privileges with
members in U.S. and Canada.
Write now for full details: UTC,
PO. Box 9147, Berkeley, Calif.
94709.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: BICYCLE; GOOD CON-
dition, ten-speed or five-speed
Phone   Saffron,   738-9855.	
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'69 VW VAN CAMPER. EXCEL-
lent tires, recent engine work,
new muffler. Great shape. 731-
0943.	
'69 FIAT 850. EXCEL. CONDI-
tion. Best offers. Sporty. Econo-
mical.   731-3919.	
•65 EPIC, MUST SELL, $200 OR
best offer. Neil Kyle, home 291-
0772,   S.F.U.   291-4778.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
MEN! MAKE THE WOMEN'S LIB
jealous. Do what they can't do!
Have your hair styled at Corky's
Men's Hair Styling, 4th & Alma.
731-4717.
Scandals—Cont'd
37
HEAVY MECHANICS — GROOVY
prices — Hans et. al. now repair
Mazda, Toyota and Datsun cars
in addition to B.M.W., Volvo,
Porsche, Mercedes and Volkswagen. Try us, 8914 Oak St. (at
Marine in Marpole) or phone us
at 263-8121.
Typing
40
FAST,
ACCI.
RATE
TYPING
OF
essays
and
thesis
Reasonable
terms
Call
Mrs   Akau.  days
688-
5235,   evenings  and
weekends
263-
4023.
YR.   ROUND  ACC    TYPING  FROM
legible     drafts.      Phone     738-6829
from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.	
ESSAYS   AND   THESES   TYPED
Experienced    Typists
  Mrs.    Freeman—731-8096
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. 350
page.   Phone 224-0385  after   5  p.m.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSTdN"-
al typing. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.    Reasonable   rates.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis     typist.     Beautiful     work
Mrs.   Ellis  321-3838.	
ESSAY   TYPING
19th   and   Dunbar
 733-5922	
PROFESSION'S.!.-. BILINGUAL —
typing, IBM Selectric, open days,
evenings, weekends phone Madeleine at 738-3827 reasonable rates
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
WANTED: ATTRACTIVE GIRL
with afternoons off to work 1-5
in Law Office —■ some typing,
shorthand, and reception skills
required — good deal of time for
study   available   —   call   731-2101.
STARTING SEPT. 1972. MARRIED
student to manage Totem Park
Canteen. Retailing exper. req'd.
Some knowledge of vending,
bookkeeping, etc. useful but not
essential. Please apply in writing
by March 30th giving full particulars of experience, etc. to: The
Manager, Totem Park Canteen,
6700  N.W.  Marine Dr.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Special Classes 62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3. register early Limited enroll-
ment.   G;' Alfred. 261-4764.	
GROUP THERAPY PSYCHOLOG-
ist, 20 years experience. Call
224-4662   between   6   p.m.-7   p.m.
Tutoring Service
63
TUTORING CENTRE CLOSES
Friday, March 24. Your last
chance now to get help for exams.
TUTORING BY HONOURS MATH
graduate. Phone Ron. 733-5445,
6-7 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
TI
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone   Directory
Now only 25c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Offic*
RENTALS k REAL ESTATE
Roomi
•1
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM. PRI-
vate bath, in lovely south Granville home for responsible male
student. On bus line. No cooking.
Quiet, conducive for study. Avail-
able  May  1st.   Phone   224-6090.
ROOM FOR RENT IN HOUSE
with 4 students, near beach,
$50<mth Share food, util. Ph.
731-3667.	
ONE GIRL TO SHARE HOUSE
with 3 others Collingwood and
3rd. May  1st.  $70.  Phone 731-1304.
ROOMS AT THE GATES APRIL
1st or May 1st, semi-Private entrance,   2nd   floor.  Phone   228-9537.
Furn. Apts.
83
NEED A ROOMMATE. PREFER-
ably female grad., to share two-
bedroom apt. in Kits. Rent $60.
738-5906. Friday,  March  24,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   15
. . .  „••-?'•• :_..*->T»>...Va'«    -
       „ -i-"j- ;.'_. •{.'■*T"*'''1,C.'.*'"_*«  __£      ■
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f ■*____■■«*" i    1
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:•*       &■.'.'• -r-  -ft v.* .•-- -I-      -'
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V^;.r <?**.
T.I.'.: ■'TJ-^fe^V _.'
iv .•":." ?" • H-.- '. .- .
__••.- *v :'.»■>»■_. •_-• * :_•";-. i
SPORTS
—bill hardman photo
THE THRILL OF IT ALL is captured in this photo of an avid skydiver. While it may be fun for him  for
most of us landlubbers it's more than enough to read about it. Story, below.
Skydiving — a nice high
By JIM ADAMS
Anyone disclaiming feat on his
first j ump is either a damn fool or
a compulsive liar.
Even with the plane throttling
back to 70 mph, getting out on
the step and bracing yourself on
the wing strut over 2,800 feet of
nothing has got to raise a few
hairs.
The accent from Chilliwack
airport was rough and your legs
feel a thousand pins as you kneel
in the 185 with three other
students.
The beauty of Mount Cheam
and Chilliwack Lake escapes you.
Adrenalin courses quickly through
the veins and eyes become
rivetted on the drop zone. A
nervous idiot in the back jokingly
admonishes everyone to "please
replace your divots" in the event
of a parachute failure. Funny.
Too quickly the wind drift
indicator and first jumper are
gone and its your turn.
Legs half paralyzed, I hobbled
to the exit and clumsily
attempted to get feet and hands
braced properly.
Inevitably, I made the mistake
of looking at the ground.
"What the hell am I doing
here?"
But it's too late now, you've
got four people inside watching.
"Go" shouts the jump master,
slapping your seat. After the
experience of getting out on the
strut you're almost happy to
oblige.
"Arch    1,000,   2,000,   3,000
You've practiced the arch
hourly, you know itll brace you
OPTOMETRIST
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Eye   Examinations
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for the canopy opening; but that
was on the ground. You let out a
bastardized war whoop and your
feet begin kicking. What control,
what style.
Your leg straps are a little
loose, so the canopy opening
provides another thrill.
"Oh well, maybe they'll
descend from the body cavity
when I get out of this. .. harness.
At least the chutes opened."
The next two or three minutes
to the ground, the calm after the
storm, makes it all worthwhile.
Cars crawl like ants along the 401,
the sun bursts through the clouds
over Vancouver, and, after a 180
degree turn, there to welcome you
home is the ground instructor,
already moving to three o'clock.
You forget the wind sock and
drift, concentrating on him,
moving slowly around the cross.
You wish you could hang there
at a 1,000 feet, surveying all,
watching the other jumpers go by.
Suddenly you're down to 200
feet. The ground rushes up to
meet your speedy descent. Legs
together, knees bent you prepare
for your PLF. Holding against the
wind you slow the drift and roll
into the pasture.
"Fantastic, I made it." Relief
and maybe some confidence cross
your face as one of the old hands
runs across the field to
congratulate the neophyte.
Above you, others are being
scattered by the winds, since
increased from 5 to 10 mph.
The heavy guy, the one with
the 32 foot chute, ends up a half
mile away in a sodden field. Gerry
came closer than you to the
target, but paid for his efforts
with a running PLF into six inches
of water. Andrea, the little
hundred pounder, rolls into a
mosaic of water and manure four
fields away beside a barn. Men
and cars head off in search of the
scattered brethren.
Skydiving is one of the fastest
growing sports in North America.
Whether doing a cannarozzo
free fall at 200 mph, or mastering
relative work with other jumpers,
excitement and concentration
immerse the participant. Jumping
is total involvement, total
concentration, one man mastering
the forces of nature. The risks
involved only increase the
pleasure and fullfillment.
Exhilarating and competitive,
the sport offers a unique
experience. Once begun, the
fascination grows.
Come and see the
NEW
NIKON F2
A good selection of Nikon equipment
RUSHANT CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
224-5858 or 224-9112
CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights
$225.
UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W. Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
UnitedX/anLines
100% TAX WRITE-OFF
FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY
ON MOVING, STORAGE AND ALL
RE-LOCATION EXPENSES
Phone for our Brochure on
New Income Tax Regulations
FREE PRE-PLANNED MOVING
BOOKLET and useful information
on your new area; such as maps,
housing, schools, churches,
recreational facilities, etc. -
REMEMBER, - ask for Bette Malone
"Slh.
INDIVIDUAL STORAGE VAULTS
-SHORT or LONG TERM-
BUTTERWORTH'S MOVING &
STORAGE LTD.
.««
SO
k1     ^^r^y4^_
padded vans & warehouses
'FREE ESTIMA TES'   2 9 9 - 7 4 8 8
2040 Alpha
Bby.
iiiiiiSMM^ moving
WmWtiil
PARAMOUKT P€TUR£S PRESENTS
STARTS
FRIDAY
[P«l
orpheum    amexz
685-8820        CONTINUOUS FROM 9:30 a.m.
JEAN OAUDE KILLY
The world's greatest skier
in his. first full-length feature motion picture.
•A
DARING
RIP-OFF OF
AN ALPINE RESORT.
STARTS
THURSDAY
STRAND
681-2362
1:40, 3:40
5:45, 7:45
Last show 9:15 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  24,   1972
"In time of peace the bulk of
intelligence can be obtained through . . .
the many Americans, business and'
professional men and American residents
of foreign countries, who are naturally and
normally brought in touch with what is
going on in these countries." (Allen Dulles,
former director of the CIA)
One such American was Charles
Denston Dickey Jr. He was president of
British Columbia Forest Products (BCFP)
from 1957-61, and during that time was in
the employ of the United States' Central
Intelligence Agency. His job — to evaluate
the political and economic environment of
Vancouver and B.C., and to report back his
findings directly to Central Intelligence.
Dickey, a bespectacled and disarming
figure with a somewhat humorous name,
must have taken his job quite seriously.
Not only did he (and therefore the CIA)
have his finger on the pulse of B.C.'s
economic life, but as president of BCFP,
one   of   the   largest   companies   in   the
province,   Dickey   had   some   degree   of
control over the economy itself.
The following article, reprinted from
The Tower, Vancouver City College, fills in
some of the background on Dickey, the
CIA and the system that produced both of
them.
The making of a spy
Born 55 years ago in New York City, Charles Dickey
Jr. came from an upper-class background.
His father had labored for many years in the Morgan
family's financial empire. Dickey graduated from St.
Paul's Boys School (an exclusive private school in NYC) in
1936 and four years later received his BA from Yale
University.
It was there that he may have met Stanley Resor
(who later in life was to sit with Dickey on the board of
directors of Scott Paper Co.) and who had graduated one
year earlier. With degree in hand, Dickey set forth
searching for a job. He soon found one. He was hired as a
special agent with the FBI and performed his duties
admirably. One of the bureau's main tasks at that time
was the herding of Americans of Japanese descent into
concentration camps. In 1943 Dickey decided that he
could better serve his country abroad than at home. He
joined the Marines and fought overseas as a lieutenant.
After the war Dickey turned towards business for a
career. He got a job with Scott Paper Co. in the sales
department and over the following nine years worked his
way up to become assistant vice-president, stationed in
Everett, Wash.
In 1955 Scott Paper bought the controlling interest in
BCFP and Dickey was named to BCFP's board of
directors. Two years later he took over the presidency and
quickly settled his family into a West Vancouver home.
Before leaving the U.S. to take on his new
responsibilities, Dickey was contacted by the CIA and
asked to do intelligence work in Canada. He may even
have been approached by people from liis own company,
for two of his fellow directors, Stanley Resor and Thomas
Gates Jr., had close contact with the American
intelligence set-up.
Resor was undersecretary of the U.S. army, while
Gates was7secretary of the navy- Besides this, both Dickey
—Aislin The Last Post
WIENTTOJWN&...
and Gates held directorships with J.P. Morgan and Co.,
Insurance Company of North America and Morgan
Guarantuary Trust Co. of New York.
Resor and Gates are currently members of the council
on foreign relations, a powerful and influential New
York-based group of corporate heads which has a large
degree of influence over American foreign policy decisions
and CIA activities.
In July, 1961 Charles Dickey resigned as president of
B.C. Forest Products and moved back to Scott Paper's
Pennsylvania offices. He is presently alive and well in
Devon, Pa. His work for the CIA is finished; but what
makes a man like that take on such a job9 It's not for
money, God knows he has enough! It can't just be 'love of
country'. It is because Charles Dickey, and many others
like him, have very real financial interests to protect; and
that is the job of the CIA — to make the world safe, not
for democracy, but for American corporate interests such
as Scott Paper.
Scott Paper literally stretches around the globe. Here
in B.C., besides its control of BCFP, ft owns Scott Paper
Ltd., which has plants in New Westminster and Surrey,
Northern Developments Ltd. and Elk River Timber Co.
Scott's tentacles reach such diverse places as the
Phillipines, Mexico, Columbia, Italy, Brazil, Great Britain,
Thailand, Argentina, Spain, Japan, Australia, Costa Rica
and Taiwan. The corporation owns more than 357,000
acres of land in Washington and B.C. and about 1,205,000
acres in eastern Canada.
With these immense holdings to protect, it is no
wonder that men like Dickey are involved in intelligence
work. For the CIA is the first line of defence for the
American Empire, and Charles Dickey was only doing his
small part.
Dickey left B.C. 11 years ago, but the CIA is still very
much interested, and involved, in Canada. One East
German source lists 64 CIA agents active in this country
today.
Engineers — 'workers with no power'
The following article is written
by a graduate engineering student
who conducted a survey of jobs
available to engineering grads. It
differs considerably from
optimistic statements made by a
professional engineer reported in
Thursday's Ubyssey.
Professional engineer R.S.
Phillips seems to think
employment prospects for
engineering grads are "good" and
he predicts about 85 per cent of
the 1972 grads will find jobs by
seven months after graduation.
Phillips, in talking Tuesday to
200 engineering students, said the
"good" employment situation
results from "the slackness of the
American and Canadian
economies."
He also suggested "the onus is
on    the    students    to    find    a
prospective employer" but failed
to mention the nature of the
employment.
It appears that engineers must
change with the changing times
and accept the lot of being
workers with no power. But they
can still keep that professional
feeling that comes with five years
of university.
The relationship of the
availability of jobs to the
economic order has become much
clearer of late.
Engineers were, at one time,
well rewarded for their long hours
of study since job opportunities
abounded both in Canada and the
U.S.
As the economy expanded,
new facilities were built and new
products were made. This
expansion meant jobs for workers
and managers, engineers being
mostly the former and some of
the latter.
In 1965 a BASc from UBC
averaged six job offers both in
Canada and the U.S., high wages,
rapid promotion and the pick of
the company.
In 1964-65 "defence" spending
was increasing on Vietnam,
aerospace was booming, the U.S.
had a strong grip on the "Free"
world and Canada's mineral
industry was expanding to meet
the needs.
In 1967 the same UBC degrees
were averaging two job offers, a
big drop, but worse was to come.
Almost all the 1970 graduates
have now found jobs, but there
are still 1971 graduate engineers
looking for jobs, and about 60 per
cent of the 1972 grads have no
jobs.
The statistics for this year are
approximately (in jobs to
graduate): civil (3 to 42);
electrical (45 to 80); mechanical
(17 to 45) and metallurgical (2 to
10).
There appears to be a certain
amount of bad feeling over this
unfortunate job situation. One
engineer recently remarked:
"Work your ass off for five
fucking years and find no fucking
job.. . you'd be pissed off
too ..."
Many engineers have adopted a
pragmatic view and simply say "it
isn't really too bad, 111 find a job
(in Sweden, Australia, Zanzibar,
Inuvik or on the assembly line at
Lenkurt Electric where there's
already 30 electrical engineers.)"
It's interesting to remember
that   in   1969  the  U.S.   started
restricting Canadian entry into the
American job market, so that
Canadian graduates were in fact
totally barred from the U.S.
where many formerly went.
This, coupled with curtailment
of foreign branches of American
business as reflected by the five
per cent unemployment in the
U.S. and seven per cent in Canada,
shows up elegantly in the
magnificent job opportunities for
Canadian engineers and for
Canadian working people in
general.
It is also interesting to note
that American companies
operating in foreign countries
(read Canada) tend to bring
managers and engineers in from
the parent offices (read U.S.) to
run their foreign holdings
(noteworthy examples being oil
companies and metal producers).
This is especially significant when
we realize that while 100 per cent
of the Canadian economy is
generated by Canadian workers,
80 per cent is controlled by
foreign holdings.
So, as the American economy
wilts in the face of its losses in
Vietnam and industrial defeats by
the Japanese and West Germans,
the situation becomes worse for
Canada.
The question is clear: Join
America or leave it.
Engineers are definitely on the
receiving end of one of the
clearest trends in Canada today:
the stifling of Canada as an
industrial nation and the
reduction to a raw-material
producing economy.
Probably the next few years
will see more and more engineers
being forced into the working
class to survive, because little
hope exists for Canadian engineers
(workers) until the Canadian
people run the Canadian
government and economy.
- 5-.

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