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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1966

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Array WORKING IN WASHROOMS
WITHOUT ENOUGH STAFF
Psychiatrists  need  help at  Wesbrook
UBC's mental health services are
inadequate.
This was the opinion Monday of
consultant psychiatrist Dr. C. J.
Schwarz. Speaking from his office
in Wesbrook (a small converted
washroom) he told of the department's lack of funds and personnel.
"We are doing a good job with
what we have but we need seven
full-time people.
"This would cost the university
approximately $80,000,"  he said.
UBC health service now has two
full-time resident psychiatrists, one
half-time consultant psychiatrist
and a psychologist for four hours a
week.
It costs the university approximately $16,000.
"We are well established but
can't handle all our patients. We
have a two week waiting list.
"Our services are so poorly publicized even some of the faculty
don't know about us.
"Often students come to the hospital seeking help and only then
find out we're available."
Schwarz blamed university housing policy for some students'
trouble.
"Admission to residence depends
on academic standing. Students
with good records are put in Totem Park, while a person with a
poor record is put into Acadia
Camp."
This means that the people with
difficulties  are put   in   the   worst
conditions, Schwarz said.
Patients or future patients are
reassured that all help is private,
he said.
"All our interviews are kept in
strictest secrecy.
"Nothing is disclosed to faculty
members about a patient."
But Schwarz warned prospective
patients: "Thre are no breaks given
for writing exams while in the
hospital."
He said he was impressed by the
student interest in mental health
services.
"We've established a service,
now people must accept and expand it."
BARBER ANALYST VAN DYKE
. .  . with customer patient
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 43
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY  1,  1966
CA 4-3916
31
h.%^^!&
POLE JUMPED, perhaps out
of basement, into path of
UBC driver Saturday near
Lower Mall residences.
Impeachment
move stalled
•i >
'temporarily
A first year engineers' petition to impeach AMS president
Byron Hender has temporarily
foundered for lack of support.
But the redshirts are not
deterred.
The petition called Hender
an "inefficient leader without
moral convictions necessary to
his office."
First year council member
Vic Hardy explained the shortage of signatures.
"We had about 550 signatures," he said.
Only 500 are needed to force
the AMS to hold a referendum
on the issue.
"But if there was one phoney
signature on a page, the whole
page of 20 signatures was
spoiled.
"We only had about 300
good signatures left."
According to EUS vice-president Don Allen, the presence
of phoney signatures was due
to the method of collecting
signatures.
Allen said he hopes to have
500 signatures by the next
council meeting Feb. 6.
Arts pres
fires editors
NEW YORK 'artist' Robert
Wickstrom ended up as bespattered as his canvas at
Friday's 'Happening' in auditorium.
Scattered polls determine
AMS ground floor occupants
Students will vote in 17 locations Wednesday from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. as they decide who will rule the AMS in the
coming year.
Two polls will be set up late Wednesday afternoon at
the Vancouver General Hospital and B.C. Institute of
Technology for UBC students working there.
Advance polls will open Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m., in South Brock and the Education building, with voting in all residences from 5 to 7 Tuesday evening.
Regular Wednesday polling stations are: Bioscience,
Brock north and south, Buchanan upstairs and down, bus
stop, Auditorium cafeteria, Sedgewick Library, Education,
Engineering, Angus, Home Economics, main Library,
Physics, Ponderosa, gymnasium and Wesbrook.
over
libel
By DOUG HALVEBSON
Arts president Chuck Campbell fired the two editors
of the arts magazine Consensus Monday.
Campbell fired editors Peter
Cameron and Nancy Corbett
after a letter from AMS lawyer
Ben Trevino stated that an
article about board of governors member Einar Gunderson in the last issue of Consensus was libelous.
The letter was sent to AMS
president Byron Hender, who
gave it to Campbell.
Neither Hender nor Campbell would disclose the exact
contents of the letter.
"The letter clearly stated the
article was libelous on three
counts," said Campbell.
Campbell fired the Consensus editors by himself after
the arts executive defeated a
motion to fire them by an eight
to two vote last week.
Campbell said he would explain his actions in an arts executive meeting he would call
before the end of the week.
"I'm willing to put my position as president on the line,"
he said, "a decision against my
move will result in my resignation.
"I think Cameron placed the
society in jeopardy because of
the danger of a lawsuit and
because in my opinion he resorted to an overwhelming personal attack," Campbell said.
"The role of Gunderson's
daily life is irrelevant to his
role as a member of the board
of governors.
"My opinion is that the chief
executive officer of a society
can make any decisions he
thinks necessary for the good of
the society subject to a vote of
censure,"   Campbell   said.
"I have acted in the face of
executive opposition," he said.
"I'm willing to take the risk.
"I hope the executive will
uphold my decision,"  he said.
Cameron said later Campbell
was making the issue into a
vote of non-confidence in himself.
"He is trying to incriminate
people,"  he said.
He described T r e v i n o ' s
judgement on the issue as "a
hasty legal opinion."
"If he is the AMS lawyer he
will have to defend the case,"
said Cameron.
"I don't see how he could
make a legal judgement," he
said.
Focus  focuses
on  mountain  top
Atop Burnaby Mountain
(in Burnaby) there is an
academy.
Simon Fraser is its name.
The Ubyssey sent a team
of reporters and photographers to Simon Fraser Academy.
They came back with
exotic tales about an ombudsman, a town crier in a
red cape, a Gordon Shrum,
athletia scholarships — even
covered parking lots.
Read it in Focus Thursday. Page 2
The   ubyssey
Tuesday, February  1,   1966
Even if he doesn't rate,
its always nice to Mate
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Associate Editor
The Uibyssey completes its
interviews of the three candidates for AMS president with
these interviews of Peter
Braund and Gabor Mate. The
interview with third candidate
Don Wise appeared: in Friday's
Ubyssey.
• •      •
AMS presidential candidate
Gabor Mate offers more
changes on his platform than
any other candidate for that
position.
Asked about student council
and its effectiveness Mate noted that this must be that group
which meets in Brock every
Monday night and plays with
itself.
Outlining his platform on a
more serious note Mate had
this to say:
• * *
"Byron Hender says Joe Student doesn't understand anything and (student union building chairman) Roger McAfee
refers to students as apathetic
armpits.
"Most AMS executives in
past years haven't taken ordin
ary students seriously after
they get in — first vice-president Bob Cruise was the only
one this school year — to get
up on a soap box in front on
the library and talk to students.
"Communication between
student council and students
have broken down. Important
issues should be presented
more intelligently to people.
The president should stand on
the soap box in front of library
at least once a week and find
out what students are concerned about.
•      •      •
"The chasm of misunderstanding before the march last
'all protesting fees arose b"
cause student council didn't
know what students wanted
and didn't make any effort to
find out.
"The present make-up of student council must be changed.
"As it is now student councillors, aside from the executive, are elected by one faculty
but make decisions for the
whole student body. These
people should be elected by
the whole student community.
"This new system will leave
Braund's singing
tor SUB a-go-go
Braund is basing his platform on a five point platform.
Here he elaborates:
"I'm in favor of the student
union building under its present lease agreement. SUB
must be either owned by the
university or leased from it.
"There will be 22,000-30,000
square ft. of space for club
rooms provided.
"There will also be $30,000-
$60,000 in revenue from vending machines.
"The lease is a good deal because the paying period for
SUB can be extended from 15
to 18 years if necessary.
"SUB will probably revert
to the status of Brock after the
55-year lease is terminated.
This means it will be used and
administered toy students.
"The ombudsman is a new
concept that should be tried.
Many unusual problems concerning students keep coming
up.
Braund's ideas on student
action revolve around what he
calls "student participatory reaction to any fee increase.  A
two day boycott is not unrealistic if combined with a
public information program to
make people understand why
we're protesting.
"We should investigate making the student president a full
time paid officer of the AMS.
"The president should take
a forceful stand on student issues but keep his mind open
to sensible alternatives.
"I'd like to see a student representative on the senate. This
would be a beginning to student participation in other
areas where they don't have
any say now.
"I also want to come out in
full support of the Canadian
Union of Students. Many important issues such as fees,
democracy at university and
others have sprung out of this
organization.
"The residences are happy
decentralized. The inter-residence council didn't work because residence students weren't interested in outside interference.
councillors free of administrative details so they can emphasize political issues.
"The student union building
offers too little in return for
its extravagant and rapidly
spiraling cost. Clubs feel at
home now in small huts and
are not interested in having to
book rooms where they have
no  permanent  home.
"The SUB auditorium seats
only 450, less than some large
class rooms. And food services
will be controlled by the administration with no competition from outside caterers as
originally planned.
"The money could be used
constructively  in   other   ways.
"It is ridiculous that we can
vote in provincial and federal
elections deciding matters of
international importance but
have no say in the running of
our   own   university.
"Senior students should have
a voice in setting the curriculum; some courses which students might like to take may
not   be   offered.
•      •      •
"I feel the faculty should
strive to have publishing of
their own works de-emphasized and teaching and dialogue
with students emphasized much
more.
"On residences students living in them should have more
voice in running the facilities
they live in as well as the university. The idea of co-operative housing should be investigated, especially since it has
worked at many other univer
sities.
"Discussions with the administration should lead to student
observers on both the board of
governors   and   the  senate.
"Student action springs from
student council's involvement
with the students. Council can
offer direction but student action will arise spontaneously
from the students.
"Another Berkeley will happen here only if problems are
ignored and tensions keep
building up — no one wants
an explosion so lets do something about it now.
EVENSONG & CONCERT
Chapel of the Epiphany
Anglican   Theological   College
Sunday, Feb. 6 at 4:30 p.m.
Sung by
Christ   Church   Cathedral   Chamber
Choir
SILVER ARROW
MINES
REQUIRES PROJECT GEOLOGIST
Salary   Open - Permanent   Position
For Information & Appointment Call  MU   3-8025
Paul Williamson
University of Victoria  Student Council  President
speaks on
Withholding of Fees
Noon      —     Wed., Feb. 2     —      Brock
w
rr
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
SCHOLARS — TIRED OF U.B.C?
Applications for I.S.E.P. scholarships now available
from Registrar.
Student co-ordinator needed to organize study group
to prepare for the seminar "Identity and Anxiety:
crisis of a student generation" in "Waterloo, Ontario,
Sept. '66. Apply C.U.S. Office, B.E. 258.
Grad Class
Meeting Thursday, February 3, in the Hebb Theatre
at noon.
The agenda will include the graduating class gift to
the University, and a vote on the Grad Class constitutional amendments.
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 77 - Jan. 26, 1966
African   Voices.   Rutherford.   (Grosiefs  Ub.)  '•••
Alcoholism.   Kessel.   (Pelican.)  ••*
Ambassador. West. (Dell.)  •?»
Annotated Alice. Carroll. (Penguin.)   "0
Arabs.  Nutting. (Mentor.)  •'»
Auto de Fe. Canetti.  (Penguin.)  *•'■»
Basic Principles of Psychoanalysis.   Brill. (Washington Sq.)  .60
Birth Control in the Modern World. Draper. (Pelican.)  1.25
Cold Comfort Farm. (Gibbons. (Delta.)            -  - - -   -      '•?**
College Entrance Examinations. Wechsler. (Barnes & Noble.)        2.50
Common Sense About Smoking. Fletcher. (Penguin.)  .85
Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. (Washington Sq.)  .75
Corridors   of Power. Snow.  (Bantam)  '1.00
De Gaulle. Alexander Werth. (Pelican.)  '-35
Drivers Wild, Wilder & Wildest. Daniells. (Penguin.)  .95
Electrodynamics.   Page.   (Dover.)      -    _     -    -      2.70
Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus. (trwin.)  1.60
Fifth  French  Republic. Pickles.  (Praeger.)  2.10
Flamingo Feather, van der Post. (Penguin.)             -    -   '.25
Four Great Restoration Plays. (Washington Sq.)      -      -60
Heritage of Persia. Frye.  (Mentor.)         -95
How to live 365 Days a Year. Schindler. (Crest.)  .50
Idiots First. Malumud. (Delta.)      —   .    -  '-75
Indian Tribes of the United States. McNickle. (Oxford.)    _-__  1.60
Intelligent   Woman's   Guide   to   Socialism,   Capitalism,   Sovietism   &
Fascism.   Shaw. (Pelican.)                   -    -     -      1-85
Johnson, Andrew & Reconstruction. McKitrick. (Phoenix.)  2.95
Journey into Russia, van der Post. (Penguin.) ..   -      1.35
Key.  Tanizaki.  (Signet.)     -50
Learning Your Way Through College. Resnick. (Merrill.) ..._ - - 2.25
Life of Billy Yank: the common soldier of the union. Wiley. (Charter
Bks.)   -     -       *•«*
Life of Johnny Reb: the common soldier of the eonfederancy. Wiley.
(Charter Bks.)             -                 -     2.«5
Literature of Australia. Dutton. (Pelican.)  2.50
Marxism: an historical & critical  study, liteheim.  (Praeger.)         2.70
Merimee. Carmen. (Penguin.).          1.35
Modern  Corporations. Votaw. (Prentice Hall.)       -       2.40
Mozart: the  man  &  the  artist  revealed  in  his  own  words.   Kerst.
(Dover.)         -             -                  - '•■<►
Murder of the Man who was 'Shakespeare.' Hoffman. (Grosset Lib. 1.90
Music  of  the  Mind:   1000  years   of   European   poetry.   McLaughlin.
(Grosset   Lib.)         3.75
Mussolini's  Italy. Finer.  (Grosset Lib.)       _     .     ..     -  3.75
Naked  Society.  Packard. (Pocket Bks.)             .75
New Cold War, Moscow v. Pekin. Crankshaw. (Penguin.)  .65
New Reformation. Robinson. (SCM Press.)      -    -     1.35
No Signposts in the Sea. Sackville-West. (Penguin.)  .85
Objections to Christian Belief. MacKinnon.   (Pelican.)  _  .85
Objections to Humanism. Kingsley. (Pelican.)        .85
Penguin Books of Wines. Siehel. (Penguin.)  _  1.35
Penguin  Encyclopedia. Summerdale.  (Penguin.)  2.95
Principles of Political Economy & Taxation. Ricardo. (Irwin.)  1.60
Pupils & Schools in New York City. Sheldon. (Russell Sage.)  1.60
Radcliffe.  Storey.   (Penguin.) .       1.25
Railway Age.  Robbins.  (Penguin.)             .85
Read Better, Read Faster. Manya. (Pelican.)           .__.- .85
Researches into the Mathematical Principles of the Theory of Wealth.
Cournot.   (Irwin.)                 —  1.60
Rise of the New West, 1819-1929. Turner. (Collier Bks.)                   ._'_- 1.60
Treasury of Jewish  Folksong.  Rubin. (Schocken Bks.)  _     3.35
Two Treatises of Government. Locke.  (Mentor.)       ______ .95
UBC BOOKSTORE Tuesday,   February   1,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—norm  betts  photo
A LOT OF BULL, alias former Mardi Gras king, Gerry Nakatsuka, rumbles through
Mardi Gras floorshow at Showmart building Saturday night. Annual Greek charity event
drew capacity crowds both nights.
AMS candidates agree:
more SUB — less fees
Three AMS presidental aspirants battled; before 400 students in Brock lounge Monday
noon, only to agree their platforms were much the same.
Candidates Peter Braund,
Gabor Mate and Don Wise
stood out foursquare for strong
leadership, more discussion of
SUB, a student ombudsman, re-
Play parliament vote
goes on first ballot
By DICK TAYLOR
Elections   for   UBC's    play
parliament will be held Wednesday.
Purpose of the model parliament, according to parliamentary council president, Ken
Gaglardi, is "to acquaint students with the processes of
parliament and to decrease
political apathy at UBC."
•
'Student vote
could decide
revolution'
UBC may be on the verge of
a revolution, and the AMS
president students elect Wednesday will decide the coUrse
of that revolution, AMS returning officer Jim Taylor said
Monday.
In his annual exhortation for
students to get out and vote,
Taylor said, "The choice you
make will influence the entire
concept of student government
at UBC.
"The onus is on the students
to decide."
He said students will not
only be electing an executive
to execute AMS business for
the next year, "They will quite
likely be electing a body which
will develop an entirely new
framework of stdent government."
There are three candidates
for AMS president — Peter
Braund, law I, Gabor Mate,
arts IV and Don Wise, arts III.
Parliamentary   council,   the
sponsor, is made up of the five
campus political clubs.
The names of the parties will
be printed on the AMS first
slate ballot.
The 80 seats will toe apportioned according to the parties
share of the popular vote.
Parliament will meet Feb. 24
and 25.
Then the party with the
largest number of seats will
form a government and present
the speech from the throne.
If two governments are defeated toy non-confidence votes,
parliament is dissolved .
After the throne speech, each
party will present one bill.
evaluation of present AMS
•structure and mass student opposition to further fee increases.
Braund accused The Ubyssey
and council of failing to present
full details on the Student Union Building.
Mate said! the proposal as
presented was misleading, and
some plans, such as a 450 seat
auditorium, were inadequate.
Wise asked for a full disclosure of SUB information
and another student decision
on the building. He said positive action should immediately
follow such a decision.
Both Mate and Braund advocated strong student opposi
tion to further fee hikes, recom
mending a student strike, cla •?•
boycott, fee withholding, and
mass information blitz.
Wise said the most significant part of the fee issue was
the additional cost borne toy the
out-of-town student.
McGOUN CUP RECORD
UBC team takes
third straight win
A team of four UBC debaters won the McGoun debating cup for the third consecutive time Friday.
It is the first time in the
cup's 40-year history a university has won it three consecutive years.
The University of Manitoba
held it for two years prior to
UBC's 1963  win.
Wolfram Raymer, arts II and
David Amor, arts I, argued the
affirmative of the resolution,
"Science is the opiate of the
Twentieth Century", against U
of M law students Jay Prober
and Michael Sinclair in Brock
lounge.
The UBC team won the debate 3-1.
Mjeanwhile in Calgary, the
other half of UBC's McGoun
team opposed the resolution
against a team from the University of Alberta at Calgary.
•      •      •
James Taylor, law I, and
Richard Watts, arts II, won four
points over UAC's zero to
make the total UBC score seven out of a possible eight.
The McGoun cup itself cannot be presented to the champion UBC team because it disappeared two years ago and
has not been seen since.
BAY
HARLOW
Carroll Baker
Peter Lawford
Plus
NINE HOURS TO RAMA
Horst Bucholz
Jose Ferrer - D. Baker
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
i February 4 and 5
BULLET  FOR A  BADMAN
Audie Murphy - R. Lee
Darin McGain
plus
LADY IN A CAGE
Adult
O. DeHavilland, A. Sothern
Arts gallery
is germ free
in pop plastic
Tuesday night is germ free
at UBC's Fine Arts Gallery.
At least, if you're interested
in renting a bagged place, a
four rm. self-contained furn.
ste., dble. bed, all plastic bagged and sterilized.
Inside the bags, it's Wosk
modern-arborite, and the wrapping was done by U1BC artist
Iain Baxter.
Also opening is the Edge of
Pop, a review showing examples of the latest trends in
modern art.
Poet Robert Duncan will
open bagged plaee, appropriately attired in a plastic bag
with snorkel.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
<f TRADES <t TERMS
& RENTALS      * REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
INDOOR
FOREIGN  STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday, Feb. 5
A cross bewteen a demolition derby and a slock
car race —
AGAIN *he crowds demand thai we present this
spectacular show.It's fantastic.
AGR0D0ME
Time trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
Child under 12 FREE with Adult
Canadian Premiere
EVOLUTION
of
THE BLUES"
starring
Jon Hendricks
Hanna Dean
Big Miller
Jim Withe rspoon
2 Performances Only
Thurs., Feb. 3rd
at
12:30 p.m.
Tickets: 75c at the Doer
and
8:30 p.m.
Reserved: $1.00 on Sale at
A.M.S.
A Festival of the Contemporary Arts Special Event Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
rear by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1,  1966
"It is not the contexture ot words, but the
effects ot Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
Revolution
Well, tomorrow is vote day in glorious AMS land.
Peter Braund, Gabor Mate and Don Wise are
soliciting your support of the presidency of the organization. All being inclined to action, it strikes us that the
voters have a particularly tough course in sorting out
which represents the best possible leader for the organization.
To date we've been a little disappointed in only a
couple of aspects of the campaign. The residence question, it seems to us, has been largely skirted — probably
because candidates feel it affects only 15 per cent of the
campus.
Since this portion of the campus is here 24 hours
a day, we feel it is an important part of the student
organization.
But the results of the 1965 residence conditions survey, which will break later this week, should be bombshell enough to get the new executive moving on the
problem.
We're a little leary, too, of some of the candidate's
positions on the union building. Since we define the
SUB question as one devolving into whether the AMS
builds ballrooms or a better university, we wish more
of the candidates had had the courage of their convictions
to come out with a more positive stand than the calling
of the (albeit vital) referendum.
The AMS's great returning officer, Jim Taylor, has
predicted a revolution of sorts in student government
at UBC.
As usual, Mr. Taylor's analysis is a shrewd one, and
his call to voters to chose the candidate which will give
them their kind of revolution seems a good one.
Mr. Braund, we feel, would provide a progressive
student leadership based in part on his years in the
organization and hence his knowledge of the strengths
and weaknesses of the system.
His uncompromising attitude on student action, however, would provide a very different approach to using
the system than we have seen, for example, this year.
Mr. Mate would provide vigorous action in perhaps
a wider sphere of student life than has previously been
the AMS' concern.
His ability to draw on a previously unheard from
segment of the campus would widen the representation,
as well as the field of real and positive action, of the
student organization.
Mr. Wise, too, would be drawing on faces unfamiliar
in the former preserves of AMS bureaucrats in Brock.
His many contacts with the campus at large would
make his administration wide open to many areas of
influence among the student population. And, of course,
his zany mind would produce ideas in abundance to keep
old Brock rocking.
There they are. The vote is up to you.
Remember, the revolution you make will be your
own.
TbuoJOftje*
"Ah, go onl Whafs she got that I haven't got?"
IN THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Moral Ian meets Mardi Gras
Whatever happened to
honesty?
This question is prompted
by a letter received toy The
Ubyssey yesterday about
Mardi Gras.
jJii-ii|,1_ The writer
com plained
that  people
there were all
' drunk,    and
went   on    to
say that while
h e     realizes
Mardi Gras is
oamerqn       for   a  good
cause ,why does it have to be
an orgy?
The answer is simple.
It is an orgy.
And that's what prompts
my question.
At one time, everyone admitted that Mardi Gras was a
blast. That's all it was.
Then came the charity angle,
and gradually this charity
plea became more and more
important until it has become
the raison d'etre of the Mardi
Gras.
And on Thursday a young
lady who has been connected
with Mardi Gras asked me
why it wasn't as much fun
this year as it was in the past.
Same reason. Raising all
that money is a big job. It's
not easy to have much fun
when you're trying to make a
profit of $15,000 in some two
weeks.
And when people do have
fun, everyone asks how they
can stand to pervert a good
cause.
Why don't we go back to
the original proposition? Have
a good time. Charity is a side
line.
Leave it that way.
Letters
Thank you for helping us SHARE'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On Ibehalf of the WUS Committee I would like to sincerely thank you and your staff
for your co-operation during
the Share with UNAN Campaign.
To date we have collected
$2300 of our $5000 objective.
I hope we may work together on future projects.
CHRIS FINCH
Publicity Officer
•      •      •
'NO SMOKING'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Why doesn't the administration do something about enforcing the "no smoking
rule?"
I have really good profs
who give out valuable material in their lectures and I
could  learn  a lot  if  only  I
could concentrate.
As it is, my eyes burn and
water so that I can't see to
write and I can't breath. Needless to say, my class notes
don't amount to much.
I resent missing out on lecture material and toeing forced
to breathe someone else's dirty
smoke.
The worst of it is, I'll probably get lung cancer from
everyone else's smoke.
A SECOND HAND
SMOKER
For more
letters
see page 5
Tkxt %
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JU FLFCTIONFRENZY^
THE"    LAST    DA V OF^CA n PAJ6MII0 6.. LO UP A UO ClEA^  cpt\B S 0M£ ,
CGEE.auTHE orws?)
flesSA&Ei Vor&rloRA^.r.AA/>t.  r)0toU.r)AM y?  U)Ho HE?
And mou, let us hbmj
ICOWTWUED!
The die is^ast. Fate is iwthe voters* tuwos.' voo are fate. houdoyooukethat?yore ToMo«o«i>....f's roiJi
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News . Ran Riter
Associate — _ George Reamsbottom
City Al Donald
Photo Norm Betts
Sports   Ed Clark
Ass't News     Dan Mullen
Richard Hair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing Ian Cameron
Features  Mike Bolton
CUP   __ Don Hull
John Kelsey sat in the city
editor's seat Monday and didn't
turn in a masthead. Rip Zuker
split the scene, and we got stories
from people like Bert Hill, Jim
Good, Carol Wilson, Pat Hrushowy, Sue Gransby, Dennis Gans,
Doug Halverson, Carol-Anne
Baker, and some other people I've
forgotten and I'm sorry but I'll
put your names  in  Wednesday.' THE EDUSSEY
TEACHERS NEVER HAD IT SO G
• !•_•
Kumquat Junction — 1965
GO GROTTO!
What can you say about a
dance?
What can you say about a
dance that will make people
come to it?
Especially when the dance
is a faculty formal, just like
all the other faculty formals?
Well, you can say that if
you're in the education faculty
you'll have a chance to see all
your friends, and have a drink
with them, and talk about the
quality of the courses that you
attend, and the ones you should
but don't.
To the rest of the campus,
you can say that the Education
formal has had the best entertainment of any faculty dance
every year for the past three
years.
You can also say that people
who like to dance will be able
to, because Dal Richards is providing the music.
But none of these really
seems to be a good sound reason for anyone to come to the
dance.
So how's this: The Education
Faculty has so many more females than males it's not funny.
Some of these girls don't have
permanent dates, fiancees, or
husbands. Because of the way
LETS FACE IT
The government is throwing
money away by the barrelful
on student teachers.
Every year they throw away
more because every year more
and more students quit the
Faculty of Education and proceed to greener or more arid
pastures.
Few quit because they are
academically poor, ineffective
in a classroom or emotionally
unstable.
They leave because, between
the desire to become a teacher
and actually being one, falls
the shadow of doubt.
Because it is not enough to
count securities, to dream of
inspiring young minds and to
fomulate erudite philosophies
on education.
It is not enough to succeed
academically and in the prac-
ticum.
Like Social Work, Education
has its dream, aspirations and
high  Social Ideals.
And like Social Work, Education has its harsh realities.
The realities are the same —
they are imposed by our society. They are imposed by
human necessity.
The student teacher must be
prepared to face the fact that
for every glimmer of light he
shines on the darkness of ignorance, there are a thousand
shadows that can never be
brightened.
The shadows are demanding
school boards, the school teacher "image", the social limi-
Continued   on  Page   4
SEE: Lets Face It
in which our society is arranged, these young ladies can't ask
ask a male to the dance.
Which means they don't go.
Which is ridiculous. So get with
it, you guys. If you know a girl
in education, (and who doesn't?) ask her to go.
If you don't know a girl in
Education, come over to the
Education lounge sometime
and ask the first girl you see.
If you are a girl, and you
don't have a date, ask someone. Break with convention.
The modern day teacher is
a combination of Mother,
Father, Santa Claus, and Jesus
Christ.
It's always easier to attack,
belittle, or degrade. It would
be easy to say what is 'wrong'
with teaching. Let's take a
look at what is 'right' with
teaching.
"How much  am I  going  to
get paid?"
Elementary:
2 years $4100-$6350
3 years __       $4600-$7500
4 years $5700-$8120
B.Ed (Elementary)
Secondary:
5 years $5650-$9255
B.Ed (Secondary)
Masters $6150-10,110
M.Ed., M.A., M.S., M. etc.
^increment   +   bonuses   +   incentive pay.
How many days a year do I
work ?"
On the average —
196 days
1966: S-21, 0-20, N-
23, D-15, J-21, F-
22, M-19, A-20, M-
21, J-16.
Days off include 10-
14 at Christmas, 10
at Easter, 70 days
in summer, and
long weekends.
"What about pensions?"
Sure, you contribute monthly, but
when one 'retires'
or takes leave-of-
absence, all contri-
b u t i o n s can be
withdrawn in one
lump sum.
"What are my working conditions ?"
Schools are modern, well-lit, comfortable. Even if
the building is old,
it's clean and
warm. Most schools
have extensive facilities—well equipped labs, libraries,
and audio - visual
material.
"How much outside help can
I get?"
The extension department    of     the
University, the Department of Education, B.C.T.F., travelling clinics, professional m e d ical
advice, and private
industry p r o v i de
assistance to teachers.
"What job protection do I
have ?"
The B.C.  Teachers'
Fed e r a t i o n   provides   a   maximum
of job security for
all    teachers    who
have   passed   their
first     year's     probationary     term.
Should    a    teacher
be  faced  with  dismissal,   the   matter
is   referred   to   the
B.C.T.F.      immediately,    action   is
taken    only    When
there   is   a   serious
case   of   ethics   involved.   Monthly
membership      fee
covers   this   protection, releases of the
monthly     B.C.T.F.
magazine,     specialist assistance delivered to your  door,
monthly    newsletters     to     your
school, and the annual Teachers' Conventions    held     in
each district.
Besides   these   material   advantages  (■which  always  seem
to be the first ones looked for),
teachers have never had it so
good in just being themselves.
The teacher, as a human being,
finds    teaching    more    elastic
than ever  before.   The atmosphere in the class and school
is created by the creativity of
the teachers — allowing them
to relieve the boredom of what
appears to most as just routine
work.  In  the  environment  of
other teachers, there is usually
stimulating conversation, humorous   anecdotes   and   an  empathy     for     the     beginners.
Remember    you    get    out    of
teaching   only   what   you   put
into it.
SPUTNIK - BOMB - BEATLES
In this 'Sputnik-Bomb-
Beatle's society, Education
has suddenly become most
important. Educator's have
gained status and thousands
upon thousands of what
statisticians used to call 'war
babies' have and are entering the teaching profession
at all levels. Some of the
pre-war types are hustling
back to take everything from
a refresher course in 'new'
mathematics to a doctorate
in Education.
But  what   about  you?   Are
you mentally tossing around
the idea of teaching?
Most people who count
holidays first and find that
a teachers' working year is
about nine months long. This
fact, coupled with ideas of
teachers-past and a touch of
idealism  and you  have the
'recruiters recipe' for potential educators.
And this is not too far
from the truth. You shape as
many young minds as the
civil engineer builds roads.
You, perhaps, are a little better than teachers-past because you take more training, but you might find your
working year a little longer
with retraining courses and
lengthened school years if
present trends continue.
You'll also meet with frustrations that you never expected. When you realize
pected. When you realize
that you're not saying it
well enough; or when you
see your friends gaily talking about something interesting and you realize that
you've been mentally mired
in shoptalk since you started
and not the person you once
were.
Education changes you —
so does educating! If you can
live with these changes then
you'll probably find some
satisfaction. The satisfaction
that conies from doing something interesting in itself
with adequate financial reward.
You might even teach
those subjects in which you
specialized.
People considering the
profession require a 65%
average and, if you're fortunate enough to have a degree, that degree must be in
teaching subjects. Standings
are recognized by two gentlemen Drs. Broome and Johnson.
Why no check it out. Page 2
THE       EDUSSEY
Tuesday, February  1,  1966
EDUSSEY
Representing the greatest but quietest faculty on campus.
Published once a year by the unfortunate people who get involved.
Opinions expressed are gospel truth.
Our thanks to that paragon of journalism and father of verbal fecundity,
Ian Cameron, and we bow low in   gratitude to The Ubyssey galley slaves.
EDITOR: MAT HASSEN
ASSOCIATE ED.: JIM CROOK
CARTOONIST: BEV. WRIGHT
Guest Writers: B. BLACK, DR. SCHWAHN
Good Gals: EVE, ERIKA, ARIENE and ARLENE
"Did he who made the lamb .   . . "
_______
It's time that Education attracted more able people
into the profession.
Too much time has been spent in trying to attain
professionalism in the eyes of the world,
the image in the eyes of the world.
Too much time has been spent in trying to glorify
Education.
Too much time has been spent to accomplish
nothing.
The time has long since passed when these trivia
should have been filed permanently in the circular file
and a more honest "these things will come eventually
of their own accord" attitude taken.
A classic case of the cart before the horse.
The old statement — "Those who can, do; those who
can't teach." has never been less true than today. With
the omnipresence of cybernetics, the leisure theory, and
an increase in required knowledge, the need for gifted
and competent teachers has never been more acute.
These needed people must come from every branch of
this University. They must come soon and be trained
as effectively as is humanly possible. How are we going
to convince them that Education does hold a promising
and stimulating future for them ?
The anti-calendar program for Education is the
first step in the right direction. An anti-calendar is not
an instrument of radicals or irresponsibles. It is not
meant to destroy. An anti-calendar is an instrument
of rational and responsible people who wish to improve
their course of studies and their level of instruction. We
hope that the Education anti-calendar will be capable of
accomplishing these goals.
The anti-calendar committee, a selected group of
interested, high-average Education students, has begun
the immense process of assessing the Faculty of Education. Their work has just begun.
We believe, and reasonably so, that every student
in Education has the duty and the responsibility to insure that this program is a success. Your contribution
can be as small as an honest assessment of your courses
on the sheets to be provided or as great as doing some
of the 'bull work' of collation, computation and publication of the results.
It is totally unsatisfactory and irresponsible to shrug
off your duty.
It would be disastrous to do so for there might be
hundreds of other students with the same intentions.
The work would be useless; the results would not
be representative; the anti-calendar would be a complete
failure.
Let's begin the "big sell" in a small but lasting
way!
RULES  OF CONDUCT
1. Teachers will each day fill lamps, clean chimneys and
trim wicks. Each teacher will bring a bucket of water
and a scuttle of coal for the day's sessions.
2. Men teachers may take one evening a week for courting purposes or two evenings a week if they go to church
regularly.
3. After ten hours of school, the teacher should spend the
remaining time reading the Bible or other good books.
4. Women teachers who marry or engage in unseemly
conduct will be dismissed.
5. Every teacher should lay aside from each pay a goodly
sum of his earnings for his 'benefit during his declining
years, so that he will not become a burden on society.
6. Any teacher who smokes, uses liquor in any form, frequents pool or public halls or gets shaved in a barber
shop will give good reason to suspect his worth intentions, integrity and honesty.
7. The teacher who performs his labors faithfully and
without fault for five years will be given an increase of
twenty-five cents per week in his pay, providing the
Board of Educaton approves.
—1871
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Deans Message
*<,>,'■""?   - *;„-  ' ,^,->A« ,-*!«-.-i;. „-,„&  ',-
/It V. Scarfe, Dean of Education
Television is not a panacea for solving all our modern educational problems. It
is, of course, a magnificent
medium of communication.
It is a superb form of entertainment. It is the cleverest device yet produced by
our technological age for
attracting the attention and
maintaining the interest of
the general public. It is also
the finest advertising mechanism ever invented. Nevertheless none of these qualities necessarily make it educational. Unless it stimulates thought, arouses curi-
ousity, and promotes further
enquiry, it cannot be called educational.
Most television is designed to entertain or to per-
suage. the emotional appeal
of commercial television is
usually far greater than its
intellectual stimulus. In
fact, it might even be proposed that the major purpose of many public television programs is to prevent the viewer from performing any worthwhile
cerebral activities.
Educational television is
not designed to caress the
emotions, to provide entertainment, or even to deliver
attractive explanatory talks
on current topics. Its major
purpose is to put viewers into as close contact with the
reality of the world and society as possible. In other
words the viewers are put in
the same situation as original explorers, investigators,
or research workers, when
engaged on initial field
work, laboratory experiment, or archive exploration. Thus, all the thinking
is left to the viewer. It is
for him to organize, classify
and sort out the data provided. It is for him to ask
questions and seek explanations. It is for him to see
implications, make inferences, draw conclusions and
formulate principles or
theories.
The function of educational television is to provides recent, up-to-date, ac-
experiences and stimulating
facts  —  particularly  those
which an ordinary teacher
in the classroom would find
it difficult to discover, impossible to present, or too
time-consuming to organize.
Educational television provides reecnt, up-to-date, accurate, on-the-spot information. It provides for a
whole class close-up of something that one (individual
only could normally see at
a time. It gives large audiences access to the finest
materials, the cleverest organizers of intellectual stimuli, and the most opposite
illustrations. More students
get access to the best that
clever educators ican provide:
For school purposes it is
unnecessary to see the
speaker; it is wrong for the
speaker to seek to give an
explanatory lecture; it is
useless for the teacher simply to reproduce a didactic
lesson. What is necessary is
to put the viewers into direct contact with original
materials and real activities
from the outside world, and
to give them the same thrill
that the explorer or research
worker gets when, through
careful observation and
study, he discovers something new, or sees relationship not so far comprehend .-
ed. In the classroom the
teacher's function is to select the appropriate T.V.
program, to set enquiry go
ing, to lead discussion, and
to promote further experiment.
For university purposes
other ways of dealing with
abstruse subjects are appropriate. It may be necessary
to see the speaker. It may
be necessary to offer explanations. It will certainly be
necessary to inject some inspiration, some new insight,
and some stimulating
thoughts into the program.
But some of the educational
theory appropriate to
schools also applies to university learning. All educational television must stimulate much thought, much
curiosity, much further intellectual effort.
President's
Message
n  WELLS
Ed. US. Pres.
This year has seen a new
attitude and temperament
developing on campus. University students have found
new ways in which to direct
their frustrations and energies. Yes, even the Education
Faculty students are beginning to raise questions on
student autonomy! How has
this come about?
If you can't lead a horse to
water, then you kick it in its
south-end and watch for a
reaction. It is my contention
that to create any queries or
interest, one must assume
the role of dictator and ride
out the ensuing storm.
Troubled water are calmed
by oil—students are pacified
by hearing just what they
want to hear.
"Don't get involved —
your social life suffers!" is a
long-time motto which is due
for change. The more experience one has with student
government, the better prepared! one is for advancement in the teaching profession.
Why do you think that the
Faculty of Engineering has
so many council positions?
Employers recognize the
worth of council experience.
Any job interview will bear
out this fact. The same attitude is held by district
superintendents who Tvill be
hiring teachers in the spring.
When you are looking for
a teaching position, don't
climb on the band wagon just
•because the band strikes up.
Be rational enough to weigh
all possibilities before jump-
teachers should adopt a ma-
ing at any offer. The time
has long since passed when
ture, if not professional attitude. Remember that you
are in demand, you are well
prepared and your profession is one of the most important in the world. Tuesday,   February   1,   1966
THE      EDUSSEY
Page 3
ETV
PRESENTS
Education Television
Control Room Overlooking The Studio
The Nature of ETV
Student  Work
For more than ninety ed -
cation students, ETV has been
a non-credit, extra-curricular
course, Many students have
spent hours of their own time
learning the peculiarities of TV
operation. When they applied
for admission into the 'sanctum
sanctorum' of ETV, few realized what things they might
learn or be asked to do.
ETV offers an opportunity
to those with a talent to use
that talent.
Functional Use of ETV
1. Lessons taught in schools
for viewing by students and
faculty on campus (Music, vis-
alizing meaning in reading,
French oral vocabulary development, written expression in
In the words of Dean N.
Scarfe; "Television is not a
panacea for solving all our modern educational problems."
What, then,  is E.T.V.?
History
During the 1962-63 university year, the faculty of Education obtained its first television
equipment. The new Education Building had been planned
so that Educational Television
could easily become an integral part of the audio-visual
department and of the entire
building.
With this equipment it was
possible to produce live television shows wherever the
equipment was set up. Co-operation from the Vancouver
School Board allowed ETV to
transmit programmes from
Queen Mary Elementary School
and from Kitsilano Secondary
Schoo. Several transmissions
were made and these programmes met with generally
enthusiastic   approval.
Current Operation
New equipment was installed
in the third floor studio late
in November. The equipment
is here on a trial basis until
such time as the ETV staff and
the university find it to be
satisfactory   or   othe.^vise.   In-
New G.E. Studio Camera
Portable Cameras and Console for School Use.
eluded in this trial installation
are two General Electric cameras, a wide range of lighting
and sound equipment, a console
with four monitors, and a
video tape recorder.
When final decisions have
been made regarding purchase
of equipment, and when all
equipment is installed and in
perfect running order, it will
be possible to produce shows
for immediate use and at the
same time record them for future presentation.
The reasons for the UBC
ETV experiment are twofold:
first, to explore further the
possibilities of this medium as
a comm nications device in all
aspects of education, and second, to use television as an
observational device in teacher
education. The projected
values of the observational use
of TV are:
1. An economical use of instructional time by means of
multiple section viewing.
2. An economical use of college student time through
avoidance of transportation
time to more distant locations.
3. An increase in the capacity of available schools to
provide observational experiences.
4. To provide focus on specific and important aspects of
the teacher-pupil learning situation, such as principles, teaching techniq es and methods,
physical features of the classroom, materials used by the
teacher, individual pupil characteristics, and the class as a
whole.
English, Arithmetic, Writing,
History, Music, Geography,
etc.)
2. Parent-teacher demonstration.
3. BCTF day.
4. Science demonstration by
UBC professor.
5. Stanford-Binet demonstra
tion.
6. Line-cut production (Art).
7. Children's shows.
8. Nursing school demonstration.
9. Education   Undergraduate
Society council meeting.
Personnel
The ETV experiment is under the direction of professor
B. R. Whittinger. Professor
Whittinger majored in Science
and Music at the University of
Minnesota where he also received his television training.
While at U. of M.; he helped
establish their closed circuit
television installation, one of
the first in North America. His
post graduate work was also
done at Minnesota with emphasis on curriculum and
theories of learning.
Before coming to UBC eight
years ago, he lectured at University of Manitoba for three
years.
At UBC, Professor Whittinger is in charge of the audiovisual department including
all of ETV. He teaches several
sections of an audio visual aids
course.
This summer there will be
a post graduate course, Education 539 in the use of audiovisual  materials.   The   empha-
Professor B. R. Whittinger, Harry Kenball, Sally Roberts
- The Staff
5. To demonstrate all aspects
of the teacher-pupil learning
situation woven into one interrelated pattern.
6. To provide all observors
with a common observation experience and a common frame
of reference upon which discussion may be based.
7. To point out events in the
classroom as they occur and
relate these pupil data in the
hands of the observer to enrich
the observer's understanding of
the situation being observed,
and 8. To provide structured
observations that may contribute to the development of observational skills to be used
in later in-person observations.
Behind The Scenes
sis will be on administration of
ETV facilities.
Harry Kemball, assistant to
Professor Whittinger, helps in
production of ETV shows. He
also does a great deal of photographic work (both moving and
still) for the audio-visual department.
Sally Roberts, graduate assistant, is currently working on
her master's thesis on evaluation of educational television.
She assists with productions,
writes scripts, makes graphics
and helps evaluate the different productions.
Future
Where is ETV going? What
will its future be? Consulting
a crystal ball might give you
the answers. Plans and hopes
for the future are:
1. Further experimentation
with TV facilities and equipment.
2. Use of ETV as an in-service teaching aid for education
faculty.
3. Continued use as an observational medium.
4. Introduction of more teachers to television operation.
5. Eventual incorporation of
TV  into  B.C.  schools.
6. UHF facilities to transmit
programmes to schools.
7. Micro-teaching. (Video
taping of student teacher's
classroom presentation allows
each student to evaluate his
own work.)
Sound interesting? It is!
Once you are involved in ETV
you're hooked — you feel that
the work you do is worthwhile.
Switching Audio-Video In New Studio Page 4
THE       EDUSSEY
Tuesday, Feb.  1,  1966
Large group instruction with overhead projector
LET'S   FACE   IT
(Continued from Page 1)
tations of the job and the lack
of intellectual freedom.
And the student teacher
must be prepared to conform,
he must be prepared to work
for his ideals in small ways
only. He must be prepared to
teach facts and not people.
It is all very well to weigh
the idealistic side of the situation, but the system, as it
stands, exists. Many of the
ideal situations  do not.
Someday it may change, but
not for many years. And it is
in the present system that the
student must teach.
If the Faculty screened its
does the School of Social Work,
applicants more carefully, as
the idealistic chaff could be
separated from the realistic
wheat.
I should know — I was a
dreamer  who quit!
E.  C.
The Vancouver Stationers Ltd.
PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHY
1110 Seymour Street,
Vancouver 2, B.C.
MU 4-7531
A Career in Teaching
The B.C. Teachers' Federation invites
education students to participate in the
BCTF Program on Thursday, February
3, 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
This is your opportunity to receive
answers to questions you may have
about teaching and the Teachers' Federation.
Registration in the Education Building
lounge at 1:00 p.m.
Teaching is rightly referred to as the
"Profession of Opportunity."
We extend to any UBC student a sincere
invitation to visit our office to obtain
information on the teaching profession
in B.C.
The B.C. Teachers' Federation
1815 West 7th Avenue (at Burrard St.)
Vancouver
WANTED ■ YOU
For Research
By W. E. SCHWAHN, Ph.D.
The Classroom Research
Center has been established'
in the Faculty of Education
of the University of British
Columbia in order to facilitate the investigation of the
nature and conditions of
learning and teaching, the
development of instructional
prescription and the formulation of learning - teaching
theory in respect to the actual educational situation.
The initial step in discharging these responsibities
is that of ascertaining the
professional persons interested in engaging in this kind of
research, the nature of the
studies they desire to undertake and the needed, as well
as available, educational
situations. Accordingly, the
Center is presently assembling a roster of faculty personnel, projects andl needs,
to be followed by gathering
similar information concerning educators in the field.
The invitation of the Edus-
sey to describe something of
the nature anid function of
the Center in this issue, likewise provides the opportunity to solicit students in the
Faculty of Education to register their interest in preparing of and participation
in classroom research. Students who are interested in
obtaining information concerning this type of research
are not only invited to con-
Monday, Wednesday or Friday afternoon following the
February-March practicum
period, but are also encouraged to do so even though
their present ideas may not
yet be clearly or fully defined.
W. E. SCHWAHN, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Room 2420 Education
Team
teaching
NEW TEACHING TECHNIQUES
New ways of organizing
classes, new and better methods of staff utilization and
new methods of instruction
are all needed in order to improve today's Secondary
Education.
An experiment in staff
utilization and instructional
methods si being conducted
at Eric Hamber Secondary
School in Vancouver. The
focus is on change and will
continue to be so as Hamber
has been designated the Experimental High School for
Vancouver.
This year, Team Teaching
is being utilized in Science 9,
Mathematics 10, English 11,
and Social Studies 11. Under
this system, a team of teachers presents lessons to a large
group of 100 to 140 students.
This method enables specialists on the staff to give lessons in their respective
fields; it also enables other
members of the staff to benefit from seeing an expert
lecturing in his field. Better
lesson prepartion, which
passes the critical judgment
of professional colleagues,
benefits the students. In
large-group presentations, the
latest audio-visual equipment
and methods are utilized to
supplement the lectures.
The large groups are subdivided into small discussion
or seminar groups of 10 to 15
students. In the discussion
groups ideas presented in the
large groups are discussed.
Students work independently in the library, in resource centres, or in the labs
doing research projects or
exercises.
The division of time is approximately 40% for large
groups, 20% for seminar or
small group work and 40%
for individual study. The
small groups are used for
remedial and enrichment
work.
The main purpose of team
teaching is to make students
more self-reliant and' to learn
through personal discovery.
At the present time there
are    thirteen,    fifth    year
secondary (B.Ed, program)
students involved in the program. The school utilizes a
combination of a ten-day
block and a mosaic-type of
timetable which was pro-
grommed by I.B.M. this year.
The team teaching blocks are
scheduled for Tuesdays and
Thursdays and the interns
spend both days at the
school. In three of the teaching blocks, the teams meet
the students four times in the
four days. In two of the
teaching blocks the teams
meet the students three times
in four days.
Asid'e from the team teaching blocks, the interns meet
with the team in a preparation period before or after
the team period for planning
and evaluation. The rest of
the day is spent working
with conventional classes.
The student interns supervise seminars and individual
study, present the occasional
large group lecture, and assist in the evaluation of the
students' progress. They also
prepare duplicated materials
for use in the team teaching.
The future is unlimited' for
innovations in education at
Hamber. An addition to the
school will be completed by
1967-68 containing among
other things, a modern lecture hall and resource centre
with study facalities for 250
students. Implementation of
a closed circuit television
network is also contemplated.
All staff members in the
core subjects will be oriented
in teaming by 1967-68. Continued use of student interns
is essential for the operation
of teaming. The use of teaching assistants for clerical and
other routine work is being
considered.
The student can look forward to a greater emphasis
on independent study and
increased freedom andl responsibility.
The success of team teaching is dependent on complete
co-operation of students, staff
and student interns.
Private Study Time Tuesday,  February   1,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Elections
AMS presidential candidates
speak out with capsule platforms
PETER BRAUND
Fellow Students:
There are two issues in this
campaign:
Leadership: I regard the
AMS presidency as a position
of great responsibility demanding both administrative
experience and competent
leadership.
I have served in this organization fighting against as well
as working with it for issues
I have believed to be in the
student body's best interest.
Direction that your student
council must take next year:
(a) Full disclosure of all
SUB facts;
(b) Forward with SUB;
(c) Student ombudsman;
(d) Student participatory
reaction to any fee increase in
1966-67;
(e) Student representation
on the Senate.
I ask you to consider your
$5 million SUB and the policies of each candidate on this
issue.
I ask you to consider your
$750,000 annual student council budget and the ability of
each candidate to administer
this budget.
I ask you to consider the
direction that you think your
student council should' take
next year.
I you favor my stands on
each of the above issues. I ask
you to support my candidacy
for AMS president on Wednesday.
GABOR MATE
Most differences .between
my program and that of my
leading opponent are matters
of detail. Where we disagree
is SUB, and even there we
both favor full disclosure of
the facts before anything else
is done.
It is obvious that the election will be decided not so
much on issues, but on differ
ences in personality and approach.
I ask you to' vote for me if
you desire a new, lively but
responsible kind of student
government.
If you believe the AMS president has a certain blue-
blazer, nice guy image to
which I don't conform, no
doubt you will vote against
me.
But if you wish a vital, new
approach to student affairs,
and a vitality which will make
the present cumbersome isolated council into an integral
part of student life, I urge you
to vote for me as AMS president.
My congratulations to my
opponents for a clean, honest
campaign.
DON WISE
The AMS president must be
a person who resolves disputes decisively and then
drives forth with confidence
and determination.
To do this he must bring
major disputes like fee hikes
quickly to a general meeting
to get a mandate from the
students.
With this clear, open indication of student opinion
our case can be given aggressively and confidently to any
opposition — no more embarrassing fiascos like EAP.
This emphasis on direct responsibility to all students
will crush the traditional role
of the AMS presidency as a
direct stepping-stone to a big
business.
This emphasis on legitimacy
can only lead to wise decisions
— like tomorrow!
'Mac doesn't have to answer'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Ubyssey has sunk to a
new low in its-disgusting attack on Dr. John B. Macdonald's excellent speech at
the symposium "Education
and Beyond."
As usual The Ubyssey has
chosen to distort and color the
truth to suit the whims of its
editor.
It is apparent that The
Ubyssey does not realize the
one basic fact of university
rule; the president is appointed by and responsible to the
board of governors, and only
to the board of governors, not
to the students, or to the
faculty.
He is under no obligation to
answer the students' questions
either in public or by means
of written questions and answers. He also has the power
to remove at will all the privileges the students presently
enjoy.
Before   Tlie   Ubyssey   con
tinues demanding that Dr.
Macdonald answer students'
questions publically, perhaps
it might be a good idea for the
editors to read the Universities Act to see exactly what
the student position is.
After reading the Act, it is
hoped that the editors will
realize how fortunate the students are in having as considerate a president as Dr.
Macdonald.
"DISGUSTED"
Education IV
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
THIS WEEK ONLY
Don Crawford
with Carol Hedin
*    *    *
HOOTENANNY
SUNDAY EVENINGS
Coming the Irish
Rovers
Civil Engineers
Graduate & Undergraduate
C/\J
Invites you to discuss
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Campus Interviews
February 3 and 4
For information, applications   and   appointments
please  see  your  Student
Placement Office.
BURSARIES
A number of scholarships, each of $6,000 per annum
(tax free), are available to suitable graduates in any
branch of engineering — mech., elec, civil etc. — or
applied science who are interested in a career in the
Mining Industry.
These are McGill University scholarships in an advanced course leading to a master's degree in mining
engineering.
Applications should be made, before February 15,
1966, to:
Chairman:
Dept. of Mining   Engineering  & Applied Geophysics,
McGill University,
Montreal, P.Q.
These scholarships are sponsored by a group of Canadian Mining Companies.
THIS IS MIKE PETCH, SCIENCE III
HE'S FASCINATED BY 2-WAY RADIOS.
HE'S NEVER USED ONE BEFORE.
HAVE YOU?
SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS,  UBC DETACHMENT,
RECRUITING, UBC ARMOURIES,
Today: 7:30 p.m.
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAM AC      r C    C   fibre.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      1
'Reg'd. Can. T.M.
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  1,  1966
TO SPLIT ARTS
'Creative' profs
like faculty bid
Many creative arts professors have welcomed the proposed new faculty of the creative and performing arts.
arts, split which will'
The
create the new faculty was approved at a faculty meeting
last week.
"I'm very much for it," said
music professor Eliot Weis-
garber. "I think most of us are.
"Its a real movement to put
the arts in a strong position on
the campus."
Creative writing professor
Jacob Zilber foresaw the possibility of a greater development in the area of films.
"There would be greater
freedom to develop programs.
"The arts are easier to promote when you have a srjnall
group of like minded people."
he said.
Red  Cross  clinic
after our blood
The Red Cross returns to
UBC in February.
The engineering undergraduate society will sponsor a blood drive Feb. 7-11
and  14-18 in the armory.
At least 300 donors each
day will be necessary for the
clinic to reach its v goal of
15,000 units of blood for local hospitals.
Theatre professor Klaus
Strassmann stressed the effect
it would have on the attitude
to the arts.
"People will pay more attention to the arts."
Strassmann said the arts
faculty was too big to give proper attention to each department.
"We'll be able to undertake
more things."
Zilber said a separate department would "allow for certain
kinds of interplay among the
arts."
He said it might be possible
to put on an event involving
all the creative and performing arts.
He sees the possibility of
more "lively experimental programs."
Report calls
for student
rep on board
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
chancellor of the University of
Alberta has called for a student representative on the
board of governors.
In a report to the Alberta
government recommend-
ing changes in the University
Act, chancellor F. P. Galbraith
and board member L. A. Des-
rochers signed a minority memorandum "strongly recommending that provision be made for
the nomination by the students'
union of one member to the
board  of  its  University."
The main body of the report
calls for an independent universities commission for the
province, as an intermediary
between government and universities.
Student union president Richard Price said he hoped the
government would consider
the minority report.
ATTENTION
1966
ARTS and SCIENCE
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of
B.C. is sponsoring
A FREE NOON HOUR FILM
on THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3 at 12:30 p.m. in
Room 100, Buchanan Building.
Representatives of the Institute will be present to
answer questions about a career in chartered
accountancy.
More 'tween classes
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Behold I Create — a talk by
sculptor Agon Milinkovich
Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
AUS
Excitement!    Danger!   Help
distribute   Arts   Anti-calendar
Wednesday noon in the AUS
office.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Wednesday noon in Bu. 104
Howard Green speaks on Ethics
in Foreign Policy.
Engineers and Scientists:
Let's talk about a career at Boeing...
50-year leader in aerospace technology
Campus Interviews, Monday and Tuesday, February  14 and 15
Seymour
and Park
Brentwood
Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
The most effective way to evaluate a company in terms of its potential for dynamic
career growth is to examine its past record, its current status, and its prospects
and planning for the future, together with
the professional climate it offers for the
development of your individual capabilities.
Boeing, which in 1966 completes 50 years
of unmatched aircraft innovation and production, offers you career opportunities as
diverse as its extensive and varied bacK-
log. Whether your interests lie in the field
of commercial jet airliners of the future or
in space-flight technology, you can find at
Boeing an opening which combines professional challenge and long-range stability.
The men of Boeing are today pioneering
evolutionary advances in both civilian and
military aircraft, as well as in space programs of such historic importance as
America's first moon landing. Missiles,
space vehicles, gas turbine engines, transport helicopters, marine vehicles and basic
research are other areas of Boeing activity.
There's a spot where your talents can
mature and grow at Boeing, in research,
design, test, manufacturing or administration. The company's position as world
leader in jet transportation provides a
measure of the calibre of people with
whom you would work. In addition, Boeing
people work in small groups, where initiative and ability get maximum exposure.
Boeing encourages participation in the
company-paid Graduate Study Program at
leading colleges and universities near
company installations.
We're looking forward to meeting engineering, mathematics and science seniors
and graduate students during our visit to
your campus. Make an appointment now
at your placement office. Boeing is an
equal opportunity employer.
(1) Boeing's new short-range 737 jetliner. (2)
Variable-sweep wing design for the nation s
first supersonic commercial jet transport.
(3) NASA's Saturn V launch vehicle wi I power
orbital and deep-space flights. (4) Model of
Lunar Orbiter Boeing is building for NASA.
(5) Boeing-Vertol 107 transport helicopter
shown with Boeing 707 jetliner.
Divisions:
Commercial Airplane   .   Military Airplane   .   Missile  .  Space
Turbine  •  Vertol   •   Also, Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories Tuesday,   February-  1,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPLIT SERIES
Birds retaliate
revenge loss
UBC Thunderbirds
PAUL NEMETH
. . looks ahead
Bellingham
baffle
matmen
boys
Bird
UBC Thunderbirds wrestling team were defeated 31-5 by
a strong Western Washington
State College team in the Women's gym Saturday.
The Western crew were able
to ride and control the UBC
team, wearing them down
steadily.
Birds, plagued by injuries
and starting without the services of Bruce Green and Conn
Christiansen, saw Ted Emerson and Ron Reagh injured.
A fine performance was put
on by Chris Nemeth who pinned his opponeent, Bruct Stu-
dich, for UBC's only points.
staged a Jeckyll and Hyde on ice
over the weekend.
Birds were drubbed 4-0 by
the University of Saskatchewan Huskies Friday night at
the Winter Sports Centre but
completely reversed their form
Saturday afternoon as they
scored an impressive 6-3 victory before over 500 fans.
Smarting from an inept performance the night before, the
Birds jumped to a 3-0 lead
Saturday.
Glen Richards opened  scoring when he took a pass from
Wayne Hunter behind the Huskies net,  and back-handed  a
^^^     low drive from the short side
^Hk   behind   Huskies'    goalie   John
^^H   O'Connor,
^^M Dan Cummings and Jack
^^TLittler followed with second
period markers before Huskies
took advantage of a brief UBC
defensive lapse and scored two
goals within 58 seconds, both
by Bill Seymour.
That was as close as the
Huskies came. UBC poured on
the pressure to get three third
period goals, two from Mickey
McDowell and Cummings' second of the game.
Friday, UBC was never in
the game.
Huskies dominated play from
the opening face-off, out-hitting, passing and shooting the
Birds.
Huskies scored two goals in
the first and last periods while
UBC failed to get any clear-cut
scoring opportunities, even
though they had a two man
advantage on two accasions.
Elementary  &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West  10th Avenue
For  an interview
call RE 1-1131
Ash cans United
in  soccer  win
Thunderbirds' soccer team
got back on the winning
track Saturday.
'Birds defeated a rough
North Shore United side 3-1
in a Pacific Coast League
game at Varsity Stadium.
Ash Valdai led the way
for UBC with two goals
while Kirby Carter notched
the other one.
In a high scoring junior
game Sunday, Tomahawks
broke their losing streak, defeating North Shore United
5-3.
Rugby teams
get two wins
UBC rugby Thunderbirds
were downed by the Occasionals 13-9 at Wolfson Field
Sunday.
The Occasionals, a team
made up of players from all
city clubs, scored in the first
minutes of the game.
Totems continued their winning streak by a sound 14-6
victory over Trojans II; Tomahawks won by default over
Meralomas IV; Papooses, playing their first game, were
edged 14-10 by Royal Rhodes.
Cagers fail
in Olympia
OLYMPIA. Wash. — Peter
Mullin's basketball Thunderbirds continued to lose on the
road as they dropped 73-65 and
109-81 decisions to St. Martin
Saints here Friday and Saturday.
The lone exception to UBC's
poor showing was Bob Barazzuol.
In the first game, the 6'2"
forward scored 19 points, and
Saturday bagged a remarkable
game high 37.
POSTGRADUATE
OPPORTUNITIES
Pathological Chemistry
BANTING INSTITUTE,
UNIVERSITY   OF   TORONTO
Three Postgraduate Fellowships, initial stipends ranging from $2,400-$4,000 per
annum depending upon
qualifications, will become
available during 1966 in the
Department of Pathological
Chemistry, Banting Institute,
University of Toronto, Toronto 5. Applications are
invited from students with
a sound undergrad uate
training in the Chemical or
Biological Sciences or in
Medicine. Interested students may write to the Head
of the Department for further details.
Netrers lose
Bellingham YMCA edged out
UBC's volleyball squad in the
American city Friday.
UBC won the first set 16-14,
'but dropped the second 15-13.
UBC had! the third set-victory
within its grasp but wilted under pressure and the American
squad grabbed a 9-3 lead and
held on for a 15-11 win.
SAVE 25%
COSMETICS
Large Size Sale
at
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
IN THE VILLAGE
FOR CAMPUS DELIVERY - 224-3202
THE   UBC   MUSICAL   SOCIETY
presents
TAKE ME
ALONG!
The Smash Broadway Musical
Starring:   Jerry Cook
Jan Rae
Dave Overton
Directed by: JAMES JOHNSTON
Music Conducted by: BEV. FYFE
Choreography: GRACE MacDONALD
UBC AUDITORIUM
FEBRUARY 7-12
TICKETS:
Auditorium  Box Office -     -    228-3176
AMS Box Office -    -    -    -    224-3242
Special Student Prices
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Noon 75c or 2/$1.25
Wednesday Night  -    -    -    $1.00  rush
■*•*'»-1h-*.1*.3* » »-1 Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  1,  1966
7WEEN CLASSES
Singing brethern here
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Direct from Winnipeg, the
Mennonite Brethren Bible College Choir, performs noon in
Brock. Admission free.
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Game session Wednesday
7:30-11:00 in the Brock TV
Room.
PRE-MED
A fourth year Med student
talks on medical school Wednesday noon in Wes. 201.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
COMMITTEE
Hear Ed Lemansky of the
Progressive Labor Party on the
Harlem Rebellion and Bill Epton and the Radical Left in
America Today. Wednesday
noon, Bu. 100.
JR. A.I.C.
Dr. N. E. ©orlaug, assistant
director Agricultural  Sciences
The   Rockefeller   Foundation,
speaks noon in Ag. 100.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish-speaking day  at IH
from noon to 4:00 p.m. Coffee
available.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Meeting today in Bu. 204
with film and elections.
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Organizational meeting in
Bu. 102 Wednesday. Everyone
welcome.
AGSCRP
Dean Burnham Kelly, College of Architecture and Urban
Planning of Cornell University
speaks Wednesday noon, Las.
102.
IL CAFFE
Italian day Wednesday 11:00-
3:00 at IH. Films at noon — all
invited.
BADMINTON CLUB
Meeting tonight to discuss
spring tournament.
DESERET CLUB
Mormon Club presents a talk
and   discussion  on  Friendship
Wednesday noon in Bu. 3252.
Everyone welcome.
CUS
Paul Williamson, Vic College
student president speaks on
Withholding of Fees in Brock
Wednesday noon.
STUDENT WIVES CLUB
Monthly meeting Wednesday
8   p.m.   Brock   Hall.   Fashion
Show.
CLASSICS CLUB
Prof. E. Badian of Leeds U.
speaks Wednesday noon in Bu.
100.
UBC CONSERVATIVES
Special    elections    meeting
Wednesday noon in Bu. 214.
(fettittf IflatMed?
Phone or call in for our new "Take
Home" invitation album. For a personal   estimate   of   costs   in   just   15
minutes, call —
™e card shop
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
is ummu
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Get out and VOTE!
Balloting will be conducted at the following
places between  10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.:
Bioscience
Brock Hall North
Brock Hall South
Buchanan I
Buchanan 2
Bus Stop
Cafeteria
College Library
Education
Engineering
Henry Angus
Home Economics
Library
Physics
Ponderosa
War Memorial Gym
Wesbrook
Balloting will be conducted at Totem Park, Fort Camp,
Acadia Camp and the Lower Mall from 5:00 to 7:00
p.m. on Tuesday (Feb. 1st).
the MOHON PICTURE
Wrci\ SOMECNAIG 10
OFFEND EVERYONE!!
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Filmways present
Martin BansohoFs Production
Loved ^i\e
sUrrin_*
ROBERT MORSE-JONATHAN WINTERS
ANJANETTE COMER
Camn U«r.t Sun
Dana Andrews • Milton Berle • James Coburn • John Gielgud
Tab Hunter- Margaret Leighton • Liberace-Roddy McDowall
Robert Morley • Barbara Nichols • Lionel Stander
iRODSTEIGER.1^-'"'
M-Mr.Jqfer
_Hj_Wu<_
Adult Entertainment Only
Directed by Tony Richardson ■
STARTS
Wednesday
Park
Royal
Weil
Vancouver
Just West of Eaton'i - 922-9174 - Ample Free Parking
2 Performances 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. - Mat. Saturday 2 p.m.
ESTATE  PLANNERS
for Head Office in Toronto
Business and Personal Estate Anaylsts
Opportunities for Arts & Commerce
Graduates
Contact Student Placement Service
Regarding Interviews — Feb. 3
^ EXCELSIOR LIFE Am*** 6*?**?
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Adrance
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
FOUND — LADIES WATCH NEAR
Wesbrook. Owner may claim same
upon description. Phone 738-9392
after   6   p.m.
FOUND LIBRARY CARD BELONG-
ing to Rosalind K. Coleman —
pick up at Ubyssey Advertising
Office, Brock Hall.
LOST THREE LIBRARY BOOKS
Jan. 27, '66. Education Building.
Phone Wayne Rm.  33, 224-9833.
FOUND: ONE BLUE PEN. TO
identify phone Ann Taylor 224-
9786  after 7  p.m.	
LOST: LADIES DARK BROWN
Glasses   Contact   Cathy   TR   4-2961.
REWARD: RETURN OF CHEER -
leadlng outfit, Gold .Sweater
White  Skirt.   Phone 266-9539.
FOUND BOOK — "COMPLETE
German Course for first examinations"   Call   Lynn   263-5602.	
LOST 5:15, JAN. 2«, ANGUS
Lounge. Black leather gloves
pleeza phone Louis 261-6297 after
6.
DESPARATE APPEAL TO CRIM-
inals! That Sombrero you stole at
Friday's Mardi Gras was the personal property of my grandfather,
who is on his death-bed. Please
return   to   A.M.S.   Office.   Reward.
%%% REWARD FOR RETURN OF
thin black binder, imprinted Western Asbestos on bottom side. Contains valuable notes which I want
bjack. Lost about Jan. 21. Hugh
922-6487.
Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING
a card. Send Valentine and Birthday Greetings to your friends with
a   Classified   ad.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSU.R-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-67.07.
EDUCATION FORMAL, FEB. 5 AT
the Commodore Cabaret. $3.50 per
couple with card, 14.50 regular.
8-12 (dancing until 1)—Tickets
on sale A.M.S.  or Ed.  Lounge.    ■
NEWMAN CENTRE MON. TO FRI.
12:30-1:30 p.m. 10:00-11:00 p.m.
Sandwiches, Hamburgers, Free
Coffee.
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.	
THE EUROPEAN TRAVEL SEM-
inar advertised In Friday's Ubyssey
to   be   held   in   the   Georgia   Hotel
on. Wednesday, February 2nd, will
start  at  8  p.m.
THE COGNOSCENTI (THINKING
people) are voting Liberal because
they believe in the Educated Society.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM, NORTH
Van. vie. Keith and Jones call
988-8886.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1958 M.G.A. — MECHANICALLY
good. Best Offer. Phone Jean
261-0468   evenings.	
•56 STUDE' CHAMP SEDAN: O.D.,
radio. A good running car in nice
shape. Private. $225.00. FA 1-9J56.
J5 CHEV., H.T., CANDY APPLE
green, exc. condition, Olds, powered (394 in., 3-deuces, 4-speed hy-
drostick, positract, R. Masters,
chromed wheels) Arlington winner
R/M.   Mel.   LA   6-7034.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with Its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 Pc.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:    New   outlet    now   open    close
to  U.B.C. 	
MEN OR WOMEN. WONDERFUL
extra income part time. Flexible
hours. Training provided. Car
necessary. Pleasant dignified work.
Phone 255-8748 between 9 to 10
a.m. and 5 to 6 p.m. for Interview.
GREYHOUND LINES OF CANADA
is accepting Driver applications:
Age 24-35 inclus. Minimum 5'10".
Maximum 6'2", 165-210 lbs., 20"-20
vision without glasses. Must pass
Greyhound Physical examination.
Apply in person Vancouver, Penticton,   or  Cache  Creek,   B.CJ
CARETAKER—SIX APARTMENTS
free suite, phone, heat, light.
Phone   MU   1-0602.
INSTRUCTION
Music
69
GTTITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRJJC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone CA 8-8412.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
USED   FURNITURE   MART
Where You  Shop at Auction Prices
3207 West  Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store)
WONDERFUL CLASSIC GUITAR
with case. Bargain $80. 224-58S5
(after 5:00 p.m.)	
LEFT-HANDED VIOLIN, FULL
size, German make, leather case
and rain case, excellent, valued
at $126. Price $75 or offer AM 6-
2280.
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MIALE) SINGLE,
furnished room, kitchen privileges:
one sharing frig., washroom, entrance — 1 block to shops, buses,
non-smoker.  RE  3-8778.
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT,
three blocks from gates, easy travelling, all facilities, own entrance,
phone   224-7623  after  4   p.m.
Room ft Board
82
ROOM AND FULL BOARD—HALF
block from gates, laundry, $75
mo. Phone Mrs. Worner, CA 8-8380.
IT TAKES HAIRS! ROOM AND
Board — Zeth Psi Fraternity. Xear
to campus. Good food. Phone CA
4-9885. U
ON  CAMPUS   ROOM   AND   BOARD
for   male   student   phone   224-9790.
Furn. Houses 8c Apis.
83
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR
rent. Suitable for two $65 per
month.    3556   W.    1st.    Phone   RE
8-5495.

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