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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1964

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Array The meek
shall inherit
the earth
THE UBYSSEY
They haven't
got the guts
to refuse it
VOL VLVII, No. 25
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1964
CA 4-3916
IFC suspends Kappas
Member charged
on liquor count
—don home photos
BLIND STUDENTS from Jericho Hill School navigated for 20 sports car drivers Saturday
in second annual Braille Rally sponsored by the UBC Sports Car Club. Students aged 9
to 12 read instructions printed in braille. Route included trip through Stanley Park
Aquarium.
Report from Morocco
By DON HULL
Inter-fraternlty council Friday suspended Kappa Sigma
Fraternity after a member
was charged with illegal possession of liquor.
The 20-year-old Kappa Sigma member was charged by
RCMP after a youth was
found with a bottle of beer
near Fraternity Row Nov. 8.
Dean Paravantes, IFC president, said the Kappa Sigmas
have lost the right to hold social functions at their house
because of the suspension.
They may, however, have frat
meetings there.
The Kappa Sigma Fraternity
loses its vote on IFC, though
members may attend meetings.
The move to suspend the fraternity was prompted by the
IFC executive under the section of its constitution which
allows for disciplinary action
against a member fraternity
acting in a manner which reflects discredit on the fraternity system.
In the meantime the matter
is under investigation by the
disciplinary committee of the
IFC which will report to a
judiciary committee in about
two weeks.
The judiciary committee
will decide on further action
to be taken.
Expulsion of the fraternity
could result, Paravantes said.
If the student, whose case is
due for hearing today, is acquitted, the IFC will drop its
investigation and reinstate the
fraternity, Paravantes said.
Campus RCMP have refused
to release the student's name.
Disillusioned
Corps 'fails' in country of poor
By AL DONALD
FEZ, Morocco—The Peace
Corps in Morocco is useless,
one of its 120 volunteers told
me here.
"I came prepared to be a
little disillusioned, but mainly I'm disappointed," Gail
Wilkins of Los Angeles told
UBC student Bob Brownell
and myself  last week.
"We're tools for propaganda in Morocco, and that's
all we are," she said. She
said. She teaches English, P.E.
and Theatre.
"In about 50 years there
will be a little progress, but
in the meantime it's like batting your head against a
wall."
We sat in on an English
conversation class with 30
teenage  girls at  the govern-
Ubyssey staffer Al Drn-
ald is travelling in Eurrpe.
This is the first of a series
of overseas reports.
ment-run high school in Mek-
nes.
The enthusiasm shown by
the class was encouraging.
"But that's not really progress," said Gail afterwards.
"In a couple of years, those
girls will be behind veils and
shut up in the house most of
the day."
The main reason the Peace
Corps is of little use to the
people of Morocco is the attitude of the Arab, she said.
"The Moroccans don't
really want us," Gail said.
"They don't really want to
progress. Most of them are
satisfied to sit around and sip
their mint tea all day."
She said this is the reason
for the high unemployment
rate in Morocco. Thirty per
cent of the working force is
unemployed and forty per
cent is partly employed.
As Brownell and I sat on
a bus in Meknes, an Arab
woman entered and began to
kiss the hands of the passeng
ers, raising her index finger
as she did so, requesting
money.
"The average Moslem gives
about 40 cents a day to beggars," Gail said.
Most Moroccans admit
things have gone downhill
since the French left the country seven years ago.
The government is ostensibly a constitutional monarchy, although the King runs
his own political party and
all government business
passes through his hands.
Many Europeans in Morocco, however, are not optimistic about the future of the
present Government.
BOB CRUISE
. . .funds inadequate
Athletics
faces big
travel bill
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
A proposal to have UBC rejoin the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association will cost $38,000 a
year for the next five years.
Rejoining WCIAA would increase costs in major sports—
football, hockey and basketball—by more than 50 per
cent, said AMS first vice president Bob Cruise in a preamble
to a report by Men's Athletic
Committee.
To meet financial obligations, athletics would need another $2.25 per student, the report says.
(Each of UBC's 15,500 students now pays $4.20 of his
$29 AMS fees for athletics.)
"Existing sources of funds
for MAC are clearly inadequate," Cruise said.
"Unfair and sweeping belt-
tightening will seriously cramp
MAC's inter-collegiate and
community programme as well
as the WCIAA sports," he said.
"Plans must be made now to
avoid a crisis in the future."
UBC dropped out of WCIAA
in 1963 because of rapidly increasing travel and administration costs, coupled with lack of
stiff competition for our major-
sport teams such as basketball,
football and hockey.
UBC was allowed to remain
in the organization as an associate member with only its
(Continued on  Page 2)
SEE:   ATHLETICS Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1964
SADIE HAWKINS Dt
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25
0*
i.,
O*
WITH
^-BROCK HA LI
PRETTY PAT Jardine wonders who she'll ask to Sadie
Hawkins Dance Saturday. Dance in Brock features The
Playboys, a seven-piece dance band. Tickets are $1.50
a couple at the AMS office. Dance is from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
AHEMON ALL SKIERS!
Here is a new economical way to go skiing!
<t/ Skier's Package Plan
4 TO MT. BAKER
Starting November 21st through March
Buses Leave 7:00 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday
THE PLAN  INCLUDES:
•fe Return trip by bus (with other congenial experts
and snow-bunnies).
-fo A VA hour ski lesson by Franz Gobi's certified
ski school. (New American technique).
•& All day rope tow tickets! (All day chair $1.50
extra).
-fr 20% off rentals.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT;
*Eaton's Ski Village—downtown
*Eaton's Sporting Goods—Brentwood, Park Royal,
New Westminster
"•Tepee Sporting Goods—1017 Robson
—3279 W. Broadway
"Blue Line Sporting Goods—154 W. Hastings
All Inclusive only $9.50
Take A Trip And Save!
Strict rules
Curlers waver
between ice, bar
ATHLETICS
(Continued   from Page   1)
women's teams competing, but
next year must make the decision to return to full competition or drop out for good.
A story in Friday's Ubyssey
said UBC coaches think the
university should rejoin
WCIAA but on a less-than-full
participation basis.
WCIAA officials have said
UBC must come in all the way
or not at all.
Athletic expenses this year
will total $90,000, of which approximately 65 per cent comes
from students, 20 per cent
from gate receipts, 10 per cent
from the university adminstra-
tion, and five per cent from A-
cards.
Costs of minimum WCIAA
participation will rise to $100,-
00O in 1966 and $130,000 by
1967.
However, revenue from gate
receipts will drop when the
stadium is torn down next
year.
The administration contributes a $10,500 grant to athletics.
To curl or to drink, that is
the question.
At least, it's the most important question for members
of the new Thunderbird Curling Club, who have a bar to
themselves while curling.
But you've got to prove
you're 21 to use it, said club
president Bill Macdonald, Law
II.
The club demands proof of
age before it will issue membership cards. And members have
to report to the drawmaster's
table every night before heading on to the lounge, he said.
The bar has been open for
two weeks. It has to be separately licensed every week by
the Liquor Control Board, but
the club is trying to get a permanent license, said Macdonald.
The club operates Saturday
nights in the Winter Sports
Arena from 7 to 12 p.m., and
uses all 6 sheets of ice.
Macdonald said if you have
$10 for the membership fee,
and you can prove you're 21,
you can go to the arena Saturday night.
Members can look at the
rocks in the glasses as well as
on the ice.
COME TO
THE
SECOND COMING
THURSDAY, NOV. 26
12:30
ARMOURIES
TWO BITS
YOUR FUTURE IS
The-
ROTP
Contact:
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT
R. B. ROBINSON
The Armoury
CA 4-1910
REGULAR
and
KING SIZE
du MAURIER
, :o ff.rgdyct of P«t«r Jccfcton Tobacco  limited — makori of fin* cigarette* Tuesday, November 17, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
I -  IU9Wf
RED ENSIGN is forced down throat of Debating Union
president Tom D'Aquino by Creditiste clubber Barry
Cooper. Scene is prelude to debate between Creditistes
and the union Wednesday noon in Brock Lounge on the
resolution: French Canada Has Gone Too Far.
Pregnant allusion
just sour grapes
By JOAN GODSELL
Frosh President Kim Campbell said Monday an article
in the Artisan describing her as heavy with child was sour
^——■■»—————— grapes.
. .   t        .   .    | , She referred to an article in
Lip S   rip   DeatS Friday's   edition   of   the   Arts
cafeteria staff
Student council meeting
will be held tonight at 6:30
p.m. in the council chambers, South Brock.
The meeting, normally
held on Monday night, was
switched because of the
cancelled Liston-Clay fisticuffs.
The Lip's hernia operation,
which cancelled the match,
came on the weekend, too
late for food services to
change its dinner-serving
schedule.
CUS names Hees
honorary head
OTTAWA (CUP) — George
Hees, former Progressive Conservative minister of trade and
commerce, Nov. 6 accepted the
honorary presidency of the
Canadian Union of Students.
Mr. Hees accepted the CUS
post after a meeting with Jean
Bazin, CUS president, in Montreal. The honorary president is
an advisory post and the highest honor the union, can bestow.
f;jr il*j".&£t *   err.   !.*   -,Jy>y;'-i?    *-*
newspaper concerning the
frosh-sponsored Baby - Buggy -
Pablum - Eating Olympics in
which she was a frosh contestant.
She said the Artsmen were
sore because they lost the race
to the Engineers.
The article said, ". . . the
latter (Kim Campbell) appeared heavy with child . . ."
• •   •
Miss Campbell said she was
offended.
She said for those people
who attended the races the article was funny but for those
who weren't there it had indecent implications.
But Miss Campbell said she
was wearing a nightgown with
a sweater stuffed under it in
the form of a large bulge over
her abdomen.
* •    •
Miss Campbell told The
Ubyssey she usually carries
her sweater in a bulge under
her nightgown.
"But people don't normally
see me like that during the
day," she said.
Artisan editor Greydon
Moore said he saw nothing
wrong with the article.
"It did not say Miss Campbell was, heavy, with child but
that' she \appeart*d to be," he
Said.  •     „'    ...,   ,. ....... '.,,   ,  -
Old liberal method best
says freshman president
VICTORIA (Special) — Malcolm Gordon Tavlor spoke out
for a return to the old concept
of a liberal education in his
inaugural address Saturday as
first President of the Victoria
College.
"When the day comes for us
to add professional schools,
our liberal arts program and
tradition will remain so secure
that our graduates will continue to get educated as well
as trained," he said.
•    •    •
In his speech to a special
congregation, Taylor described
the progress of Victoria College from the class of seven
students in 1903 to the 2,500
students now, and onward to
the expected 10,000 students
in 1980.
"We have the resources to
create, if we but choose, the
greatest educational system the
world has ever known," Taylor said.
"We are in a position to
carry knowledge to the ends
of the earth, to wipe out illiteracy, ignorance, intolerance,
disease and hunger."
•    •    •
Disturbed by the increased
technology of the professions,
Taylor said he wants to return
to an education that accepts no
divorce between the sciences
and humanities.
"We in the University of
Victoria (Victoria College)
have an extraordinary opportunity. It is within our power
to play more than a minor role
in the creation of a new
world," he said.
"It is our privilege to inspire and prepare for the future the thousands of students
who will become part of this
academic community to
achieve the high hopes that are
within us all."
High court justice named
to Capital Fund drive post
Justice N. T. Nemetz of the B.C. Supreme Court has
been appointed chairman of the universities division of the
Three Universities Capital Fund.
The fund aims to raise $28 million for UBC, Victoria
College and Simon Fraser Academy.
The universities division of the fund is responsible for
raising $2 million from university groups such as alumni,
students, faculty, boards of directors, staff and parents of
students.
Justice Nemetz will be assisted by business men Alan
Eyre, Paul Plant, Paul Sharp and Dr. Vyner Brooke of
Victoria- College.
Reverend listens
while students talk
The church does too much
talking and not enough listening, Lutheran minister Rev. O.
H. Emberg said in a lecture on
experimental sex Monday.
And to show he meant what
he said, Mr. Emberg spoke for
15 minutes and then turned his
lecture in Bu. 102, into a discussion.
In his lecture Pastor Emberg
outlined his personal beliefs:
The Bible contains everything necessary for a good life,
he said.
"Christian morality as
taught in the Bible is the best
for mankind. Pre-marital sexual intercourse is wrong and
sinful.
"Christian morality exists
because it exists," he said. "It
is true because it is true. It
does not need to be validated."
Mr. Emberg said the family
is the basis of society and that
anything which tends to break
up the family is bad.
"Experimental marriage is
just one more force that tends
to destroy the sacredness of
life."
Mr. Emberg was asked by
the audience for his definition
of real marriage.
"You can't experiment with
marriage," Emberg said. "The
main purpose of marriage is
comfort, love, and aid between
man and woman. The perfect
marriage doesn't exist. It is
the striving for perfection that
makes a good marriage."
Locarno loop ball
The Good Guys beat a
scratch team of the Bad Guys
18-7 last Sunday at Locarno.
Watch for the return grudge
match scheduled next weekend, and everyone show up
this time.
Careers In
Technical Management
Proctor & Gamble has openings in
Production Management    -    Product Research
Quality Control    -    Process Development
Package Development
for Bachelor and Master graduates in Chemical Engineering and
Honours Chemistry.
A full outline of the opportunities in these fields is given in our Technical
brochures available at the Placement Office.
INTERVIEWS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23 and TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24
The Procter & Gamble Company
of Canada, Limited
Hamilton, Ontario
Pointe Claire, P.Q.
..-^^i*. .*<v**»*»*"V^"*f,,^t*t—*-V-T* pl*r"T^P e #:"S.
mmmmt THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Pounding member, Pacific
Student Tress. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1964
I'M SWffiEt&D.
UBC justice
Student autonomy was put to a test last week and it
came out with egg on its face.
The student court heard a case involving an egg-
throwing incident.
A student was alleged to have thrown eggs at sorority
pledges during a rushing function.
Evidence was gathered and the discipline committee
decided there was enough evidence to take the matter
before student court.
At the student trial the alleged throwe* — who failed
to show up — was let off by the judges who failed to find
basis for the charges.
Two witnesses, only one of whom could as much as
identify the defendant as having fled from the scene,
would hardly seem to be sufficient evidence.
The discipline committee should not have brought
the charges before the court in the first place.
Student discipline does not enjoy high esteem in the
eyes of many UBC students.
Bringing an ill-prepared case before court lowers this
already slight esteem.
The defendant should have shown up at the student
court hearing.
Without the approval of the students the court is
powerless to act.
Presumably the responsibility of discipline for our
own affairs is only as good as the respect all of us have
for the privileges UBC students have earned.
The alternatives, we suggest, are not as desirable as
students judging students.
The matter could have been dealt with by a faculty
committee or a department head—an open admission that
students are unable to control their affairs.
Or such cases can be taken to a regular court of law—
though in this particular incidence the evidence suggests any prosecutor would have been laughed out of
court.
The present system is far from perfect.
The fact that the student was proceeded against when
he was not in court is a flaw.
In the egg throwing incident a plea of not guilty was
entered and the student did not have to even speak on
his own behalf.
But if the court had found the student guilty, without the student being present, the situation would have
been ludicrous.
UBC's system of autonomy is not found elsewhere.
Few other North American universities have as
much freedom to control their own affairs as students
at UBC.
Let's not have another egg-throwing incident end up
with egg all over our ptetty, autonomous faces.
Skin a what?
Six names have so far been suggested for the new
student union building.
No one has made the obvious suggestion, so it's up
to The Ubyssey to do so.
The Premier William Andrew Cecil Bennett Building.
Why not? Mr. Bennett is well known.
His government's financial resources are, too.
And so is UBC's lack thereof.
There's more than one way to skin a Socred.
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
News  Tim Padmore
Managing    Janet Matheson
City  Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Asst. City    Lorraine Shore
iAsst. News   Carole Munroe
^Associate  , Mike Hunter
Magazine
Dave Ablett
Hey listen there's big important
news like on Thursday there's a staff
meeting on Thursday to talk about
the party and the blazers and the
crest and things like that so be sure
and come even though we can't
promise any jellybeans this time.
Thursday. Sweat: Elaine Quinton,
Bob Burton, Paul Wood, Jock The
Jack McQuarrie, Ed (Big Ed)
Clarke, Richard (Essay) Blair,
S h e r i, Harold McAllister, Corol
Smith, Lynn Curtis, Doug Halver-3 4
son,   Don   Hull,   Carol   Anne   Baker I';
aid. Snappy ena: Shore was writing
essay: Perspire.
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Go to Hell Mr. Riter
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Perhaps Mr. Riter, or college editors
in general <see Ubyssey Friday Nov. 13),
would be less inclined towards blasphemy if he, or they, had lived in the
sixteenth century when the penalty for
disbelief was death. GOD
fft      fft      iff
Gordon gets his answer
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I offer a few points of clarification concerning the B.C. Student Federation?
In his Friday letter to the Ubyssey,
Gordon Gaibraith said: "If the BCSF is
dissatisfied with the organizational
structure of the AMS, it could work to
change it."
It seems to me that the.BCSF sees the
AMS as the duly constituted representative body of the university student population. However, it also sees the need
for the AMS to be told of certain pressing needs and problems.
This is where the BCSF comes in. Its
aim is to awaken student opinion and
discussion on these problems. It does not
want to be, nor does it claim to be another group like the AMS. It is merely
attempting to organize the already vocal
voice of discontent so that the student
body, the AMS, and the administration
can be involved in a dialogue.
Already this is happening. Letters are
appearing in the Ubyssey, soap-box oratory is on the way back and slowly but
surely, student problems are being aired.
No, Gordon Gaibraith, it is not just
activity for the sake of activity.
The BCSF hopes to see this "bizarre
and ludicrous" activity culminating in
actual solutions for actual problems.
These problems will not solve themselves; each and every student must
speak up. KiM MORGAN
Arts IV.
pft     Sfi     fft
Artsy-crafty tastelessness
Editor, The Ubyssey:
To students in first year Arts:
Don't let a reading of the latest issue
of the Artisan cause you to forsake the
Arts faculty, and to join the Science—
or even the Education faculty next year.
Of course the article "God's Blood—
for Pets" was in poor taste. But, please,
don't jump to the conclusion that all
Artsmen think that using ridicule, the
weapon of the impotent, is a good means
of fostering mutual understanding
among students.
Furthermore, be assured that few
Artsmen, when they want to mention
the word "foreskin", feel compelled to
put it in a worthless poem to make it
look respectable.
Freshmen in Arts, don't leave us just
because you prefer the publications of
other undergraduate societies to your
own sick and sly sheet.
P.M.
Arts IV.
V     *r     V
Where's the real story?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I read your report on the stunt carried out by the First Year Engineers
Thursday with a great deal of interest.
However, I was quite surprised that an
important part of the story was omitted.
I am referring to the childish actions
of some of the boys from Fraternity
Row. The signs were erected to publicize what we thought to be a reasonable
solution to the bottleneck that results
from university-bound cars turning onto
Wesbrook Crescent every morning.
As soon as our work was completed,
one of the Frat boys knocked down one
of the signs.
We went back, reclaimed the sign, reinstalled it and returned to the Engineering Building.
However, as soon as we left, persons
unknown removed all of the signs. I
think that this action was poor taste on
the part of the "Greeks", and I think that
an apology would bfe^iri 'ofcder.
• !- KEN SPRAGGS.
Engineering I. Tuesday, November 17, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Claims letter
We were
too hard
on Russia
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In my talk, "Higher Educa-
Education and Student Life
in the USSR", I attempted, in
a brief period, to outline the
basic features of Soviet higher education, student life in
Moscow University, and the
great academic benefits to be
gained by studying there on
a World University Service
Exchange Scholarship.
The report in The Ubyssey
is unduly disparaging, which"
my talk was not designed to
be.
(1) I hoped to explain that,
although institutions of higher education in the USSR
do no^ charge fees, tuition
etc., to attend university on
a regular daytime basis requires considerable financial
help from home, which often
would be  difficult to obtain.
In my opinion, the stipend
(average stipend is 30-35
rubles) is not sufficient to
meet more than one-half of
two-thirds of the food requirements of the student. Students have a busy daytime
lecture schedule which affords little time for extensive
part-time work, or even summer work.
In the Soviet Union,, where
the state is to be the body
enriched by personal sacrifice
and effort, it seems to me that
students should not have to
undergo rather severe financial limitations during their
period of study.
They make up the costs incurred in training them by
serving for three years afterward in the place chosen by
a  state  committee.
(2) In conversations with
Russian students in Moscow
and other universities, I noticed a homogeneous approach
to understanding current affairs at home and abroad. I
was greatly disappointed to
receive virtually no questions
on Canadian life or Canadian
affairs. I was asked very
little about America in general.
Thus, it seemed to me that
the students of Moscow university with whom I talked
were conditioned very rigidly to a Marxist-Leninist outlook and interpretation.
I was told that political indoctrination was considerable
in the schools, in institutes,
in the Komsomol (the majority of Moscow university students are members of the
Komsomol, meaning Communist Youth organization)
and in the university.
Students take courses in
Political ceonomics, listen to
the news reports on Moscow
radio, which are carefully
editorialized and weighed,
and read newspapers and
journals which tend to be terribly one-sided.
It was my desire to clarify,
not confuse or mislead, which
led to Monday's lecture.
I was not condemning or
condoning features of Soviet
higher education.
BRENT  BARB
. Grad Studies
\
I
DAVIE FULTON
. . . unique talent
Local Tories
want Fulton
in Ottawa
Th UBC Conservative Club
has decided to push for Davie
Fulton's entry into federal politics.
The Conservative Club executive Monday passed a resolution which said:
"Fulton is uniquely talented
to help resolve the French-
English dialogue."
However the resolution cautioned that the statements are
not an opinion respecting the
present Federal leadership of
the party.
The resolution will go to a
club general meeting Wednesday.
Councillors, mad students
blast 'slanted' Vic annual
By CAROLE MUNROE
Assistant News Editor
Council censure and angry
students have greeted the publication of the 1964 Victoria
College yearbook.
And the parents of one coed threatened a libel suit until
a letter of apology was written, said Mrs. Olivia Barr,
student president at Victoria
College.
The Victoria Alma Mater
Society passed a resolution
censuring the students responsible for the annual for "the
general tone and bad taste" in
the annual.
One council member charged
it contained personal antagonism and was prepared exclusively by and for a small clique.
Student reaction toward the
annual was bitter.
A quick count of the annual showed there are 21 pictures  of the  editor.
"Why all these pictures of
Daniel O'Brien (the editor)
asked one student, "I didn't
pay my money to see him in
a hard cover."
Another student objected to
the humor.
"The   pre-social   work   club
Special Events
Don't miss the Second Coming—in the Armory at noon a
week Thursday. Admission 25
cents—get there early.
Employment Opportunities
(Regular and Summer)
in
Exploration Geophysics
with
Pan American
Petroleum Corporation
(Calgary, Alberta)
Interviews:
Tuesday and Wednesday
November 17 & 18,1964
for
POST GRADUATES
GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
GEOPHYSICS
HONORS GEOLOGY
HONORS MATH
HONORS PHYSICS
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
See the University Student Placement Service for further
particulars and arrange an interview.
snooped all over the place.
Highlight of the year came
when Don Ball swallowed a
canary," was one example of
the humor which caused a uproar.
On the Debating Union the
yearbook said: "There were
also too many pansies in this
English country club .  . ."
Charges of favoritism were
also hurled at the yearbook
staff:
Some clubs got( one line
and some got two pages, said
a student.
One campus publication, The
Critic, rated a line and a half.
The Phrateres, whose president is the editor's girl friend,
got two pages, the student
charged.
Another student had a bitter
comment:
"Let's call the 1965 edition
Daniel's Annual," he said.
1. C.U.S.  National Seminar
Applications will be accepted up to 4 p.m. Thursday,
November 19, for the position of local chairman
of the U.B.C. delegation to the C.U.S. Seminar,
"Democracy in the University Community". Further information may be obtained from the C.U.S.
Committee Office, Brock Extension 258.
2. Returning Officer
The Elections Committee is now receiving applications for a Returning Officer for the A.M.S.
elections. Students who apply should be in third
year or above. They should also be mature,
responsible students who are somewhat aware of
student activities on campus. The Returning
Officer will be instrumental in forming the rules
and procedures for A.M.S. elections. Interested
students should apply to the Secretary, Box 55,
Brock Hall, no later than Friday, Nov. 20.
TOTEM 6 5
Your Year Book in two Editions
CAMPUS LIFE
Complete photographic coverage of the
year on the campus- 100 pages of people
and action.
GRAD BOOK
Coverage for Grads of convocation, the
faculties and individual pictures of all
grads.
Reserve Your Copy Now
at Reduced Pre-Sale Rates
CAMPUS LIFE
.......
$1.75      I
GRAD BOOK
	
4.00     1
Limited Printing
of
Both
Editions |
DONT PANIC YET
But Get Your Order In NOW Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1964
STEVE WHITELAW
. . . top student
MIKE HORSEY
. . . honored
Fifteen
elected
to STX
■ Fifteen  students  have
been named to Sigma Tau
Chi men's honorary fraternity at UBC.
They are:
Hardial Bains, Grad
Studies; Bob Cruise, AMS
first vice-president; Byron
Hender, AMS second vice-
: president; Dick Hayes,
, Law president; Fiumu
Kari, general secretary of
.the .union of African Students of the Americas;
Roger McAfee, AMS
president; Mike Horsey,
Ubyssey editor; Barry
McDell, Arts IV; Rick
McGraw, Homecoming
chairman; Scott Mclntyre, Totem editor; Everett Northup, president of
New JDemocrats.
Charles Pentland, Arts
president; Barry Slutsky,
Law II; Jim Slater, Grad
Studies president; and
Steve Whitelaw, Engineers president.
Classical Guitar
Tuition to Advanced Level
Segovia Technique
W. Parker 682-1096
CONFIDENCE
You, too will hove confidence in
CONTACT IfNSES
C        by LAWRENCE
ALVERT
"He specialises"
70S Bhfts WUq.   MULtST*
Claim misuse
Papers gang up
on student loans
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canadian campus newspapers are
united in their criticism of the Canada Student Loan Act.
Controversial   comment
on
the loan plan began when the
University of Toronto's Varsity
ran a story claiming students
are using federal loans for investments, fur coats, sports
cars and trips to Europe.
Hurried through parliament
in time for students this year,
the plan provides loans for
undergraduates at a maximum
of $1,000 per year and a total
of $5,000 during their college
careers. Repayment begins six
months after graduation at
five and three-quarter per cent
interest.
However another Varsity reporter said the number of
students   cheating   represents
less than one per cent of the
total granted loans.
Several    other    universities
supported the idea that students would cheat on the plan.
"University students are not
to be trusted," said Victoria
College's Martlet. "If they can
cheat and get away with it they
will."
The University of Guelph
paper agreed. It called the
loans an irrestible opportunity
for cheating.
Some editorials claimed the
loans inadequate for students'
financial problems.
The student papers of the
Universities of Alberta, Toronto and Victoria joined The
Ubyssey in claiming the loans
are only a start in the right
direction.
Two Ontario university papers said they prefer provincial
loan schemes.
Student in hot water
over hate literature
HAMILTON (CUP)—Hate literature was found in the
main lounge of a McMaster University residence, the campus
newspaper, The Silhouette, has ^reported.
A residence warden said he
will interview students thought
responsible for distribution of
eight copies of the Free American, a Nazi newspaper, and
several copies of the White-
man's Mission, a book supporting negro segregation.
"University policy does not
allow university buildings to
be used as drop-off points for
material from off-campus organizations," he said.
Students' council president
Don Stephenson said: "Some
of the material was pretty malicious. They have a right to
say it, but not to distribute it
where we don't want it."
The paper labelled former
prime minister John Diefenbaker, New Democratic Party
leader Tommy Douglas and
Rabbi Feinberg of Toronto as
subversives. It said Minister of
External Affairs Paul Martin
participated in a Young Communist League tour.
Whiteman's Mission contains
passages such as the following:
"The passing' of the Civil
Rights Bill by the gang of
equalitarians now occupying
the White House has marked
the beginning of the end for
the white race."
EYE GLASSES
i-
Alt Doctor'i Eyeglass  Prescriptions
fHI*d. First quality material* t*s*d.
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Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
Ml Granville     MU 3-8921
HENRY GILLESPIE, B. Comm.
(Alberta, '59),
Investment Assistant,
The Great-West Life Assurance
Company.
Five years out of university,
Henry was appointed an officer
of Great-West Life, an important
milestone in his quickly developing and successful business
career. His is a position of responsibility and challenge, a position providing a high measure
of personal and financial reward.
Henry Gillespie is but one of 60
recent college graduates who
have joined the Company within the past five years and who
have become key management
personnel in all phases of the
insurance business at the Company's head office in Winnipeg.
You can find out more about the
Great-West Life and its career
opportunities in this new booklet, available for the asking. It
tells a success story of a Company that stands among the
leaders in the insurance industry
in North America and of the
varied and stimulating careers
created by its continued growth
and expansion.
Described in our career booklet
are 6 main avenues to success
at Great-West Life's head office
in Winnipeg.
• Research and Development
• Investment Management
• Sales Management
• Technical Appointments
• Administrative Appointments
• Actuarial Management
One of these may be the beginning of your success story.
Ask your student placement
officer for a copy of the booklet, or write our Personnel Office
in Winnipeg. And be sure to discuss your career plans with
Company representatives on
your campus:
November 25-27
THE
Great-West Life
LM
ASSURANCE COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG, CANADA
mmmmmm Tuesday, November 17, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
—bob belhouse photo
MOAT ROUND Totem Park residences is latest barrier to
keep girls in and boys out. The moat runs around eight-
foot brick wall, labelled Berlin Wall by irate residents who
claim it is a waste of money. (A building and grounds
spokesman Monday claimed the trench is actually a drainage ditch.)
SPECIAL EVENTS
fci$R
presents
The World Renowned Guitarist
CARLOS  MONTOYA
In His Only Vancouver Performance This Season
Hear One of the Musical Highlights of the Year
Tonight 8:30 p.m. - Auditorium
Tickets at AMS, Vancouver Ticket Centre, or at the door
Students 75c & $1-25.    Adults $1-35 & $2.00
•    ••       ******
The Internationally Known
COPENHAGEN STRING QUARTET
Playing Mozart, Haydin, Mendelssohn and Others
This Quartet was awarded the Danish Music Reviewer's
Prize in 1960
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, NOON - AUDITORIUM
******     •••
India's Most Famous Musician
RAVI  SHANKAR
Acclaimed in November « "TIME"
Reserve Now For NOVEMBER 28 at 8:30 P.M.
AUDITORIUM
.   Tjcket4 at,AMS & Vancouver Ticket. Centre
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rtWMMi
Ends on terry
Wake of dents
follows snatch
By BOB BURTON
A group of fraternity pledges left a wake of bent fenders
Sunday night as they kidnapped a senior fraternity member
and put him in the Woodfibre ferry's women's washroom.
Duncan  MacGregor,  Arts
IV, was taken from the Winter
Sports Centre while playing an
intramural hockey game.
Other frat members chased
the pledge's car to Stanley
Park.
The kidnappers stopped and
attacked their pursuers by
lifting the hood and pulling out
the electrical wiring.
The driver panicked and
hacked his car into a tree.
At Horeshoe Bay, an RCMP
constable drew them over to
the side of the road.
He ordered the pledges to
release MacGregor.
They told the Mountie he
would have to take MacGregor
home himself—10 miles away.
While the officer was contemplating this, the safety
brake of the kidnap car slipped and it smashed into the
police car.
The officer let them go.
The pledges moved on to
Squamish where they placed
their captive in the women's
washroom of the Ferry.
MacGregor was not available
for comment Monday.
Clubs hit
model House
KINGSTON (CUP)—Queen's
University Model Parliament,
active since 1930, will not be
held this year.
The decision followed the
withdrawal of the Progressive
Conservative and New Democratic political clubs.
The Conservative club explained:
"Model Parliament has been
of little value to the participants, and has distorted general student opinion of the
practice of politics."
The New Democrat said:
"We believe the farcical image of model parliament must
be allowed to dissipate."
Both parties suggested that
model parliament be replaced
by a series of debates and seminars on political problems.
Alums edge out
student fans
SEATTLE (PSP) — Foot-
ball fans at the University
of Washington are angry.
They say if students want
a seat at the games they have
to come four hours early.
Most of the seats are reserved for alums they say,
and only a quarter of the
students can be seated in the
student section.
First trimesters
TORONTO (CUP) — Ryerson Polytechnical Institute will
become the first Canadian
technological school to operate on a year-round trimester
system next year.
g.  It YOUR P122A U PtRteCT
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X
WE ARE NOW
Open for Lunch
with  a  special
LUNCHEON MENU
Low Prices - Quick Service
from 11:00 a.m.
2676 W. Bdwy. - RE 6-9019
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
VANCOUVER, B.C.
offering careers in
Data Processing - Scientific Computing
and Data Processing Education
Will Conduct Campus Interviews
on November 30th,
December 1st and 2nd
For Post Graduates and Graduates
in
ENGINEERING
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
HONORS MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
COMMERCE
Arrangements for Personal Interviews
May Be Made Through
The University Placement Office
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY. LIMITED
1445 West Georgia     -     Vancouver, B.C.     -     682-5515
IBM Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1964
Nuclear arms protest
24-hour vigil
held at Comox
The placard read, Nuclear
Ryerson offers
degrees by mail
TORONTO (CUP) — Students can attend Ryerson
by mail.
A correspondence course
in public administration costing $170 has been instituted
this year.
Fifty students, some from
as far away as the Yukon and
the Congo are enrolled.
Education
backs Fed'n
Education Undergraduate Society will support the newly
formed B.C. Student Federation.
A motion that the Education
Undergraduate Society urge its
students to participate in the
formation of the B.C. Student
Federation passed eight to one
at last Friday's Ed. US executive meeting.
Education will also send a
delegation to the founding
convention of the B.C. Student
Federation after Christmas.
The delegation will be headed by Education president Dave
Lynn.
Arms: A Moritorium on Man.
And for 24 hours, this sign
and a few UBC students stood
in front of the RCAF nuclear
base at Comox last week.
One of the demonstrators,
Denis Newman, Arts I, said although no base official talked
to them, many enlisted men
did.
"Although most of the base
personnel were against us,
their hostility was based on
the fear of losing their security and their fear of the unknown," Newman said.
"The small segment that
agreed with us, agreed only in
principle. They were generally
just apathetic," he added.
Newman said he considered
the demonstration successful
and said it could be the beginning of a series of demonstrations in that area.
Yellow cannon
GUELPH, Ont. (CUP) — An
anonymous artist has painted
Old Jeremiah, the cannon landmark of the University of
Guelph, a bright canary yellow.
peter
elbling
plua
jana
bergh
3607 West Broadway
eservations: RE 6-6011
JEAN BAZIN
. . . don't undermine me
Maritimers
union wobbles
HALIFAX (CUP)—The Association of Maritime Students
has been given a shaky christening as two Maritime universities charged its constitution was illegal.
CUS president Jean Bazin
expressed concern that AMS
might undermine CUS.
The constitution passed 11-2.
Student writer hits
book censorship'
TORONTO (CUP) — A student author says his work is
being censored by the University of Western Ontario.
John Scott Cowan, a fourth-
year student at the University
of Toronto said Western officials refused the Western New
Democratic Party club permission to display liis book "See
No Evil" on Canadian defence.
He said John Short reed,
Western Superintendent of
Grounds and Buildings, told
him he did not want to help
distribute material "which
came from the outside or tended to be communist," and refused to read a copy of the
book.
Although the book was written independently, the New
Democratic Party claimed after
its publication it reflects NDP
defence views.
The   book   has   since   sold
about 2,600 copies since publication last year.
Cowan said Shortreed told
him:
"It is not my job to act as
censor." He said Shortreed
said he would pass on for approval anything which was not
propaganda unrepresentative
of the sponsoring student organization or tending to be
communist.
He also promised to give
copies of the book to the political economy department.
Cowan said he received a
letter nine weeks later saying
one copy had been given to a
chemistry professor.
"I believe I have been implicitly slandered, politely insulted and cautiously told to
go to blazes by what, I am
sorry to say, is a degree-granting institution," he said.
Chemcell (1963) Limited with annual
sales of over 90 million dollars, ranks
as one of Canada's major producers of
chemicals, synthetic fibres and fabrics.
The head office is located in Montreal
and the two operating divisions, Canadian Chemical Company and Canadian Celanese Company, together employ over 6,000 personnel in plants,
laboratories and offices across Canada.
The keynote of Chemcell is growth
and diversification. Started by a petrochemical operation launched in 1955,
Chemcell's history has been marked
by a continued expansion of capacity,
diversification into new products, and
a steady growth of markets and earnings.
CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY
The main plant at Edmonton,
Alberta produces a wide range of
organic chemicals — solvents and
intermediates — which serve a host
of industrial uses such as the manufacture of paints and lacquers, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, plastics, ad-
hesives, herbicides, etc.
At Two Hills, Alberta, Western
Chemicals, a recently acquired subsidiary, produces inorganic chemicals
including chlorine, muriatic acid, caustic soda and calcium chloride.
Canadian Chemical has a modern
research centre at Edmonton. Sales
offices are located in Montreal, Toronto  and  Vancouver and  extensive
export  sales  are  handled  by  agents
throughout the world.
CANADIAN CELANESE COMPANY
The Canadian Celanese division
manufactures a wide variety of synthetic textile products, including the
chemical intermediates which receive
further processing. The end- products
include fibres in both staple and continuous filament form, cigarette filter
tow, woven and knitted fabrics and
tufted and woven carpets. Cellulose
acetate and polypropylene are the
principal fibres processed. The main
plant and research centre is located at
Drummondville, Quebec, with other
Quebec plants at Sorel, St. Jean and
Coaticook.
A plant producing cellulose acetate
flake and fibre is located in Edmonton
in conjunction with the chemical operation of Canadian Chemical Company.
Sales offices are maintained in Mont-
real,Toronto,Winnipeg and Vancouver.
Types of Graduates Required:
The diversity and growth of Chemcell provides the opportunity to fully
utilize a broad range of skills at the
graduate and post-graduate levels. Requirements include chemistry; chemical, mechanical, electrical and textile
engineering; physics and engineering
physics. As a chemist or engineer, you
may work on research, product development,   process  engineering  design,
construction or production; or your
qualifications and interests may suggest a career in marketing or technical
service.
Requirements also occur in other
disciplines, notably commerce, mathematics and business administration and
graduates are utilized in such functions
as accounting, data processing, operations research, planning, marketing,
industrial relations, etc. Post-graduate
requirements occur most often in research.
Salaries and Employee Plans:
Our salaries and benefit plans are
designed to meet part of our overall
objective of attracting and retaining a
highly qualified work force.
Opportunities1 for Advancement
Chemcell is a growth Company and
personal professional growth can be
achieved through varied, interesting
and challenging experience in a fully
integrated and highly diversified operation.
Our representatives will be visiting
your campus and we cordially invite
you to make an appointment for an
interview through your placement
officer.
For further information, just write
to: Administrative Officer. Chemcell
(1963) Limited, 1155 Dorchester Blvd.
West, Montreal 2, Quebec.
Representatives of the Company will visit this Campus for interviews on November 26 and 17, 1964.
<S
>4umcUC (ts>o^) </lmJ&d
-MONTREAL -.-TORONTO   'y.WINNI.PEp, . , VA'tfpOUj/ES
OPERATING DIVISIONS: CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY • CANADIAN CELANESE COMPANY
• V  CHEMICALS^ «, yARNS, . /IB^S^FAfi.RlfiS,. * CARRSaTS,,., pi^SJJC*.,,.
.IMMf , Tuesday, November 17, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
MIKE COLEMAN
. . . broke barrier
Indifference
wall changed
to a bridge
The Academic Activities
Committee has lifted the barrier of indifference between
faculty and students, according
to its chairman, Mike Coleman.
"Many faculty members are
becoming more concerned with
the student as a thinking being," he said.
"Because of this, an increasing number of students are beginning to understand what
makes a university tick."
The AAC began two years
ago with a suggestion at Academic Symposium.
Small gatherings at private
homes gave impetus to the idea
of such a committee.
"The AAC is now self-perpetuating," said Coleman.
"AAC co-ordinates six programs. It throws a spotlight on
academic and student-faculty
spirit and new people with new
ideas are coming forward constantly.
"Now there is somewhere
for these students to come for
advice and the help needed to
put their ideas into action," he
said.
For more information on the
AAC Coleman suggests interested students drop by the
Academic Activities room, 260
in Brock Extension (by the
College Shop).
Says  McMaster  survey
Women bulwark
of intolerance
HAMILTON (CUP)—The champions of religious intolerance at McMaster University are female Protestants according to a recent survey conducted by The Silhouette,
McMaster's student newspaper.	
Fifty-five per cent of the fe
male Protestants interviewed
answered no to the question:
"Do you believe in religious toleration?"
The survey also revealed that
female Protestants:
• Feel they are discriminated against;
• Would not marry someone of a different faith;
• Think Roman Catholics
are correct in considering birth
control a religious problem;
• Rate separation preferable
to divorce.
The girls and men on almost
all questions in the survey disagreed.
Other survey findings, based
on interviews with 375 students classified as Protestants,
Roman Catholics, agnostics,
atheists, and others, are as follows:
Roughly 75 per cent of the
agnostics and atheists said they
dislike organized religion.
Slightly more than 50 per cent
in other groups concurred.
Seventy-six per cent of the
students surveyed said church
and state should be separate.
Only 16 per cent of the
Roman Catholics said they advocated church control of education.
All groups except the Protestants said university had no
effect on their religious beliefs.
The Protestant students generally said they feel their religious beliefs have grown stronger since entering university.
Forty per cent of the students questioned said their religious philosophy was the only
true one. Roman Catholics gave
the strongest ''yes" vote.
Only female Protestants and
atheists felt they were the objects of discrimination.
A majority in all groups, ex
cept female Protestants, said
they would marry someone of a
different faith.
ORAL POLIO VACCINE
(SABIN)
Wednesday November 18th
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Wesbrook Building, Room 237
Oral Polio Vaccine (Sabin) will be available
to Students, Faculty and Staff, and Adults in
the University Area.
Three doses of Sabin are required to give
immunity.
It is not recommended for those who have not
received two doses of Salk Vaccine.
Eh? What's so
quiet about it?
Prof. Jacques Parizeau of
L'Ecole des Hautes Etudies
Commerciales de Montreal
will speak on Quebec—the
Quiet Revolution at noon today in Bu. 106.
Sponsor is Dr. John Young
of the Political Science and
Economics Department.
Employment Opportunities
(Regular and Summer)
AMS seeks
new officer
The Alma Mater Society is
trying to turn up a returning
officer.
But they're not having much
luck.
Deadline for applications for
the position was Friday night,
and   AMS   secretary   Marilyn
McMeans reports no students
have applied.
She said the AMS will continue the hunt.
"After all without a returning officer we can't have elections," she said.
in
GEOLOGY
with
Pan American
Petroleum Corporation
(Calgary, Alberta)
Interviews:
NOVEMBER 19 & 20, 1964
for
POST GRADUATES
GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
HONORS & ARTS GEOLOGY
See the University Student Placement Service for further
particulars and arrange an interview. Page  lb
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1964
—don hume photo.
BIRDS CLOSE IN AGAIN on befuddled Kat, undecided whether to keep ball or hand
off to another Kat who is trying to talk h imself out of the situation. UBC defeated
the Kats 16-8 at Varsity stadium Saturda y to move into a three-way tie for first place
in the Miller cup rugger tournament.
Sports roundup
UBC wins hockey tourney
The UBC women's field
hockey team won the Pacific
Northwest field hockey tournament held in Cornwallis, Oregon, last weekend.
Led by Liz Philpot who
scored 12 goals UBC won four
games and tied one match 1-1
with the University of Victoria.
Meredith Adshead was
UBC's second top scorer with
five goals.
The UBC team also finished
their fall season in the City
field hockey league with an
undefeated record downing
Brittania by a 2-0 score.
The first annual B.C! inter-
school invitational girl's field
hockey tournament will be
held at UBC this Friday and
Saturday.
Teams from Vancouver, Vancouver Island, the Fraser Val-
Hockey Braves lose two
to undefeated Royals
The UBC Braves opened and closed the scoring but still
were beaten by the undefeated Westminster Royals 4 to 2
Saturday night.
Wayne Deharnais, a standout defenceman for the Braves,
scored UBC's first goal in the opening period with a sizzling
drive from the blueline that caught the upper right hand
corner of the net.
New Westminster scored four unanswered goals before
the Braves' Keith Klemets tallied in the third period.
The two teams played again Sunday but UBC couldn't
muster a win, losing 4 to 1.
Stan Shillington scored UBC's only goal.
Despite their two losses, the Braves still are in second
place in the Lower Mainland Junior Hockey League with
three wins and five losses in eight games.
UBC plays-.Vancouver at Grandviaw.Arena, Wednesday
at 9:30 p.m.
• frj — - \
■MD\v
ley, Okanagan and Kootenay
West will be taking part.
All games will be held on
Spencer field.
The second annual B.C. High
School Girls' Volleyball Championships will also be held at
UBC this Saturday in the
Memorial gym.
Again teams will be coming
from all over B.C. to take part
in the tournament.
Some three hundred students
will be taking part in the two
tournaments.
The intramural badminton
singles championship was won
by Physical Education's Gord
Cameron.
The next five finishers were
Mike Delf (Alpha Delts) Malcolm Clay (Phi Gamma Delta),
Russ Jolliffe (Carey Hall),
Gord Pope (Engineers) and
Roger Sparks (St. Andrews).
In the tennis singles the
Rambler's Brian Robertson
took top honors followed by
Cam Harrison (Alpha Delts)
in second spot and Don Munro
(Engineers) in third position.
The intramural .team standings at the end of last week
have Ramblers in first place
with 245 points.
Close behind with 220 points
are, the engineers followed by
St?'■ M&iews'>wMQ9i 'points:'*
In rugby
Kats turn tail
as Birds try, try
Grid game
The annual senior high
school football championship
will be held in Varsity stadium
this Saturday at 2:00 p.m.
Opponents in this year's
match are West Vancouver,
winners of the City's western
division, and John Oliver, winners of the eastern division.
General admission prices are
50 cents per student.
SPORTS
EDITOR:
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
By HAROLD  MCALLISTER
The Kats' snarl was reduced to a whimper by the powerful UBC Thunderbirds in rugger action Saturday at Varsity
stadium.
The T-Birds  upset  the   former   league-leaders  by   a   de-1
cisive   16-8 score.   It was only j
the   Kats'   second   loss   in   58
games.
UBC forced the play from
the start, and opened scoring
early with a twenty yard penalty kick by Mike Cartmel.
Soon after, Dave Murphy, on
a great effort, came around
the blind side, drew in the defender, and kicked ahead to
Gary Rowles, who dived into
the corner for a try. Cart-
ment converted from the tough
angle.
• •    •
The    'Birds    never    looked
back. With 25 minutes gone.
Rowles scored another try,
which was the result of great
play by the scrum forwards,
who broke up a Kats play and
gained possession of the ball.
Cartmel converted to put the
score at 13-0.
Early in the second half,
Cartmel made a 25 yard penalty kick good.
Kats retaliated with an unconverted try by Ted Hunt,
and Niels Carlson got an—'opportunity' — score with ten
minutes left in the game, Hunt
converting.
The 'Birds turned in a great
team effort, with the forwards
being on top of the play
throughout the game. Gary
Rowles, Dave Murphy, and
Tetsuhiko Kariya were outstanding.
• *    *
Kats played well, hut UBC
consistently beat them to the
ball and won many set and
loose scrums. The 'Birds also
kicked ahead very effectively,
for both distance and accuracy.
The Kats at times resorted
to "aggressive" tactics — tripping, neck-tackling, and piling up loose scrums — but it
was to no avail. UBC showed
that they are now the rugby
power in B.C.
The victory lifted UBC into
a three-way tie for first place
in the Vancouver rugby union's first division with Kats
and the Meralomas.
Soccer Birds
running last
with injuries
UBC's soccer 'Birds aren't
flying very high these days.
The 'Birds are competing in
the Pacific Coast Soccer
League for the first time and
know they must make good if
they want to remain in the
league.
But Saturday they lost their
seventh game, as opposed to
only two wins, going down to
a 3-2 defeat at the hands of
North Shore United.
The loss dropped UBC to
last spot in the league standings.
UBC goals were scored by
Harvey Thorn and Joe Alexis,
while Neil Ellett, Ted Canon
and Ed Hunter scored for the
North Shore club.
Thorn's goal was his third
of the year, tying him for the
club lead with Bobby Johnstone.
Commenting on the 'Birds'
record to date, coach Joe Johnson said he blamed himself in
part for UBC's poor record
because he has been juggling
his players around but has not
been able to find a winning
combination.
Currently UBC has two regular halfbacks, Walter Hanik
and Keith Commons, out with
knee injuries.
Lynne Hughes
plus
George Hewison
November 17 - 21
at Ihe
BUNKHOUSE
Coffee House
612 Davie
Reserve now — 683-9790
.... and remember
Jazz Every Sunday
Afternoon 2-5 p.m.
Coming - Next Tuesday!
UBYSSEY'S
Special Ski Issue
Don't Miss It! .
oooooocoodooftoosbooa Tuesday, November 17, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
AROUND
THE
CAMPUS
By ED CLARK
It's all over now, but for
15,000 and some students it
never began.
The football Thunderbirds
finished a favourable season
by mangling the Wolves from
Oregon College and thus winning their fifth game in nine
starts.
Four victories came at the
expense of small American
colleges, which were not competitively equal to the high
flying 'Birds.
I don't want to bore you
with statistics but I'm not
far off the total when I say
that only about 3,000 students witnessed the 'Birds
win their way to an undefeated season at Varsity stadium. If you count Homecoming the total reaches approximately 7,000 for five games.
However, Homecoming is
an event which is highly promoted and the football match
is an annual classic. But even
then, 4,000 students still is a
pretty poor attendance figure
for a Universiy with roughly
16,000 intellectuals.
•    •    •
I happened to chat with one
of the Southern Oregon spotters who was admiring the
Homecoming attendance
coupled with the enjoyable
half-time side shows.
"You know," he said, "this
here campus must have quite
a spirited group and the players must surely enjoy such a
wonderful crowd watching
them. Down south there in
Ashland we can only get
1,000 at the most to a game."
"What's your enrolment,"
I asked. I kind of chuckled
when he said about 3,500. I
hated to spoil his day when
I told him ours. His only remarks were "sure is disappointing, isn't it?"
When the Thunderbirds
played their last game at Varsity stadium this season
nobody knew what they were
going to use for a gladiator
field for the next couple of
years or three. In the year
1967 UBC is SUPPOSED to
have a brand new stadium
with a seating capacity of
6,000 to 8,000 at the least.
For what? Anybody who
thinks that the demolition of
Varsity and the resurrection
of a new stadium will improve the attendance better
look in the yellow pages for
a psychiatrist. If the 'Birds
played in Empire Statdium
there would still be no improvement.
•   •   •
This is another bad move
by the administration and it
is about time somebody started pointing out to them the
$600,000 which will be spent
On this construction will be a
lost cause. Just who is going
to make use of it?
Varsity stadium can last
for another twenty years and
I doubt if one will find it
not big enough to suit our
capacity crowds.
Where are we going to
watch (all 400 of us) the
'Birds fly next season?
Somebody better start
thinking about it because it
Jw!jt.ttMt,i«,otf.,-,,,-.,, .
GRID BIRDS GIVE-WAY TO RUGBY BIRDS
•■■" i y.
• »* •••A*-
—don hume photo.
Heavy footsteps and ominous hand around throat caused this Orgeonian to miss pass
'I've got it", yells a Bird Rugger chap. But one worthy,on the other team
,..,   sees that he's got it and also wants it. (See story page 10.) Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 17, 1964
'tween classes
The last word on alumni
Last Lecture Series features
Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Director
of the Alumni Association,
speaking today, noon, Bu. 100.
*    *    *
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Lutheran View of Pre-marital Sex, by Rev. H. Fox,, Wed.
noon in Bu. 3202.
• •   •
POETRY SYMPOSIUM
Open discussion on personal
methods of writing, led by
Jane Rule of English whose
book, The Desert of the Heart,
has been sold in England and
Canada. Noon today in IH 402.
• •    •
UN CLUB
Dr. C. P. Fitzgerald of Asian
Studies, addresses the discussion group, today noon in IH
Upper Lounge. His topic: The
Two Chinas.
• •    •
HEALTH SERVICES
Oral Polio Vaccine Clinic in
Wesbrook 237, Wednesday 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Tour of new School of Social
Work today. Meet at 3:30 by
main entrance to Buchanan.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
The first half of the film,
On Call To a Nation, on British Medicare, Wednesday noon
in Wes. 100. Admission 10c.
• •    •
CONSERVATIVES
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 214, everyone welcome.
• •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies rally noon Thursday.
Start line at top of C lot. Members free; non-members 25c.
• •    •
YOUNG BOURGEOIS
Pique meets noon today in
Brock conference room. '
DR. PAT McGEER
. . . education's role
LIBERALS  & AAC
Dr. Pat McGeer, MLA for
Point Grey, speaks on The
Role of Education in Society
in Bu. 100 Wednesday noon.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
Conversation group meets in
Bu.  3252  at  noon today.
• •    •
PHYSICS SOC
Movies: Schlieren and The
Revealing Eye noon Wednesday  in  Hebb Theatre.
• •    •
COMMUNITY   PLANNING
Part IV of CBC series Metropolis: Private Dream, Public
Nightmare. Wednesday noon
in La. 102.
• •    •
CURLING CLUB
Curlers needed for Mon.,
Wed., Fri. Call Ian Frier: 261-
0735. Everyone wishing to enter Briar Playdowns must submit full rink and $1 per member. Come to Bu. 2201 Tuesday or Thursday noon.
Virgin territory exposed
by penetrating questions
HALIFAX (CUP)—Eighty per cent of the unmarried
females and 45 per cent of the males at Dalhousie University are virgins.
This conclusion is the result of a campus-wide survey
conducted by the campus newspaper, the Gazette.
The survey indicated that 83 per cent of the women who
opposed pre-marital sex said they did so on moral grounds.
Few feared disease or pregnancy would result from such
relations.
NATIVE CANADIANS
Annual lecture on Study
Habits by Dr. D. C. G. MacKay
(of the Psychology Department), Wednesday noon in Bu.
203.
• •    •
NOON  HOUR CONCERTS
Dale Reubart plays Brahms
Piano Sonata Opus 5. Tomorrow noon in Bu. 106.
• •    •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Talk: How to Become a Curator by R. J. Drake of the Vancouver City Museum in Bu.
225 noon today.
• *    *
CHILDHOOD  EDUCATION
Coffee party Thursday from
2-4 p.m. in Lower Lounge of
Grad Centre. If you would like
to come sign list on bulletin
board of the New Ed Bldg.
• •    •
RADSOC
Liverpool Lunch Hour. Free
dance, sponsored by Ubyssey
Radio. Thursday noon in Brock
Lounge. Fun, prizes, Beatles
and first predictions.
• •   •
MARDI GRAS
Chorus line auditions November 23-27. Males: Mon.,
Wed. and Fri. Females: Tues.,
Thurs. and Fri. 11:30-2:30.
Everyone welcome.
• •   •
PRE-DENT SOC
Dr. Keith Lindsay shows
slides on oral surgery Wednesday noon in Bu. 204.
• •   •
GSA
Bert Johnson, of the World
Youth Festival, discusses Youth
Festival '65 in Algiers in the
committee room of graduate
students centre Wed. noon.
• •   •
CHORAL SOC
Anyone interested in singing is invited to join Choral
Soc Wednesday evening. 6-8
p.m. in Bu. 104.
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.  10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service      CA 4-0034
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
Autos for Sale, Conf d.
21
LOST—College Physics Text last
Friday in Hebb, Arts or Chemistry
Bldgs.  Reward.  Call  HE  3-7668.
LOST—Would person who took the
wrong raincoat from Ponderosa
last Tues. please phone AL 3-8709.
Gary.	
LOST—In  village.  Engagement ring
fold band with cluster of 7 small
iamonds. Reward. Phone 224-1451.
FOUND—Pup tent on V.O.C. short
long hike. Phone Gordon Spriggs,
738-3391.
LOST—Blue keycase and keys  (car
keys).  AM 3-4935,  ask for Carole.
DESPITE NOTE—girl who left ring
in washroom during registration
did not yet claim it. Please call
CA 4-7565 evenings.
FOUND—Bracelet in Library. Please
call CA 4-7565 evenings.
KEYS —Found   171-105.   Please  call
CA 4-7565 evenings.	
FOUND—Brown  leather gloves,  Bu.
bldg.    104.    12:30    Friday.    Phone
 Donna RE 1-4406.
FOUND—4 Text books. M. J Sienko.
Equilibrium. Harrison, A Laboratory Course in Chemistry, A Inke-
les, What is Sociology? Seventeenth Century Prose & Poetry,
2nd ed. at College Library.
FOUND — 1 cosmetic bag, 1 notebook wallet, 1 spectacle's case,
(creme), 1 umbrella (brown), 3
jackets at College Library.
BIRD CALLS. Will those holding
pre sale tickets please apply for
their directory at the Publications
Office as soon as possible.
Special Notices.
13
PURPLE PILGRIM is the usual
appelation for a pledge of the
fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta.
Perge!
WANTED   —   Placards     to
N.D.P. See Totem, BE 168.
picket
IF   YOU  are   suspected   of  being  a
study space hog, BEWARE!
ATTENTION — Electricals III. The
best of his friends call him Huggy.
HEAR the young lovers in action.
731-9108. Soon you can SEE the
young lovers in action.
Transportation
14
DESPERATELY wanted from central West Van car pool member to
drive once a week. Phone Christine,   WA   2-0205.
RIDE wanted mornings only from
25th & Kingsway, desperate! Phone
876-6665.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1963 AUSTIN Healy Sprite custom
radio, white walls, seat belts fender
mirrors.   Offers.   738-5954.
1961 FIAT 600—White, city tested,
radio. Mr. Johnson, Memorial,
Gym.  Local 434 or AM  3-4421.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typing
42
TYPING for essays, assignments.
Fast service, reasonable rates.
Mrs. Poison, AM 6-9042.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MALE over 21—3 evenings per week.
Good hours and benefits. Phone
J.   Ruskin,  AM  1-3064.
INSTRUCTION  — SCHOOLS
Music
63
JOYCE MAGUIRE, G.R.S.M. (England), L.R.A.M., A.R.C.M., Piano,
Theory,   Accompaniment.   733-4584.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SMART QUALITY clothing for all
the family, like new, at terrific
savings. Ex Toggery Shop, 6246
E.  Blvd. AM 6-6744.
EXCELLENT English 200 notes
now on sale at the College Shop.
Check the high quality yourself!
TOTEM PRE SALES now at th«
AMS office. Books will be wrapped
in plain brown paper for NDP's.
TAPE    recorder,    Philips    Mono.    I
mos.   old.  $100.00.  Phone  228-8032.
FOR SALE—Sacrifice men's 21 jewel
wrist watch. Waterproof, antimag.
lum. dial, calender, sweep second,
unbreakable crystal, gold case, 9
mos. old, $30 or offer. 224-5389,
7:00-9:00 p.m.	
TAPE lectures! Transistor recorder,
fine condition, $25.00. Mike Mar-
chant, 2997 W. 2nd Ave.     	
Rooms
81
2 BOYS wanted to share large upstairs double room 2 blocks from
gates. Room and board supplied if
desired.   224-6084.
Room  & Board
82
PRIVATE room & board for male
student available now. 4595 W. 6th.
CA 4-4866.
RENTALS   &  REAL ESTATE
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SHARE large pleasant suite at
Kitsilano with one other gentleman graduate or quiet student.
Garage,  phone.  733-6534.
FURNISHED home, students, teachers, five adults, spacious rumpus
room, TV, etc.; warm, near UBC.
Home for students for years, Telephone  AM  1-4333,   12-1 p.m.
1965   GRADUATES
seeking employment
register NOW with the
EXECUTIVE and PROFESSIONAL DIVISION
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Phone Mr. W. L. Roberts who will mail you
an application and arrange an interview to
discuss employment opportunities.
UNDERGRADS—will be registered later—
Watch for notice.
1145 ROBSON STREET
MU 1-8253
opportunities for
engineers at pan american
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company
(Indiana) organization, has several challenging career openings in the Canadian Division Office in Calgary, and in field
operations throughout Alberta. Graduating, Post-Graduate
and Undergraduate Engineers are invited to:
INTERVIEWS NOVEMBER 19 & 20
Interviews for summer employment will also be conducted.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company in Alberta, offering attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity
for rapid advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the Student
Placement Office. Company and Job information booklets are
available there.
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION
VV
> tti
*$        f   &   *V  j

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