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The Ubyssey Jul 29, 1987

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Array UiiC Arctti'.'c:
THE
UBYSSEY
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By ROSS McLAREN
The great land fight |
goes on. The University of British Columbia |
and Point Grey residents are locked in ai
struggle for control of)
the University Endowment Lands.
UBC wants to develop the land for research
space and faculty and
market housing. Point
Grey residents want the
land to remain as a
park, only the outer
edges of the UEL being
developed.
At stake are 680
hectares of land, the
most valuable piece of |
undeveloped property
in the country, with an
area larger than Stanley
Park.
The university's)
claim to the land rests
on "an old tradition that I
the UEL was to provide
another source of revenue to enhance the
quality of the university," says UBC's VP
Academic, Daniel|
Birch.
UBC wants to develop 155 hectares. Forty
hectares would be used
to double the size of
UBC's Discovery Park
Scientific Research
facility; the rest,
approximately 115
hectares between 16th
and Chancellor and on
the south side of South
West Marine Drive,
would be developed for
faculty and market
housing.
The money realized
from the sale of real estate
would create an endowment fund for the university. According to Peter
Larkin, VP Research, a
ball-park figure for profits
would be $100 million,
interest from which would
be used to upgrade buildings in need of repair.
members is_ha| the „tuvers«y wanjs**
l**_dtt^xpaA*_*iscovery Parte    -. **
-   "UBC needs $138j_fflqaft:ln
ij^BlejjaiK* ¥o_£j'_i JMffi^s*.
i_|>s. -We would spenoTKe inie|p^'Th -r. ■ ^
"money ($10 ayHiosi ft yeatitb *_»&-»*»** -^V -'* 'ftr* '+■■*
t_jiestaH^_en<y^^-s«il,   r'V^K^K^'*:
li^ But the Jiooght that J&C ra
get into the real estate busuieM?.^,f .
one iruerest group upset. ' ?__      - ^^-*M^-^'l^1*f-#P''
The Endowment Lands,
Park Committee, like the u^vefsity,
has strong ties with the UEL.- Tbe
11 year old organization is a regular
user of the land and,* with volunteer
labor and community support.lias
built many of the chip trails intersecting the endowment lands.
The 600 member committee, has
strong support in the Point Grey
community, and elsewhere in the
lower mainland, and speaks for
many of those residents.
Except for 20 hectares in isolated parcels on campus (south of S.W
Marine Drive and near 4th and
Chancellor), the committee is
against any UEL development.
Bowie Keefer, director of the
committee, says "it was never
intended that the university get into
the real estate business. The university should be properly funded, funded out of general revenues. The
parkland is being held hostage for
funding."
The committee thinks UBC's
development pjans are short-sighted
served by preserving the lands as
Ken Jfewett, Point Grey
and committee member* scoffi*«Mhe<
idea that the research facility needs
more space** "since! 981, UBC h*r
attracted one Customer to the park.
There are at least 165 acres of vacant
or under-utilized land (ortcampus
near Discovery Park) tjh#can be
made available for research."
But Larkin says those 165 acres
are not available foT further expansion. UBC, Larkin says, has plans
for forestry, agriculture and animal
care to move into these areas. "If
Discovery Park moved there, we
would have to give up the idea this
area was originally fiitertded for,"
Larkin said.
Keefer has another reason to
oppose the expansion of Discovery
Par||, He thinks it is important foi
university s®entists to interact with
the research companies off campus.
See Page 2: Resident
t altietor one.
ie%jrW#%park"  .
p*op4|£al f<$r^hr OTL has been
approved by ||$!gffflMstry of forestry
and lands, <&_ytoTb^e^ab*jiet reject
According tQjDarlene Mar_mi,  <
testfe.is agaj^imd development of
She does not, however, have the
* pofiaftHcfoat McGeer had. She is a
A rookie MLA and not in cabjnet.
Government priorities often out-
. weigh the wishes of MLA's.
„ One of these priorities is money.
JEJBC needs more money, but the
Point Grey's NDP MLA, it was Dr.
Pat McGeer who spearheaded a
drive against the proposals. This
time, in this fight, McGeer is no
longer around. He has been replaced
by a new Social Credit MLA; park
sympathizer Kim Campbell.
Campbell, who later this summer
will report to cabinet oa the UEL
government deficit won't allow that.
A politically safe move would be to
give UBC money in the form of
unused forest land.
Th^jpvetnment also wants to
encourage research and development
companies to locate in B.C., especially at universities.
See Page 2: UEL Page 2
Resident rejects compromise
The Summer Ubyssey, July 29,1987
from page 1
As he says, "when companies are
located on campus, you remove
industry from its suppliers and customers."
UBC, however, has already
approved plans for research and
development. They include relocating the Forest Engineering Research
Institute of Canada in Discovery
Park, building a Kaon plant at TRIUMF, expanding the Pulp and Paper
Research Institute, and building a
biological processing facility.
Dan Birch is very optimistic
about Discovery Park's future. "The
fastest growth at UBC in the last few
years has been in industry liason.
Developments like this tend to break
very fast. If the university signed
agreements with all the industries we
are in discussion with, the park
would be filled in no time."
Caught in the middle of the UEL
struggle is Point Grey MLA Kim
Campbell, who must represent both
the university and Point Grey residents. CampbeU, however, has said
she is in favor of a park for the UEL.
UEL action likely
"I made an election promise to
get park status for the UEL. There is
no political initiative at the government level to develop the park and
I'm going to see that there isn't one,"
she said.
Campbell will have a chance to
air her views before cabinet when
she delivers her report on the UEL
later this summer. A cabinet decision is expected at that time.
When that happens the fate of
the UEL will be decided. I n
Larkin's opinion there is room for
compromise. But not according to
Keefer. "The university had better
back off or lose in the present hassle," he said. "The province won't
partition the endowment lands."
hair and suntanning co.
5784 University Boulevard Phone 224 - 1922
224-9116
SASAMAT
PIZZA FACTORY
2630 SASAMAT STREET
(Just outside the UBC Gates on 10th Ave.)
Free 26 oz. Coke with all orders
224-3333 or 224-2417
from page 1
These factors will weigh in UBC's
favour when the government
resolves the UEL issue.
The government, however, does not
want to alienate Point Grey voters.
The park proposal has received
tremendous local support in Point
Grey. When 1,000 people attended a
public meeting on short notice, and
when all of those people clap, cheer
and yell for a park, you know they
are committed to a cause. And governments tend to walk lightly when a
large number of votes are at stake.
However, the park proposal is still a
community concern, and has not
gathered widespread support
throughout the lower mainland. The
UEL is not Lyell Island or the Stein
Valley. The government could axe
the resident's park plan and still
escape problems at the polls.
What the cabinet will decide is
impossible to predict. The government could take the path of its predecessors and let the matter drift, but
given Bill Vander Zalm's penchant
for action, that is unlikely. The government will probably let UBC
develop the land around Discovery
Park and reach a compromise on
market housing.
I^wfa'
I
fllflfl STWCT
Friday July 31 is
- June Katz, vocals
- Ross Taggart, piano
- Allan Matheson, flugelhorn
Saturday, August 1
- Diana Krall, piano
2505 Alma at Broadway - 222-2244
SUMMER SGENE
l/OL 16 NO. 1
Hello and welcome to Summer Session '87
Summer Session
Association
The Summer Session Association is the student organization of
Summer Session; if you have any problems, concerns or suggestions, please drop by our office - main floor of SUB, opposite the candy counter. We are there Monday - Friday, 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. Phone 228 - 4846.
SUMMER SOUNDS
FREE, noon-hour concerts. Bring your
lunch and a friend.
Wednesday, July 29:
GARY KEENAN QUARTET, SUB
Friday, July 31:
D.C. QUARTET, SUB
Monday, August 5:
STEPHEN NIKLEVA QUARTET, SUB
MUSIC FOR A SUMMER EVENING
FREE, Music Building Recital Hall,
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, July 30:
KUM SING LEE, PIANO
JOHN LOBAN, VIOLIN
LEE DUCKLES, CELLO
Thursday, August 6:
JOHN LOBAN, VIOLIN
PHILLIPE ETTER, VIOLA
IAN HAMPTON, CELLO
MELINDA COFFEY, PIANO
SUMMER SCREEN
All films are FREE to everyone! 7:30
p.m., IRC, Lecture Hall #2.
Wednesday, July 29: RUTHLESS PEOPLE
This comedy stars the Divine Miss M as a
kidnapped housewife, and Danny de Vito
as her slimeball husband in one of the funniest movies of recent years.
Friday July 31: HANNAH AND HER SISTERS
Woody Allen's wonderful comedy/drama
about the usual Woody Allen issues: life,
death, religion, family and sex.
Tuesday, August 4:NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN
Sean Connnery. Maria Brandauer & Max
Van Sydow star in this classic James Bond
film, as they fight the evil SPECTRE and its
threat of nuclear terrorism.
Friday August 7: LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS
A camp classic starring a singing carnivorous plant, a timid flower-shop clerk, and
fabulous song-and-dance sequences.
The Summer Students Association is looking
for people to help in the office in the summer of 1988 if you are returning and would
be able to help out, please see Michael
Grice in Room 100A (Ombuds Office) in
SUB. The Summer Ubyssey, July 22,1987
Page 3
Stan's the man but he's out on his can
By JENNIFER LYALL
UBC educators and administrators
are scared they may lose the best
minister they've had for years.
"Stan Hagen has been an outstanding minister," said UBC vice
president academic Dan Birch. "We
hope (his resignation) is temporary."
Hagen resigned Friday following
conflict of interest questions involving a contract between his Comox
cement company and the UBC research farm. UBC facilities fall under the jurisdiction of the advanced
education ministry.
"We were absolutely shocked
(about the resignation)," said Birch.
"He is clearly a man who cares very
strongly about ethics...to find him in
an apparent position of conflict of
interest was a shock."
Board of Governors student representative Simon Seshadri said he
too was "really upset" by the news.
"I'd hate to lose him as minister,
because he's been really concerned
(about post-secondary education),"
said Seshadri. "He's really taken an
interest in his ministry, and he's
been very accessible."
NDP critic of advanced education
Darlene Marzari said she understands the administators' concern.
"He has done some decent work
for the financing of universities, and
consequently the entire system is
quite upset at the prospect of losing
him," she said.
But Marzari is more concerned
about the possibility that Hagen
knowingly profited from a contract
with UBC while he was minister.
"When I heard he was pouring cement on the UBC farm...it struck
me then that this was not an oversight," she said.
Marzari is calling for "an investigation that looks into whether he did
this knowingly."
She said the inquiry that is being
conducted by the deputy attorney
general, a paid civil servant, is not
impartial and will not go deep
enough.
"He has to be cleared absolutely
and irrevocably" before he is reinstated, said Marzari. "It's just a
question of following the law."
Hagen said he would not comment
on the conflict of interest allegations
until after the results of the inquiry
are released on August 5.
He said he appreciated the sympathetic response of the university
community. "It's been quite overwhelming, the support I've received."
Section 80 sparks spat
By CELIA HENSLOWE
A proposal to abolish Section
80 of the Election Act "threatens to
disenfranchise a large part of the
student and tenant population"
NDP MLA Darlene Marzari said
Tuesday.
"There is no way students are
disenfranchised. You don't need
section 80 to vote. You can register
in the preceding 16 days," SC
AMS declares war on AIDS
By RICK HIEBERT
The AMS has declared war on
AIDS.
This summer.the AMS has passed
several motions dealing with the issue of AIDS on campus. During the
last council meeting, 3 motions relating to AIDS were discussed. Todd
Ablett, AMS science representative,
has been researching the disease to
help the AMS form an official policy
on AIDS.
Ablett anticipates that the AMS will
adopt an official policy on AIDS after campus symposiums discuss how
UBC can best fight the disease.
Ablett doesn't know what the policy
will be but he did say "We want a
policy not based on fear.or just good
guesses."
John Liesch.president of Gays and
Lesbians of UBC and president of
the UBC AIDS coalition, said "I
don't see that the AMS needs an
AIDS policy right now, just a policy
of educating the entire student body
to remove any hysteria about the
disease."
Ablett agreed."We want informed
students, so that's why we're looking
into free condom distribution and
handing out information. Even if it's
something students will giggle over,
they'll read it and know something
about it (AIDS)," he said.
"What I'd like to see is an
AMS non-discriminatory policy towards those who might have AIDS.
I'd also like to see some support for
students who test HIV positive or
who have AIDS," said Liesch. He
said the AMS should attempt to coordinate its activities with the
Student Heath Ad-Hoc committee
on AIDS,or cosponsor a symposium
on AIDS.
Ablett also backed a fall symposium on AIDS, saying, "We have
some of the best researchers on
AIDS here at UBC, so we should
use them."
Graduate student representative
Kurt Preinsperg, who has been one
of the AMS' most outspoken activists on AIDS agreed with Ablett,
saying "The AMS should publicize
or promote AIDS tests or sponsor a
forum on AIDS. A good symposium
on AIDS would be to the AMS'
credit."
MLA Kim Campbell refuted.
AMS President Rebecca
Nevraument is also concerned that
the deletion of Section 80 will
"make it much more difficult for average students to vote, due to their
high mobility and the number of address changes they go through each
year."
The debate is in response to
Provincial Secretary and Minister of
Government Services' proposal to
abolish polling day registration for
unregistered elegible voters.
Elwood Veitch intends to extend the
registration period from 10 to 16
days instead.
Marzari allows that Bill 28
"might improve" registration because of the extended time in which
to register, and may increase the
number of places available to register. She is adamant, however, that
polling day registration continue because "there will always be people
who need to register on voting day
who will otherwise be disenfranchised."
Marzari said that Bill 28 is a
result of her defeat over Pat
McGeer by 55 votes after the
Section 80 ballots had been counted
in the last election. She explained
that many people who vote under
Section 80, such as students, tend to
be NDP.
Campbell denied this charge.
Veitch claims that "a lot of individuals that voted under Section
80 (in the last election) were registered in
another riding. In some ridings up
to 80 per cent of Section 80 voters
were ineligible."
"I'm not suggesting anyone
voted twice, just that there has to be
a better system," said Veitch.
Eliminating election day registration will allow the electoral offices enough time to verify registrations and ensure that no one has
registered or voted twice. Marzari
disputes this reasoning, stating that
Section 80 provides triple checking
between voters'names and addresses. Conse-quently a voter can register but not vote twice.
Marzari said that the Social
Credits, and not the electorate, had
abused section 80, because they relied on polling day registration to
make up for "poor enumeration
practices." "By not doing a decent
registration," she said,
"the government threw 100,000's
of people into the position of registering on election day or not voting."
"Judging from registration last
year, or lack of registration, it
(Section 80) had an impact on 25
per cent of all the votes in Point
Grey."
Campbell agreed that Section
80 was "necessary for the 1986
election because enumeration was
very poor." But the proposed
amendments to enumerate three
years after an election combined
with the extended registration period will now make it unneccessary.
Veitch introduced the
proposals to the house in Bill 28
last session. The bill will be debated when Legislature resumes in
November.
Marzari says that meanwhile
she will raise public attention
through interviews and meetings
with the community, and hopes that
students will inform the government of their concerns.
Birch balances budget
Loogan balances chair on face in celebration of university balancing budget.
Dan Shirley Andrews
By JENNIFER LYALL
UBC has balanced its budget for
the first time in several years thanks
to a 4.5 per cent increase in
government funding and a decrease
in expenditures, according to UBC's
vice president academic.
Dan Birch said the budget, released Tuesday, represents a significant improvement over recent years.
"In the last several years we've
gone in with anticipated deficits
from $11/2 million to $3 million
and with pressure from the beginning not to make budgeted expenditures," he said.
But the university is still far
from financial security, said Birch.
"Although we're talking about a
slightly improved financial situation
this year, if you look at it in actual
dollars (adjusted for inflation) we're
still operating at 80 per cent of 82-
83 levels," he said. "It's a fairly serious situation."
Birch said a decrease in expenditures has resulted from major cutbacks, made in 1985, which have
just now come into effect.
Increasing faculty salaries was
the Board of Governors' _i^hest priority when developing the budget,
said Birch. He said this year's budgeted 4.7 per cent salary increase
will help UBC "regain a competitive
position" among Canadian universities.
"This is the first year we've been
able to make a salary settlement
that's even comparable (to other universities)," he said.
Graduate student aid has been
increased by $500, 000 to reflect the
rise in graduate enrolment. In the
last five years enrolment has risen
by 11 per cent in masters programs
and 38 per cent in doctoral programs.
But undergraduate student aid,
including bursaries, scholarships and
work study grants, has been cut by
$535,000 because of the improvements in the government aid program.
"We expect the government will
pick up more of the student need,"
said director of awards and financial
assistance Byron Hender. "Students
will be as well off or better off with
the changes we've made."
But Board of Governors student
representative Simon Seshadri was
afraid students might need the university's aid.
"The argument for removing the
money is because it's not being
claimed," said Seshadri. "I want to
know if it's not being claimed because students genuinely don't need
to money or because the system so
red-tapish that they're being denied
the funds."
"I think we have to ensure that
those students who need money and
wfto are qualified are not being denied stscess because of bureaucracy
and red tape."
\ £5/
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m
White Trash..
Partying 8c Politics
Merge at La Quena Fest
By ALAR OLLJUM
"Unity in diversity...unity in the
face of adversity," said a participant
at the second annual La Quena
Fiesta, held last Sunday at
Grandview Park on Vancouver's east
side.
Huddled under a huge sheet of
plastic in the midst of a raging thunderstorm along with twenty or so
others, the feeling of unity was palpable. Sharing a makeshift shelter
with an odd assortment of punks,
feminists, middle-aged union activists and a token social democratic
politician, one could not help but
feel as if Vancouver's 'alternative culture' had finally united in a common
cause.
For seven hours, a procession
of musicians, poets, politicos and comedians streamed across the stage.
The audience of 300 was cajoled to
eschew the Canadian habit of lethargy; moved close to tears by stories
of resistance to brutal acts of repression; uplifted by songs celebrating
victories large and small; humoured
by boisterous parades of wild clowns
and children.
Jose Ortiz of Vancouver's
FDR/FMLN support team brought
greetings from the people of El
Salvador. He asked the audience to
recall that the fiesta marks an important anniversary for the Cuban people, the 26 July 1956 attack on the
Moncada army barracks by Fidel
Castro's small band of guerrillas.
Ortiz noted that the Reagan administration has often claimed Cuba's
hand lies behind the insurgencies in
Central America. But Ortiz denied
this, saying "It is not a question of
Cuba exporting revolution, because
Cuba does not export poverty."
Vancouver East NDP MP
Margaret Mitchell might have addressed Canada's export of poverty
to the Third World, but instead
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talked about a controversial
Canadian import - political refugees.
"We should not be closing our borders to refugees from Central
America," Mitchell said. She urged
her audience to support the NDP's
campaign against Bill C-55, the proposed Tory immigration policy. The
many political refugees in attendance applauded warmly.
One-time political refugee from
Newfoundland and former east
Vancouver political activist Gene
Long brought a message of solidarity from St. John's East, a riding
Long was recently elected to repre-
sent as NDP MLA in the
Newfoundland legislature. Long
saluted the continued vitality of
\_icouver's 'radical culture' and said
its 'political impulses' inspire activists across Canada. "I was educated politically in Vancouver, first as a
student at UBC and then in Central
American solidarity work," said
Long. Asked what his first impressions were upon returning to
Vancouver, Long said: "I heard all
these stories about demoralization
and 'burn-out' being rampant in the
activist community, but found out
this is not true. It seems that out of a
long night of darkness, a new resistance movement is emerging."
An important part of any movement for social change is cultural renewal. The fiesta highlighted the
recreation of popular culture, both
locally and globally.
Poking fun at the Vander Zalm
government's attacks on the labour
movement, the Vancouver band
"White Trash" sang its 'theme song'
"Billy's Lookin' for a Fight" Named
after a notorious comment about
Britain's unemployed youth uttered
by Socred cabinet minister Stephen
Rogers, they contributed to the international flavour of the fiesta. The
band also covered the British pop
tune "Free Nelson Mandela" and
sang a version of the Chilean anthem
of resistance, "El pueblo unido, ja-
sera vencido" ("The people
united, can never be defeated".)
British folk singer/songwriter
Roy Bailey was one of several acts
from the Folk Music Festival who
extended their stay in Vancouver in
order to play the La Quena Fiesta.
Reality emulated art in a disturbing
manner during one of Bailey's songs.
Jtfst as he was singing a line from a
song about an Irish political activist
on the run from the law, "The wail of
the sirens is the cry of the morning,"
a lightning bolt struck a nearby
transformer and set an air-raid siren
wailing. If only for a brief moment,
it seemed as though the far-off wars
being sung about at the Fiesta had
suddenly become immediate and
real.
The collective sense of angst
produced by the electrical storm, the
wailing siren and stories of repression and battles at home and abroad
were symbolically purged by a ritual
led by clowns and children. A
colourful parade of a jumping, hooting and hollering swirl of painted
faces ended by smashing two artfully decorated pinatas: one in the
shape of a pig (that poor reviled
creature), and one in the form of a
two-sided superpower balloon (stars
and stripes backed with hammer and
sickle.)
In the end, the La Quena Fiesta
was celebratory and joyous, as a\\
good fiestas should ultimately "be.
As a finale, the lovable Topp Twins
from New Zealand yodeled the
crowd to a state of near-ecstasy with
their hilarious songs of bank robbers,
paranoid peaceniks and righteous
feminists. In a special treat, the
Twins performed a song of peace
and reconciliation composed especially for the fiesta. Its refrain:
'Throw down your guns, we're coming home again, home again soon,"
profoundly touching the whole audience: those who have sought refuge
in Canada from abroad, and those
who seek refuge from the troubled
political scene of B.C.
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Lo
By  LAURA BUSHEIKIN
Pinter's one-act play Tl
Lover features a couple who exhib
all the classic characteristics of tl
British upper-middle class. Tfo
are--on the surface, at least--r
served, proper, reasonable^.**!
cold. But in order to maintain th
veneer, they must subvert much (
their humanity—in particular the
more Dyonysian urges. Howeve
these urges still churn beneatk-J)
surface of these overly-sophistica
ed, ultra-refined humans.        ^^
Theatre
The Lover
Kits House Hall
Until August 1st
The Lover reminds i
that humans, even at their most cv
ilized, are the same CTeature_i_"_
savage who dances a ritual of s
duction to the sound of tribal druii
ming. Pinter shows how civiliz
tion (as defined by the British uj
per-middle-class) tries to denj^tfi
^savage' energy. Yet this enerj
WILL escape, and The Lover si("*|
just how bizarre such an outlet cs
be.
Hopefully the themat
summary above will replace a pli
summary, because I simply C^£
discuss the plot in any detail wit]
out spoiling the element of sljM
which is such an important featu
of the show. y^
The couple, Sarah a:
Richard, have, to borrow ^ phra
from the program notes,,'an "inu
esting arrangement",.-"with mutu
consent, they ea.ch have lov*->
Naturally they are very reasonab
about it, and very reserved^
proper as they discuss their el-*
curricular love-lives calmly ov
cocktails. Yet something is nir
bling uncomfortably beneath th
apparent calmness—something jjj
looks like jealousy or need. B
Sarah and Richard would never a
mit to such emotions.
Does this marriage soui
strange? Well, the situation gets
whole lot stranger once we meet £
t> ver:
iking
winy
lovers. When Sarah and Richard in-
. teract with their respective lovers,
t those buried Dionysian urges begin
. to surface. As the plot thickens,
^_» Sarah and Richard's veneer thins.
And due to complications I can't dis-
^^plose, their marriage is revealed as
j being far weirder than it appeared at
f     first.
r The play is not only
shocking and thought-provoking, but
t^—.also very funnv. The increasingly
bizzarre behavior of the characters is
^_at times hilarious. The dialogue is
^sparse and telling—every murmured
"hmmm" is worth a thousand explanatory sentences.  Apparently
trivial conversations about, say,
_ _^ whether or not the blinds have been
\^ kept up or down are laden with significance.
P**^"" Sarah Rodgers as Sarah
and Bruce Harwood as Richard successfully express the subtext beneath
the words. As a duo, they are dynamic even in the most static scenes,
and dynamite in the...uh...raunchier
scenes. They both make the two
■sides of their characters—the sophisticated, civilized persona, and the
crude inner passion—equally believable.
One technical complaint:
The "stage1 was created by a backdrop of drapery. Occasionally the
■^audience could hear and/or see
^movement behind this drapery. I
I    kept wondering if some surprise
n>e__racter was going to jump out of a
hiding place in the bedroom closet,
^vfery distracting!
The Kitsalano Theatre
■»>» Company was created by the UBC
Theatre Department to showcase
- -.^their graduates and hopefully create
a bridge between theatre school and
professional theatre.  The Theatre
Department provides a small budget,
props, rehearsal space, and a direc-
_ ^ tor—in this case, Klaus Straussman.
At the same time that the
UBC Theatre Department has given
"their graduates an opportunity to
work, they've given theatre goers the
opportunity to see well-produced,
well acted community theatre at affordable prices.
Polaroids Paint Powerful Picture'""**
By KATHY CHUNG
Anyone interested in
photography or the human
collective will find editorial
photographer Neal Slavin's show
BRITONS an absolute delight.
Those who have despaired over the
possibilities of Polaroid
photography will come away with a
greater appreciation of that medium.
Gallery
NealSlavin: BRITONS
Presentation House Gallery, North
Vancouver
July 17 to August 23
The Presentation House exhibit
contains 49 colour photographs
taken with Polaroid's huge 20 x 24
inch camera. These large-scale
portraits, with emulsion clearly
visible around their borders, have
bright, vivid colours and sharp
details.
Slavin shows us a Britain
seldom seen by visitors. Over a
four-year period he roamed the
country, documenting social and
professional groups ranging from
the canine members of the Great
Dane Breeders Association to the
Painters of the Fourth Rail Bridge to
the Duke and Duchess of
Devonshire and their staff. These
carefully-arranged group portraits
reflect Slavin's fascination with the
individual in relation to his
collective. There is a sense of
mutual reinforcement of identity,
not only between individual and
group, but also between group and
environment
The subjects show intriguing
diversity. It takes a moment to
distinguish the Motorcycle
Messengers of Hermes Dispatch;
suited up in riding jackets and
helmets of red and black, they meld
into the mass of motorcycles
surrounding them. Capped and
goggled members of the Channel
Swimming Association pose on a
rocky Dover beach before an ocean
and sky of surrealistic blue. The
members of the Camera Club in
London, each armed with camera
and happily snapping away at the
viewer, invoke in multiple the
precise feeling of being pursued by
an overzealous photographer.
The settings are also
fascinating. The Painters of the
Fourth Rail Bridge are dwarfed by
the towering steelwork yet share in
the strength and presence of the
immense structure. The members of
the Black Dycke Mills Band are
delightfully posed on metal
scaffoldings like fireflies caught in a
spider web. The elderly nuns of the
Redemptoristine Order gather
cheerfully, their habits deep red
against the intense green of their
convent garden.
One leaves the exhibit with the
feeling of having wandered through
an album of charming family
photos, complete with eccentric
aunts and uncles, taken with skill
and care and filled with benevolent
wit and humour.
Well worth the trip to the North
Shore, BRITONS should not be
missed.
The Cure...hot, hot, hot Page 6
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY, JULY 29,1987
Former student UAC member sets the record straight
I have just read the first edition
of the Summer Ubyssey (July 15,
1987). Sorry I'm a little behind the
times. This letter is about some
inaccuracies in the story entitled,
"Report urges AMS to take over
Intramurals", and in my own comments on the report. The reason I
decided to comment on the article is
because the whole athletics issue is
complex, often misunderstood, and
always the centre of much emotional debate. Consequently, misleading
or erroneous information should not
be allowed to flow freely so that the
issues become even more obscured.
That said, where to begin?
First, the report with recommendations for athletics and sports ser-
vices was prepared by the
Presidential Task Force on Athletics
and Sports Services— a body completely separate from the University
Athletic Council (U.A.C.)- not the
U.A.C. as reported in Ms. Bjorge's
article. It is extremely important to
make this separation clear for the
report makes recommendations
which among others, affects U.A.C.'
The Task Force sought to review
"administrative and management
structures" (Task Force terms of reference, number 1), which of course
includes a review of U.A.C. The
task Force also looked at the relationship between various athletics
and sports programs, and the role of
athletics committees such as the
Men's Athletic.Committee (M.A.C.)
and the Women's Athletic
Committee (W.A.C).
While the recommendation to
move Intramurals completely to
AMS control (a move which I
favour in principle, subject to certain guarantees) is important, the
report makes other recommendations whose implications are quite
significant. These other issues were
not raised in the article.
Foremost of these recommendations is that the Athletic Department
and the School of P.E. not be integrated. The integration model is in
use at some other universities in
Canada, and is favoured by many, if
not all faculty members in the
School of P.E. The Task Force,
however, felt that the separation
model allows for greater flexibility
for both athletics and the School.
Under this system, athletics funding
would be entrenched and could not
be spent by the School (a danger
with the integration model); consequently, better planning and overall
financial control for athletics is possible. Lack of ability to plan, due
primarily to a constantly fluctuating
financial future has seriously
harmed athletics. With separation,
the School is still able to draw on
the resources of the Athletic
Department, namely coaches for
Student hacks convene
CUSEC, or the Canadian
University Student Executive
Conference, will be hosted by UBC
from July 31st to August 4th.
CUSEC is a new national student
organization formed two years ago.
In February of this year, CUSEC's
constitution was ratified in Toronto.
CUSEC's mandate is to organize an
annual conference for Canadian
university student unions. These
conferences will consider the logistical aspects of running large student unions: conflicts between businesses and services, relative importance of different services, user
fees, funding, and the like.
Delegates to this first
CUSEC conference are coming
from as far away as Montreal. A
total of 21 delegates from 11 universities will join the large UBC
contingent. Four intensive days of
seminars and workshops will see the
delegates covering several topics:
federal funding for handicapped
access and daycare, student publications and broadcasting, business
operations, the relationship with the
Canadian Federation of Students,
housing and student aid are examples.
CUSEC will have two
special guests. Mary Meloshe, the
director of the Canada Student Loan
program, will lead a workshop on
August 3rd, and Jean Charest, the
Federal Minsiter of State for Youth,
will give a dinner address that
evening.
If you have any questions
regarding CUSEC, call Tim Bird at
228-3961, or drop by the AMS
offices.
Jody Woodland
AMS Vice-President
r
THE SUMMER UBYSSEY
July 29,1987
The Summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays throughout the
summer session by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
British Columbia, with the additional funding from the Walter H.
Gage Memorial Fund, and the UBC Alumni Association. Editorial
opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member
of Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-
2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD
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pick-up orders
228-9114
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OlAC ^ord Services
EDITING - WORD PROCESSING - CONSULTATION
306 - 1701     W.BROADWAY 737-8111
teaching P.E. courses, and athletes
for research activities.
Another significant recommendation made by the Task Force is the
restructuring of both M.A.C. and
W.A.C. Currently these two bodies
are Presidential advisory committees— they report to the President's
Office and are not strictly in the
UA.C. hierarchy. Under the reorganization, these bodies will be either
eliminated or moved under U.A.C.
as subcommittees. To ensure the
greatest student input, these bodies
should be made subcommittes of
U.A.C. rather than eliminating them
completely.
As far as funding is concerned,
one must be clear that there is a difference between "equitable" and
"equal". Funding between men's
and women's porgrams will never be
equal as long as there are more male
athletes and a greater number of
men's teams. But funding for both
can be equitable: for instance, men
and women should receive the same
for meal vouchers and travel
expenses. Speaking from my experience as manager of the Rowing
crew, things may be equal, but not
equitable— often, equality depends
on the coaches. In fact, during my
four years the women's crew
received more in terms of these
expenses than did the men. So,
while the overall funding was equal
(about $15,000 per year each), the
treatment vis a vis meal and travel
allowances was not. This practice
must end.
What has to be considered by
U.A.C. in the coming months is the
level of participation that U.B.C. is
to have in extra-mural sports.
Fewer sports will mean that remaining sports receive better funding and
are thus better competitors, or that
other areas, such as Intramurals,
will receive better funding, and perhaps lower their participation rates
so that more students can participate.
As always, I would urge those
who have questions to get answers
by talking to student reps on U.A.C.
One day this whole athletics management problem will cease to be a
problem, the Ubyssey will then be
able to concentrate on the impressive performance of our varsity
teams, and UBC students will no
longer have to read my letters...
Martin Cocking
Formerly Involved
New financial
assistance programs
now give everyone
an opportunity for
college or university.
If you are attending college or university this fall - or
thinking of doing so - you may qualify for the new
financial assistance programs for British Columbia
students.
New benefits for students
• improved financial assistance for students with
financial need
• new funds provide direct assistance to individual
students
• reduced student loan debt
New requirements
The new benefits are available to students who spend a
portion of their summer
• working or
• volunteering or
• taking approved courses.
These new requirements affect all students seeking
financial assistance, including those entering first year this
fall.
Find out more!
For information or an application kit, phone the provincial
Student Financial Assistance office toll free
1-800-742-1818 Ssto4:30pm-
Or contact any British Columbia University, Community
College or Provincial Institute.
\**~
Investment
&T~^ forthe
FUTURE
Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training
"Skills for Life''
HONOURABLE STANLEY B. HAGEN, MINISTER The Summer Ubyssey, July 29,1987
t _
AH- H_H - W£tL;      \
DID WANT TO swr
U/ITMA WtfGf.. .
editorial
Page 7
OOOOPS!
You have to hand it to Stan Hagen. In the past
nine months he has been accessible and conscientious
enough to gain a great deal of respect from the university communities. And he's managed to squeeze a
modest funding increase out of the Social Credit government.
Concern over the loss of Hagen is understandable,
especially considering his replacement could be like
his predecessors.
But Hagen is now facing very serious charges that.
if true, could spell the end of his ministerial career.
Hopefully he will be back. And hopefully, before he
is vindicated, his affairs will be thoroughly investigated
by an unbiased committee.
Deputy Attorney General Ted Hughes is paid by the
government and cannot be considered unbiased. And he
will probably not have time before August 5 to conduct
a thorough investigation.
The people of British Columbia deserve more respect.
ODE TO SHEIKS
Ricky likes ones that glow in the darky
Jennifer likes them edible,/ Laura likes
them biodegradable/ So she can do it in
the park./ Steve Chan needs ribbed to
get a rise/ And Ross, we hear, takes the
largest size./ C-elia buys them by the
crated Dan likes those that lubricate,/
Alar Olljum likes them extra-thiny
Steven Chess thinks they protect against
sin./ Kathy Chung thinks they're disgusting/ But Corinne says, "How else
can we be safe with all our lusting?"/
Don Isaak would use any condom/ If he
could get anyone to want him ./Victor
likes to use them twice/But we don't
think thats very nice.
WORDPOWER
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Sat: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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OPEN EARLY,
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kinko's business day starts early
and ends late so we're here when
you need us most—before an early
morning class or business
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Saturdays and Sundays.
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when you have a job for kinko's.
kinko's
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1K6
(604)222- 1688
Monday - Thurs. 8 - 9
Friday 8 - 6
Saturday 10-6
Sunday 11-6
►
OPE
JULY 29,1987
DUNBAR LIQUOR
STORE
3453 Dunbar Street
The new store features over 1,500 products,
including a selection of specialty items.
Store Hours are:
Monday to Thursday and Saturday
9:30 AM to 6:00 PM
Friday 9:30 AM to 9:00 PM
Join Us for Coffee on Opening Morning
THE STORE MANAGER AND STAFF
LOOK FORWARD TO SERVING
THE VANCOUVER COMMUNITY
B.C. Liquor Stores
Student financial
assistance and
volunteer community
work: an explanation
Some benefits under the new B.C. student assistance
program are now linked to a student's activities during the
summer — activities which may include, for some students,
volunteer work in the community. Here's how it works:
1. Level of student assistance based on financial
need
Student assistance — in the form of loans — is available to virtually
all British Columbia students who can demonstrate financial need
while attending university, college or a provincial institute. These loans
must be repaid after graduation.
2. New programs reduce student loan debt
New programs now enable many students to reduce their debt from
student loans. These programs work by replacing a portion of the
student loan assistance with assistance from special new funds which
do not need to be repaid. (Officially these programs are known as
Supplemental Funds, Equalization, and Loan Remission. We will send
you a pamphlet if you want to know more.)
3. Student requirements: work or study during
summer
Most students in B.C. already contribute to their education by working
or studying during the summer. This type of "personal contribution" is
now a formal eligibility requirement for the new programs which
reduce student debt. (It is not a requirement for the basic student loan
— which is based solely on financial need.)
4. If you can't find work, you can volunteer
Students who look for a job, but cannot find one, can still meet their
"personal contribution" requirement by finding volunteer work in
their community. Student assistance officials will be flexible when
interpreting this innovative requirement — particularly during this
first year. Students are advised to keep a log of their volunteer activity.
Find out more!
For information or an application kit, phone the provincial Student
Financial Assistance office toll free
1-800-742-1818
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
weekdays
or contact any British Columbia University, Institute or Community
College.
Investment
f^T^ forthe
Future
Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training
"Skills for Life"
HONOURABLE STANLEY B. HAGEN. MINISTER Page 8
The Summer Ubyssey, July 29,1987
* *-% *\!v
AIDS has become a recurring theme at Council
meetings.
Council voted to look into the idea of organizing a
fall symposium on the medical facts and the psychological, social and moral implications of AIDS.
A motion to ask Student Health to encourage students to get AIDS tests as often as they wish was
voted down.
Council also passed a motion to give away free
condoms and information packages during registration. AMS vice president Jody Woodland suggested
throwing them by the handful from a huge Trojan
Horse.
There is no room at the inn for the Science
Undergraduate Society. Pushed from building to
building and into smaller and more cramped spaces,
the undergraduate representatives requested a letter
from Council urging the Dean of Science to provide
space for the Society. "We are not third class citizens," said SUS representative Todd Ablett.
The Disabled Students Association was granted
service organization status. The association plans to
produce a bi-monthly newsletter, offer peer counselling and support, and host a variety of workshops
throughout the year
A formal outline of what constitutes a service
organization still does not exist, a problem AMS
vice president Jody Woodland will address in the
fall.
The AMS set up two work study grants to study
the feasibility of operating an AMS staple goods
store. See story on page 8.
Raymond and Ernest Perrault have been nominated
for The Great Trekker award. Both are graduates of
UBC and both worked for the UBC Radio Society
in the '40s. Raymond Perrault went on to be minister of state in the House of Commons and is currently a senator. His brother Ernest is an award winning
screenplay writer and novelist. Council tabled the
vote pending further information on other nominations.
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
"We actually tossed around the idea of giving them
away with the first pitcher of beer at the AMS barbecue"
—AMS President Rebecca Nevraumont on the
distribution of condoms in the fall.
classifieds
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years experience.
Word processing, IBM typewriter. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING, short notice service. Essays, resumes,
papers. Proof reading extra. 327-0425 John.
Research & essay writing assistance available. Will
pick up &/or deliver!
TYPING QUICK $1.25/page
Call Rob 228-8989 anytime. Right by UBC.
AMS considers toiletpaper blowout
-***■-$
By CORINNE BJORGE
UBC students may be able to purchase bulk toilet paper at low prices
as a result of a motion passed by
Council last Wednesday.
The motion established two work-
study positions to examine the feasibility of setting up an AMS-run
staple goods store on campus.
Students, especially those from the
T        interior "end up paying a lot more
s s* ~ ^   than they need to, because they don't
s*^ss  know the area", said Duncan
*   •• s   Stewart, a UBC student who helped
* ?   formulate the idea.
AMS arts representative Byron
..   0 s   Berry, who forwarded the motion to
*«fw>>r>wwww*MMr*w*><r*f
Council, said he saw the store being
run for about 4 weeks "parallel to or
in conjunction with, the AMS Used
Bookstore".
But Board of Governors representative Simon Seshadri questioned the
value of setting up a store for such a
short time. "It seems kind of dopey
to buy all these things, do the
unloading, pricing and then send
them all back," he said.
Seshadri added it is important to
get student input on the matter. "I
want to know if the students want
it", he said.
Seshadri said if the store was set
up, it shouldn't be run by outside
groups. He said an AMS-run store
could "spread around the overhead"
and "employ students at a higher
wage while charging lower prices."
Stewart disagreed. He said retailers
should come in and sell directly to
the students. He saw the store as
selling at "wholesale prices direct to
the students with a zero per cent
mark-up."
Stewart said running the
store for four weeks wouldn't be feasible. To maintain the zero per cent
mark-up, it would require the retailers to run it for only a few days.
"The retailers cannot come in for
longer than that" he said.
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<*rd_*^_*_'_rM»*<_M_-M-»*»_»*<--»*>»-'
The University of
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Stage
Campus
TEN LOST YEARS
by Barrie Broadfoot
directed by Bruce Dow
July 29th - August 8th
Curtain: 8 pm
Adult $5 Student/Senior $4
Mondays - Two for One
Frederic Wood Theatre
Reservations 228 - 2678
STARLINE MOVING SYSTEMS LTD.:
long distance and overseas moves. Estimates no
obligation. 270-0662.
One and two bedroom suites, available immediately
brand new, ground level, nr Central Park. $400 and
$550. 438-3060 Ask for Ben.
CAMPUS REP.-Are you interested in music, audio
equipment, making money and marketing? Work as
a campus rep for MUSIC WORKS representing fine
stereo products. Work at your own pace, on your
own time, on campus. Call Mike at 875-6364.
tweens
Monday
UBC ZEN MEDITATION SOCIETY
Meditation, instruction provided, all welcome. 4:30
pm to 5:30 pm, penthouse. Graduate Center.
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OPEN LATE.
kinko's business day starts early
and ends late so we're here when
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morning class or business
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meeting or seminar, and even on
Saturdays and Sundays.
Come by and see us. No
"Closed, Come By Again" signs
when you have a job for kinko's.
kinko's
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver. B.C. V6T 1K6
(604)222- 1688
Monday - Thurs. 8-9
Friday 8-6
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UBC Aquatic Centre
The University of British Columbia, 6121 University Blvd.,
 FOR INFORMATION CALL: 228-4521	
SWIMMING SCHEDULE FOR INDOOR AND OUTDOOR POOLS
Hours Effective Jun* 8 to September 6,1987
SESSION
DAYS
HOURS
ADMITTANCE TO:
1
PUBLIC
SWIMS
FAMILY
SWIMS
Mon to Fri
Mon/Frl
Wed
Sat/Sun
S«t/Sun
1:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.**
7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
6 p.m. to 10 p.m."
Pool is open to all -get. Children under
6 must be accompanied by an adult. Fitness area Is open to those 16 and over
for an additional charge.
'Outdoor pool will NOT be available until 7:30 p.m. on Mon/Fri/Sat/Sun June 29,
July3, 4, 5,6, 10, 11, 12
Wed 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.** Families   only.   Children   are   admitted
Sun 10:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. FREE only when accompanied by their
OWN parent(s). Adults without their own
children  are not admitted.  Passes end
book tickets are not accepted and fitness
area is closed.
"Outdoor pool win NOT be avallabl. until 7:30 p.m. on Wed July 8
AOULT
SWIMS
Tues/Thurs
Sat
8 p.m. to 12:25 a.m.'
10:15 p.m. to
12:25 a.m."
Adults 18 years and over. Proof of age
may be requested. Fitness area Is open
with additional' charge only until 10 p.m.
'At 10*00 p.m., fitness area Is dosed and steam and saunas are open and co-ed.
AOULT A
PARENT
SWIM
Mon/Wed/Fri
9:15 to 11:25 a.m.
Starts Monday. June Sth to Friday.
September 4. 1987.
Cancelled on Fri June 26, W.d July 1
and Mon August 3.
Anyone 18 years old and over. This swim
coincides with children's lessons, therefore the availability of the indoor and
outdoor pools is limited. Fitness area.
Sauna and Steam available. Cost is $2
for everyone. No book tickets or passes
accepted.
CO-ED                Tues/Thurs           6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Anyone 18 years and older: 50 min of
EVENING
dryland exercises, 30 min of water exer
FITNESS
cises. No book tickets or passes accept
ed.   70   people   maximum   per   session.
Starts June 9 to September 3. 1987
Cost $2.
FITNESS The new fitness area is equipped with universal/global stations, hydra-gym exer-
AREA else  machines, stationary bicycles, dumbbells,  wall  mirrors,  exercise posters.
(For avails- weight scale, steam rooms and saunas. All the equipment is suitable for every
Mllty refer level °* fitness — so drop by the fitness area to get in shape or maintain the one
to specific y°u have! Please read schedule for hours of operation. Fitness area is supervised
twlm by an attendant during the University, Public and Adult swim sessions and is open
sessions) l0 anyone 16 years and older. Cost is $1 extra over and above single admission fee
for pool use. T-shirts, shorts and runners must b« wom when using the Fitness
Area.
ADMISSION FEES
Children: 3-12 inclusive
Under 3 admitted free
Seniors: 65 and over
Youth: 13-17 inclusive
UBC Student*: valid student card
Adults: 18-64 inclusive
Keep Fit and Swim
Fitness Area Card
Please note. To use fitness area during Public and Adult swim session* there is an additional
charge of $1.
The area is only open to those 16 years and olJer.
PLEASE NOTE: SWIM SCHEDULE AND ADMISSIONS FEES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE
WITHOUT NOTICE  ^^_^___^^_
SINGLE
OMISSION
BOOK
TICKETS
PASSE!
$1.00
10 for $ 8.00
$25.00
$1.00
10for$ 8.00
$25.00
$1.25
10 for $ S.50
$30.00
$1.25
10 for $ 9.50
$30.00
$1.50
10 for $12.50
$35.00
$2.50
10 for $20.00
15 for $12.00
	
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