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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1972

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 GRAVE COUNTENANCE of RCMP Constable S. F. (Secret*Squirrel) Leach overseas proceedings at
Thursdays AMS General meeting. Leach clearly hoped to do a number on blackguards trying to control
Ubyssey editorship and regain the prestige he lost when the fire department beat him to the evidence in The
Case of the Stolen Ubysseys.
Endowment lands 'getting a good deal'
Class of 72
faces conflict
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Capitalism and the class of '71 seem to be having a conflict of
interests.
And things don't look any better for the class of '72.
Only 4.474 university graduates were required nationally in
1971, a drop of 21 per cent from the previous year, according to
statistics recently released by the federal department of manpower
and immigration.
The national figures are based on a survey of 788 major
employers, of whom 72 per cent responded.
Hardest hit were science students. Only 418 jobs were offered
them, a decrease of 41 per cent.
The demand for arts grads dropped 37 per cent to 852, jobs for
professional graduates dropped 25 per cent to 1,409, jobs for
engineers dropped 21 per cent to 901 while jobs for commerce grads
dropped 14 per cent to 894.
A survey of 37 campuses across the country by the University
and College Placement Association indicates business recruiting
activity dropped 14 per cent between 1969-1970 and a further 41 per
cent last academic year.
"Heading for disaster".is how University of Toronto placement
officer David Curry described the situation facing this year's grads in a
Financial Post interview.
Fred Denton, placement officer at Sir George Williams
University in Montreal, told the Post:
"Commerce grads are still trying. Arts men, having given up on
permanent job offers, are applying for Opportunities For Youth
grants or other summer work. Science graduates seem so depressed
about their chances they often don't even register for employment."
UBC placement officer Cam Craik agreed with the predictions
of his Montreal and Toronto counterparts.
"In general, the career job situation is going to be serious this
year," he said in a written statement given Thursday to The Ubyssey.
He said about 188 recruiting teams have come to campus this
academic year, only a four per cent decrease from last year.
"However, they seem to be seeking fewer students than in
previous years," he said.
The number of teacher recruiting teams showed the biggest
decrease with a drop of 30 per cent from last year.
Craik said: "Many companies are inviting students to interviews
in their downtown offices, however, rather than using campus facilities,
because they know students will suffer the inconvenience out of
sheer hunger."
He said he is even interviewing many first and second year
students who are asking what opportunities might be open in their
fields on graduation.
Craik said one bright note is a recent flurry of job interviews
during the past few weeks, particularly for the forest industry.
There has also been an increase of job listings for immediate
placements of graduates from previous years, he said.
Faculty in a quandary
No decision was reached on the treatment of the engineers
responsible for the racist newsletter at the faculty council meeting
Thursday.
"I think this is because they are in a quandary as to what they
should do," said Alma Mater Society president Doug Aldridge.
After meeting 2V£ hours-and hearing six briefs, the council
announced it is in the process of drafting a future course of action.
Said Aldridge after the meeting: "It was really a repeat
performance of the (AMS) council meeting Wednesday night."
A motion passed at that council meeting recommended striking
a committee to examine the possibility of implementing courses
dealing with a society which gives rise to racism and sexism and
exploring reforms promising to alleviate the tensions and frustration
of such a society.
Math department head Ralph James said he was asked to appear
before the council but declined.
In a statement issued Wednesday he recommended an official
investigation of "teaching conditions in general and physical and
mental intimidation in particular, in the faculty of applied science."
By VAUGHN PALMER
Once again a proposal that the
university endowment lands be annexed to
the city of Vancouver has quietly died.
A proposal that a 2,433-acre plot of the
UEL be annexed was before city council
this month, but alderman Harry Rankin
said Thursday the motion is now low on
the list of priorities.
Endowment lands manager, Robert
Murdoch said Thursday that he hadn't
heard much of the proposal but that "city
council really can't take much action
anyway.
"Annexation is a two-partner
arrangement as it requires provincial
government authorization."  -
In 1970, B.C. lands and forests minister
Ray Williston indicated the government
was considering introducing legislation
giving parts of the UEL to Vancouver city,
but later the idea was dropped.
Since then, the idea has floated around
council, but Murdoch said: "I would agree
with Rankin that the proposal is low on
council's priorities. The current system
seems satisfactory."
"Council seems to have decided that
annexation would be too much trouble,"
Rankin said.
Among the problems of annexation was
the revelation in a recent survey done by
the  city  that  the  services the provincial
government  provides for the 3,500 UEL
residents are below city standards.
Upgrading these standards and replacing
the UEL's RCMP force with city police
would cost between $1.3 and $2.3 million.
Another question raised by annexation
is what will be done with the 1,694
undeveloped acres included in the package.
"I suspect that any number of real
estate promoters have their eyes on that
block of land," Rankin said.
"If they had their way the UEL would
become another West End apartment
jungle."
"Bitter experience has shown time and
time    again    that    the    development   of
Vancouver can't be trusted to city council
alone," he said.
There are currently 454 private
residences and 20 apartment buildings on
the lands.
Murdoch said he thinks UEL residents
are now getting a good deal.
"Their position of power in the regional
district administration is second to none,"
he said.
"Votes to regional districts are allotted
on the basis of one per 25,000 residents or
any part thereof. So the 3,500 UEL
residents have one vote, a large say for such
a small group."
"I guess everyone's satisfied with the
way things are now," Rankin said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,  1972
Decentralization closer
By JIM JOLY
The Alma Mater Society has moved closer to
decentralization of its services with the passage of
an amended Palmer Proposal.
In a surprising move Wednesday evening, the
AMS council passed a code revision known as the
Palmer Proposal, amending it to allow greater
financial support to undergraduate societies than
intended by treasurer David Dick.
The proposal first came up last year under arts
undergraduate society president Don Palmer.
The amendment, moved by former external
affairs officer Adrian Belshaw, will give each
undergraduate society a $200 financial base, with a
40-cent annual grant for each student registered in a
faculty.
The original motion presented by Dick called
for a 20-cent per capita grant on top of the $200
base.
Michael Robinson, former internal affairs
officer, said the most important thing for the AMS
to do next year is decentralize. He said the 40-cent
per capita grant will work towards this objective.
"The undergraduate societies will now be able
to put on the activities they should be putting on
and haven't," Robinson said.
Dick told council the amended policy will cost
the AMS about $13,000.
"That will mean a $7,000 new cost to the AMS
with the other $6,000 having been already allocated
to undergraduate societies in existing budget
funds," said Dick.
He said his original 20-cent per capita proposal
would have cost an additional $2,000, not counting
the $6,000 already set aside for the undergraduate
societies.
-Following approval of the amended code
revision, AMS president Doug Aldridge warned
council there would be budget cuts in other areas.
"It's up to the new executive to find the new
money," Aldridge said.
"It will mean cuts in everything else. We'll have
to go through the whole budget to find the extra
capital."
Aldridge said special events and intramurals are
areas which might suffer budget cuts.
Dick said after the meeting his only concern is
that the new policy will be too expensive.
"But I'm not against the principle of it," he
said.
Undergraduate societies do not currently
receive set grants from the AMS. They must submit
budget requests which are subject to acceptance,
cuts, or complete rejection.
Computerization out this year
If people have spent the past
week fretting about the possibility
of computerized registration at
UBC next year, they have been
wasting their time.
"The present indications are
that the plans (for
computerization) will not be
implemented this year," registrar
Jack Parnall said Thursday.
Assistant registrar Ken Young,
who is directly involved with the
planning, said the plans were
never definite.
He said that in 1970 various
faculties suggested the university
take advantage of 1970's
technology to get rid of some of
the clerical work of registration.
As a result the registration and
systems services departments
began plans for computerizing
registration, in conjunction with
faculty representatives.
The tentative proposals were
discussed with the university
faculites and departments
between Feb. 15 and March 1 of
this year.
Young said the objections to
the plans expressed by the
faculties make it highly unlikely
they   will, be  implemented  this
year.
The primary objections are
that the plans do not allow for
sufficient student counselling and
that timetable clashes cannot be
adequately dealt with.
Young said the plans "never
went beyond the talking stage."
The current plans will be
presented to the president's
timetabling and registration
sub-committee on March 23.
Young said the planners would
recommend the university not
implement the plans this year
because of the faculty objections.
'There is no time to revise the
plans before next year," said
Young.
And there is no target date for
completion of the project. The
only aim is to get the best possible
system arranged, he said.
"The current registration
system is inexpensive and efficient
and we will keep it until we get a
new system that will justify higher
costs."
He said the planners would
work on the project next year to
iron out the present difficulties.
"We hope to have some
concrete plans by next fall," he
said.
Anti-calendar planned
The arts undergraduate society today will be circulating
questionnaires for the preparation of an arts faculty anti-calendar,
AUS president Brian Loomes announced Thursday.
He said questionnaires and a list of procedures are available at
the AUS office, Buchanan 107, and invited students to pick them up
for distribution in classes.
He said he hopes the anti-calendar will be completed for
registration week, next September.
But, Loomes said, anti-calendars are not just used by students.
"While faculty won't admit it, much of the teaching evaluation
for tenure decisions is made from calendar reports," he said.
WEDNESDAY MARCH 22
IVOTE YES!
ABORTION LAW REPEAL
referendum
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• OH  C&lTlfMJaS*
m^fdh to 5ee me excltu
e exciuna
(Darh " ^JrinlAn, *2)et
&0.aeedH
LIMITED
Granville at Pindar Sine* 1904
CRIME
is one of society's major social problems
— are you one of those who can accept
the challenge of trying to solve it?
THE B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
is looking for graduates, both men and women,
with a background in the social sciences
to train as
PROBATION OFFICERS
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for futher details.
1972
CHARTER FLIGHTS
RETURN FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON - VANCOUVER
MAY 1-AUG. 25 $250.00
MAY 2-JUNE 26    250.00
MAY 10-SEPT. 3       250.00
MAY 15-AUG. 25    250.00
MAY 28-JULY 14        250.00
ONE-WAY FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON
MAY 15     $145.00
SEPT. 7     145.00
SEPT. 11     145.00
EDMONTON - LONDON
MAY 15 $140.00
CALGARY.- LONDON
SEPT. 30 ,. $140.00
STUDENT GUIDE TO EUROPE
NOW ON SALE $1.95
EURAIL AND BRITRAIL PASSES AND
INTRA-EUROPEAN FLIGHTS NOW BOOKING
Now booking flights between Vancouver & Toronto April 29,
May 6, August 26, September 2 - $75.00 one way.
AMS Travel Office Room 226 SUB
OPEN - 1:00 - 4 P.M. Mon. - Thurs.
Phone 228-2980
1:00-3 P.M. Fri.
Who says Vampires
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JACK MacGOWRAN SHARON TATE
Friday and Saturday | TUCATDF    I
7:00 & 9:30 | Sunday-7:00        I HEM IKE J
•■■•B^^aB! Friday, March  17,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
In the classroom
B,y CATHY AGNEW
Re: In the Classroom of March 10:
In my opinion all teachers can and should be
constructively criticized. In the Classroom could be a
useful tool to inform students about the advantages or
shortcomings of a specific course or professor.
Unfortunately the objectives of The Ubyssey appear
to lie in other directions. I am referring to the inane
reaction of Denny Sekue to Harry Adaskin's Music 326
course.
Initially Sekue asserts that there has been a
transformation over the years in the teacher-student
relationship.
Certainly Adaskin maintains a traditional approach to
the task of communicating knowledge, yet in a course
which has approximately 300 students enrolled there is no
possibility for a less formal structure to exist.
Informal rapport must, and does occur after lectures.
Adaskin is not an unapproachable professor by any
means.
For someone to claim that he "seeks only to repress
and dominate a large number of potentially creative
human beings" is ludicrous, and borders on the libelous.
Adaskin does not adhere strictly to the explication of
musical works, instead he draws upon his vast knowledge
and intense appreciation of literature and the fine arts.
This is a positive rather than a negative aspect of Music
326.
Too often students encounter professors who are
solidly mired in the academic specialities, and who don't
— kini mcdonald photo
SMILING ECSTATICALLY while singing to 3,000 at the Queen E Wednesday night, Joni Mitchell thrilled audience with new songs.
Engineering 'four years of oppression
The following article, written by a third
year engineering student attempts to analyze
the publication of the two racist engineering
newsletters.
By OWEN HERTZMAN
The current dispute over the Engineering
Undergraduate Society newsletter has
prompted this article about the background
situation in the engineering faculty.
Let me state unequivocally that these
opinions are my own and do not in any way
represent the view of any organized section of
engineers. I know, however, that some fellow
engineers will agree with me.
The racist remarks which were printed in
two newsletters appeared not because those
who wrote them are inherently racist or
fascist, but rather, because for four years
these students have existed in the most
oppressive academic conditions on this
campus.
During this time, most engineers make few
or no attempts to explore the political and
social situations prevalent in the world outside
the EUS and/or AMS (and when they do they
are given little time to become effectively
involved in any action).
These conditions allow the faculty to
graduate people who are so historically and
philosophically ignorant and so politically
naive that they do not realize the effects of
their words and actions on the general
community.
Topics of general concern in most other
faculties — topics such as the women's
movement, red and black power, labor
struggles, welfare reform, etc. — are rarely
discussed at any level beyond that of the Sun
and Province.
U.S. control of the Canadian economy is
also a rare topic, though engineers often find
themselves the tools (servants) of American
imperialist corporations.
So who is responsible for this mess? The
immediate blame lies primarily in three
places: the Association of Professional
Engineers of B.C. (APE) which accredits
UBC's engineering school; the UBC
administration, including the faculty of
applied science and its sub-departments and
the small number of articulate and aware
engineering students who sit back and say
nothing whenever controversies occur.
The APE wields the most power and is
most at fault. It has failed to counteract,
indeed, it has subtly encouraged, the sexist,
fascist and racist ideas which have long been
characteristic of mass engineering activities on
this campus.
The de facto obstacles (in hiring, etc.) to
the training of female engineers shows the
APE's blatant sexism. Fascism is encouraged
by the 'corporate-continuity-formula'
whereby before an engineering student can
join the 'club' of graduate engineers, he must
be indoctrinated to keep his mouth shut on
controversial (read, activist) political issues
and to concentrate on making money for his
firm (while not questioning the framework in
which he is told to deal with a problem).
Racism, which seemed to be disappearing
from engineering circles, has viciously
reappeared with the recent influx of
minority-group students into the faculty.
Quotas may not yet exist for all such groups,
just the ones where "too many" have entered
the faculty.
Even more important than the above, is the
stifling of any meaningful curriculum changes
by the threat of withdrawal of accreditation.
Those engineers who do not take enough
in-faculty courses are not accredited.
The administration stands accused of
allowing the APE to muscle in this way,
thereby making the engineering school
intellectually disgusting to many politically
active engineering candidates. The
administration must take responsibility for
not squelching EUS stunts that infringe on the
civil rights of any and all members of the
campus community.
Further, it condones the openly-sexist
displays which are a frequent occurrence in
the civil engineering building.
Finally, this spineless attitude on
interdisciplinary programs for both technical
and non-technical students has furthered the
breakdown in communication which helped
bring on this present crisis.
The silent majority in engineering stands
accused of doing nothing — which in this case
amounts to moral negligence.
make any attempts to relate their subject matter to the
external environment. Music appreciation cannot be
taught in a vacuum.
Adaskin's use of poetry and even the "lapses" into
personal experience are justifiable in these terms.
Certainly Sekue is entitled to state his opinions.
However it becomes slightly questionable journalism when
such a "critique" is founded on over-generalization,
half-truths, and opinionated, rather than informed
statements.
In the Classroom is in this instance completely devoid
of any constructive criticism.
I suggest The Ubyssey examine its motives for
publishing this inaccurate article, which serves only to
denigrate the character of one of this university's better
teachers.
Unmeeting
unattended
Speakers, reporters and band
members almost outnumbered
spectators at Thursday's Alma
Mater Society annual general
meeting in War Memorial Gym
which  lasted about five minutes.
The crowd of students,
numbering about 300, was one of
the smallest turnouts in AMS
general meeting history.
Former AMS president Grant
Burnyeat attributed the small
attendance to "students having
better things to do."
Although there were only two
items of business in the
five-minute meeting, both were
passed with irregularities in
procedure.
Motions to receive the
treasurers' report and to approve
the AMS' auditors for the coming
year were both seconded by
Burnyeat, who, as chairman of the
meeting, cannot move or second
motions.
Sunshyne entertained the
crowd until Burnyeat called the
meeting to order about 1 p.m.
AMS treasurer David Dick
reported that the society managed
to make it through the year and
stay out of debt, with $30,000
out of the almost $160,000
budget yet to be spent.
But, he said, the monies are
committed and are not a surplus.
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and
Company were approved as AMS
auditors, after a dispute between
Burnyeat and former student
senator Art Smolensky over
whom the auditors are was
resolved.
Burnyeat asked the meeting to
approve Kates, Peat. Marwick and
Company as auditors, when
Smolensky told Burnyeat he had
named the wrong firm.
Burnyeat told Smolensky to go
to a senate meeting, but retracted
his statement when he found out
Smolensky had been right.
Peat, Marwick and Mitchell
have been auditors for several
years, but under the Societies
Act, the auditors have to be
approved annually at a general
meeting.
Aldridge said later the
constitutional revisions
concerning The Ubyssey were
"obviously not important enough
for more students to turn out for
the meeting, but this was the only
issue brought to our attention."
He said he didn't know if The
Ubyssey will come up at the next
general meeting.
"It will just depend on the
situation at that time." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,   1972
On relevance
As former AMS president Grant Burnyeat
said, it seems students had better things to do
Thursday than appearing at a general meeting to
vote on bullshit motions about The Ubyssey.
(Does this mean there's such a thing as
positive apathy?)
At any rate, stupid as the whole exercise was,
it did give us a chance to say a few things about
freedom of the press and to talk to a number of
students about the executive's attempt to have
The Ubyssey editor elected.
Thursday's general meeting leaves us
wondering, though, how members of the
immediate past executive even managed to tie
their shoe laces in the morning.
Not only would the two motions passed at
the meeting be found illegal if challenged (we're
sure no one will bother) because they were
seconded   by  the  meeting's chairman,   but  the
executive's advertising prior to the meeting
generally neglected to state where the meeting
would take place.
Now that the whole show is out of the way,
however, we can all move on to more important
things. Hopefully the new council will do
likewise.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 17, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page
Friday, Sports, 228-2306; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"Ah, my dahlings, how I ' cannot bear to be
without you," the soap box screamed at
pseudo-dilligent staffers irresponsible for the
production of today's rag. A pile of scrap, John
Andersen Vaughn Palmered. But Sandi Shreve enjoyed
it, and along with Lesley Krueger and Sandy Kass, the
triangle almost quadrupled. Art Smolenskied through
the ordeal with Mike Gidora who appeared to ask, .
"What does bear mean?" Berton Woodward jambled
with the dictionary, trying to find out, while Jim Joly
jambled in his pocket. But Leslie Plommer and Jan
O'Brien really got off on the commercials, which
prompted Kini McDonald and Gord Gibson to join
Kent Spencer and Jim Adams for a barbershop
quartet.
TBBfcS
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W/IVTo PREVENT
UNGRATEFUL
4MER0WS FtioM
WING WANTAGE
OF FREE SPEECH//
©HTOSdWVBf «£SS du PhWtrs Ksraw>
Rgm
Letters
Quebec
This is a comment on Michael
Wallace's letter printed in The
Ubyssey, March 9. Mr. Wallace
points out that he spoke out
against the War Measures Act and
he rightly condemns those faculty
members who did not. Mr.
Wallace was, in that action, taking
the side of the people of Quebec
and Canada.
It is obvious that we are in
need of more instructors who will
take a stand such as this. We saw
where most of the faculty
members' allegiances were at that
time. I strongly support Mr.
Wallace's position on the War
Measures Act but 1 do have some
other criticisms.
In an interview with Mr.
Wallace that appeared in the Sun,
Oct. 21, 1971, it was reported
that Mr. Wallace is a member of a
team of scientists that recently
received a $149,000 grant from
the U.S. National Science
Foundation. His contribution to
the team is to study how to
prevent war in Quebec. This may
seem innocent enough, but if we
examine the history of such
studies we will see that it is far
from innocent.
To begin with the U.S. state
department has the right to screen
and approve government-funded
social science research projects on
other countries. The National
Science Foundation is a U.S.
government agency that is subject
to this control. The U.S. state
department is very concerned
with protecting the U.S.'s
economic, political, and military
interests. As we know, the Quebec
economy is dominated by
American corporations and an
independent, socialist Quebec
would not be healthy for
American economic concerns.
Also a socialist, independent
Quebec would be disastrous to the
U.S. in terms of American
military and political interests.
(We have seen this in the case of
Cuba.)
The type of research that Mr.
Wallace is doing is nothing new. It
is very similar to another study of
Quebec that was begun in 1964 as
a part of a Project Camelot.
Camelot was officially announced
on Dec. 4, 1964. It was begun as a
continuation of the U.S. Army's
Special Operations Research
Office (SORO). Project Camelot
was principally aimed at studies in
Latin America and was funded by
the National Science Foundation
and similar agencies under the
watchful eyes of the U.S.- state
department. A 1964 document
that introduced Project Camelot
to prospective researchers was
reprinted in I. L. Horowitz's The
Rise and Fall of Project Camelot
(available in the UBC library).
The first line of that document
sets the tone of the project.
"Project Camelot is a study whose
objective is to determine the
feasibility of developing a general
social systems model which would
make it possible to predict and
influence politically significant
aspects of social change in the
developing nations." A few
paragraphs later in the same
document it is stated:
"Another major factor is the
recognition at the highest level of
the defence establishment of the
fact that relatively little is known,
with a high degree of surety,
about the social processes which
must be understood in order to
deal effectively with problems of
insurgency. Within the army there
is especially ready acceptance of
the need to improve the general
understanding of the processes of
social change if the army is to
discharge its responsibilities in the
over-all counterinsurgency
program of the U.S. government."
Project "Revolt" was a section
of Project Camelot that was aimed
directly at Quebec.
Project Camelot was halted as a
result of public disapproval within
the U.S. and especially from the
people of Latin America. But the
U.S. does not give up easily, as the
people of Vietnam will testify. It
merely changes tactics. It seems as
if Project Revolt has been
resurrected and is being carried
out at UBC by Mr. Wallace.
I would like to see Mr.
Wallace's answers to these queries
as my only information on his
actual work is from the interview
in the Sun. I may be quite
mistaken about Mr. Wallace's
research and I would like to see
him clear up any misconceptions
that may have appeared in this
letter.
E. Kravitz
Smug
There is one thing about the
engineers, they always make
everybody else feel so superior.
When they throw people into
the library pool, we snicker; when
somebody gets hurt in the chariot
race, we say "tsk, tsk"; and when
they indulge in racist and other
bad jokes, we can indulge in
justified outrage. All we need to
do is point at others, and, bingo,
our own consciences are clear.
Right, professor Colin Clark?
Right, professor Rene Goldman?
Suddenly there is a Joe
Schmidt in your class, professor
Clark, where usually there is a Joe
Blow or a Joe College. While I
don't know the names of the
people who were responsible for
the engineering newsletter, . it
seems that nobody else does
either, so why discriminate against
Germans? To do so on the basis of
past history could properly be
called prejudice.
I am sure that professor
Goldman (Letters, The Ubyssey,
March 14) intended to speak
figuratively when he used phrases
like "Nazi ideology" and
"goose-stepping perpetrators of
these racist outrages," but
nevertheless, some Germans could
be offended, couldn't they, for
being thus singled out? In fact,
they might feel they were being
discriminated against, and accuse
him of having racist tendencies
himself.
Furthermore, I disagree with
professor Goldman that "in a
centre of learning there should be
no room for such hooliganism."
Where would he rather have it,
out there in the "real world?" The
university is supposedly a place
where ideas are exchanged, and
therefore ideally suited to
intellectually and morally
convince those racists that racism
is out. But you can't fight racism
with more racism.
I would suggest that everyone
who feels so smug about not being
like the engineers try a little
critical self-evaluation.
Inge Fleet,
Library
Team
Although I do not wish to
cavil, I must reply to that
ostensibly apodictic letter of Mr.
Levac's, in your Feb. 30 edition.
In that letter the writer stated
that Jim Adams' review of the
VOA's operatic double-bill was
larded with errors and contained
an example of plagiarism at its
most manneristic level. (I must
congratulate you for daring to
print such a disreputable letter.)
The writer of that letter stated
in conclusion that should Mr.
Adams wish to continue writing
erroneous articles then he should
write exposes of departmental
scandals.
I cannot agree with this, for
The Ubyssey already has a
reporter by the name of Stafford
who fills that capacity. Mr. Adams
should be allowed to continue
writing musical reviews. The team
of Adams and Stafford shall thus
secure the continued consistency
of The Ubyssey.
Richard A. Cavell
We breathlessly await your
non-erroneous contributions to
the paper, since we are sure you
agree that general,
unsubstantiated criticisms do little
good for anyone.
See page 13: LETTERS  Arts and politics week
The Arts and Politics Conference
which the Union of Radicals in the
Humanities is sponsoring comes at a
time when the internal politics of a
number of arts departments are coming
under increasingly heavy criticism from
junior faculty as well as students. It is
obvious to anyone who has been
following the developments in the
anthro-soc, psych, Slavonic studies, and
English departments that major
confrontations are shaping up at staid
old. Point Grey U, and that the best
lame replies from administrators
(witness the twaddle of English
department head Robert Jordan in a
recent Ubyssey edition) to charges of
corruption, cronyism, politically
discriminatory practices, and plain
stupidity, have ceased to convince
virtually anybody.
Amidst the increasing resentment of
junior faculty that has surfaced, and the
development of student organizations
with mass support in most of the above
named departments, the power stucturc
in the faculty of arts has remained
intact and virtually immoveable. In fact,
this has been largely because a
movement of students around a
comprehensive critique of the nature ol
education students are receiving at UBC.
rather than around isolated instances of
administrative hanky-panky, has not
developed. However, such a movement
is being built, as witnessed in the actions
of the Union of Radical Social Scientists
around a critique of the present role of
the social sciences in Canada.
The URH also is working to provide
a critique of the role of the humanities,
both in the university and in society,
and it sees the coming conference as an
attempt to concretely illustrate the
analysis that the university fails to
provide a real education in thy arts.
A primary theme of the proposed
events involves a challenge to the idea
that  the  arts, and commentary on the
arts (criticism), should be the preserve
of the elite minority of so-called experts
who populate our universities and art
schools.
The URH contends that as long as
artistic ventures and cultural criticism
reflect the priorities and values of the
small group of people who control the
lives of the vast majority of the
population, the liberating impulse
behind the creative imagination and the
liberating potential of artistic creation
(that is, its influence on those exposed
to it) remains negated.
In reality, the "sensibility" to the
arts which professors claim is the
correct and cultured approach is
nothing more than good old bourgeois
individualism embellished with an
impressive vocabulary.
The function of the arts departments
and the university is to provide the
ideology, or socially necessary mask,
which allows the small group of people
who control our lives to stay at the top
of the social-economic heap. This
necessitates that cultural criticism, as
well as creative endeavors, affirm the
values of a social order which negates
the possibility of human fulfillment, a
^
social order which has overseen the total
mobilization of economic, technological
and human resources in the interest of
profit.
Of course, this does not mean that
artists and critics are required to stand
on rooftops praising MacMillan-Bloedel
and American Imperialism Inc. No,
siree, our culture guardians are more
sophisticated than that. They didn't
spend eight years slaving for their PhDs
for nothing.
The process of cultural affirmation in
the university, in fact, begins with the
reification, or fragmentation, of
studying culture. There are special
departments to study specific aspects of
Arts and politics
schedule
Monday, March 20
Noon      Diane de Prima Reading, SUB
Ballroom.
Evening (8:00 p.m.)      "Women in the
Arts"    Panel    Discussion:    Diane    di
Prima, Judith Copithorne, and others,
GSC Ballroom.
Tuesday, March 21
Evening    (7:00    p.m.) Margaret
Atwood Reading (in conjunction with
Women's Studies) SUB Auditorium.
Wednesday, March 22
Evening (8:00) - Movie, SUB
Auditorium, "Cuba: Revolution in the
Arts".
Thursday, March 23
Noon Doug Nichol, "Perspectives in
Communal  Architecture" Buch.   106.
Friday, March 24
Noon - Music: Joe Irving and Co.
Band.
Monday, March 27
Noon - Vancouver Street Theatre,
SUB Ballroom.
Tuesday, March 28
Noon Steve      Ga r ro d .
"Communications Arts: The Mass
Media in Canada" Buch 106.
Wednesday, March 29
Noon — "Literature and Social
Responsibility" Panel: Shelagh
Delaney, George Stanley, Jean-Louis
Brachet, Buch 106.,
Thursday, March 30
Noon - Poetry Reading: Tom
Wayman, Pierre Coupey. Judith
Copithorne, George Stanley, Scott
Lawrence and others SUB Art Gallery.
human endeavor (English, history, fine
arts, etc.), each one isolated from the
other. Once people are convinced that
the study of art can be separated from
other aspects of social reality, the chief
tool of affirmation — mystification —
isn't quite so hard to employ. Art
becomes isolated ("transcendant" is the
favored critical description), from the
real world. It becomes God, and the
critic becomes the High Priest of its
Ascension. Of course, not all schools of
criticism agree on the way in which art
should be mystified (there are sectarian
differences, similar to those between
Catholics and Protestants), but the
critical   journals    mass   produced   on
__: s
university critical assembly lines all
faithfully flog the idea that the aery
realms of poesy have nothing to do with
the ugly day-to-day reality which people
experience in the world. The fact that
most people's experience is one of
exploitation and oppression doesn't
count in such a theory. Poets and
painters (and by extensions, critics)
presumably have no responsibility to
people. Nowhere do these journals
suggest that art should be the preserve
of everybody.
In response to such a view of art,
which reinforces and affirms the
concepts of elitism and hierarchical
control upon which capitalism and
imperialism rest, the Arts and Politics
conference will be an attempt to
illustrate that art and the real world
cannot be separated. The project of
poetry, as well as of political action,
must be to create a social revolution.
Obviously, these events can only
represent a beginning in the struggle to
demystify culture, but at the very least,
it provides a real alternative way of
regarding culture than that ladled out in
the classroom.
Singles'Europe Adventure
We want you to run away to Europe
with us.
,   We'll drain our last pint of Guinness
at the Tournament Pub in Earlscourt,
London, hit the road south to the Channel
and be in Calais by sunset.
A month later, we could be in Istanbul.
Or Berlin or Barcelona. Or Athens. Or
Copenhagen. Or just about any place you
and your Australian, English, New Zealand
and South African mates want to be.
On the way, we'll camp under canvas,
cook over open fires, swim, sun and drink
in some of the most spectacular settings on
the continent.
We'll provide a small zippy European
motorbus and your camping gear and a
young cat to drive it who knows every
wineshop from here to Zagreb, plus how to
ask for a John, or how to find your way
back home to bed, smashed, later on.
You can go for as little as 28 days or
as many as 70. Spring, Summer or Fall.
The cost is ultra reasonable. And
we'll get you to London from here just as
cheaply as is humanly possible.
We've got a booklet that fills in the
details and prices.
If you're single, under 30 and slightly
adventurous, send for it.
We're booking now.
£ Please send me details, itineraries and an application.
A        Name_	
W        Address	
• City	
.Prov.
Mail to: Europe, Going Down the Road,
214 A Adelaide St. West, Toronto, Ontario.
UBC
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,   1972 Efforts to understand the relationship
of poetry to politics quickly go astray
when we talk simply about the 'political
content' of a particular poem, or
speculate on how poetry can serve a
particular ideology. Almost immediately
we run into the' poem that is about
politics, whose author has 'progressive'
political views, and yet the poem is a
'bad' poem — to make matters worse, we
can offer no 'rules' for telling
'objectively' that a poem is 'bad'. There's
a lot of work to be done involving
questions of political content in poetry
and how poetry is used and evaluated,
but here I want to look at other issues.
1. I'm not interested in whether a
work of art does or doesn't have 'political
content', I'm concerned with the kind of
life the poet leads in this capitalist
society. Does his or her life serve the
creation of a ('proletarian') revolution or
does it oppose it (that is, is the making of
that person's poems dependent on
exploiting the lives of others)?
If my life serves the revolution I
believe that the content of my poems is
so thoroughly interrelated with my 'life'
that 'what the poems are about' will be
taken care of (the poem takes images of
my life; if my life contains 'struggle',
images of that struggle will be realized in
the poem).
The
materialism
of poetry
them. My job is not to 'simplify' my
poetry to make it more 'understandable'
(that doesn't change anybody's life) but
to take action to change the material
conditions of the lives of people so that
their consciousness can change (or more
accurately, to take action that makes it
more possible for people to change their
own material conditions).
In defending the poet's work (in its
appearance as an 'organic necessity') I
emphasize that the formula about the
need for action that changes the world
mustn't be used as a hiding place, has to
be made real beyond 'formulas'.
2. The conditions of the world that I
experience as most overwhelming (in
addition to the particulars of 'my life')
are the systematic starvation and
slaughter of the 'proletariat' (and the
'peasantry') by the capitalist class to
preserve the system of capitalist
imperialism (I think this condition is
documented  beyond reasonable doubt).
In that sense, as a poet in a capitalist
country, my art is a luxury, in that my
existence is provided for by capitalist
society. My poetry can be an action
against this economic system that
oppresses others (and it's a disastrous
failure to have a definition of action that
excludes such things as poetry). The
activity of poetry is personally
experienced by me as a psychic necessity.
If I'm committed to action against
capitalism my action must be appropriate
to the conditions that exist. If I lived in a
society where no political action was
possible except in the form of writing
then that would be the appropriate mode.
But I live in a society where other and
more appropriate actions are possible—for
example, teaching, political organizing,
community work, material support of
revolutionary movements, etc. I know
that the 'consciousness' of the
'proletariat' is oppressed in such a way
that my poetry is not 'understandable' to
3. 1 believe anyone is capable of
writing: I want a world in which that
ability is an actual possibility that people
can choose or not choose to realize.
4. Why is it that when we talk about
the communist society that Marx
envisaged we often find ourselves saying
that the production of things by people
in such a society will be something like
what we now call 'art'? Because there is
something about the activity of art that is
special, and which displays, even in a
capitalist society where the artist also is
an^ alienated person, tendencies that
foreshadow de-alienated human life.
What are these special conditions?
When a worker makes a car he is
alienated from the thing he makes
because the car belongs to someone else.
The materials he uses belong to someone
else. He has no control over what is made.
The poet is not (by definition)
alienated from the poem she makes. She
has free access to her materials of
production: the language. It is also the
case that the material she works with has
the special character of being the material
basis of consciousness.
The worker who builds a car on an
assembly line is alienated from the
process of making the car (he has no say
in how it is made and he is separated
from the experience of the totality of the
making; in fact, the act of making it is the
concrete occurrence of alienation). The
poet on the other hand is engaged in
creative work in the language. The
process is freely entered into (even
though we say we are 'driven' to make
poetry). The creative experience is
liberating, because, instead of
experiencing separation from the world,
the poet experiences merging with the
world — the material base of
consciousness, language, is actively taken
into your being.
The worker in capitalist society
experiences separation from that which
makes us human - consciousness of
ourselves as a species (that is, human
beings, in pictures and words, can 'think'
about themselves as a species) — and is
driven to individualism -- that is, each
worker must individually sell her labor
(when workers unionize they have taken
a step toward de-alienation). The activity
of producing poems, insofar as it is
de-alienated production, gives us the
experience of being merged with our
species, insofar as language activates
experience. Though each poem has an
'individual' character, the production of a
poem is one of the deepest experiences of
human community currently (and
historically) available to us. (Perhaps it is
this aspect that explains the unusual
durability of the field of energy that a
poem is — I'm thinking of Homer,
Shakespeare, Dante.)
Yet poets are also alienated in
capitalist society. They produce poems
according to their ability, yet they are
not permitted to take from the wealth of
the society according to their needs.
It's in this sense that art provides us
with something of a model of the
character of production in an ideal
communist society. Insofar as all
production in such a society would be
creative there would be little need to
distinguish  a  particular  activity  by the
term 'art'. Insofar as the distinction now
maintained between intellectual and
manual work would break down (as they
seem to be doing, to some degree, in
China) there would be little need to
distinguish a particular role by the term
'artist'.
5. The economist, Robert Heilbroner,
recently writes, in talking about 'human
nature' as the history of alienation
containing the possibility of
de-alienation, that Marx uses the term
'appropriation' to mean the use to which
human beings put the perceived and
understood environment. "The richer and
more fully developed the human being,
the more of his environment will he
'appropriate', not in the narrow sense of
exerting a claim of ownership over it, but
in the deeper sense of incorporating
within his own being aspects of the world
to which a less developed human will
remain indifferent. Thus, in the goal of an
ideal communist society, people will
appropriate life as poets do making part
of themselves the smallest as well as the
largest marvels of existence, until in
Marx's words: 'People appropriate their
total essence in a total manner, that is to
say, as a whole person'."
Similarly, the philosopher Robert
Tucker, interprets the Marxian way of
human beings ending their alienation in
their producing activity as lying "in the
seizure and socialization of the world of
private property in a proletarian
communist revolution. Beyond this lies
freedom, the emancipation of human
creativity from the acquisitive passion,
the transformation of labor into creative
leisure and artistic self-expression." (This
use of 'self-expression' - which in a
de-alienated form means expression or
action    of    the    world is    to    be
distinguished from its present vulgar form
which simply refers to a display of the
alienated individual.)
In another passage, Tucker writes:
"People will achieve self-realization as
free creative beings devoting themselves
to a multitude of productive life activities
for the sake of the aesthetic satisfaction
they afford." Or again: "The new mode
of production, marking the maturity of
the race after the long painful
development in history, would be akin to
art."
6. Every person (including poets)
struggling for communist revolution find
themselves not only working in
metaphors, but involved in the
transformation of real modes and
relationships of production, involved in
real 'class' struggle' For the poet, this
deep immersion in 'class' struggle
inevitably 'appears' in the poem.
-Stan Persky
Friday, March   17,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 By MICHAEL MYERSGN
The Guardian
(Second of three articles)
Unionist and British policy
has long used religious
prejudice to keep the poor
divided in Northern Ireland.
Protestant workers, paid
lower than anywhere else in
the United Kingdom, still
remain a peg above those of
Catholic workers.
Suffering economic
depression and political
repression, a half-million
Catholics have fled North
Ireland in the last 20 years.
Had they stayed they would
have become the majority in
the six northern counties.
Economic discrimination in
Ulster, thus, is essential to
preserve a Protestant majority.
By forcing Catholic emigration,
it offsets the higher Catholic
birthrate. Only a third of the
total population. Catholics are
52 per cent of those under 21.
(The South fares no better.
The historic economic
stagnation cost the Republic of
Ireland 150,000 emigrants two
years ago. In the 20th century,
it is the only country in the
world to suffer an absolute loss
of population.)
The Ulster Catholic
population has been decimated
for the simple reason that there
are no jobs: Catholic male
unemployment in Derry is 28
per cent; in Dungannon 23 per
cent; in Belfast 17 per cent.
(These are the most
conservative estimates; most
people in the street estimate as
much as three times these
figures. In some areas, like the
South Falls ghetto of Belfast,
the majonty arc unemployed.
And these figures aie liom
before List August's crisis and
the subsequent urban warfare
and resulting lack of economic
investment.)
The dole and other welfare
measures of the British
government are the major
incentives    to    Ulstermen    to
remain loyal to Westminster.
For those employed, weekly
wages in the North average $45
for men, $28 for women.
(Again, these are the most
charitable estimates.) In the
South things are a bit worse;
wages are in the neighborhood
of $38 for men, $21 for
women, a very poor
neighborhood indeed.
Ulster's two main industries,
shipbuilding and linen, art-
decaying, no longer able to
compete in the world market
evey relying on cheap labor.
Only 8000 ship workers remain
of the 40,000 employed 25
years ago and there are
constant rumors and threats by
ownership that the shipyards
will close down altogether.
Figures in the linen industry
are similar: from 60,000
workers in 1951 to the present
30,000.
As embarrassed as London
might be by the reactionary
Unionist regime in Stormont, it
continues to subsidiae Ulster's
ersatz parliament by $240
million a year. England knows
that releasing the six counties
to reunite with the 26 counties
of the South would mean
paying Ireland for all imports
that now come duty-free from
Northern Ireland. Ulster's
relationship to England in this
regard is much like Puerto
Rico's to the U.S. The North
produces a third of Britain's
bacon, a fifth of Britain's
shirts, a tenth of its eggs. It
maintains Britain largest
synthetic fiber center, the
largest polyester yarn factory
in Europe, the largest rope
industry in the world.
If Ulster's relationship to
England is colonial, the South's
is neoa»Ioni?.l. About 75 per
cent of all lieland's exports go
to Britain, bl per cent if Ulster
is excluded. No other country
in Europe is so heavily
dependent on one market.
Most Irish Republicans argue
that,    on    simple    economics
alone, reuniting the six
northern counties and the 26
of the south is imperative. The
two could live as cheaply as
one; administrative costs of
one government are obviously
less than those of two. One
market of 4.4 million people is
better than two of 1.5 in the
North and 2.9 in the South.
And reunification would mean
income from taxes of British
industry in Ulster.
The six counties of the
North remain one of the few
places in the world that retains
a property requirement for
voting. A quarter-million
people, 25 per cent of the
adult population, are thereby
disenfranchised. In Belfast, 23
per cent of the citizenry has
been on the waiting list for
homes for 20 years, In Derry,
only 500 new homes have been
built in the last half-century,
almost all reserved for Unionist
voters.
Catholic families, generally
larger than Protestant, have
another cross to bear: no
matter the size of family, only
the one in whose name the
property is registered is
allowed to vote. In Derry,
Unionists, representing only a
third of the population,
occupy 60 per cent of the
council seats. In Lurgan, no
Catholic has ever been elected
to the city council, although
they constitute 40 per cent of
the population.
Job discrimination is
equally glaring: Fermanagh's
County Council employs but
32 Catholics out of a total of
338 although Catholics are 52
per cent of the counry
population. (These figures are
two years old; concessions to
pressures brought by the civil
rights movement — a one-man,
one-vote policy, disbandment
of the vigilante B-specials and
other reforms have been
announced. Some have been
enforced, most have not, and
new     repressive     laws    have
in Ir
replaced the old discarded
ones, leaving the figures here
virtually intact.)
Such a regime must be
maintained by force, which
explains the current
concentration camps and their
800 prisoners. (An equivalent
per capita figure for the United
States would be over 100,000.)
The government also has at its
disposal its Special Powers Act.
A remarkable piece of
legislation, whose virtues have
led South African Prime
Minister Vorster to remark that
he'd prefer it to all of his own
repressive laws, it was
originally enacted in 1922
against the IRA.
Under the act, authorities
are empowered to: arrest
without warrant; imprison
without trial; deny the right of
habeas corpus; enter homes at
any hour without warrant;
prohibit meetings and
processions; permit flogging;
deny trial by jury; jail people
for refusing to answer
incriminating questions; hold
prisoners incognito; prohibit an
inquest after a prisoner's death;
prohibit circulation of any
newspaper and possession of
any film or recording (the sale
of United Irishman, the Sinn
Fein newspaper, brings six
months' imprisonment; sale of
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17,  1972 eland
an Easter Lily flower, symbol
of the 1916 taster Rising, is
punishable by two years'
imprisonment); arrest anyone
who does anything "calculated
to    be    prejudicial     to     the
. preservation of peace or
maintenance of order."'
Obviously the present
internment means the Special
Powers Act is in full effect.
If the Catholic working class
of Ulster didn't have enough
problems, it now faces a virtual
army of hostile law officers,
over and above the actual army
of 14,000 British occupation
■ troops. (Again, to understand
the significance, this is as if 19
million foreign troops were
stationed in the U.S. to
"preserve the peace".) The
3500-man Royal Ulster
Constabulary (RUC) is the
largest armed police force in
the United Kingdom and it is
de facto directed by the
Orange Order. A
supplementary government-
sponsored militia, the
Orange-controlled B-specials
numbering 10,000, were
"disbanded" over a year ago in
a "reform measure". Open for
membership to any adult
Protestant without a criminal
record, the B-Specials were
fitted for uniform, rifle or Sten
gun   and   sent   home,   to   be
called   upon   when   the   need
arose.
The "need" arose whenever
the Orange Order or its
Unionist party wished to
terrorize the Catholic poor
with pogroms and other
"law-enforcing" maneuvers.
The (Jisbandment of the
B-Specials was a priority
demand of the civil rights
movement three years ago.
Now most former B-Specials
are incorporated into the
British-controlled Ulster
Defense Regiment which, while
it limits their perogatives for
vigilante activities, provides
them with more advanced
weaponry when they do decide
to move. Still remaining intact
is the 10,000-strong vigilante
group, the Ulster Protestant
Volunteers, a paramilitary unit
under the' neo-fascist
ideological guidance of the
Rev. Ian Paisley.
When the Northern Ireland >
civil rights movement began,
composed of radical Belfast
students, liberals, Republicans
and Communists, its demands
were modest: an end to
discrimination, and one-man
one-vote in elections. The
movement's first
demonstration, in August
1968, was peaceful. But two
months later, marching to
Derry, the Royal Ulster
Constabulary broke every head
within reach in full view of the
television and press.
The movement has rarely
been out of the headlines since.
Culminating in the. Bloody
Sunday of Jan. 30, when 14
were massacred by British
troops, the civil .rights
movement - under the
leadership of the Official IRA
and its Communist allies — has
spearheaded the struggle for
freedom in the six counties of
the North.
The ascendancey to
leadership of the movement by
Republicans and their
Communist allies with a
growing consciousness of the
need for socialism in Ireland,
has alarmed the British.
Through Stormont,
Westminster two years ago
placed a new inspector general
in charge of the RUC. They
hoped that their great white
knight, Sir Arthur Edwin
Young, would prove stronger
than the growing revolutionary
movement.
Sir Arthur, since 1950
police commissioner in the
City of London, took leave of
his post twice before. In 1952,
he directed police operations
against revolutionary guerrillas
in Malaya; in 1954, he repeated
the operation against the Man
Mau in Kenya. That he was
sent to Belfast speaks volumes
about the importance Britain
places on the six counties.
Troop reinforcements in Ulster
include men of the First
Battalion of the Parachute
Regiment (the ones who made
Bloody Sunday bloody),
veterans of the British
campaigns in Cyprus and Aden.
England uses military force
now because it cannot solve
the social-economic crisis of
Northern Ireland. The crisis of
the North is in fact an
exacerbated outgrowth of the
crisis of British capitalism,
itself heavily in hock to the
United States. The Stormont
Ministry of Commerce, in an
official pamphlet called
"Northern Ireland: The Most
Profitable Area for Industrial
Expansion," claims: "Northern
Ireland is especially attractive
to companies seeking fast
profitable investment, for it
has a large surplus of labor
with a high reputation for
reliability. The country is still
faced with a higher degree of
unemployment than elsewhere'
in the United Kingdom. But
this is a situation which you
can turn to your advantage.
With a birth rate nearly a third
higher than elsewhere in the
United Kingdom, Ulster offers
an assured supply of young
. workers for the future."
Forty-five U.S. companies
have taken the bait to the
combined extent of a $200
million investment in the six
counties since the Second
World War. These include
American Tobacco, Ford,
Goodyear, and 1T&T; Aristotle
Onassis owns a quarter of
Harlan and Wolfe shipbuilders,
the largest single employer in
Ulster. Standing watch are
three friendly U.S. military
bases (the largest one, in Derry,
was reportedly offered to the
British for use as an internment
camp for Irish revolutionaries
in June 1970) while junior
officers from the 26 counties
receive counterinsurgency
training in the U.S.
When Britain originally
carved up Ireland, it brought
the Unionist party to power in
the six counties. This coalition
of big businessmen and
landlords has been in control
ever since.
Prior to the civil rights
movement, the main public
opposition to the Unionists
were the Nationalists, now
virtually defunct, whose goal
was solely the elimination of
partition and union with
Catholic Ireland.
The sectarian nature- of the
Nationalists allowed the rise to
prominence of Ian Paisley, a
"Reverend" with an honorary
degree from Bob Jones
University in South Carolina,
who leads the most reactionary
sections of the six counties.
Representing sections of
Protestant workers, small
business and the traditional
Protestant petite bourgeoisie,
Paisley's particular brand of
right-wing fanaticism has both
clashed with' the Unionist
leadership (Paisley has now
formed the breakaway
Demociatic Unionist Party)
and smed to bolster the
position of British military
occupation, performing much
the same role as the Ku Klux
Klan in the U.S. South.
Friday, March  17,  1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 AUDITIONS
Educations's BIG
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8      TUES. MAR. 21  - 12:30
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All gowns except Phd. are available at the studio. White
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3343  WEST   BROADWAY
VANCOUVER   8,   B.C.
Phone now for your appointment — 732-7446
BIRD CALLS
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The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
A Souvenir of
Your Year on Campus
Available While Stock Lasts at
UBC BOOKSTORE - THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE IN SUB
They're gutting
the houses
at the bottom
of the street
small men pick
them apart on Sunday nights
in the cold
brick by brick
after the major
wrecking is done
bomb pits like this
all over the land
maybe this is really
Warsaw 1947
they're remembering
the dangers of
ignoring politics
but no
Edmonton '71
high rises       fruit
that comes out of the
torn land
breaking the sky
into fragments
the cranes leaving no
space for panic
these buildings done
3/4 full and profitable
with no kids
no pets
and walls that inhibit
the begetting
of such
then the next street
• • m^m •«„•,• • • • •
my father sent
a bitter book
when they kicked me out
of the party
of WWII atrocities
against the Jews
saying this happens
when you won't
struggle
I wonder
if he remembers
the hysteria of the 8
year old girl I was
in mid-mccarthyism
seeing the same
kind of pictures
(he tried then to
keep them from me)
how I stuttered
in horror
my comforting dreams
of mushroom clouds
hiding the human skeletons
then realize
somewhere hidden
among these corpses
between these pages
lies the centre
of his life.
• • •
push push push
I think
you only push
forget there's another
person here
not a broom
or your left fingers
and then
suddenly there's
a glimmering
a sign
like a small
wave of electricity
that shifts
when there's something
immutable
before it.
about '68 we began
to see why
telephone lines clicked
in the night
once
a voice said, dull
automation, police station.
oops, then dead silence
cabs started
parking in front
of friends' houses
while they were meeting
someone else
found the telephone tap
connected rather clumsily
to a transmitter
in the garage
(that time, they were
embarrassed, didn't
reconnect for a week)
later,
the telephone calls
all night with obscenities
waking up the babies.
well, we say, but
this isn't right
I mean, this isn't
South Africa or
a banana republic
you know
we're anglo/saxon citizens
you know
with the magna carta & all
at least except for
Quebec, mostly
obviously someone
has discovered our
true texture beneath
the facade.
— Sharon Stephenson
Diane di Prima
Diane di Prima, San Francisco poet of Italian-American background, mother of five
children, author of Revolutionary Letters (City Lights Pocket Poets Series) will be reading in SUB
Ballroom at 12:30 on Monday. Poets write about themselves and their vision of the world in
different ways: Diane chose the letter form:
Revolutionary Letter 1: "I have just realized that the stakes are myself, I have no other"
Revolutionary Letter 31: "not all the works of Mozart worth one human life"
Diane will also be reading selections from new works, as yet unpublished, including parts of
her new WOMAN-poem which she read for the first time last month at City Lights Poets' Theatre
in San Francisco to an enthusiastic crowd of several hundred poetry-lovers.
On Monday night she will take part in a panel discussion on WOMEN AND THE ARTS.
FAREWELL, NEW MEXICO
One thing they never mention in Western movies
or those ballads they're always writing about
wide open spaces:
Sagebrush has a smell
And there are hills, distinctly flesh-colored, lying
down
in front of the purple ones.
O wondrous wide open spaces!
O dust on the roads!
O Rio Grande Gorge!
Green  Taos valley full of thunderstorms and
mosquitoes
Mountain with two peaks, sacred to Taos indians
Great ceremonial lake, fought over in congress
O Taos indians, with your braids wrapped in
leather
may you keep your sacred lake and whatever else
you would like to keep
may you drink with brother buffalo on its edge
when no one at all remembers the US Congress
As for me I have just changed from the D to the
A train
in a dark tunnel you Indians wouldn't believe;
a metal tube is shrieking as it carries me to an
island
with four million people on it, eating supper.
The newspaper tells me that there is a war in
Newark.
My hope is small but constant: black men shall
tear down
the thing they cannot name.
They will make room again for the great sea birds
the woods
will spring up thicker than even you remember
Where you are, it is two hours earlier
the breeze is cold, the sun is very hot
the horses are standing around, wishing for trees
It is possible I shall see you dance again
on your hills, in your beads, if the gods are very
kind
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   17,   1972 High Quality
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di Prima
reads
Monday
Revolution: a turning, as the earth
turns, among planets, as the sun
turns round some (darker) star, the galaxy
describes a yin-yang spiral in the aether, we turn
from dark to light, turn
faces of pain & fear, the dawn
awash among them
TANSAR CRAFTS
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NOMINATIONS
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Nominations close 5 p.m.
March 20, 1972
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CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
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free list of flights.
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542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
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Friday, March   17,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 TERM PAPERS
edited by retired publisher
for
GRAMMAR - PUNCTUATION
SPELLING -SYNTAX
REDUNDANCY - CLARITY, ETC.
Only Self prepared
Papers Accepted
Essays Theses Book
Manuscripts — Reports
And Speeches Corrected
FACULTY & STUDENT
REFERENCES
Phone Mr. Way      263-6565
lieautiful
clothes. .
[or
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
PEN PALS
Male and female students near and
faraway. For FREE list and
information write:
SCE PO Box 918
Church St. Station
New York NY 10008 USA
Selling your home?
Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
Rutherford-Thompson-McRae
733-8181
OPTOMETRIST
J.O. MacKENZIE
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Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,   1972 Friday, March  17,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Letters
_  From page 4
Liverwurst
I ran into an old high school
friend Thursday at the general
meeting in the gym. We hadn't
seen each other for a couple years
so we exchanged greetings.
And then — knowing him not
to be politically motivated — I
asked what he was doing in the
gym.
"What are you doing in the
gym," he replied. t'I'm always in
the gym at noon hour. I eat my
lunch here." My friend is a
fourth-year physical education
student.
I had to admit it was probably
a couple of years since I had been
in the gym. I explained about the
general meeting, how the forces of
evil (the AMS executive) were
trying to quash goodness (The
Ubyssey, champion of freedom). I
told him to vote against the
constitutional amendments when
the masses voted.
He laughed. I always was a bit
of a card, he said.
"I don't know anything about
a vote," he said. "I just came here
to eat my lunch, like I always do.
I walked through the doors and all
these strange guys are pushing
leaflets at me."
I urged him to stay arid vote as
soon as the rock band — which
was probably okay but which
sounded harsh and loud in the
empty gym — was through.
He laughed again. He said he
never reads The Ubyssey and
anyway, he should probably go
eat lunch.
We talked a while longer about
the old times and then he excused
himself.
"Ha, this is the first dance I 've
been   to   all   year,"   he   shouted
above the music. My friend has
always liked dances.
Anyway, the music ended and
a couple guys identifying
themselves as AMS officers got up
on the stage and partook of some
tired reparte for the 200 or so
people who were there.
I was embarrassed. I hoped my
friend wasn't eating his liverwurst
sandwich somewhere in the
stands, where he could see the
painful spectacle of the AMS
general meeting. The same
meeting I had asked him to vote
at.
Finally, the two guys got off
the stand. And then another
friend and I bought Lyle
Osmundson hot dogs — which was
the high point of the meeting for
me — and walked out into the
sun.
Was I doing something wrong?
Or was I just hungry? As editor of
The Ubyssey, I hope at least you
have some answers.
John Gibbs,
Arts 3
Same answer we've always had:
When the AMS does something
worth meeting about, a quorate
general meeting will take place.
For our part, we prefer lettuce
and tomato on brown.
Slavonics
In all the discussion and
polemics going on recently in the
Slavonics department at UBC, a
significant element of opinion,
upheld by not a few students, has
been almost entirely ignored.
It seems to me that both in the
malicious attacks of a certain
group of graduate students on
individual profs in Slavonics, as
well as in the defensive views
expressed by another group of
graduates, many of whom come
from Europe, a third element of
opinion and criticism upheld by
me and other Russian majors and
TRAVELl
CHARTER
Official representatives for travel to the U.S.S.R.
and Eastern Europe. Arrangements made for attendance at scientific and educational conferences.
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graduates has been unfairly
overlooked.
Undoubtedly, there are glaring
faults "in. the organizational and
methodological structure of the
department, but these should be
examined and corrected not
through a Maoist (sic) approach of
outright malice and insinuation,
but through the proper channels
of students and profs getting
together to sort out the
difficulties and jointly propose
constructive changes.
I have taken several courses in
the Russian linguistics and
literature sections of Slavonic
studies and cannot help but be
indignated at the gross
misrepresentations and
indiscriminate lies exposed in the
Ubyssey article "Nyet, Said the
Killer", insofar as many of the
profs who were unjustly
slandered, regardless of their
degree qualifications, were among
the best I have had in my four
years of university. There is no
doubt that the progressive wing in
Slavonics, as in other
departments, is stepped upon and
almost denied existence, but that
doesn't prevent it from existing.
In my opinion, there are many
evident and glaring insufficiencies
in the Slavonics dept., including
an anarchist, bourgeois approach
to teaching Russian literature, in
particular, Soviet literature.
Because   of its   popular-oriented
sentiment, the Soviet stand is
always criticized and ignored, but
I think it is unjustified in a course
entitled Soviet Russian Literature
(no. 433) to see that two-thirds of
the authors discussed in the
course are dissidents, who both
have no recognition in the Soviet
Union and cannot be taken at all
to represent the basic direction of
Soviet Russian literature.
Harry Kalmakoff,
Fourth-year Russian major
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879-0491 Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,  1972
Hot flashes
2 AMS hacks
up for bread
The Alma Mater Society has
nominated Svend Robinson,
science 2 and Colin Portnuff, arts
4 as candidates for the Sherwood
Lett Memorial Scholarship.
The $1,500 scholarship is given
to the candidate who most
typifies the qualities of Lett,
former chief justice of the B.C.
Supreme Court.
Robinson and Portnuff were
nominated at Wednesday's AMS
council meeting.
The graduate student
association, undergrad societies
and faculty deans can also make
nominations for the award.
Guards needed
The Surrey parks and
recreation department is looking
for life-guards for this summer.
Work begins soon after exams
end, and will continue until labor
day.
Applicants should be over 21
years old and hold current Red
Cross and Royal Life Saving
Society certificates, the RLSS
award of merit and a Red Cross
Examiners certificate. Three years
of   experience   in   lifeguarding   is
required.
Starting wage is S3.37 per
hour, and further information can
be obtained by phoning the
department at 596-5111 (local
315) or writing 14245-56 Avenue,
Surrey.
99c spe€ial
Unbelievably, the UBC
bookstore is currently selling a
limited number of lab coats for 99
cents each.
The usual selling price for the
coats is $6 at the bookstore and
S4.50 at other places.
It's a good deal while they last.
Musit week
The Alma Mater Society
council has declared March 20 to
27 Music Week on campus.
Highlight of the week will be a
March 23 concert in the SUB
auditorium featuring, among
other things, the music faculty
stage band, pianists and kazoo
players.
Turning point
British Labor Law — A Turning
Point? is the topic of a Saturday
Vancouver    Institute   lecture   by
Otto Kahn-Freund, a former
Oxford University law professor.
Kahn-Fruend, currently a
visiting law prof at UBC will speak
in Buchanan 106 at 8:15 p.m.
union
The Radical Union will not
(repeat, not) meet tonight.
Next Friday's meeting will take
place at 8 p.m. at the Lutheran
Campus Centre.
last coffee
The Lutheran Campus Centre
is holding its last coffee house of
the year tonight at 8 p.m.
Entertainment will be provided
by jazz pianist Dave Weichman
and singers Cathy Ireland and
Dave McLelland.
Food, tea and coffee will be
available.
1 SAIB K££rl> on TRUCKW'...
'Tween classes
TODAY
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Meeting to choose delegates for
abortion conference in SUB 210 at
noon.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Discussion of election of women
faculty to senate at noon in blue
room of Arts I building.
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Guest speaker on Paris Commune
1871/May-June '68 at 8 p.m. in
1208 Granville.
SPECIAL EVENTS — ECO
Skagit Valley Revisited, slides and
discussion with Skagit Defence
Fund lawyer John Fraser at noon in
SUB auditorium.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Executive elections at noon in SUB
205.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Coffee house with singing group and
jazz pianists at 9 p.m. in Lutheran
campus centre.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
LIP — Election Gimmick of Real
Reform with Murray Perry from
Manpower at noon in SUB 111.
SATURDAY
HILLEL  HOUSE   CLUB
Film, Getting Straight, starring
Elliott Gould and Candice Bergen.
Free refreshments at 8:30 p.m. in
Hillel House behind Brock.
MONDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
211.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Executive meeting at noon in SUB
205.
ELCIRCULO
Meeting at noon in IH 402.
TUESDAY
NDP CLUB
Meeting at noon in SUB 213.
HILLEL CLUB
Free   luncheon   hosted   by   BBW  at
noon  in  Hillel house behind Brock.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES LUTHERAN
How   Much   is   Enough,   a   film   by
Paul Keller, last of a series at noon
in Luthern campus centre chapel.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Poetry reading with Susan Graley,
Marc Caccioni, Gwen Hauser at
noon in SUB art gallery.
THURSDAY
STUDENT LIBERALS
Club elections at  noon in SUB 205.
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village) 224-3939
© BARTON BUCKS  0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
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WEDNESDAY MARCH 22
I VOTE YES!
ABORTION LAW REPEAL
referendum
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(Westbrook & Univ. Blvd.)
3 GROUPS PERFORM
FfllDAY, MARCH 17
9:00 p.m.
Coffee, Food Adm. 25c
OVERSEAS
STUDENTS
For arrangements for your
Travel Home or your Holiday
Travelin North America this
summer call
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
WORLDWIDE
B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
SUB Lower Floor- 9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri. 224-4636
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Campus — 3  lines,  1  day  $1.00;  3  days $2.50
Commercial■ — 3  lines,   1   day  $r.25;  additional
fines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline ia 11:30 «.«., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY: LAST ONE OF
the year. Friday March 17 IH.
8:00 p.m.   to  1:00 a.m.	
DANCE SUNSET CAVALIERS
Steelband, Sat. March 18th. 9pm
-1 am. Admission $1.00 each. Everyone welcome GRAD STUDENT  CENTRE.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
LOST- BEADED NECKLACE
Egyptian turquoise and coral
beads, lost on Tesday March 7th
en route from Old Auditorium
to Buchanan inclusive. Reward
offered.    Contact   922-7435.	
LOST MARCH 6th IN MEN'S
washroom Buch. man's gold and
silver diamond ring. Contact
Shirley  Menifee.  263-5047.	
LOST FAIRLY NEW BROWN
wallet belonging to Jack Morran.
Last Sunday at new gyms. About
$25 and IDs. Phone 738-8293 or
put   in   lost   and   found.	
SILVER LOCKET LOST ON CAMPUS Wednesday March 15th.
Please   phone   936-2048   if   found.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
— SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657  eves.
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested phone 224-1910 or 684-
7750.
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE-
ness — 1 day introductory workshop — Individual — Groups.
1'syehologist. One year Esalen.
929-3662   mornings.
VANCOUVER CHURCH FOR THE
Deaf will participate in the 11
o'clock service at University Hill
United Church, "University Boulevard, on Sunday. March 19th.
Rev. Harold MacKay and Rev.
Don Hume (church for the deaf)
will conduct the service. You are
welcome.
LOOK    HERE
3 FOR $1.00
Why pay this much for your
prophylactics? We will mail you
24 Assorted Prophylactics for
only $2.00, by return mail in
plain sealed envelope. Enclose
this ad for additional bonus of
3  prophylactics.
POSTTRADING
BOX   4002       VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special (homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone  684-8638.
UNIVERSITY    TRAVELLERS
CLUB
Travelling this summer? Stay
overnight free! Stuck at home?
Host travellers. Meet friendly
people. Exchange privileges with
members in U S. and Canada.
Write now for full details: UTC,
P O. Box 9147. Berkeley, Calif.
94709
AUTOMOTIVE
Autoi For Sale
21
•62 FORD GAL. 500 AUTO., 390 hp
New power brakes, steering, new
snowtires, radio. Come see &
make offer 263-5640. $10 reward
to  anyone   helping   to   make   sale.
'58 VW DRIVEN DAILY. $150 OR
best offer. Phone Ruth 224-3166.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandali
37
WE GUARANTEE NOT TO BALL
up your haircut at Corky's Mens
Hairstyling, 4th & Alma 731-
4717.
Typing
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.
'TPYED YOUR OOWN ESSAT
lass time". It's easier to call
Dari.    738-6498.
TEDIOUS TASKS^PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.    Reasonable   rates.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis typist. Beautiful work
Mrs.   Ellis  321-3838.
ESSAYS. THESIS, MANUSCRIPTS,
Term Papers Fast, accurate.
Near 41st & Marine Drive, 266-
5053.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS ETC. ?,'<(
Page.   'Phone 224-0385 after 5 p.m.
ESSAY   TYPING
19th   and   Dunbar
733-5922
EXPERIENCED LEGAL SECRET-
ary to do typing at 35 ( page.
Call   Cheryl   732-0949.
PROFESSIONAL BILTNGUAL —
typing. TBM Selectric, open days,
evenings, weekends phone Madeleine at 73S-3S27 reasonable rates
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
COUPLE TO MANAGE ISLAND
campground June 15 Sept. 4. Salary $500 plus cabin. Phone 224-
0539.	
—    $$    IMMEDIATE    CASH    ??    —
Full or part time, Men or Women. New recreational product.
Every car owner potential buyer.
High earnings. Do not hesitate.
See or call A If Pike. Former
N H.L player and coach at Rich
International Inc. 1252 A Vickers
Way,    Richmond.    273-6651.	
WANTED: ATTRACTIVE GIRL
with afternoons off to work 1-5
in Law Office — some typing,
shorthand, and reception skills
reuuired — good deal of time l'or
study   available    -    call    731-2101.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION fc SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early. Limited enrollment.  G.'Alfred,  261-4764.
Tutoring Service
83
TUTORING CENTRE CLOSES
Friday, March 24. Your last
chance now to get help for exams.
84
Tutors—Wanted
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone   Directory
Now only 25c
at the  Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and  AMS  Publications Office
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Roomt
•1
ROOM, KITCHEN. »60/MO. ON
campus 5745 Agronomy Road, 224-
9549. Live on campus, exams are
corning.
Room 8c Board
82
Furnished Apti.
83
SUITE TO SUBLET MAY 1ST-
Sept. 1st. Three large rooms,
good view, partly furnished. Near
Broadway and Oak. $110.00 per
month.   Call   Bill    873-2228.
ROOMATE TO SHARE 2 BED-
room apt. in Kits, furnished, May
to S,ept., rent $90/mo. with gay
male student. 3ox 6572, Station
■G",   Van.   8. Friday,  March   17,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
INDOOR POOL at the University of Laval makes the UBC pool (Empire Pool) look like a haven for ducks
and not for the water conscious students at UBC.
Momentum for pool grows
By MIKE GIDORA
As an ice-rink it would be fine. Located
somwhere south of Orlando, Florida you couldn't
ask for more.
But where it sits now, Empire Pool is nothing
more than a large, antiquated bathtub.
At least that is the opinion of an ever-growing
number of students, faculty and staff at UBC. And
right now these people are making a concerted
effort to have Empire Pool replaced with an
adequate aquatic facility.
Let's examine the case they make for a new
pool.
Empire Pool has been surrounded in
controversy since the early 1950's when it became
obvious that the people of Vancouver would be
hosting the 1954 British Empire Games and would
have to build an aquatic facility for the games'
swimming and diving events.
Vancouver's ineptitude in constructing large
facilities isn't a newly acquired trait. Even 18 years
ago the people of Vancouver couldn't decide the
who, how or where of Empire Pool.
It was suggested that it might be built at UBC,
by the city, to remain in their control. The
university said, in effect, "thanks, but no thanks."
Then Exhibition Park was suggested.
Then the present site of Percy Norman Pool.
All were rejected for reasons of sorts.
By this time they were getting desperate for a
site, so they came back to UBC with a proposal that
they would build a pool for the games, then turn it
over to the university for administration. This time
the board of governors agreed.
But all they agreed to was to accept the pool
and not, as many have later held, to cover the pool
once they had control of it.
The result of all that hassling can be seen next
to War Memorial Gymnasium. It is an 18 year old,
seven lane, 55 meter outdoor swimming pool.
And it is totally inadequate in every respect to
the needs of this university.
But it has made no real impression on the
powers-that-be. They maintain that UBC does not
need an indoor pool because of its climate. That's
strange, but I didn't happen to notice too many
sun-bathers on the pool deck during December and
January of this past winter.
They maintain that aquatic director Jack
Pomfret and his staff are doing a good enough job
with the present facilities.
The director of the school of physical
education and recreation, Bob Osborne has his own
views on that subject.
"They've been saying to us for years, 'Well,
you've managed to get along with what you have for
years. Just keep it up.' That's fine. We got along
with the Model T Ford, but that was no reason not
to develop any newer models.
But that's not the point.
We have the largest physical education school
of any Canadian university. We have the second
largest education faculty in Canada and a large
rehabilitation medicine school. These people all
need the use of a swimming pool.
Indeed they should, for as it stands now, these
students, numbering some 5,000 must try to
squeeze their water instruction into a period of less
than three months at the beginning of the year. It is
just not feasible to try and give proper instruction
to such a number in so short a time.
Swimming has now become the most popular
recreational activity during winter months and in a
university    which   has    a    daily    population    of
somewhat in excess of 30,000 people (students,
faculty and staff) it is completely beyond
comprehension not to have an indoor pool.
But not only swimming is involved. An all-year
facility would provide an area for instruction in
swimming, life-saving, canoeing, synchronized
swimming, scuba diving, competitive diving, as well
as providing an additional public swimming area to
alleviate the already over-crowded pools in
Vancouver.
As an example, Empire Pool is in continuous
use from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. during the summer,
being used by 10 to 15 groups including students,
faculty, staff, winter clubs, sport camps and so on,
covering a wide, area of activities in the recreational
field.
Then there is the Thunderbird swim team. Over
the past 18 years, the UBC extramural swimmers
have been renting other pools at a cost of about
$3,500 per year. That adds up over the years and is
not including travelling costs and the inconveniences
encountered.
A new indoor swimming pool would go a long
way towards cutting down the costs incurred by the
extramural teams, as well as providing them with a
usable facility in which to train.
Of course, replacing Empire Pool is going to
cost a lot of money. Estimates for a facility of top
quality run in the neighborhood of 1.25 million to
two million dollars.
But this is not out of line with what other
Canadian universities are spending on similar
facilities.
The University of Alberta has just completed
plans for a new indoor pool. They already have
three indoor swimming pools.
The  University of Toronto has set aside 6.4
millions for a new swimming facility. They have two"
other indoor pools. UBC's total physical education
and recreation expenditure over the years isn't as
much as that.
Probably the best aquatic unit in the country is
the University of Laval. There they have a
competition 25 meter pool, a 25 meter teaching
pool with a moveable bulkhead and a diving tank
complete with all diving board heights. In addition,
there is space for spectators, storage, television
platforms, press facilities, offices and individualized
changing facilities. All under one roof.
These are the type of facilities the rest of the
Canadian universities are getting. Not over-sized
bathtubs!
In its fear of going overboard on athletic
facilities, UBC has placed itself completely out of
line in the opposite direction. We have no facilities
worthy of that title at UBC, particularly when it
comes to the swimming pool.
If a new pool is to be built, Empire Pool will
still be used to the extent that it is now used.
Empire Pool could serve as the basis of an
excellent intramural program when it is available for
use. It could still be used during the summer months
when hundreds of requests for pool time must be
turned down because of lack of space. It will still be
used for instruction in canoeing, scuba diving and
other outdoor water recreational activities.
But Empire Pool by itself is not adequate for an
institution of this size and stature.
The construction of a new pool must be put on
the priority lists of new developments for UBC
immediately.
Not as a teaching facility, not as an extramural
facility and not as a recreational facility, but as a
total aquatic centre.
Highlights
Rugby
UBC's ingby 'Buds take on
Washington State Satin day in
what must be one ot the more'
anti-climactic games of the year.
Leading the Northwest
Intercollegiate League, and
virtually assured of the New
Zealand Bowl on the strength of
last week's victory over Victoria,
the 'Birds' game pits them against
a team they beat 44-0 last year.
Coach Donn Spence reports all
hands healthy with the exception
of John Mitchell and Garth
Henrikson. Mike Wyncss and Bob
Gallagher will replace them. In the
continuing alternation of hookers
Bob Jickling will replace Steve
Owens. Game time is 2:30 p.m. at
the UBC stadium.
added singles. Ian Cordey
recorded his seventh shutout of
the season.
UBC remains in first place in
the top-division and has a good
chance to win the league title. The
'Birds have been extremely
successful this season, winning
their own indoor tournament and
the B.C. indoor field hockey
league.
Coach Eric Broom, after a two
year absence during which period
UBC took fourth place twice, has
rebuilt a winning team centred
a r o u n d f i v e C a n a d i a n
internationals, Al llobkirk, Doug
Harrison, Warren Bell, Kelvin
Wood, and Antonie Schouten.
UBC has the strongest and
fastest forward line in the league.
Captain Schouten leads the league
with 1 8 goals.
Field hockey Women
Despite a torrential rain fall,
which made the field almost
unplayable, the UBC
Thunderbirds field hockey team
did it again and exploded for five
unanswered second-half goals to
defeat North Shore 5-0.
Kelvin Wood got his first
hat-trick of the season while Doug
Harrison   and   J.   W.   Schouten
Positions with women's
athletics are available for next
year.
Sports managers, a public
relations officer and an equipment
manager are needed.
Applications to i these
positions should be handed into
the Women's Athletic Office by
March 22. The office is located in
room   202 of the  Gym.
Elizabeth Taylor plays an agressive domineering wife  She
seems to relish tormenting her husband, and his mistress.
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
Vogue
rll GRANVILLE
615-5434
SUSANNAH YORK
"X Y & Zee
MICHAEL CAINE
fj ADULT
ENTERTAINMENT
IWARNING:     Occasional     coarse     language     and
swearing. R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
SHOW TIMES:  12:25, 2:35, 4:45, 7:00, 9:10
NOMINATED FOR
* ACADEMY
GE0R8EC.SC0TT
"THE HOSPITAL"
SHOW TIMES:  12:00, 1:40, g,
8s, «AMVllu  wa3r=nfn- f:^e3°s™g PADDYCHAYEFWY
682-7468       and coarse language. ADULT INTIKTAINM1WT
AWARDS
Odeon
NOMINATED FOR      j
ACADEMY AWARDS'
BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR
LAST
SHOW TIMES:
12:30,
2:45,5:00,
7:15, 9:30
Coronet
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
(^Bf^?
ETER BOGDANOVICH
»
NOMINATED FOR  8   ACADEMY AWARDS
Including  BEST PICTURE
--_-    "FIDDLER ON THE ROOF
I __■>! I >^________l Tickets on sale at Box Office at
■JLIAI^^I Odeon Theatre, 881 Granville St.
4MBIE at 18th For Phone Reservations Call 688-2308
876-2747 Daily 11:30-7:30 —Sunday 1:30-7 p.m.
NOMINATED FOR 6 ACAMEDY AWARDS
"Nicholas and Alexandra"
Hyland
KINGS'Y at KNIGHT
876-3045
Tickets on sale at Box Office at
Odeon Theatre, 881 Granville St.
For Phone Reservations Call 688-2308
DAILY  11:30-7:30 —SUNDAY  1:30-7 P.M.
«CHI/411
a film by Jacques Tati
Trafic
ENGLISH
SUBTITLES
IN COLOR
Varsity
224-3730"
4375 W. 10th
SHOWTIMES:
7:30,9:30 Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  March   17,   1972
1 concrete, 1 steel crossing proposal
Comment and analysis of Wednesday'
third crossing hearing by Ubyssey reporter
Berton Woodward.
It's hard to say which delegation gave
the brief most representative of the spirit
of Wednesday's hearing into the proposed
third crossing of Burrard Inlet, but
probably it was the guy from the Canadian
Institute of Steel Construction who, in all
seriousness, argued for the construction of
a steel bridge.
The audience, which knew where.he was
from, howled at him and his speech was
not without a sense of irony.
In fact what he had to say made some
sense: a bridge would cost less than a
tunnel to build, the construction costs are
more predictable, upkeep is cut in half, and
bridges can even be beautiful.
The point, of course, is not what he
said, but what organization he represented.
He even bothered to point out that there is
serious unemployment in the steel
construction industry and building a third
crossing bridge would help alleviate it.
And so it went. With a few unnotable
exceptions the only delegations that
supported the current Swan-Wooster
tunnel-freeway plan were consultants
involved in the plan who stand to lose $3.5
million if the thing doesn't go through.
The Vancouver Board of Trade also
supported it. naturally enough, since any
kind of decentralization of the downtown
core such as the crossing opponents
advocate, would seriously cut into its
members' precious profit-margins.
But now, what about the opponents
who formed the majority of Wednesday's
delegations? Except for the steel man —
who did not attempt to solve the essential
freeway question — and another delegate
who advocated a ferry system, there were
no concrete (if you'll excuse the term),
proposals that would provide an
anti-congestion clean-air alternative to
Swan-Wooster's clearly unwanted plan.
Save one.
That one was Bruce Yorke of the
Citizens Co-ordinating Committee for
Rapid Transit. There is no need here to go
into the contemptible circumstances
surrounding the time and audience Yorke
had for his brief. See Fotheringham in
Thursday's Sun for a graphic description of
that. Let's see what Yorke said.
ATTENTION
All Students
OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENT
OF REFERENDUM
First stage (S70 million): trains along
the old inter-urban tracks along the
Kingsway corridor; then extend the rail
system over the Arbutus inter-urban
(currently used by B.C. Hydro), the
Hastings east tracks and finally, as the last
priority, to the North Shore.
Upgrade these routes and use, in the
short term, park-and-ride deals such as that
now being used at the Pacific National
Exhibition, for North Shore commuter
traffic.
Yorke bases his ideas on the
DeLeuw-Cather report presented to the
Greater Vancouver Regional District, a
body which is supposed to be in charge of
Lower Mainland transportation but has,
with its third crossing low profile,
effectively abdicated that responsibility.
Capital cost of Yorke's full proposal: no
less than $300 million (1972) for heavy
rapid transit built in the aforementioned
stages over 15 to 20 years.
Who pays? 37'/> per cent provincial,
already promised by the Bennett
government if the federal government kicks
in with a matching amount. Then,
assuming federal agreement, the remaining
25    per   cent   would   be   shared   by   the
municipal governments involved.
So. We get the main counter-proposal
from   a   non-professional.
Where were the. others who have
important alternatives to give the people of
Vancouver? Where, for instance, was Alan
Kelly, who headed the GVRD study group
that commissioned the DeLeuw-Cather
report? Where were the people who know
about the present study being made by a
San Francisco firm which will deal with
three different rapid transit crossing points
and several different cost formulas?
Walter Hardwick knows. "There are a
lot of people not here who should be
here," he said at a break in the meeting.
Why aren't they? "Because they see
these things as circuses. They feel that if
council wants to hear from them they will
be asked for their views. They'll give them
then."
//, it must be noted, they are asked. But
will they be?
Campbell and his Non-Partisan
Association majority are quite
knowledgeable in the technique of turning
a public hearing into a non-credible circus.
With one stroke they can discredit their
opposition, keep the public out.of hearing,
so to speak, by Bennett's trick of
government by exhaustion and then claim
a full hearing was given to crossing
dissidents.
The public remains as confused as ever.
Given the impression by the opponents
that this third crossing plan is not really
the best proposal possible, but also given
the impression by Tom's foolery that it's
the only one we've got and the time to act
is now, one can easily envisage even a
plebiscite supporting the Swan-Wooster
plan.
As long as the newsmakers keep
screaming, whether they are members of
city council or the audience at Eric
Hamber school Wednesday night, Campbell
knows he's got it in the bag.
He may not know much about cities but
he knows three-ring circus politics as well
as P. T. Barnum.
As long as those who do know about
cities are resigned to sitting in the
audience, the ring master gets the
attention.
If the experts think they can talk
quietly to the audience when the show is
over, all they will find is an audience filing
out and the tent coming down.
Faculty find few
Spectrum '72 may well be re-named Spectrum Finis, in
light of the poor attendance at Thursday's session, held in
the SUB ballroom between 12:30 and 2:30 p.m.
Joyce Searcy, of the dean of women's office which has
sponsored the Spectrum faculty counselling series for the
past three years, said its organizers will have to take a long
look at the results of Thursday's efforts before deciding
whether or not to continue the program.
"We had 125 faculty from all over campus turn out to
counsel students, but few students showed up. The turnout
was really disappointing.
"But those who did come seem to have gained from
it," she said.
Faculties and services such as housing and health
services are represented by senior students and faculty
members who flog their pamphlets to any students who
seem reasonably interested in their program.
General student reaction Thursday was disappointment
more than anything else.
One student said: "It was just like reading the UBC
calendar. They didn't tell you anything about profs, or
courses, or anything that really matters."
ROYAL BAN K
THE HELPFUL BANK
TRANSFER OF ACCOUNTS
ARRANGED TO ANYWHERE!
GENERAL BANKING SERVICES
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Mgr.
10th & SASAMAT 224-4348
HOUSE OF DENMARK
Your specialty
shop in authentic Danish
.CLOGS
HHIIlJI      Men's — Women's
||3Hf|             Children's
PjBBP^       All Sizes, Styles and Colors
682-1123^^
^,       809 THURLOW
The following referendum will be put
to students on WEDNESDAY MARCH 22.
ARE YOU IN FAVOUR OF REPEAL OF
THOSE SECTIONS OF THE CRIMINAL
CODE DEALING WITH ABORTION?
Polls open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
at following buildings:
• MacMillan        e Civil ■ SUB
e Buchanan e Main Library • Woodward Library
e Angus t Sedgewick Library
• Law • Education
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED TO STAFF POLLING BOOTHS!
contact Hilary Powell or Sally Clark
at 228-3967 or AMS executive offices
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
\0  OOOO
□
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
■-n
Name	
Residence
Address
City.   .     	
Phone: Home  ___.  _. Office-
Occupation  .              .       ...       	
Age -
Married □ Divorced □      Male Q
Separated q Never Married □ Female □
Date first licensed to drive   ... __  	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past live years?
Yes □ No n (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended? _    	
Are you now insured?       	
Date current policy expires  __	
This  coupon   is  designed  solely  to  enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile 	
No. of cylinders-  ._..
Horsepower	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area.,* ...
One way driving distance __ -
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
..Days
..Miles.
Yes □ No □
Car No. 2
Days
_. Mil-
Yes Q No □
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
Car#1
%
FPR UBC 51

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