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The Ubyssey Nov 29, 2010

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Array Thinking we can walk on water SINCE 1918
SUSTAINABLE
SAUSAGE FROM
HERE: THE
UBYSSEY
EXPLAINS THE
INS AND OUTS
OF LOCALLY
PRODUCED
MEAT. page
PAGE 5
NOVEMBER 29,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER XXIV
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
H
EU
BYSS
EY 2/UBYSSEY.CA/E VENTS/2010.11.29
NOVEMBER 29, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°XXIV
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@uhyney.ca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Vacant
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubysseyca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubysseyca
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubysseyca
PRINT AD SALES
Kathy Yan Li: advertising@ubysseyca
WEB AD SALES
Paul Bucci: webads@ubysseyca
ACCOUNTS
AlexHoopes: accounts@ubysseyca
CONTRIBUTORS
Micki Cowan Drake Fenton
Marie Vondracek KrissyDarch
Karina Palmitesta Lila Volkas
Tim Blonk Caitlin Crawshaw
David Lee Charles To
Martin Parlett Chris Borchert
Front cover illustration by Indiana
Joel
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear-
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of The
Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian
University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student number
and signature (not for publication) as well as your
year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be
checked when submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750 words and
are run according to space. "Freestyles" are opinion
pieces written by Ubyssey staff members. Priority
will be given to letters and perspectives over free-
styles unless the latter is time sensitive. Opinion
pieces will not be run until the identity of the writer has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before intended publication. Letters received after this point wil
be published in the following issue unless there is
an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed
relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
Itisagreed byall persons placing display or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications
Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an
error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS wil
not be greater than the price paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for slight changes or
typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
5£
University
Press
Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
printea onj[0.0%
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EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
WESTSIDE HOMEOWNER
seeks live-in cat sitter on
ongoing basis • WILL PAY
prefer quiet student
seedpe@hotmail.com
LARGE 1BR BSMNT SUITE near
Commercial Drive. Dec. 1. in-suite
laundry, heated floors, pwr
ncluded
New kitchen. $1150/month
No Smoking. Cat ok.
604-788-7390
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come help
us create this baby! Learn about
layout and editing. Expect to be
fed. • Every Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
MULTIVERSITY GALLERIES CURATOR TOURS* Learn about a different aspect of the Multiversity Galleries from a different curator every week. From the local
to the global and the mundane
to the arcane, let the experts introduce you to the objects that
intrigue them most. Along the
way, you'll gain fresh perspectives related to collecting, consulting, researching, interpreting and exhibiting in the Museum. • Tuesdays 1-2pm, Museum of Anthropology, $14/12 included with admission, free with
UBC student ID.
AUDITIONS FOR BRAVE NEW PLAY
RITES FESTIVAL • Audition: Call
for actors for Brave New Play
Rites Short Play Festival. Actors
needed for short play festival
which runs March 30,2011—April
3, 2011. Non-union, non-paying but great acting experience
with exciting new playwrights
and directors. • Auditions take
place Jan. 9-10, e-mail brave-
newplayrites@gmail.com for
more information.
MONDAY, NOV. 29
"AIDSTHENANDNOW'SPEAKERFO-
RUM»UBC-Universities Allied for
Essential Medicines presents a
public screening ofthe Dr. Peter
Diaries, followed by a talk by Dr.
Julio Montaner on "AIDS Treatment as Prevention." Special
guest Jo Gorton will discuss the
politics and economics of HIV.
• 5-7pm, Woodward 5, free.
AMS HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR • The annual AMS Holiday Gift Fair has
arrived. Each week the vendors
will vary. Over 30+ vendors each
will be selling various winter accessories, knitwear, clothing,
jewellery, handcrafts and supplies, bath soaps, fragrances,
etc. Come check out this year's
Holiday Gift Fair for your latest
gifts for family, friends and yourself! • Nov. 29-Dec. 3, 10am-
5:30pm, contactconco3@ams.
ubc.ca for more information.
TUESDAY, NOV 30
SIGNEDWITHOUTSIGNATURE:WORKS
BY CHARLES AND ISABELLA EDEN-
SHAW* From the late 1800s to
the early 1900s, Charles and
Isabella Edenshaw produced
Haida art that continues to inspire the finest Haida artists of
today, many of whom are their
descendants. This exhibit highlights Charles Edenshaw's engraved silver bracelets, as well
as his wife Isabella's basketry,
which Charles painted. • 10am-
5pm, Museum of Anthropology, $14 adult, $12 student/senior, free for UBC faculty, students and staff.
HOLIDAY GLAM-UP!* Earn makeup tips to really glam up for the
holiday season. Professional
make-up retailer Beauty Court
will show you tricks on looking
your best. Men's skin care will
also be covered. • 5-7pm, UBC
Bookstore, free gifts for attendees, lucky gift basket draw at
the end of the session. Products available for sale.
THURSDAY, DEC. 2
THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, CiTR AND
LUV-A-FAIR PRESENT: CONJURE ONE
AND FRONTLINEASSEMBLY* Conjure One's Rhys Fulber (Dele-
rium, Fear Factory and Front
Line Assembly) is concluding
his North American tour at Venue on December 2, showcasing
his "dirty, squelchy electronic,
semi trip-hop" album, Exilarch.
• 19+ event, 9pm-2am, Venue
Nightclub, 881 Granville St, $20.
KEEP THE LIGHT SHINING: CANDLELIGHT VIGIL • A candlelight vigil
will be happening to remember
and celebrate the strength and
resilience of people who have
and are fighting HIV/AIDS and in
memory of those passed away
from HIV/AIDS. • 6-8:30pm,
North SUB entrance.
FRIDAY, DEC. 3
INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PERSONS
WITH DISABILITIES • The United Nations International Day
of Persons with Disabilities
gives people an opportunity
to shine a light on the achievements of people with disabilities, and to glimpse the possibility of a world where everyone belongs. The celebration
will include a marvellous evening of music, performances,
crafts, dance, storytelling and
art, performed and designed by
artists, performers and musicians with disabilities. • 5:30-
9pm, Roundhouse Community Centre, 181 Roundhouse
Mews (Davie & Pacific), free,
go tovancouverdisabilitiesday.
ca or call (604) 608-0384 for
more information.
NATIONAL DAY OF REMEMBRANCE
& ACTION ON VIOLENCE AGAINST
WOMEN:  DANCE FUNDRAISER
• Dance the night away at
this all-ages dance fundraiser hosted by UBC V-Day and
Pride UBC. All the proceeds
of the event go towards support services for women experiencing gender-based violence. • 7pm-12am, SUB Room
207/209, contact CJ Rowe at
(604) 822-2415 or cj.rowe®
ubc.ca for more information.
ONE-MAN STAR WARS • A one-
hour, high energy, nonstop blast
through the first three Star Wars
films. The catch is, there's only
one cast member. Charles
Ross, the writer and solo performer, spent too much of his
childhood in a galaxy far, far
away—adulthood has been
similar. Ross plays all the characters, recreates the effects,
sings the music, flies the ships
and fights both sides of the battles. Three movies, one man,
one hour! • 8-9pm, Vogue Theatre, 918 Granville St, $27.50-
29.50, tickets available at
voguetheatre.com, Vogue Box
Office or on the phone at (604)
569-1144.
SATURDAY, DEC. 4
EXCLAIM! AND CBC RADIO 3 PRESENT: FRAZEY FORD • Exclaim!
and CBC Radio 3 are bringing
you Vancouver's very own indie folk phenomenon, Frazey
Ford. Formerly from the Canadian folk trio The Be Good
Tanyas, Frazey has been touring the globe in support of her
debut solo album, Obadiah. •
19+ event, 8pm-2am, Fortune
Sound Club, 147 East Pender St.
Accountable.
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OXFORD SEMINARS
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We only have
three issues left
for the semester,
so its time to
send us your
festive events!
events@ubyssey.ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc 2010.11.29/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Land Use Plan ready for its close-up
Public hearing for amendments this Tuesday
ARSHY MANN
news@ubyssey.ca
After months of consultations
and meetings, UBC's proposed
amendments to the Land Use
Plan (LUP) will be open to public scrutiny at a hearing Tuesday evening.
The hearing will take place at
6pm on November 30 in the Ponderosa Centre. It will be the only
opportunity for UBC students,
residents, faculty and staff to
provide input on the specific
amendments that the UBC Board
of Governors (BoG) is proposing.
According to a Campus and
Community Planning (CCP), the
hearing is "to ensure that all
persons who believe that their
interest in property is affected
by proposed amendments to the
LUP are provided a reasonable
opportunity to be heard or to
present written submissions."
The Public Hearing Committee which will oversee the forum
is comprised of UBC Associate
VP Nancy Knight, UBC VP External Stephen Owen, Chair ofthe
University Neighbourhoods Association (UNA) Sharon Wu and
two external professional planners, as well as two members of
the UBC Board of Governors-
faculty representative Andrew
Irvine and AMS representative
Sean Heisler.
Attendees will be allowed to
make a five minute presentation
to the committee and can also
submit written material. Only
university officials, however,
are allowed to make any pow-
erpoint or video presentations.
Neal Yonson, editor of the
blog UBC Insiders, said that students should provide written
submissions.
"I will be putting in a written
submission," he said. "The oral
submission thatyou make gets
filtered through CCP, which inevitably distorts some ofyour
points."
After the hearing is completed, committee members are not
allowed to receive any more input about the amendments. This
includes phone calls, emails,
letters or even conversations.
The committee will then take
the input from the hearing and
decide whether to fully endorse
the amendments, change some
of the amendments or to reject
the amendments outright.
According to Knight, CCP is
hoping that the finalized amendments will be ready for the BoG
to consider by January. Final
approval must come from the
province's minister of community sport and cultural development, who is currently Stephanie Cadieux.
Yonson said that he believes
the way the consultations were
handled will mean the hearing
will be flawed.
"During the consultation process, they were required to provide amendments to discuss.
But instead, they only discussed
themes, not particular amendments," he said.
"This is akin to your professor asking you to submit an essay and all you submit is an
essay outline. It's unacceptable...And now that the actual amendments are visible, or
have been circulated, the content of those doesn't necessarily match what was discussed
in the consultation."
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian said the AMS's response to
the amendments will be finalized in the University and External Relations Committee meeting, to be held on Monday. He
also said that he would not be
making the presentation on
behalf of the AMS. Instead, VP
Academic and University Affairs Ben Cappellacci will be
speaking.
"I'm signing off on [the AMS's
position] and Ben will be presenting it at the actual hearing,"
Ahmadian said.
This means that Ahmadian will not defy a council motion that barred him from liaising with the university about
land use issues, and specifically from speaking at Tuesday's
hearing. At the November 10
council meeting, Ahmadian had
repeatedly asserted that if he
did not agree with what Cappellacci would say at the hearing, he would speak on behalf
of the AMS in defiance of the
motion, tl
AMENDMENTS INCREASE
DENSITY AND SAVE FARM,
BUT STALL ON GAGE SOUTH
The proposed amendments to
the Land Use Plan (LUP) would
be the first changes since 1997
and would affect zoning, building
heights, the UBC Farm, as well
as the Gage South and University Boulevard neighbourhoods.
According to AMS President
Bijan Ahmadian, two ofthe most
important changes included in
the amendments are the reduction in the number of zoning designations at UBC and
the increasing density at UBC
which would "make units more
affordable."
Among these is a proposal to
change the designation of the
UBC Farm to "Green Academic." Currently, the farm is zoned
as a market housing reserve.
This new designation would
save the farm on the condition
that space for that housing be
found elsewhere on campus.
Gage South, the area where
the bus loop and Maclnnes field
are presently located, will be
designated as an "area under
review." This means that no development can occur on this
area until further amendments
to the Land Use Plan are made.
The area is currently slated for
market housing.
"The university has heard the
AMS," said VP Academic and
University Affairs Ben Cappellacci at the last AMS Council
meeting.
"There is going to be no designated development on this
area until further notice."
According to Nancy Knight,
UBC is holding off on a decision on Gage South because
the future of the new bus loop
as well as the new aquatic centre is currently uncertain. In addition, during the consultation
process, many students opposed building market housing
in that area as proposed by the
university.
"The future use of this area
will be reviewed in a consultative process that includes students, faculty, staff, residents
and the adjacent University Endowment Lands community,"
read the relevant section of the
amendment.
Yonson said that there are
problems with this designation.
"In terms of Gage South,
they're putting a condition on
it which will make it difficult to
be returned to the academic
core. They're saying that housing must be transferred but
that there may be no place on
campus to receive this housing transfer.
"In addition, the amount of
housing that they're proposing to
transfer is greater than the housing that they have said would go
there in previous estimates."
The University Boulevard
neighbourhood will be zoned
as "Village Centre Academic"
and will have housing and commercial development primarily
aimed at faculty, students and
staff. The area is slated to be
rental-only.
At the meeting, Cappellacci said that this was largely in
line with what the AMS was
looking for.
Yonson, however, said that
some aspects of the proposed
amendments differ from what
was brought forward during
consultations.
"During the consultation, they
asked if the relaxation of the
maximum height from five storeys to six would be acceptable,
but the actual amendment proposed includes an eight storey
limit, and not the six that was
proposed. So this is coming out
of left field," he said. U
NEWS BRIEFS
GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
TOO ASIAN' PANEL CRITICIZES
MACLEANS'M\T\CLE
A panel of UBC professors addressed the issue of diversity to
a packed audience in Buchanan
last Friday, during a dialogue
concerning the recent Maclean's
article "Too Asian?"
The article, published two
weeks ago as part of Maclean's
annual University Issue, has
caused controversy amongst
students and academics alike
at UBC. The panel consisted of
a mix of faculty, administration
members and two undergraduate students.
Brian Sullivan, Vice-President
of Students at U BC, opened the
dialogue by addressing the issue
as one "not about admissions."
Nor was it about the "unhappi-
ness over the way that students
choose to associate or to be engaged," he said.
As the dialogue continued,
panelist Professor Henry Yu
made his feelings clear. "Canada is a different place than it
was in 1967...This article hearkens back to an older Canada.
It's also a hurtful article for a lot
of people."
Undergraduate student Elysa
Hogg said of the claims, "What
are the issues we're not dealing with? Do we really have a
language barrier on our campus?" She continued, "Are we
addressing that? If we aren't, I
think it's a failure on our part to
engage with the campus life."
William Tao, also an undergraduate student, agreed that
the issue must be addressed
on campus. "Oftentimes, we
ourselves are the biggest perpetrators ofthe 'Too Asian' stereotype...These types of hypocritical activities must come to
an end."
TOTEM SECOND IN
ENERGY COMPETITION
UBC has reached second place
in the first year of the Campus
Conservation National Energy
competition, beating 38 other
North American campuses.
The competition, which is in
its pilot year at UBC, was held
at Totem Park. UBC saved 8,989
kilowatts hours of energy, with
the competition saving 510,191
kWh overall.
The six houses in Totem competed against each other. Haida House took the winners title with a 24.1 per cent reduction in electricity use. tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NATIONAL/2010.11.29
NATIONAL
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
Bill C-389 looks to protect trans people
Would make it illegal to discriminate based on gender identity and expression
KAILEYWILLETTS
The Martlet (UVic]
VICTORIA—Canadians may soon
see legal protection for trans
and gender-variant individuals.
Bill C-389, which is expected
to go through its third reading
in the House of Commons in
December, would add gender
identity and gender expression
to the definition of an "identifiable group" in the Criminal Code's hate provisions. It
would also add gender identity
and gender expression to prohibited grounds of discrimination in the Canadian Human
Rights Act.
"[The bill would give]...explicit legal protections, rather
than ones that are implicit," said
Meris Colby, UVic Pride's representative to trans groups.
First-year UVic student Katie
Fukada showed her support by
signing an online petition that
sent her MP an email in support
of Bill C-389.
"I feel like this bill is really
important. I wanted to make
sure that my rights and the
rights of people that I care about
very much are protected," she
said. "Everybody has a right to
safety and I think this bill would
just help enshrine that."
■ | MENf ■ 0
9^1<fN\EN\W|
BROOKE MACLENNAN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE MARTLET
Fukuda didn't, however, expect a response from LaVar
Payne, a Conservative MP representing her home riding of
Medicine Hat, Alberta.
Although she didn't expect
Payne to be in support of Bill
C-389, Fukuda said the response
she got was shocking.
The letter from Payne said
that for gender identity and expression to be considered for
addition to the criminal code,
"We need enough evidence to
conclude that there are enough
cases of hate propaganda against
transgender people."
"That was really what bothered me the most," said Fukuda. "He literally says that he
doesn't see there being instances of transphobia and I'm like,
'Canyoutake a look around?' So
I found that to be really hurtful
and really ignorant."
Payne's response also mentioned broadening identifiable
groups in the criminal code
"will further infringe on Canadians' right to free speech."
Payne could not be reached
for comment as of press time.
Victoria NDP MP Denise
Savoie, however, said the suggestion Bill C-389 would limit
free speech is "ridiculous."
"[The bill] doesn't eliminate
any existing right that's held
within our constitution," said
Savoie. "It simply gives people
who are...marginalized and
who do face prejudice and often
violence...a certain protection
that doesn't exist now. So I would
just say that seems like hogwash
to me and an excuse for not supporting the bill."
O'Connor echoed that trans
and gender-variant people do
face discrimination and cited a
recent study that highlights the
effects of that discrimination.
"[The study was] basically saying trans people have a 25 per
cent higher chance of attempting suicide, and they're significantly underemployed compared to the general population
and generally discriminated
against in health care because
few people understand their
problems. There's a lot of societal momentum to work against
and there's really no indicators
right now that it is something
anyone cares about beside queer
groups," said O'Connor.
Colby is hopeful that Bill
C-389 reaching its third reading in Parliament will help bring
attention to trans issues.
"I think it's just gaining a lot
of momentum right now. There's
a lot more publicity now that it's
reached this point," said Colby.
"It's the third attempt so it's finally gotten far enough through
that people are paying attention to it."
Carleton pro-life club to sue students' union
Club threatens legal action over union s decision to deny them club recertification
ALEXANDRA POSADZKI
CUP Ontario Bureau Chief
TORONTO (CUP)-Carleton University's pro-life club will take
its students' union to court if
the union doesn't reverse its
decision to revoke the group's
club status.
Albertos Polizogopoulos, the
lawyer representing the pro-
life club Carleton Lifeline, confirmed on November 21 that he
would take legal action against
the union if they do not re-certify the club. Losing their certification means Carleton Lifeline will not be able to apply
for funding, nor book student
space.
The union made the decision
to deny Carleton Lifeline recertification on the basis that the
club's constitution violates the
students' union's "discrimination on campus policy." The policy states that CUSA will "respect
and affirm a woman's right to
choose her options in case of
pregnancy."
It goes on to state that "actions
such as any campaign, distribution, solicitation, lobbying,
effort, display, event, etc. that
seeks to limit or remove a woman's right to choose her options
in the case of pregnancy will
not be supported," and that "no
CUSA resources, space, recognition or funding will be allocated for the purpose of promoting
these actions."
In a letter dated Nov 11, CU-
SA's vice-president internal affairs invited Carleton Lifeline to
amend their constitution to respect CUSA's policy by November 18 in order to regain their
certification.
But Ruth Lobo, president
of Carleton Lifeline, said the
union's decision is discriminatory and a blow to free
speech.
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arshy mann | news@ubysseyca
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"CUSA's constitution says they
will not discriminate against
students for political ideologies
and that's exactly what they're
doing," said Lobo. "I think it's
kind of ludicrous that I have to
give money to a student union
that discriminates against me.
CUSA should be representing
all students fairly, regardless
of political ideologies."
CUSA's decision comes on the
heels of the recent arrests of
Lobo and four other students
for attempting to put up a controversial pro-life display featuring graphic images of aborted fetuses on campus. Polizogopoulos believes that CUSA's decision stems from those earlier
arrests. He points to the fact that
Carleton Lifeline has been certified since the winter of 2007,
and has applied for and received
funding and recertification everyyear since.
The club has not changed
their constitution or their position on abortion since, which
raises the issue of why CUSA
would choose now to decertify
the club, he said.
Cara Zwibel, a spokesperson
for the Canadian Civil Liberties
Association, said there seems to
be a growing trend towards silencing pro-life clubs on Canadian campuses.
"We're very concerned about
freedom of expression on university campuses," said Zwibel.
"It's an important place for people to debate and discuss controversial issues, and to silence one
side ofthe debate does not contribute to the marketplace of ideas."
"I think the very existence of
pro-life clubs has become seen
as offensive," said Lobo.
Zwibel said the Canadian Civil Liberties Association supports
a woman's right to choose, but
she does not think that abortion
is the real issue at hand.
"This is about the right to express different opinions in a
university setting, and we think
it's inappropriate for a student
group to be prohibited from being a club because ofthe views
that it's expressing," she said.
Polizogopoulos said that
CUSA tried to deny Carleton Lifeline club status back in 2006
for the same reason. But after
public outcry from students
and other organizations, the
club was certified and has successfully remained a club since
then.
He believes the issue is a textbook definition of differential
treatment.
"CUSA has labeled itself as a
pro-choice organization, and is
shutting down groups that are
pro-life, that disagree with the
position that CUSA has taken,"
he said.
"So they are effectively treating pro-life students and pro-
life student clubs differently
than they're treating pro-choice
students."
Alex Sirois, union president,
said CUSA believes they were
upholding the Clubs and Societies bylaws and the anti-discrimination policy in their decision, but they are unable to
comment further until the legal issues are resolved. 2010.11.29/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/5
cnHttfffMe^ y^**- Mc^
B^^^^^™    '       ^*^^^^^B ^     A CUltUTG TOOQ SOGCIdl      EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.c
^^^^ ^^W ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA »associate.culture@ubyssey.c
BRYCE WARNES
culture@ubyssey.ca
Tomatoes
in winter
flown in
from God
knows
where, fro-
zen dinners that
look like
they came from a food replicator in Star Trek—the cogs and
wheels of industrial agriculture
and processing form a gulf between us and our bodies' fuel.
This is the argument presented by the local and (to a lesser extent) organic food movements, one which has been gaining mainstream momentum.
The success of Alms like Food
Inc. and books like Michael Pol-
lan's The Omnivore's Dilemma
have been changing the discussions we have about how we're
fed. Convenience used to be the
gastronomic ideal. Now it's the
health and well-being of our environment, our local economies
and our bodies.
Meat adds a layer of complexity to the discussion by introducing a third party—the animal that is killed. Any omni-
vore who is concerned about the
wider impact of their food choices has to take into account the
lives of the animals they eat-
how they lived, how they were
ended and what effects these
factors have on the people who
eat the finished product.
This special food supplement
of The Ubyssey's Culture section isn't meant to convert carnivores to niche market meat
products, or lead vegetarians
astray from their chosen path.
It is an introduction to alternatives to industrial agriculture's
methods of raising and killing
animals. To that end, we have
a guide by Micki Cowan to the
labels—from grass-fed to hormone-free—that adorn "sustainable" meat; a list by Anna Zoria
of the businesses closest to UBC
that offer these options; a gastronomic exploration by Martin Parlett of some Vancouver
restaurants that source their
animal products locally; and a
profile of Pemberton Meadows
Farms by Nina Kiri, complete
with a mini-biography of one of
Don Millerd's pasture-raised,
"happy" cattle.
A diet that includes flesh offends some and obsesses others. Wherever your tastes lie, we
hope you'll take this opportunity to learn about the alternatives
that exist, how they can be pursued and what differences they
make in the lives of humans and
animals alike. Dig in. va
^1
ONLINE EXCLUSIVE
We visited The Butcher on 10th
to learn about the resurgence
of what was, for a time, a dying art. Checkout ubyssey.ca/
cu/fure/forthe video.
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MICKI COWAN
mcowan@ubyssey.ca
For the concerned carnivore, labels on meat products can be
confusing.
Mark Bomford, director ofthe
UBC farm, said that each label
has different strengths, so it's really about deciding what matters
most to the individual consumer.
"Some [labeling] systems
mighthave lower netgreenhouse
gas emissions, others might excel in animal welfare practices,
some may be particularly economically viable—but there is
no single system that is the clear
winner in all categories," he said.
This leaves the rest ofthe decision making up to you. Here's the
skinny on what the labels on your
meat actually mean, according to
two local butchers and Bamford.
THE BUTCHERS
Richard Noble is co-owner of The
Butcher on 10th, which carries
a wide range of meat products,
with labels including grain-fed
and grass-fed for beef, free-range
for poultry, as well as many locally sourced products.
Chris Jackson is an eighth
generation butcher and the new
owner of his family's business,
Jackson's Meats on W 4th. He carries certified organic, non-medicated and free run poultry, and
grain fed beef. See below for a
translation of those labels.
GRAIN FED AND GRASS FED
Grain-fed cattle, mainly out
of Alberta, are fed a combination of grains, and will often be
from feedlots, but have a fattier,
more flavourful meat, said Noble. Some ofthe grain-fed cattle,
said Jackson, also eat grass during the growing season, but are
brought into the barns for processing and finished on grain.
Noble explains the difference.
"Grass-fed animals just stay
out in the pasture," said Noble. "They just sit out and eat
grass. They're not finished on
any grain, they just go straight
to market as grass-fed beef."
Jackson described the taste
of grass-fed as being earthier in
flavor. This type of beef also has
an environmental advantage.
"Grass-fed systems can be
part of an important restorative
strategy for lands that have seen
manyyears of intensive agricultural cultivation. In these cases
is it possible to sequester carbon
back into soils with the transition to perennial feed grasses
and animal grazing."
FREE RANGE AND FREE RUN
Noble said that free-run birds,
like cage-free birds, are kept
inside a barn with no access to
the outdoors.
"The free-range birds can get
outside. They have access to the
outdoors, they can play around
and run and do whatever they
like," he said, noting, however,
that some don't bother to leave
the barn.
CERTIFIED ORGANIC
Bamford said that unlike non-
certified organic meat, "Certified
organic operations have to follow a fairly detailed set of standards that demand many components associated with animal
welfare, including space allowances, water and feed access and
quality, and enrichment."
"If it's not certified, it's not
certified organic," said Noble.
NON-MEDICATED AND HORMONE
FREE
Both labels actually mean the
same thing.
"It means that they weren't
given any antibiotics or growth
hormones during the growing
process," said Jackson. "There's
no growth hormones, no animal
by-products in the feed. Most
birds are given a shot when
they're a chickling, or a hatch-
ling, just to keep them from getting sick. It's a vaccination. But
that's it, that's all they receive."
LOCAL
"Local means within the province
of BC.we could buy from Uruguay
if we wanted to, but if we can buy
and support local farmers, it reduces our footprint," saidjackson.
Both Jackson and Noble consider local to be from the Fraser
Valley or Lower Mainland. For
those on the 100-mile diet, ask
the butchers themselves to be
sure that the meat you are buying is within range.
"Every butcher, if they're doing it right, they see every piece
of meat every day. They know exactly what they're selling, exactly whatitis," said Noble. "I would
strongly recommend that |you] at
least try and source a good butcher [and] some good products that
are locally supplied, and you'd be
a lot better off. You'll pay a little
bit more out of it, but at leastyou
get an honest answer out of who
you're dealing with."
Jackson's Meats, for example, gets poultry from Maple
Hill Farms and Bradner Organic Chickens, both located in Abbotsford and well within a 100-
mile trip from the city, va
KEEPING IT LOCAL!
ANNA ZORIA
assistant, cui ture® ubyssey.ca
With the rise of mega-sized
chains like Whole Foods and
Choices, it's getting harder to
spot family-owned establishments that sell local, organic
and free-range meat products
at a reasonable price. The benefit of going to a real butcher is
that they will be able to tell you
where the animal was raised,
how it was fed and where it
came from. They also won't
look at you like you just ordered
a minotaur when you ask for a
specific cut. Here are just some
of the specialty stores that can
put some meat on your bones.
JACKSON'S MEATS AND DELI
2274 W4th Ave
Jackson's has been frequently crowned best meat shop
in town. Formerly located on
Granville, it hasn't suffered
from any loss of faithful clientele since its move to Kitsilano.
Their rib eye steak is rumoured
to be consistently tender and
fresh, and their made-on-site
British banger sausages are
also renowned. The prices are
on par with what you would
pay at a grocery store and their
staff are very knowledgeable
about all things carnivorous.
Jackson's also carries a variety of cheeses, fresh pasta
and sandwiches if you want
to eat on the go.
MARKET MEATS
2326 W 4th Ave
Located on the same strip as
Jackson's, Market Meats carries a wide variety of meats,
from the usual beef and pork
to unexpected game such as
muskox, ostrich and quail. Although it's pricier than Jackson's, the staff will surprise
you with their knowledge on
anything and everything in their
store, and will even give you
cooking suggestions for your
next culinary masterpiece. If
you're looking for a tasty ready-
made meal, they also carry stuffed potatoes, marinated wings and ribs, barbecued
chickens and steak and prawn
combos. Ifyou're willing to put
down some extra green for real
quality, this is your place.
THE BUTCHER ON 10th
4529 W 10th Ave
This specialty meat store,
located close to UBC, puts
a modern spin on a classic
butcher shop, with a focus on
local, organic and grass- fed
meat. They have free-range
chicken that comes from Fraser Valley, along with lamb and
rabbit from Saltspring. Their
sausages are tailored to your
tastes, with an option to make
requests such as wheat-free.
The Butcher also carries a variety of artisan cheeses, meat
pies, pastas, soups, pates,
cabbage rolls and bacons, as
well as a selection of locally
produced deli items.
WINTER FARMER'S MARKET
1882 Adanac St
This farmer's market, which
happens every other weekend
from November to April and
is located close to the Drive,
is a great way to support local farms. Empire Valley Beef,
Forstbauer Family Natural Food
Farm and Gelderman Farms
Ltd are just some of the BC
farms that can be found here,
selling everything from beef
to bison.
Aside from finding fresh
eggs, lamb, fish and meat at
reasonable prices, you can
also stock up on local cheeses, sauces, baked goods, honey, maple syrup, tea, coffee,
flowers and fresh produce.
All vendors are certified organic and set up their stalls
both outside and inside Wise
Hall. The Winter Market is
undeniably the best way to
buy meat directly from local
farms, and has a friendly community vibe, til 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.11.29
At home on the range
Pemberton Meadows cattle live life outdoors—naturally
NINA KIRI
Contributor
The food industry has changed
a lot in the last century. Author
Michael Pollan witnessed for
himself the reality of present
day factory farms that he visited, where approximately 90 per
cent of North America's beef is
raised. He recorded his firsthand accounts in his book The
Omnivore's Dilemma and according to him, the average life of
the factory farm raised cow is
anything but appetizing.
The calves are separated from
their mothers at six months of
age to learn how to feed independently. Instead of grass, they
are immediately put on a diet
of corn—a food their rumens
(specialized stomachs) aren't
meant to process and which
makes them sick. Two to three
months later, they are moved
to feedlots. Here, liquefied fat,
protein supplements, liquid vitamins, synthetic estrogen and
antibiotics are added to the supply of corn. The cows are also fed
blood and fat products from other beef, even though, as Pollan
points out, "cows are herbivores
by evolution." This type of diet
allows the cows to be hyper-fattened to meet industry needs.
There are, however, alternatives. Enter Pemberton Meadows
farm, an all-natural beef farm
that, contrary to the majority of
industrial-sized cattle "farms,"
uses no hormones, steroids or
antibiotics on its animals. The
farm was founded by Bob Mitchell and Don Millerd on excess
land that they owned. Learning
that 90 to 99 per cent of cattle
raised in BC are shipped to Alberta for fattening and slaughter, and then shipped back, they
decided to start a cattle farm
where the cattle could spend
their entire lives.
Pemberton Meadows cattle have a completely different
lifestyle in comparison to those
raised by typical 21st century
farming methods.
Born from February to March,
calves go out on the pasture and
nurse with their mothers for the
summer. By late October, they
are brought in from the pasture to be weaned. Weaning is
the process of separating the
calves from their mothers so
that they can be introduced to
adult food. Millerd noted that,
"unlike the conventional cattle
business, we only separate them
through a nose-to-nose wooden
fence, and once the mothers'
milk has dried up, the mothers
can go out on the pasture and
come back to see their calves."
The result of this method is that
the cows and their offspring naturally separate, as opposed to
being forced.
Next comes winter. Ifyou're
expecting a smelly cow barn,
don't hold your breath, because
Pemberton Meadow cows know
of no such thing. The cattle's
winters are spent in an area
called "the Park"—20 to 30 acres
of trees and bushes where the
cows can wander freely. Following their natural instincts, the
cows can create "hidey holes,"
as Millerd calls them. These are
Watching over the herd at Pemberton Meadows. DAVE STEERS PHOTO/COURTESY PEMBERTON MEADOWS FARM
hollows in the bushes and in between branches that the cows
make to stay dry and warm.
Having an entire playground to
roam keeps the cows happy and
healthy. With plenty of space,
the viruses and infections endemic in modern feedlots are
no longer a serious threat.
During this time, the cows are
fed their grains and hay outside.
Millerd points out that having
an entire playground to roam
around on makes the cows not
only happier, but also "much
healthier because they get away
from each other and aren't living in their own feces and bacteria." At two years of age, an animal is slaughtered and ready
for packaging.
When looking at these cows'
lives, it's obvious that an organic, free-range approach to raising cattle is the more humane
way. Millerd, however, is quick
to point out that we shouldn't be
downplaying the beef made industrially. "We have to be very
careful about making judgments
on the food industry," he said.
"Obviously I think our beef is
superior, but it's also more expensive. I think the great thing
about the food industry is to
have choices so the people who
can't afford to buy specialty beef
can buy lots of beef on special
at Costco or Safeway—they don't
have to go to Whole Foods." The
bottom line with Millerd is that
"there's no right or wrong way to
do it, it's different, which gives
us choices, which is the good
stuff." tl
Fine dining, from the field to the table
MARTIN PARLETT
Contributor
Four letter words get us into
trouble and 'meat' is becoming one of them. Recent times
have witnessed a purist challenge to the viability of this unadulterated primal pleasure.
Kudos to vegetarianism and its
more extreme manifestations
(I dabbled in high school—who
didn't?), but boycotts have never really been my thing, especially when it comes to food.
That's why ethical meat-eating appears to be the pragmatic 'third way' when it comes to
carnivorous indulgences. Vancouver is at the forefront of this
development towards a 'meat
conscience,' and this week I
have been exploring some of
its most prominent pioneers.
Raincity Grill was the first
stop on my week-long me-
atathon. Testament to Raincity's commitment to celebrating the best of local produce
("farm to table" is their motto),
I was invited to a private event
showcasing Sloping Hill pork
and BC pinot grigios. It was a
five course homage to neighbourhood pig and grape, and I
was pleased to kneel at its altar. From head to ear to cheek
to chop to belly, chef Jennifer
Peters gave this animal a regal memorial in every dish.
The confit of pork belly with
a creme brulee crackling battled with the dessert of a bacon
sprinkled donut, maple syrup and crab apple sorbet for
the runaway success of this
tasting. It was an intriguing
CAITLIN CRAWSHAWILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
act of gastro-anatomy and it
demonstrated without doubt
that local meat, treated with
respect, yields better results
than any inferior import. I was
not alone at the table in making this equation.
The farmers at Sloping Hill
cite the limitation of intramuscular fat and more marbling as
the reason for why their breeds
taste better "compared to any
conventionally raised pork."
Whatever it is, my week began
with a confirmation that dining ethically tastes better.
I thought I'd seen the most
committed local enterprise in
the city, until I stumbled upon
Aphrodite Cafe and Pie Shop—
an under-the-radar organic
bistro on West 4th Avenue. Aphrodite's manager, Kyle McEachern, sat with me in his countrified and unpretentious restaurant, and radiated a commitment to (almost) 100 per cent
organic foods, including their
meat. By the light of miniature
flower lamps, he explained that
it's a vision passed on from Allan Christian, the cafe's founder, whose farming background
shaped his attitude towards
food. Their evening menu will
always offer a local meat option, but it is brunch where the
principled carnivore can feel
most at home. Whether it's their
rich elk and succulent bison
sausages or their festive Quebe-
cois-inspired tourtiere—a deep
dished pork pie bathed in aromatic maple syrup—you can put
fork to mouth with the knowledge that McEachern has selected the best from Maple Hill
and Oyama, and that all meat
will have a supporting cast of
local fruits and veggies. Customers expect local here, and
it sells—a queue was forming
by the time I settled the bill,
despite the inclement weather.
Before I left, I was introduced
to two waiters and ex-veggies
who cite Aphrodite as the celestial power which converted
them back to the brawny light.
Amen to that.
Finally, I made plans to visit
Vij's—an Indian restaurant so
popular that in the two hours
I was there, I couldn't get a table. So I walked about five feet
and settled myself in at their
sister restaurant Rangoli, conveniently located next door-
serving less ambitious food,
but with the same meat ingredients. A warning: Vij's and Rangoli are a little more half-hearted when it comes to meat sourc-
ing, and I was made aware that
only the chicken and the goat
were native Canadian fare that
evening. The latter beast was
my choice, braised slowly and
served with a jackfruit and coconut curry sauce. Whilst the meat
was almost too tender—and like
the best lamb and game in one
mouthful—there was something
unapologetic about the foreign-
ness of its orbital ingredients.
The waitress was realistic: "We
get what we can from our local
farmers, but when they can't supply we go elsewhere." Perhaps
that's why "local" is to be found
nowhere on the Rangoli menu.
There was something refreshing about her honesty and this
ad hoc approach—it makes sense,
and it's a good first step for any
Vancouver eatery, tl
Raincity Grill: 1193 Den
man Street,  (604) 685
7337
Aphrodite Cafe and Pie
Shop: 3598 West 4th Avenue, (604) 733 8308
Vij's Rangoli: 1488 West
11 Avenue, (604)736 5711 2010.11.29/ U BYSSEY. CA/S PORTS/7
SPORTS
EDITOR VACANT
Wrestling club refused varsity status
DAVID LEE
Contributor
Wrestling is huge in BC high
schools: there are 2200 high
school wrestlers in the province, many of whom are top in
the country. In an effort to retain
these athletes, UBC's Wrestling
Club has sought to gain varsity
status with UBC Athletics, which
would provide partial scholarships and travel funding for the
current club's wrestlers.
For ten consecutive years, the
UBC Wrestling Club has tried to
gain varsity status, only to be rejected each time.
Last spring, Matthew Kocal,
former captain ofthe UBC wrestling team, and his squad put
forward a comprehensive varsity proposal and again they were
turned down.
"Disappointment," is how Kocal, current national team member, summarized his reaction to
the rejection.
"The athletic potential is not
being fulfilled, and students are
not being provided with opportunities. We have a lot of good
athletes at the university who
are struggling with their potential in the sport. Some of us do
well still, but it is a big individual effort to succeed in the sport
while attending UBC."
Theresa Hanson, associate director of Athletics, argued that
UBC simply "does not have the
capacity to add to our varsity
Gunnder Grewal and Ben Lee train and study. CHRIS BORCHERT PHOTO/
THEUBYSSEY
program at this time." According
to Hanson, a lot of factors must
come into consideration such as
"financial [resources], facilities,
administrative, etc." She added
that "it would require funding
for areas such as staffing, team
travel, equipment, membership
and sport fees, recruiting, scholarships, uniforms, etc."
However, Dave Wilson, coach of
the UBC Wrestling Club and former heavyweight wrestler from
Concordia University, thinks
differently. "Wrestling is among
the cheapest of all sports," he said.
"All you need is a mat, a training
partner and a coach. We also stated [in the proposal] that we would
do our own fundraising. So money is not the problem."
Wilson believes their professional proposal was never considered seriously. "We proposed
a well-researched, innovative
and feasible wrestling program
that would be economical and
self-funding. And it wasn't even
read." The detailed proposal included a practice schedule, a tentative competition schedule, recruiting, a budget proposal, an
action plan and a combat studio.
"We felt that if it was objectively assessed we would be successful in our quest to be elevated to varsity status. However, if
the administration is not even
open to reviewing the proposal,
it makes dialogue challenging."
The future remains dim for
wrestlers at UBC. Hanson is not
optimistic about a varsity program for wrestling any time
soon. "You can never say never," she said. "However, as mentioned, we do not have the capacity to start a new varsity program in the near future."
Yet, Wilson is determined.
"We're not quitters," he affirmed.
"We'll keep on moving forward
and developing. We will likely
communicate with Bijan Ahmadian and the AMS as they have been
super supportive. They may be
able to guide us to the next step."
In the summer of 2008, the
UBC Wrestling Club hosted the
first Annual UBC Summer Youth
Wrestling camp in the SUB ballroom. Thirty-five young wrestlers had an experience with
UBC students/athletes, Canadian Olympic champion Daniel Igali, World Champion Gui-
vi Sissaouri and the Canadian
men's Olympic team.
"That was prettvspectacular,"
Wilson recalled, vl
Women's Basketball extends winning streak
T-Birds sweep Saskatchewan for fourth straight win to end first half
MARIE V0NDRACEK
mvo n d ra ce k@ u by s s ey. ca
The UBC women's basketball
team made great progress this
weekend, both on and off the
scoreboard.
The Thunderbirds (7-5) extended their winning streak to
four games with a 77-64 Thursday night win and a 94-55 win
on Friday over the University of
Lethbridge Pronghorns (2-10).
The 'Birds were led by Alex
Vieweg, who tallied 40 points,
a 17-25 shooting record and 14
rebounds over both games.
"She is a very hard-working
player and she's very committed
to basketball, so it's nice to see
her rewarded for her efforts,"
said UBC head coach Deb Huband. "This weekend she really got her offensive touch back,
made some good decisions and
finished well."
Due to foul trouble, UBC
played Thursday's first half without leading forward contributors Vieweg and Zara Huntley,
who finished the matches with
38 points and ten rebounds. The
two players combined for just
12 minutes of playing time in
the first half.
These spots allowed players
to come off the bench and gain
experience which will benefit
the T-Birds in the long run. The
hole was largely filled by Devan
Lisson, putting in 12 points and
five assists. Lisson also had 6
of UBC's 14 steals in the game.
"Anytime you have to sit people because of fouls, it disrupts
your flow and your chemistry
on the floor," said Huband. "So
losing our starting forwards is
not a situation we wanted to be
in, but I think people came in
and did a good job."
Lethbridge put in a strong run
late in the third to try to get back
into the game, but the T-Birds
opened the fourth quarter hot
to secure the win. UBC kept that
fire going into Friday's game,
starting off with an 18-2 run and
extending it with a 14-2 run to
gain a big 39-17 lead athalftime.
"Any time you can hold a team
that low, you are givingyourself
a lot of transition opportunities,"
she said. "We have been working
towards trying to be more disciplined for each defensive possession and we know if we can
do that, we are capable of holding teams to minimal scoring."
The Thunderbirds found other great backing off the bench
from rookie Alyssa Binns, who
added ten points and was two-
for-two from the three-point
range and four-for-four from
the free-throw line. Lia St Pierre
and Lisson also combined for 21
points and 12 assists.
Zara Huntley drives the hoop against the Huskies. CHARLEST0 PHOTO/
THEUBYSSEY
"We have made a lot of progress as a team," said Huband.
"It was nice to see us put together 40 minutes and play solid defensively and offensively.
We got a lot of people involved
offensively and had a lot of
weapons on the floor. It was
a really positive step forward
for our team." tl
BIRD DROPPINGS
THUNDBIRD WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL NOW RANKED NUMBER ONE
The number one-ranked UBC
women's volleyball team (8-2)
swept the Saskatchewan Huskies (1-7) to keep their winning
streak, which is now at eight
games.
The Thunderbirds had a scare
Saturday when the Saskatchewan Huskies took a two set to
one lead. In the fourth set, the
Thunderbirds clawed out a 27-
25 set win and cruised to a 15-7
fifth set victory.
"I give Saskatchewan credit
because they did a lot of things
really well. And it may not be fancy, but it put pressure on us,"
said head coach Doug Reimer.
"That's a very good 1-7 team."
Lisa Barclay led all players putting in 22 kills and Shanice Marcelle was close behind with 21
kills in the match.
Marcelle had 31 points, 27
kills and an impressive 28.5
percent hitting success rate over
the two matches. This earned
her Canada West women's
volleyball 'athlete of the week'
honour.
"I was really pleased with
how we hung in there and how
players, after struggling in certain areas, found a way to come
back and contribute," said Reimer. "It was a very important
win for us."
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL SWEEPS
HUSKIES
The Thunderbird men's volleyball team (4-6) swept the Saskatchewan Huskies (1-7) 3-2
and 3-1.
Friday night the Thunderbirds
battled through four close sets,
only to cruise through the fifth
set 15-6 to win the match.
"I think we kept it simple
in the fifth set. We just want
guys to make plays. Chris Klassen goes in and serves the
game out. That's the type of
plays we're talking about," said
Schick. "Working hard isn't good
enough. Working hard doesn't
necessarily mean you are working smart. We've just got to relax and do what we've got to do
out there."
On Saturday, UBC had a
smoother go of things in a 3-1
victory over the Huskies. Demi-
jan Savija started a 9-1 UBC run
in the fourth set that essentially ended any hopes of a Huskies comeback. He racked up
23 kills with a .444 hitting percentage to lead the UBC attack
ending the effort with a big kill
on match point.
Blair Bann, the reigning CIS Libera of the Year, tallied 42 digs
over the two game in a standout
defensive performance and help
lift the 'Birds to victory.
"We've leaned on Blair a lot
this year and we've got to lean
on him some more. He makes
the game look pretty easy and
he knows the game pretty
well. He's got to do a lot for us
and he's brought it every single game," noted Schick. "Our
guys also have to learn from
him, how he plays and what
he brings. I don't think they realize how lucky they are sometimes but it's part of the learning process.' 8/UBYSSEY.CA/LETTERS/2010.11.29
LETTERS: GAZA RESPONSES
FRIEDMAN: IN RESPONSE TO
ONLINE COMMENTS
Dear Ubyssey
In your past two issues, you have
been publishing extensively about
recent conflicts involving the Social Justice Centre. I have some
reservations about the comments
that are appearing in response
to The Ubyssey's recent coverage,
particularly, with regard to some
misconceptions about the SJC's recent donation of $700 to the Canadian Boat to Gaza.
First of all, contrary to what
our critics have led many to believe, supporting the Boat to Gaza
does NOT constitute supporting
Hamas. The project's stated aim is
to deliver humanitarian supplies
(not weapons or even money that
could be used by Hamas) to communities in Gaza that are suffering as a result of Israel's illegal
blockade. This is part of a broader
effort to lift the blockade, which
blatantly violates the Fourth Geneva Convention. It is ridiculously one-sided and quite prejudiced
to assume that anyone who opposes Israel's human rights abuses
is automatically "supporting the
terrorists."
Second, the donation is going
to a legally registered Canadian
Charity, Alternatives. As such, it
will be screened to make sure that
no aid gets to Hamas, as Canada
considers this group to be a terrorist organization. That is good
enough for the SJC; it ought to be
good enough for the AMS.
Third, some have said that this
project is reckless, as it resulted in
"needless deaths" the last time it
was attempted. I would like to remind you that those deaths were
not the result of the Gaza Flotilla but rather of an illegal boarding in international waters by the
IDF—technically an act of piracy
under international law. The only
party that has been acting "recklessly" in this case is Israel itself.
Thank you for giving this issue the publicity that it deserves.
Sincerely,
—Arielle Friedman
Treasurer, Socialjustice Centre
BERGER: SJC UNACCOUNTABLE
FOR THEIR ACTIONS
I am writing in response to the
November 25 editorial [The Gaza
flotilla donation is fair] as well as
the column by Blake Frederick
[AMS President inflaming Israel/
Palestine campus conflict] regarding the ongoing scandal involving
the SJC. In their columns these
two writers fail to lay any blame
on the SJC and instead pass the
buck to lie AMS administration.
The editorial did get one thing
right, when it stated, "If students
don't like the way that they [the
SJC] are choosing to operate, they
could join the SJC or put forward
referendums to have the group removed." This is absolutely correct;
every fee-paying student has the
right to attend resource group
meetings, raise motions, run in
their elections and vote on their
proceedings.
What the columnists fail to
recognize, however, is that the
current leadership ofthe SJC has
made open and democratic involvement in their group impossible. In his column Frederick
claims that last week "...a group
of students infiltrated an SJC
meeting..." How exactly can students 'infiltrate' a group of which
they are voting and fee-paying
members?
The reason we have a problem
in the first place is because the
current SJC executive labels students who do not agree with their
agenda 'infiltrators.' The SJC leaders have hijacked a valuable AMS
resource group and pushed it toward their own extreme agenda.
Any student who dares to speak
out in opposition is silenced as an
'infiltrator.' This became abundantly clear at their recent attempt at an AGM. When it was obvious that the current executives
would not be re-elected, they adjourned the meeting and shut the
opposition out. The message was
clear: if we are opposed, then democracy is closed. Will the student body and the other resource
groups let this stand?
—Jeremy Berger
Commerce 4
A WORD FROM THE CANADIAN
BOAT TO GAZA
Attention AMS President Bijan
Ahmadian,
I am writing to share with you the
letter that I co-wrote with others
from the Canadian Boat to Gaza
when we learned of the planned
donation from the UBC Social
Justice Centre. You may have already seen this letter, but I would
ask thatyou consider it seriously,
and also that you read the website ofthe Canadian Boat to Gaza
(http://canadaboatgaza.org). Do
the humanitarian aims of this
Boat project really warrant this
special 'intervention' by your office? On what possible grounds
can this be justified?
On the positive side, I should
inform you that the publicity this
blocked donation has generated
correlates with an increased interest from potential donors and
supporters for the Boat to Gaza.
Poll after poll has shown that the
more Canadians know about the
'conflict' in the Middle East, the
more that they tend to support the
Palestinian cause. This, of course,
is because it is no ordinary conflict between two equally powerfully and equally culpable sides;
it is a case of oppression and injustice, and in cases like this you
can't fool all ofthe people all ofthe
time, at least not forever.
Notknowingyou at all, I imagine that on some level you must
know that your heavy-handed action in this matter is wrong, on
both political and moral grounds.
It's not too late for you to do the
right thing.
Ifyou don't, you will provide an
ongoing wedge for us organizers
of the Boat to use as motivation
for our supporters. I can guarantee you there will be people from
right across Canada stepping forward to donate $700 to match the
amount you have blocked.
Best regards,
—Derrick O'Keefe
UBC BA'99, B.Ed'06
CANZER: "FEES TO FUND A FLOTILLA' [ARE] TANTAMOUNT TO
SUPPORTING ARMED CONFLICT"
Dear Council Members,
I write regarding SJC's recent request to transfer $700 to SPHR
for a donation to a so-called Canadian Gaza Flotilla. I understand
that the AMS Executive has decided to refer the matter to AMS
Council, and that the issue will
be discussed at the December 1
meeting.
As a graduate of UBC, I am
deeply concerned about this request. Approving a transfer of
student fees to fund a "flotilla" is
tantamount to supporting armed
conflict. UBC students would be
equally shocked if Hillel asked for
funds to be donated to the Israeli army to resist the flotilla, and
rightfully so. To pretend that this
is a generic aid mission is to ignore the obvious: Israel considers
ships that aim to break its blockade of Gaza a threat to its national sovereignty, and they will use
military force to stop these ships.
There are established channels
available that allow Israel to prevent weapons from being smuggled in to Gaza with humanitarian supplies, and SJC's decision to
fund a flotilla reveals that their
true intention is to confront the
Israeli army, not to support their
Palestinian brethren with genuine supplies. The legitimacy of
Israel's blockade is an excellent
topic for informed debate, passionate protest and political action, but student fees should not
be used to support one side of
this conflict unless there is overwhelming consensus among students that the cause is just. That
certainly is not the case at UBC.
I encourage you to refuse to allow UBC student fees to be used to
promote armed conflict. I would
also appreciate if someone could
advise me of the legal authority
and AMS policies under which
the Council will consider and
vote on this issue. Surely, there
must be some restrictions on SJC's
autonomy.
Thank you,
-Matthew Canzer
LL.B. 2008
SPHR'S RESPONSE TO
THE ABOVE LETTER
Dear Matthew,
Thankyou foryour interest in this
issue regarding the transaction
which was illegally frozen by AMS
President Bijan Ahmadian. I understand you have some concerns
as outlined in your email. I have
responded with abrief summary
regarding resource group autonomy and describing how Mr Ahmadian neglected the channels of
due process in order to freeze the
transaction. I have also written to
clarify some questions about the
flotilla funds.
In regards to Resource Group
autonomy:
AMS Code Section XI, Article
four, clearly describes the autonomy ofthe resource groups which
was declared by the referendum
of 1996. A referendum is the highest level of student law. This autonomy can only be overturned
by another referendum and can
be put on suspension if they commit an action which is contrary
to Canadian law. That said, AMS
Council, by a two-thirds majority vote, can create a resolution
which the Resource Groups must
abide by, and according to AMS
archivist Sheldon Goldfarb, this
is a murky area since it is in contrast to the referendum-granted
autonomy ofthe RGs.
Our concern is that Mr Ahmadian neglected due process
by deciding himself to freeze the
funds, without the approval of
Council. While we respecthis disagreement with the RGs' decision,
we condemn his neglect for code
and bylaws.
In regards to the Canadian Boat
to Gaza:
The funds are administered
through Canadian charity Alternatives, which is subject to scrutiny by the Canadian government.
If there are any concerns about
funds being used to fund conflict,
I am sure the government will
catch this. Amnesty International has applauded the international efforts to lift the illegal blockade (fourth Geneva Convention,
Article 33) on the Gaza Strip and
deliver humanitarian aid. They
have reiterated, "The blockade of
Gaza [is] a form of collective punishment in contravention of international law and call on the
Israeli government to lift it without delay" (2010).
Please do not hesitate to contact us with further questions.
Sincerely,
—Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights
DURGAN: FREE THE FUNDS FOR
GAZA BOAT
I have come to a surprising understanding of freedom. Those at the
vanguard ofthe status quo, such
as sororities, have inherited our
culture of rape and exploitation no
less than radical feminists have.
As inheritors we all embody and
engender it just as any survivor
of systematic abuse or refugee
from mortal conflict. One difference is how we organize.
The conformists take flight
from freedom and build personalities that fit into socio-economic
niches like cogs in a meat grinder. In the resistance we not only
swing hammers to smash that
machine, but we seek to free ourselves as much as anyone else.
We spend our days at war and
our nights in love, but as we seek
to end cycles of victimization we
cannot escape our own history,
our biographies. So we tend to
recreate them in all of our relationships. There is one antidote
to this self-poisoning: the face of
the Other.
Ego-centred versions of the
world are shattered by the vulnerability manifesting in open
dialogue. It is difficult to sustain,
but we rely on one another to call
us on prejudices we are blind to
alone. In agoras such as the Resource Groups, the infinite possibilities of ethical action are revealed to us.
In this space we have come to
realize that we are no less responsible for the Palestinians under
siege a world away than we are
to the most vulnerable members
of our own community. We have
heard a deafening call to action
and the SJC has responded to it.
This responsibility is what sets us
free, but that freedom is the most
terrifying thing of all. Our decision in the face of that terrifying
freedom, namely to take responsibility or to neglect it, makes us
who we are.
The AMS is terrified to take
this ethical responsibility, but
they are us and their decisions
make us who we are as students
at UBC. Please show your face at
the meeting to encourage them
to free the funds for the Canadian Boat to Gaza, to free Palestine
and to free ourselves.
—Ed Durgan
Graduate Student
AND NOW, A WORD FROM
NOAM CHOMSKY
I am happy to endorse the Social
Justice Centre (SJC) and Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights
(SPHR). They are integral parts
ofthe UBC and Vancouver communities, and important voices
in the struggle for justice. I oppose any efforts to defame or destroy these groups, and would
urge the AMS Council to ensure
their voices are protected. I support the autonomy of the SJC,
and defend the right of the SJC
and other Resource Groups to
fulfill their political mandates
without interference.
Noam Chomsky
MIT
Where is your degree
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iveyhba.com 2010.11.29/UBYSSEY.CA/GAZA/9
FAQ: THE AMS/SJC FLOTILLA FUND FREEZE
WANT TO SOUND INFORMED? KNOW ALL YOUR FACTS
Hello, UBC students!
Over the past few days, you may have heard
a number of alarming things about your student
union. Maybe you've heard that they're planning on giving $700 to Hamas. Maybe you've
heard that they're trying to destroy the independence of clubs. Maybe you've been blissfully
unaware of the scores of an
have pervaded our website recently.
A big debate is happening on campus
right now regarding whether $700 of student money should be given to help fund a
flotilla to Gaza, and it's important to know
what you're talking about before you give
your opinion.
Thus, we present this installment of The
tions by imaginary people.
Q: WHERE EXACTLY WOULD THIS
$700 GO, ANYHOW?
A: The money would be donated to "Canadian Boat to Gaza,"
a group that claims they are
trying to "fight the illegal Israeli blockade of Gaza and to
expose the Canadian government's unjustified support for
Israel," by funding a humanitarian aid boat to the Palestinian
territory. The Canadian charity overseeing the operation is
called "Alternatives." They estimate they will need $300,000
to pay for the boat and crew,
of which $100,000 has already
been raised. They plan to set
sail in the spring of 2011.
Q: HOW ISTHIS BEING FUNDED
BY STUDENTS?
A: It's coming from the Social Justice Centre (SJC), one
of the AMS Resource Groups.
Students voted in a 1996 referendum to create the Resource Groups, fund them to
the tune of $1.50 per student
each year and allow them to
be semi-autonomous from the
rest of the AMS. So the money
is coming from there—specifically, the $4000 line item for
"grants" in the SJC's budget.
$700 of this fund was slated to
go to the UBC club Solidarity
for Palestinian Human Rights
(SPHR), who wanted to donate to the Canadian Boat to
Gaza. And in case you were
wondering, yes, all fee-paying students are members of
the SJC and can run for executive positions and attend their
meetings.
Q: WHY IS THE AMS LETTING
COUNCIL DECIDE THIS?
A: Resource groups are allowed
to operate however they want
within the confines of their budget—set in conjunction with
the AMS's budget each year—
and their constitution. However, Council can, by a two-thirds
majority, create a motion which
the Resource Groups must abide
by. Ahmadian has said he wants
Council to decide this because
a) the donation could be controversial and b) there are currently questions as to whether the
SJC followed their constitution
by not having their required Annual General Meeting.
Q: THE SJC SAID THEY TRIED
TO HAVE AN AGM, BUT IT WAS
PREVENTED FROM HAPPENING.
WHO'S TELLING THE TRUTH
HERE?
A: It's true they haven't had an
AGM yet. At their November
15 meeting, they were going to have one. According to
the SJC, members of the Israeli Awareness Club came
and asked so many questions
about their support of an event
George Galloway was hosting in Vancouver that by the
time they finished, the scheduled meeting time for the AGM
had passed. They say they're
working on scheduling a new
one. Members ofthe IAC claim
that the SJC shut down the
AGM because they didn't expect new people to show up
at the meeting and wanted to
control the results of executive elections.
Q: I HEARD THAT AHMADIAN
GOT SECURITY TO REMOVE SPHR
PRESIDENT OMAR SHABAN
FROM HIS OFFICE. WHAT'S UP
WITH THAT?
A: Confrontations with no cameras or unbiased witnesses
quickly turn into classic he
said/she said cases, so making any definitive judgment is
pointless. However, Shaban
and members of the SJC did
go to Ahmadian's office to ask
for minutes of the executive
committee meeting where it
was decided to withhold the
$700 transfer. Now, given that
a) minutes can't be "released"
until AMS Council approves
them (which hasn't happened
yet) and b) there was no official motion to withhold the
money, but rather a consensus decision by most of the
executive, the minutes don't
matter anyway.
However, according to Ahmadian, Shaban stalked him
around his office, stopped him
from closing his door for privacy, became extremely agitated and refused to leave when
asked. According to Shaban
and members of the SJC, Ahmadian refused to give them
a direct answer to their question, faked a phone call with
no one on the other line and
then called security.
Q: PEOPLE IN FAVOUR OFTHE
DONATION SEEM TO BE PUTTING ALL OFTHE BLAME ON
AHMADIAN FOR BLOCKING IT. IS
THIS FAIR?
A: A majority of the executive
wanted to bring this to Council, so ifyou're going to blame
Ahmadian for this, you might
as well blame VP Finance
Elin Tayyar and VP Academic
Ben Cappellacci as well. And
as Ahmadian himself wryly
noted, the President doesn't
have signing authority—so he
couldn't personally block the
transaction even if he wanted
to. But he is a divisive figure
on campus, and when you're
the AMS President, you get
the credit as well as the blame.
Q: I AM VERY PASSIONATE
ABOUT THIS ISSUE! HOW CAN
I LET THE AMS KNOW WHERE I
STAND?
A: Good question, angry person! There are two competing
petitions. If you're against the
donation, go to ubcstudents-
forstudents.com, and ifyou're
for it, try petitiononline.com/
SPHRGAZA/petition.html.
Q: WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN
AT THIS COUNCIL MEETING ON
WEDNESDAY AND WHAT WILL
THE MOTION LOOK LIKE?
A: We don't quite know yet.
The executive have asked the
AMS's legal firm to give an
opinion on what the motion
wording should say so there
will be little possibility of a
subsequent lawsuit against
the decision. SAC is also releasing a report on Tuesday as
to the current constitutionality ofthe SJC.
Q: BUT WHO WILL COUNCIL SIDE
WITH?
A: There won't be as many fireworks as you would like. Many
who sit on council don't like
that Ahmadian has made this
their decision, and just want to
ensure that this becomes as
non-political as possible. So,
hoping that they will come out
strongly in favour of one side
or the other is folly. Instead,
they'll focus on whether the
SJC is meeting its constitutional mandate by holding legitimate AGMs, when (and if)
Council can override the wishes of Resource Groups and
how to avoid this clusterfuck
in the future.
Given that the flotilla isn't
scheduled to leave for another
three to six months, the chances of any definitive conclusion
being made on Wednesday are
negligible. Which will probably further inflame people's
opinions. tl
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Many of you have strong opinions about what is happening in AMS politics right now. Please ensure that
you don't embarrass yourself in a letter by a) mistaking
comments made by others for The Ubyssey's opinion, or
b) not reading our above Gazagate FAQs.
Justin mcelroy | letters@ubyssey.ca y| 1 .Hjfc/U jl>IOOjlI/Y.c 10/U BYSSEY. CA/G AMES/2010.11.29
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ams Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
29.11.10
IBC'S GOT
EGGTJGMSiM
Get tickets online or at the
Chan Centre Box Office
For full information, visit:
talent.ubc.ca
MYEHE7SUB
Come see what the schematic design
looks like for the New SUB, and to give us
your feedback and comments! On
Friday, December 3fdr 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.,
we will be hosting a open house display
in the SUB's main concourse to show
everyone the progress on the new
building.Team members from the
design team and the New SUB Project
committee will be there to chat with.
Visit ams.ubc.ca
for your
FREE UBC
RE-usable bag
with purchase     >»
\che outpost:
<&«
November 22-26
^ November 29 - Decernb,
ei-3
10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.    Monday to Friday     SUB
Barfk
The AMS Student Food Bank provides
emergency food relief to current UBC
students.
We offer a seven-day emergency supply of
food to help students during a time of crisis.
Nominate a Candidate for the AMS Election!
The nominations period for the 2011 AMS Elections opens on Monday,
November 29th 2010. Nomination forms for AMS Executive, Board of
Governors, Senate, and Student Legal Fund Society Board can be
picked up in the Student Union Building in room SUB 238A on Monday.
Nominations close at 4pm Friday, January 7th 2011. Good luck!
Visit the SUB Room 58 during operation hours and staff
members will be able to assist you.
www.ams.ubc.ca/services/ams-food-bank
STAY UP TO DATE WITH THE AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
y Twitter:
AMSExecutive 2010.11.29/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/ll
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
UBC NEEDS TO HEAR YOU LOUD AND CLEAR
Fans of good old-fashioned town-hall style democracy are in luck this week. There are two events,
on two consecutive days, where hundreds of people will show up to loudly proclaim that the values ofthe UBC community just so happen to align
perfectly with their own.
While Wednesday's AMS Council meeting, where
the fate of the planned $700 donation to a Gaza
flotilla will be decided, may be more controversial, it's Tuesday's land use public hearing that is
of real consequence. The hearing is where ordinary students and residents ofthe university lands
will get their final say about changes that will impact this campus for decades to come.
The public hearing is the final stage of a consultation process around zoning changes that,
while overly controlled by Campus and Community Planning in their standard hamfisted fashion, have produced positive results. Maximum
building heights, which UBC wanted to eliminate, have been capped at around 22 storeys, for
example. Density increases, which would allow
for more students to live on campus, have been
given support. And the notorious "Gage South,"
which previously was going to be a market-housing development right in between Gage Residences and the SUB (and yes, somehow UBC didn't realize this was a stupid idea) has been given an "under review" designation. Which isn't ideal, but it's
a step in the right direction.
So credit must be given to the AMS for standing
up and gaining these concessions. Yet it's also important to realize that this isn't a victory, but merely the first step in ensuring that the future UBCity
meets the needs of those that the campus serves.
And further vigilance will be needed in the future.
The provincial government has given UBC the
discretion to decide its future governance structure
with very little oversight. Given that the university is both land-owner and land-regulator, this provides ample opportunity for manipulation, which
makes Tuesday's public hearing all the more important. All governments need an honourable and
loyal opposition to keep their plans accountable.
And as UBC continues to make amendments to
how lands on this campus are governed, students
will—and should—continue to be at the forefront, va
GOAT RUSTLIN', EVERY DAY I'M HUSTLIN'
Recently in these pages we've discussed UBC's
future, donations to Gaza and abortion posters.
However, there is another issue of crucial importance that deserves attention. We are speaking, of
course, of goat abductions.
A disturbing trend has been plaguing farms in
Chilliwack, and it makes pinworms, potato blight
and two-headed calves look like 4-H follies. Over
the past several months, more than 50 goats have
gone missing in the Chilliwack-Agassiz area. Just
over a week ago, RCMP responded to a call where
seven goats—all of them pregnant—had been forcibly
taken from their homes. Six were later recovered
in good health. We are thankful the six expectant
mothers are now safely returned to their owners.
We dare not speculate on the fate ofthe seventh.
Goat rustling is a crime that affects communities, individuals and goats. Farmers in Chilliwack
draw their living from goat-related resource extraction, husbandry and sales. The sort of doubt
that a vigilante goat-snatcher brings to any rural
economy has the potential to do harm. But in one
as goat-centric as Chilliwack's, these actions can
deal a crippling blow. Crippling.
We encourage consumers to continue purchasing as many goat-dependant products as they normally would, and to have faith in the important
role goat-related stocks play in any diverse portfolio. And don't let these recent events push you towards bathing your family with non-goat's-milk-
based soap. The goat market may see occasional
instability, but it is always self-correcting.
And to the nefarious night-stalker who is responsible for these crimes: you will be caught.
Theft of any sort is an offence. But to steal a goat
who is in the family way, already weighed down
with the stress of preparing for a new child, is simply wrong. We only hope that the long arm of the
law reaches you before the horns of that missing
mother-to-be's mate do. Truly, sir^you are guilty
of crimes against man and goat, vl
OPINIONS
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
RCMP shouldn't be the only ones talking about groping
KRISSY DARCH
Contributor
Last week, two campus security guards
and an RCMP officer walked into Irving
K. Barber and called the attention of
all students. Someone had been putting
up posters that were extremely offensive towards women. If anyone were
to see folks putting up these posters,
they should call campus security. Arrests would be made.
A young woman approached them
and asked what was on these posters.
The officer responded that they were
"so offensive," he wouldn't repeat what
they said.
That night, almost all of them— hundreds of them—were removed. Rumours circulated. A group of women
meeting on campus. Maybe connected
to the action. Women's Studies department discussing the posters in class.
People shocked, angry, frightened, offended. A few days later, a student blog-
ger posted pictures ofthe posters to a
personal tumblr account, describing
them as brilliant.
The posters went like this: "ATTENTION GROPERS: Based on recent incidents of men groping women on campus, the public has been increasingly
concerned with risky groper behaviour.
We have completed a series of tips we
think will help you."
They went on to outline safety tips,
while the subheading "Hey women,
fed up with fear? We are too," clearly
spoke to the opposite intention.
Looking closer, I could see the reference to the campus warnings that
were issued in response to recent attacks and the RCMP warnings. The
posters were a line-by-line satire ofthe
messages that are typically directed at
women: walk in groups, stay on familiar paths, don't go anywhere alone, use
common sense.
I can see why these posters would
have been triggering. The message was
unclear. They definitely appeared, at
first, to be encouraging groping. This
distracted from what they set out to
critique: an atmosphere that puts the
onus on women to prevent assault, in
which perpetrators ofthe violence are
never directly addressed or warned.
Rather than declaring UBC campus a
woman-unsafe area, why don't we rally
together and declare it, forcefully and
often, a groper-unsafe area?
I of ten hear other young women talking about whether or not they "feel" safe,
or "feel" threatened. Safe is not a feeling—it's an objective thing. Is the feeling of safety, but not the real thing, all
young women can bring themselves
to hope for?
Why do we so often use passive, subjective language around group-based,
gender-motivated attacks? Women's
bathroom stall ads all over Vancouver about cervical cancer and breast
cancer are getting tough, waging war
and calling passes. When it comes to
gropers and rapists, no one wants to
name any names. The men who are
committing these attacks must "feel"
pretty safe. The violence continues to
be perpetrated while women continue to be told how to prevent it, even
though those actions are only ever
partial measures.
The posters were clumsily worded
and probably hastily conceived, but
our attention should be focused on the
fact that the RCMP and campus security seem to think they should have a
monopoly on saying what is in women's interests.
I was heartened to hear that there
was a visible and angry response to the
constant spectre of gropings on campus. What disturbs me is that there
seemed to be more outrage over the
posters than over the attacks.
I want to caution against the soft paternalism of suggesting that only people in statused positions of authority
or police are qualified to respond to
sexual assault, or that we can anticipate what will be "offensive" to whom.
I know many women, myself included,
who are not willing to be silent and let
the RCMP frame the whole issue, tl
LETTERS
A ONCE-A-YEAR DISCUSSION ON
RACE ISN'T A DISCUSSION
If the crayon box on the cover of The
Ubyssey's "Colours" supplement was
meant to symbolize Canada and its
racial makeup, then the 'artists' were
discriminating in their use of these
crayons to illustrate Canada's racial
diversity. Perhaps this is one reason
why people avoid discussions of race
in the first place; exclusion, whether intentional or not, is boundary-forming.
Particularly lacking from the Colours
supplement is the mention of Aboriginal Canadians.
In fact, Aboriginal Canadians are
only hinted at once in the entire supplement: Kalyeena Makortoff's article, "UBC professors weigh in on
multiculturalism and racism in Canada." Although The Ubyssey runs an
annual supplement focussing specifically on Aboriginal Canadians, this
shouldn't preclude the inclusion of Aboriginal Canadians from the Colours
supplement.
Canada's First Nations, Inuit and
Metis populations face so many intersecting discriminations and oppressions that The Ubyssey could easily have a weekly column dedicated
specifically to issues facing Aboriginal people across the country. However, as it stands, the exclusion of Aboriginal Canadians from the Colours
supplement is yet another example of
boundary formation.
To be wholly inclusive, I propose
that The Ubyssey expand its "annual"
focus on race and ethnicity to a weekly focus, dedicating a page (or part of
one) to articles, personal anecdotes
and feedback.
If the topics of race and ethnicity
are avoided in everyday discussion,
then The Ubyssey can help to facilitate a "safe space" for these discussions to begin. Furthermore, a weekly focus will allow these issues to be
at the forefront of readers' consciousness; you can't just "start" a discussion
on race if the next part of the discussion isn't going to happen for another year! Let's draw an accurate [expletive] picture instead of playing connect the dots.
Sincerely,
Emily Plommer UBYSSEYCA/OURCAMPUS/2010.11.29
LILAVOLKAS PHOTO/THE UB>
Wanted: Photographers to help fill our paper with butt-kickin'visuals.
geoff"vernon" lister | photos@ubysseyca
U THEUBYSSEYc

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