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The Ubyssey Sep 9, 1980

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Array $1.5 million AMS plans hit
By NANCY CAMPBELL
The Alma Mater Society wants to
spend at least SI.3 million on two
new bars, office space, a snack bar
and other necessities — but one
AMS executive member is concerned that there has been no student input on the plans, which were formulated by a special AMS planning
committee during the summer.
The money will come from the
$15 SUB building fee, which would
otherwise be no longer charged after this year because the debt on
SUB has been laid to rest.
External affairs coordinator Alan
Soltis is concerned both about how
student council began implementa
tion of the plan while students were
away and how the money is being
spent.
"We should be putting some of
this money towards housing," Soltis said. "I think the money can be
put to better use elsewhere."
Soltis said he feels that too much
of the work oh the extensive AMS
(THE UBYSSEY 1
Vol. LXIII, No. 1
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September9,1980      <*$m»-48     228-2301
—glen sanford photo
GODDAMN HOUSING RACKET. I line up for registration, my loan, I.D., books and now they expect me to
come'here and fight over a phone so I can get screened by some jerk who tells me I can't smoke or own a cat and
must like Bill Bennett. If they think I'm gonna stand in one more line for one more hassle and end up paying four
hundred bucks to live with cockroaches, they can shove their glorious university. I'm going back to the work force
Where I'm guaranteed a prbductive role in society talking revolution to my comrades in the unemployment lines.
Poster law traps city council
By GENE LONG
The city of Vancouver set a legal
trap this summer that could have
unwittingly ensnared its own officials.
A controversial bylaw prohibiting
postering on city property that was
inadvertently passed in June, made
no distinction between postering
and the placing of traffic signs and
city notices and as a result, the city
has had to withdraw the bylaw.
In a preliminary hearing held
Monday morning, lawyers for the
city conceded to a technical challenge of the bylaw's validity.
Charges were also dropped in a test
case application against Don Stewart, a spokesperson for a coalition
of groups opposing the bylaw who
was arrested for violating the law.
The legal battle over the issue has
only started as city council has promised to redraft the bylaw and proceed with implementing the intended prohibition against postering.
"The bylaw had to be amended
anyway, spelling out the specifics of
its application," said city prosecutor Derek Creighton after the hear
ing. Rather than waste time in
court, we agreed not to proceed
with charges. The technical gap has
made the case a moot one."
Stewart said he expects it will be
only a couple of weeks before the
bylaw is reintroduced. "Undoubtedly the next bylaw will be as
severe as the one before. We are already preparing for round two."
Two main arguments against the
bylaw are an assertion that the bylaw discriminates against groups
and individuals in the community
who cannot afford expensive advertising for their events and that it violates freedom of speech rights, according to Stewart.
The campaign to repeal the bylaw
"will be taken all the way to the
Supreme Court if we have to," he
said. A coalition of groups are organizing moral and financial support for the legal case and a number
of benefit concerts are planned to
raise money for a defence fund.
The coalition includes a variety
of theatre and arts groups, community and neighborhood associations, a wide range of local punk
and new wave rock bands, political
groups and others who feel they
have a stake in overturning the bylaw.
Stewart said the groups will also
focus on the council meeting when
the bylaw is brought back. The
meeting will be used to draw public
attention to the issue by protesting
directly to city council.
The bylaw imposed a maximum
fine for offences of $2,000 or three
months in jail.
plans was done without input from
students or student council members not on the committee.
"We should be advertising with
the undergraduate societies to see
what they want on campus," he
said.
But AMS vice-president Marlea
Haugen said Monday she could not
guarantee there would be a public
forum called at which students
could discuss the projects. She said
that a lunch hour meeting to answer
questions from students may be
considered as a means of allowing
input into the plans.
During the summer the AMS executive voted to approve the expan
sion project in principle and appointed a committee of 10 students,
mostly executive members, to draft
plans in consultation with an architect. So far the AMS has spent approximately $6,500 on preliminary
plans.
The project must be approved by
a referendum, which will probably
be held in mid-October, according
to Haugen.
The AMS intends to convert one-
half of the courtyard on the second
floor of SUB to a lounge and the remainder into club offices. Renovations would cost about $900,000.
Another student centre is also
See page 2: PLANS
UBC housing
crisis strikes
By GERRE GALVIN
and GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Thousands of UBC students are
scrambling for accommodation as
they face the worst housing crisis
since students had to pitch tents on
Main Mall 10 years ago.
Plans to establish "tent cities"
near B.C.'s three universities to
protest the situation were cancelled
in late August, as emergency measures have succeeded in finding temporary housing for most students.
But university housing officials
warn that the crisis has not eased
because students still must find permanent homes.
At UBC, some students have
been temporarily placed through an
emergency "help-a-friend" program started during registration
week, which asks students with
homes to share with those still looking. Some of those students were
among the 2,600 who applied unsuccessfully for residence accommodation at UBC.
Across the province:
• Mattresses have been set up in
Simon Fraser University residences
to temporarily house the estimated
1,000 homeless SFU students.
Other students have lived in tents
on Burnaby Mountain and some are
reported living in treehouses on the
side of the mountain.
• The University of Victoria student society has petitioned the department of national defence for
the use of barracks in Esquimalt.
• Three trailers capable of housing 44 students are being used as
temporary accommodation at the
B.C. Institute of Technology in
Burnaby. The trailers have no cooking or shower facilities.
"People are finding a place to
stay, but just barely," says Steve
Shallhorn, spokesperson for the
B.C. Students' Federation. "People are not being choosey and still
we face the fact that some people
are not able to return to school be
cause there is nowhere for them to
live."
At a press conference last week,
BCSF unanimously condemned the
provincial government for failing to
provide adequate on-campus housing.
BCSF will be lobbying federal
politicians this month to make
money available for building residences, Shallhorn said.
But aid from either the provincial
or federal government seems unlikely. The federal Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation and
the provincial Universities Council
of B.C. have thwarted plans for a
300-unit residence at UVic by refusing to grant the university low interest lbans.
At UBC, the student council executive is discussing a proposal for a
mostly student-financed $5 million
housing development for residences.
"We are presently investigating
the idea of building new residences
or purchasing houses around Vancouver to relieve the housing problem," said Yves Fricot, of the student housing and access committee.
"This is our long-term solution to
the problem."
UBC's administration probably
will not organize any emergency
housing because initial student response to such a proposal was poor,
said off-campus housing director
Dave Johnson.
Johnson said he is pushing Vancouver city council to adopt a 1975
report that stated thousands of
suites could be created in private
homes if council reversed its bylaw
that makes the suites illegal.
Council should change its position on illegal suites and could then
offer incentives to homeowners to
develop suites, he said.
Until then, "some of the married
students and families might have to
camp out for a while," he said.
See page 3: NO
AMS boosts beer prices again
Pit profits are up, but beer price increases are close Another factor in the price rise is the $80,000 in ren-
behind in what is becoming an annual price rise for the ovations currently under way in the Pit's traditional
suds.                                                                '?■'■ SUB basement home, forcing movement of the Pit to
. The price of a bottle of domestic beer went to $1.15 temporary quarters in the SUB party room upstairs,
from $1 early in August despite Pit profits that were AMS director of administration Craig Brooks said
double what the Alma Mater Society expected them to Monday the renovations, originally scheduled to be
be for last year.
In a recent interview AMS director of finance Len
Clark said Pit revenue was close to $70,000 rather than
the $35,000 that had been projected in last year's budget. But he added that rising expenses and operating
costs nevertheless made a price inaease necessary.
Clark denied that the society is trying to push profits
up. "We didn't try to make more money. It's more
likely that the manager has stopped profits from flowing out the back door."
In the past, losses from theft of beer have been esti-
ymated to be as high a» $10-$15,000 a year.
completed for the first day of registration week, will
run at least two weeks over. The Pit will reopen next
Monday.
After an initial one-week delay, the project was held
up again when a plumber installing essential equipment was called on for jury duty, Brooks said.
Drooks could not guarantee the reopening date.
"Good construction takes good time."
The renovations include standup bars, facilities for
serving hard liquor drinks, a new food bar with a wider
selection and a $16,000 sound and lighting system. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1980
PLANS
From page 1
planned, to be built next to the
Barn. The 6,000-square-foot centre
would include an English-style pub,
an unlicensed conversation pit and
possibly a snack bar. It would cost
at least $600,000.
Funds for the project would
come from the $15 building fee that
students pay each year. The fee was
created to pay off SUB but with the
building paid off as of this year, the
AMS executive is seeking approval
from students to go ahead with
more building plans.
Soltis is the only member of the
AMS executive to speak out against
the project.
"The courtyard right now is a
waste of space," said Shane Boyd,
a member of the student administrative commission. "There's a lot
of square footage out there that's
getting no use."
"I'm very much in favor of creating places like the art gallery, the
way it's been for the past two
weeks," said Yves Fricot of the student housing and access committee.
"We need more lounges and not
drinking establishments" like the
Pit.
Haugen had a more businesslike
approach to the project. "I think
the courtyard project is a good investment for the building and can
help us make more money off conventions," she said. "It will also be
useful for students."
According to Soltis, members of
the Agriculture Undergraduate Society are against having a south side
centre. He said they are concerned
that there are no guarantees coming
from the AMS about the security of
their office.
But Haugen denied that there
were complaints from the students,
and said that she felt "there would
be no security trouble with the type
of pub" being planned for the centre.
Soltis is also unhappy with the
cost and design of the project. "I
consider the costs estimated to be
too low," he said. But Haugen feels
the project costs are reasonable.
"I personally am scared of multi-
million dollar projects," said Haugen. She feels that the AMS plan is
better for students than housing.
"The University of Alberta students' association went and lost millions of dollars on student housing
St. Marie's Church, Kitsilano
(Anglican-Episcopal)
Corner West 2nd and Larch
Rector: The Rev. B. C. Gifford
SUNDAY SERVICES
8:00 a.m. HOLY EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG EUCHARIST
Organist & Choirmaster: Jeffrey Campbell
WELCOME
to all new and returning students from
HILLEL HOUSE
located across from SUB
and behind Brock Hall
Open 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily
Phone: 224-4748
Lunches served:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday,
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
YOU ARE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN
HIGH HOLIDAY
SERVICES
At CHABAD HOUSE
497 West 39th Ave., Vancouver, B.C.
Where the prayers are meaningful ... the people
are friendly and everyone feels at home.
ROSH HASHANA
•EVENING SERVICES - Sept. 10,11,12
Wed., Fri. — 7:26 p.m. Thurs. — 8:16 p.m.
•MORNING SERVICES - Sept. 11,12,13
Thurs., Fri. Shabboe — KkOO a.m.
YOM KIPPUR
•Fri. Evening, Sept. 19 - Kol Nidre - 7:40 p.m.
•Shabboe - Sept. 20 - 10:00 a.m.
HOLIDAY DINNERS AT THE
END OF ALL SERVICES
324-2400
NO CHARGE
WPpaaja»P
and I don't think we should get into
it ourselves." Haugen felt that
housing was not up to the AMS and
said that she would be approaching
the administration for help.
Haugen prefers the current AMS
project because of its lost in comparison to student housing (which
she estimated could cost $4 million
for 250 units) and what she feels are
its greater benefits for students.
"You really can't predict what
housing is going to do," she said.
"Last year the residences still had
empty rooms, but this year there's a
shortage of accommodation." She
prefers the guaranteed security of
pubs and lounges.
Haugen is enthusiastic about the
proposed south side centre, and
says that she has been one of the
main people involved in the project.
"The idea to renovate the Barn
came up a few years ago, but if we
did that would disrupt food services," she said. "Then we had the
idea to build a totally new
building."
"If we're going to build a pub, it
has to be a nice one," said Soltis.
MUSIC/UBC
Beginning Wednesday Noon-hour Recitals
Tomorrow — September 10
Ronald Oe Kant, clarinet — Robert Rogers, piano
Next Week, September 17
George Zukerman, bassoon
12:30, Recital Hall of the Music Building
FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE   FREE
Back to
^University
Lucff
ESPRESSO, SOUPS, LUNCH
DINNER, DESSERTS
LIVE MUSIC
^
&&
EXPRESS CAFE
731-0019
2281 West Broadway
unisex hairstyling
20% DISCOUNT
ON ANY SERVICE
with presentation of this ad —
by Terry, Karin and Debbie
Expires Sept. 30, 1980
For appointment Z28" 14/1
ken hippert, hair co. ltd.
5736 University Blvd.
(next to Lucky Dollar Store
in the Village)
3
If you ever wanted to run your own business —
You owe it to yourself to investigate
COLLEGE  PRO  PAINTERS
THE"JOB" -
Being   an   owner-manager   of
employees) in the summer of '81.
a   small   painting   business   (10-12
THE CANDIDATE -
Must be hard worker; a person dedicated to the idea that quality workmanship combined with the "make it happen" flair of the entrepreneur provide
the perfect circumstances for a profitable and interesting summer job.
THE REWARDS -
1) Managers earn between $7,000 and $14,000 a summer.
2) A very good "basic training" in the day to day operation of a small
business (Your businessl).
3) A dynamite resume item.
HOWEVER -
Everything is up to you. To find out if you qualify for a franchise please apply at the Canada Employment Centre on Campus or write:
COLLEGE PRO PAINTERS
Ste. 2 - 2475 Manitoba Street
Vancouver, B.C.   V5Y 3A4 Tuesday, September 9,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ubyssey takeover attempt fails
Two student council executive
members failed in their attempt this
summer to wrest control of The
Ubyssey's editor and newspaper
policy from the newspaper's staff.
Alma Mater Society president
Bruce Armstrong and finance director Len Clarke called for the creation of a media board "which shall
determine policy of all forms of
media communication." The board
would also have had the power to
appoint The Ubyssey's editor and
CITR's program director.
Armstrong's board would have
consisted of five council members,
two Ubyssey representatives including the appointed editor, and two
members of CITR, the campus radio station.
More than 40 Ubyssey staffers attended the May council meeting and
presented council with a petition
signed by 400 students supporting
freedom of the press and the newspaper's right to be democratically
run by its staff.
"It is with a deep sense of regret
that the staff of The Ubyssey finds
itself compelled to come before the
UBC student council tonight to defend the freedom and independence
of the campus press in the face of
an unprecedented attack," stated
the newspaper staffs position paper read to council by Ubyssey staffer Steve McClure.
"That attack, in the form of a
motion which would impose a
media board upon all student media
at UBC, is one that unmistakeably
strikes at the very principles of the
free press. And the unprincipled
methods chosen by those introducing the motion in perpetrating this
attack make it painfully and sadly
clear that they are blatantly attempting to silence the press."
Clarke said Monday the intent of
the motion has been misinterpreted.
"The intent of trying to do something with The Ubyssey was for the
student council to exercise its rights
and responsibilities as publisher.
The other was the feedback I've
been hearing from a number of people about trying to get articles in the
paper. A lot of them said they got a
runaround. People want to get news
about the campus in."
Clarke said he felt it was important the newspaper's staff know that
"a lot of people" disagree with
them.
"We somehow have to get a happy medium and that was the intent
of the motion," he said. "We're
now trying to define the grey area
between freedom of the press and
reporting on what council has done
so students can react."
Council should decide who becomes the editor of the paper, he
added.
(The editor is currenUy elected by
a majority vote of the newspaper's
staff members, as are all other edi-
No room at
torial positions. The staff has operated as a democratic editorial collective for almost 15 years.)
Current Ubyssey editor Verne
McDonald said Monday ending
media freedom on campus would be
a great disservice to students.
"Student council's insistence that
they didn't intend to suppress or
control The Ubyssey is totally contradicted by the media board motion itself. If they didn't intend to
control us, why did they try to set
up a mechanism to do exactly that?
"And if the students were so con-
$
From page 1
Hard luck stories are becoming
more frequent. One UBC student
said his living arrangements have
twice been subject to the role of a
dice or the flip of a coin. Both times
he lost. A married couple, both attending UBC, spent most of August
living in a tent in Tsawwassen while
searching for a home in Point Grey
Community rental agencies just
are not getting enough listings, said
Pat McClain, an assistant at the
non-profit Red Door rental Aid on
Main Street.
"We are getting three or four
students looking for a place together because they just can't afford or find one of their own," he
said.
cerned about the quality of The
Ubyssey, why did they sign the petition supporting us? In three days we
collected about 400 signatures out
of a summer student body of 3,500.
Very few people didn't want to
sign. It'll be a cold day in hell before student council ever gets that
much support from the students
they have the gall to say they represent."
McDonald said he cannot imagine a better responsiveness to students than having a democratic
newspaper.  Student council's at
tempt "to put an end to this showed
they didn't care nearly so much
about the students as they did their
own frail egos."
Delegates from the Peak, the student newspaper of Simon Fraser
University, told council in May that
both its staff and SFU's student
society had passed unanimous motions opposed to the media board
scheme.
In a later editorial, the Peak staff
said: "The immediate harm of this
obnoxious design is that it has disrupted student journalists at The
Ubyssey from pursuing their work,
i.e. newswriting. They are, instead,
busy defending the right of freedom
of the press, a right which undis-
putedly belongs to them in the first
place."
A media commission struck as a
compromise from the May motion
will hold public meetings on Sept.
16 and 23. The commission, composed of. two representatives from
each of The Ubyssey, CITR and
student council, will also take into
consideration student presentations
at those meetings.
IT'S A LIVING says AMS hack Monday as campus tour bus looks for unwitting students to take on campus "trail of tears" tour. Students unfamiliar with campus geography were taken for ride and deposited
somewhere in south Ladner in effort to add to already existing chaos dur-
— eric eggarston photo
ing first week of classes. Those wishing to find out what's really going on
at this wonderful university are urged to peruse carefully the pages of this
same journal rather than go on insane joyrides with venal careerist hacks.
UBC radioactive dumping dumped on
By MARK LElREN-YOUNG
Skeletons in UBC's closet came
to light this summer when it was
learned that UBC dumped an unknown quantity of radioactive
waste in steel barrels into B.C.'s
coastal waters during the 1950s.
David Garrick, a spokesperson
for Scientific Pollution and Environmental Control said Monday,
"it's deplorable that we have to
learn about these acts to our environment and potential threats to our
health through the news media,
many years after the actual event."
Garrick cited a similar incident
which occurred near the Farallon
Islands, about 20 miles west of San
Francisco. "Similar barrels off the
coast of California have ruptured.
The contents have obviously entered the environment," he said.
Garrick said that the effect any
radioactive leakage might have on
the food chain was the ultimate
concern, as "any radioactive-nuclei
that get into the water ultimately
end up as radioactive toxins or as
contaminants (such as lead) that
have lost their radioactivity."
"We're only now coming to
realize the important role that radiation has played on the evolution of
life, and the more we learn about
radiation the more we realize how
vulnerable life really is," Garrick
said.
He also said that as far as safety
is concerned, all we really have "are
government assurances published in
the Sun and Province."
The Atomic Energy Control
Board has said the waste was dumped without its permission. A
spokesperson for the board said the
AECB learned UBC had dumped
the waste nearly 10 years after the
event and ordered UBC to stop the
practice.
Since then, he added, the university has sent its waste to the Atomic
Energy of Canada Limited laboratories in Chalk River for storage
and disposal.
SPEC has charged the AECB and
AECL as being "unreliable, secretive and irresponsible" in their attitudes towards nuclear waste safety
and disposal, and has requested
that federal fisheries minister
Romeo LeBlanc provide further
information.
Union says admin won't put principles in print
By HEATHER CONN union organizer Charlotte Waddell. pie on an "on call" basis for up to 64 houi
["he university is presenting a "really watered-        "The university has opposed any article on    term. The union fears this will take jobs a-
By HEATHER CONN
The university is presenting a "really watered-
down version" of teaching assistants' demands
in current contract negotiations, agreeing on
issues only in principle, not in print, a union
negotiator said Monday.
"There's been an awful lot of frustration lately," said Malcolm Kennard. "We're getting the
impression they're playing around."
Four members of the negotiating team, CUPE
2278, representing UBC teaching assistants'
union, are now meeting with university management to try and reach a first collective agreement
on the following issues:
• wage structure; the university wants differentiated wages that will pay more for those
with more academic education. The union wants
consistent wages for any job regardless of
academic status.
• academic freedom; the university administration thinks this is inappropriate to include in the contract because quality of education should not be a concern of employees, says
union organizer Charlotte Waddell.
"The university has opposed any article on
this," she said. "They say we shouldn't concern
ourselves with academic matters. They feel it's
trespassing our roles as employees."
• sexual harrassment; the union wants this
clause included in a contract with a grievance
procedure and the university agrees, but claims
it does not know how to implement it, says
Waddell. The matter is under negotiation as a
separate clause from discrimination (TAs at
Simon Fraser University AUCE local 6 have sexual harrassment under a non-discrimination
clause in their contract).
• management rights; the university wants
rights entrenched in the contract that the union
thinks would severely curtail its activities. For
example, if management writes a job description
saying a position demands 20 hours a week and
it really demands 40, TAs will have no power to
dispute it.
• exclusion of some casual workers; the
university would like to hire non-unionized peo
ple on an "on call" basis for up to 64 hours a
term. The union fears this will take jobs away
from its member TAs.
Kennard and Waddell say there have been no
major stonewalls so far in the negotiations,
which have been held all summer. Both say they
are fairly optimistic a reasonable agreement will
be met, but only 12 of the original 42 articles
have so far been settled.
Negotiations began last week on monetary
matters, which affect benefits, wage increases,
loss of time, pregnancy leave, and other issues.
It is too early to predict the outcome of these
issues, say the negotiators.
The union is currently conducting a membership drive to sign up new TAs, markers and
tutors. A general meeting will be held Sept. 18 at
noon in the grad centre to discuss bylaws and
negotiating positions.
UBC TAs received union certification from
the B.C. labor relations board last March after
69 per cent of those who cast ballots voted in
favor of unionization. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1980
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THE UBYSSEY
September 9, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMIS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Verne McDonald
Verne McDonald wes wary aa he crept into the crypt, even when he thought of the valiant Steve McClure at his side on a chain screaming, "Get me out of
here! I don't care if Gerre Gahrin, Jo-Anne Falkner and Nancy Cembali might be in there." Instead they found Eddie Wkk cackling aa he tortured the groaning
bodies of Heavy Stout, Paul Yaekowich and Mark Leiren-Young. Eric Eggeraton and Gene Long could only look on in horror aa Glen Sanford opened the way
to the central tomb. Slowly they came out, bonea rattling, fleah peeling from their faces. First was BM Tieleman, aknoet alive, but the cadavera behind had no
right to be considered as living and breathing. There was Tom Hawthorn end Heather Conn, still arguing with their fallen chaps. Ralph Maurer and Chris Gainor
croaked against cowardice from within their single cosy coffin. Geof end Julie Wheelwright tottered out from their graves, again asking their eternal question,
"Why are we always mentioned together?" Only Kevin Hnnegan failed to show up for the wonderful orgy that followed, still searching for native soil in faraway Europe. Everyone apologized to the many people thet contributed end were missed. We'll see ell the entertainment types at the PF meeting todey at
noon.
Summer fun
Welcome back.
We on The Ubyssey are certainly glad you're here. It is the
students who make up our staff, who read us and occasionally who
love or hate us. And we have always believed that the students are
the only real expression of sanity on this campus.
In the summer sanity was lacking, particularly in the offices of
the Alma Mater Society, which claims to represent you. They
represent you so much they tried to shut down your newspaper
and turn it into a publicity organ for themselves.
They also decided to spend a million and a half bucks of your
money. All this while you were away.
Before we go on with a more complete account of the AMS'
summer madness, we have to talk a bit about their attempted attack on freedom of the press. In a so-called democratic society
such issues should not be ignored. They cannot be ignored.
In plain terms, the AMS tried to replace the editor of The
Ubyssey with an appointee obligated to carry out the wishes of student council. Should the federal government try passing comparable legislation they would be howled out of office.
Of course nothing like that happened here. Not while nearly all of
us were safely out of the way trying to make enough money to
return to our studies. Instead The Ubyssey had to enlist help from
the Simon Fraser University student society, other Lower Mainland
student newspapers and Vancouver commercial media just to prevent passage of one of the most regressive acts student council has
ever attempted.
Boy, are we glad you're back.
And now that you're back you might take a look at some of the
other things "your" AMS worked on over the summer.
Student council wants to build things. In the past they've
wanted to build things, but those have been things like gyms,
swimming pools, residences and the student union building.
Times certainly have changed. Now they want to renovate and
build bars. One and a half million bucks worth of them. Altruistic
idealists, aren't they?
The money for these absolutely necessary projects designed to
increase your drinking habit will come from you. And the irony of it
all is that you should never have to pay it. Your building fee of $15
for SUB will end this year, but for those grandiose schemes.
Now that you are here again, you should look into all these
things that "your" AMS thought up while you were gone. For
some reason they are afraid of you and your opinions. Maybe they
think you might have some objections to them wasting your
money. And taking over your newspaper.
It is the very fact that they did not want The Ubyssey to be an independent free press which breeds suspicion. Something is wrong
in the student government which affects a lot of your life and a
good chunk of your money.
So long as you are here, you should worry about it. And so long
as The Ubyssey remains a free press, we will strive to help.
Join or die
There's no life like it.
There's an exciting career waiting for you at The Ubyssey.
If you're looking to get a little more out of university than a
degree and a spouse, Canada's best student newspaper has a
challenging, exciting career for you.
Whether you're learning to operate a sleek, grey, dangerous
Underwood-class destroyer or coming to grips with the latest technology of an ultra-sophisticated Nikon EM, you'll be learning about
yourself and the complex world you're growing up into — and
passing that knowledge on to others.
Today's Ubyssey needs young men and women like you. To
report and analyze on the events of today and tomorrow. We need
reporters to cover sports, politics, culture and other things you
won't learn about in class. Photographers, to capture those elusive
images of the '80s for tomorrow's generation, if there is one.
Troublemakers, to ask the awkward questions and supply the unpopular answers.
Ask us about you. Contact your nearest recruiting office, at SUB
241k, Mondays, Wednesday and Thursdays.
Hope for Fox
My name is Vandessa de Crewe. I
am a third-year education student
here at UBC. I would like to pub-
lically challenge you all to donate a
dollar for each of your healthy legs
to the Terry Fox run for cancer. I
have two reasons for issuing this
challenge; I feel I share a lot in common with Terry Fox: my youth, my
future and the future of others.
What I don't have in common with
him is the fact that I have two
healthy legs, and for each of them I
am grateful.
Secondly, my younger brother
was stricken with leukemia several
years ago, and for the sake of his
memory I feel I have an obligation
to fight cancer in whatever way I
can.
Together, as students, we are able
to support the courage, drive and
determination evident in Terry's
Marathon of Hope.
Please join me in supporting him,
and also in perhaps eventually saving someone's little brother from
the dread of any form of cancer.
I pledge my two dollars in faith
that I may be supported by my fellow students.
Vanessa de Crewe
educ 3
Pals wanted
I am a 19-year-old male Japanese
student who is interested in your
university.
Since I would like to correspond
with students at your university for
the international friendship and
mutual understanding, if you will
publish my name, age and address
in your newspaper I will appreciate
it very much. I am interested in various social problems, foreign affairs
and relations, et cetera. In addition
my interests include orientalism,
music, film, art, travelling and
sports, too. I am really glad if I can
discuss such matters with students
at your university.
I suppose you are a person with
much international awareness. I
hope you would keep up such good
works.
Yoshkaz Ijuin
1-12-16 Higasbi-cho
Kichijoji, Musashino
Tokyo 180
Japan
Last resort
I am writing to you because
newspapers have traditionally taken
up causes when all other options
have been exhausted by the complainant; the matter at hand concerns UBC Aquasoc.
Last summer I put up for a sale
sign for my wet suit. I made arrangements to leave the suit there
over a four-day period. I was then
working off campus and said I
would pick it up the following
week. Well, I have been back there
several times, tried to phone, written two letters. I have not heard a
word from them and no one is there
when I am. That wet suit was worth
$250 used, and I am not in a position to casually throw away $250.
I am hoping your staff can help
me in this matter. Thank you.
Gail West
4175 West 10th Avenue,
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 9,1980
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 5
Negotiations test
TAU strength
Since early May the UBC Teaching Assistants' Union has been bargaining with the university toward
the settlement of a first contract.
The Teaching Assistants' Union
represents teaching assistants,
markers and tutors at UBC and was
certified by the Labor Relations
Board of B.C. in March of this
year.
A first collective agreement is always the most difficult to reach,
and also the most significant. Subsequent negotiations tend to refine
ceded the academic role?
Another example of the differences between us is the question of
who.should be excluded from the
bargaining unit.
The university proposes that
there is a category of casual markers
who are necessarily employed for
one-time assignments. Such situations might occur if a regular teaching assistant or marker is sick
around exam time and must be replaced by a casual marker. In such a
case it would be impossible to foi-
perspectives
the language of a first contract, but
only rarely add new principles.
While bargaining is always a process of compromise, the union cannot afford to give up certain principles with the hope that these will
be included in future contracts.
Relations between the university
and the union at the bargaining
table have been generally amiable,
and there has been agreement
reached on a number of issues. As
soon as the contract is signed there
will be a grievance procedure to
deal with working conditions that
are unreasonable, such as excessive
hours.
Foreign students cannot be discriminated against on the basis of
their citizenship. A majority decision by employees in workplace that
the workplace is unhealthy or unsafe gives them the right to refuse to
work in those conditions.
As in any set of negotiations, the
employer and the union have different interests to protect. There is a
particular flavor to negotiations
with the university because of the
multitude of roles that characterize
the two parties in bargaining.
The university as employer is
concerned with the financial affairs
of the establishment, organizing its
faculty as supervisory personnel,
and getting a good return on its investment in employees. The university with its academic hat pursues
knowledge, churns out scholars,
evaluates students, and must attract
a significant number of bright new
students each year to keep the
whole operation going.
The union represents a group of
employees at the university w*ho
perform academic duties under
supervision. Its interest include security of employment and decent
working conditions.
In the case of this bargaining
unit, members are also students, engaged in scholarly endeavors and
subject to evaluation by faculty.
Presumably, both parties as academics are committed to the role of
the university: to inquire, to teach
and to learn. Teaching assistants,
markers and tutors organized a
union and entered into negotiations
to protect and improve their employment conditions, but the duality of the student-employee role is
problematic.
In most cases our employment is
restricted to a 12-hour work week
because of a UBC senate regulation. Within those 12 hours TAs
must earn a living wage because the
senate has told us we cannot exceed
that limit on the basis of our student status.
The union has attempted to embody in the collective agreement its
concern for the academic process by
proposing articles that cover academic freedom and the quality of
education. The university has so far
flatly rejected these concepts for inclusion in the contract and imply
that these are none of our business.
Has the management role super-
'The union
cannot be bullied
into signing
a first contract"
low the normal appointments procedures which include job postings
and time periods for processing applications.
Problems like these made sense to
the union until the university presented its definition of those casual
markers who were to be excluded
from contract provisions.
Casual markers were described as
markers who worked less than 64
hours per semester. By no stretch of
the imagination could the union
agree that 64 hours per term con
stitutes casual employment. Did the
university, in submitting such a definition, have motives other than
covering emergency situations?
The ramifications of allowing this
exclusion are horrendous to the integrity of the bargaining unit.
Markers could all be casual. Teaching assistantships could be divided
into a teaching and a marking component — the marking element not
covered by the negotiated rates of
pay or other contract provisions.
With the onset of the academic
year, both sides have become more
impatient. Both the university and
the union would like to see the
agreement in place as soon as possible but there are major problems
still unresolved.
For instance, the university's position regarding wage structure is
that wages should be differentiated
according to academic degrees. The
union believes that the same work
should be paid at the same rate.
Two persons teaching different sections of the same course should be
paid identically regardless of academic qualifications. Other problems are our differences regarding
union membership and management rights.
These are issues on which the union must remain steadfast to protect
its members. The union cannot be
bullied into signing a first contract.
That contract is too important.
The real power of the union to
exert pressure at the bargaining
table lies in the solidarity and determination of its members. The effectiveness of this depends on the
success of the current membership
drive this fall. For more information come by our office at the Grad
Centre or call 228-4883. Do come to
our membership meeting Sept. 18 at
noon in the Grad Centre.
This article was submitted by the
negotiating committee of the TA
union, Canadian Union of Public
Employees local 2278. Perspectives
is open to all members of the university community. Submissions
must be legibly typed and double-
spaced.	
^WOMEN'S
i BOOKSTORE
Feminist Books,
Records & Posters
Open Monday - Saturday
Noon - 6:00 p.m.
804  Richards Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3A7    684 0523
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
FACULTY OF ARTS
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES TO THE FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) one representative from the combined major, honours and
graduate students in each of the departments and schools
of the Faculty of Arts.
b) two representatives from each of First and Second Year
Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings
of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the
Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Advisor's Office,
and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar
of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 26, 1980.
We found Him!
God is alive
My Dear Sir:
As Almighty GOD, I greet you.
Since 1942, My Holy SPIRIT has been in the body of My Son,
Eugene. The newspapers have treated Us shabbily with their silence.
Very few Editors had the courtesy to answer Our Letters or in receipt of
the Books We graciously sent. The World should know that I Am Alive,
here on Earth and NOT hid in the pages of the Bible. Editors and
publishers should not suppress information to which the masses of the
people are entitled. My heart is sad and heavy laden. Love and Devotion
should not be suppressed. I hereby state that I Am NOT the author of
confusion but of Tranquility and Love.
Almost two thousands years is a long time to be locked up after the
death of My first born, Jesus. I travelled the empty corridors of Time
alone. Now, I Am in My second born Son Eugene's body, to give hope
to the World. Mark My Word and mark it well, Eugene and Jesus are
One and the same — reincarnated.
I Am here on Earth, to give Grace to the humble and abhor the proud. I stand upon the face of this Earth and bellow My ROAR!! I Love
people who hold Me in fascination — their reward in Heaven will be
great.
The turbulence that has swept this World is not to My liking. Love is
preached on Sunday but wickedness prevails throughout the week. Love
can uphold destiny, if given a chance — where Grace can prevail. The
crime against Justice makes a mockery of Religion. Love is wanton to
test fear but hell holds no bond for the unjust.
Crime will not go unpunished. Justice will triumph over evil, as the
blade of the Reaper flails against her adversary — which is life. The just
will be severed from the unjust. In the end, Love will conquer all but the
wicked will dwell in hell.
Now, the Words of Life must come to a halt, as My Son's pencil must
stop writing. Just as the on rushing tide must stop at the sea shore, so
must another day fade into the sunset.
As Almighty GOD, My Holy SPIRIT had Dictated this Holy Letter
to you through My Son, who wrote down My Exact Words. My Holy
Name is void of form, so it can never be written on any document. My
humble Son will sign this blessed Letter so that Faith and Love are not
denied. With Love and Devotion, I bid you a fond Anon.
Prayerfully yours,
EUGENE CHANGEY
P.S. In Our Existence together — almost forty years — My Son and I
did NOT receive one red cent in-contributions for Our Letters and
Books which We mailed. ALL Our expenditures come from the job
which My Son holds as a Turret-Lathe operator in a Machine Shop.
This dates back to 1942. All Our works are sent gratis to any one who
wishes to know of a Real, Live GOD.
ENGLISH 100 STUDENTS
Need help with writing essays?
Register by
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12th for
ENGLISH COMPOSITION WORKSHOPS
Phone 228-2181, Local 246
Reading, Writing and Study Skills Centre
Centre for Continuing Education
University of British Columbia
CAMPUS
BICYCLES
TEI_:224-C611
• Sales — Ladies and Gents 1, 3, 5, 10 and 12-speed.
• Accessories
• Parts and Repairs — Same day service on small repairs —
"In by 10 a.m. — out by 6 p.m."
24 Hour Service On Most Other Repairs     ouality
• Used Bikes — Bought and Sold
• Rentals — Hourly, Daily, Weekly
• Open 7 Days A Week
BICYCLES &
ACCESSORIES
U. LB. C.
VILLAGE
5706 UNIVERSITY  BLVD. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
AMS WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Organizational moating, new membera welcome,
noon, women'a centre SUB 130.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Oeneral meeting, noon, SUB 213.
HUMAN SETTLEMENTS VIEWING CENTRE
Videotape of R. Buckminster Fuller on 'Structures.' Large acreen projection, noon. Library
Processing Building, Rm. 306.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films: 'The search for national unity 1800-1927,
'Civil war and invasion 1927-41.' History of China
with original news footage. Noon. Buch. 322.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General organizational meeting, noon, Chemistry Bldg., Rm. 260.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE FOLK DANCERS
Beginning class of folk dancing, 7:30-9 p.m., IH
upper lounge.
NEWMAN CENTRE
First general meeting, noon, SUB 212.
THURSDAY
UBC ICE HOCKEY THUNDERBIRDS
Organizational meetings for new players interested in trying out for varsity team, noon. War
Memorial gym, Rm. 211.
SLAVONIC STUDIES
Public discussion:  The Soviet Bloc in Crisis:
Poland, USSR, Afghanistan, with UBC professors, noon, Buch. 102.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Organizational meeting with refreshments,
noon, SUB 207/209.
FRIDAY
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
NEWMAN CENTRE Er ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Orientation weekend 'Close Encounters of the
Christian Kind.' Contact Fr. Bruno Tesolin at
228-3311.
Hot flashes
Sttthor on in
sfvggisfc fans
Are you a truly intelligent, well informed individual who knows that
when Doug and the Slugs are
around you don't need to go out
and buy an extra back of "Instant
Snail Death". Do you know enough
not to call Greenpeace and warn
them about Bob Marley and the
Wailers? If so why not join AMS
Concerts Committee for the coming
year.
All you need is a genuine interest
in the music industry and interests
in the promotional and technical
aspects of concert production. No
experience is necessary. Applicants
please reply to Room 246 SUB or
phone concerts 228-5336.
Mope is alive
The run has stopped, for now,
but that doesn't mean that The
Marathon of Hope has to end here.
The Canadian Cancer Society
would like to make the various organizations on campus aware that
you can possibly organize your own
fund raising events to aid the Fox
fund. If interested, please contact
Rick Lengert at the Canadian Cancer Society, 736-1211.
Built for you
And a warm hello to all of you
homeless students out there from
the   Human   Settlement   Viewing
Torture
devised
for cars
UBC commuters will find that
once favourite scenic routes into the
campus are now cleverly disguised
as dirt roads.
Due to the 16th Avenue and S.W.
Marine drive expansion to four
lanes of traffic, only two lanes of a
gravel road are available for use on
each route.
Physical plant director Neville
Smith said Monday 16th Avenue
will not be completed for about a
month, while Bill Nielson, the resident engineer for both projects,
said that S.W. Marine Drive may be
open in two weeks.
"Priority will be given to the
completion of 16th Avenue (between Blanca and Wesbrook Mall),"
Nielson said.
These two routes represent half
the access arteries into UBC.
16th Avenue was opened Monday
as a gravel, two lane road — one
side of the boulevard that will
divide the four lanes upon completion of the highway. S.W. Marine
drive is also open to two lanes of
gravel road.
Until the blacktop is laid
motorists will have to subject their
cars to the tortures usually experienced on backroads in Saskatchewan, or deal with the congestion
on alternate routes: Chancellor
Boulevard and Tenth Avenue.
Centre. Have we got an exciting
film for you . . . don't answer that.
We have ordered in, at great expense, one of the great films of the
twentieth century — R. Buckminster Fuller on "Structures."
Hear his views on Tinkertoys,
Lego, and pyramids constructed
entirely of beer cans Tuesday,
Sept. 9 at 12:30 in Room 308 of the
Library Processing Building.
Grow your own
Have you noticed that something
in your life seems to be missing?
Have you noticed that the only life
in your room besides yourself is
that strange mould that seems to be
growing on the window ledge? If so
this is for you. The Friends of the
UBC Botanical Garden cordially invite you to their annual sale of indoor plants for students. It runs
from 12 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, or
12 to 3 p.m. Thursday and Friday at
the Botanical Garden office and
Education Centre - 6601 N.W.
Marine Drive (opposite Nitobe
Gardens).
Bare your soul
'Tween classes is The Ubyssey's thrice-weekly campus bulletin board. It is open to all
members of the university community and, unless your taste is
even worse than ours, we run
every submission.
'Tween classes forms are available in The Ubyssey office, 241k
SUB (northeast corner, second
floor). The deadline for submissions is noon (12:30) the day before publication. And as everyone knows, The Ubyssey comes
out Tuesdays, Thursdays and
Fridays, weather permitting.
- 'Tween classes notices must be
submitted on the correct forms
and printed legibly. The unpaid
bureaucrats who process the
forms will not permit deviations
from this norm, nor will they
take' tweens information over
the phone.
The Ubyssey also runs Hot
Flashes. These minute missives
will tell readers about events of
major and minor importance on
and off campus. We cannot
guarantee that news about the
aardvark breeders convention
will make it in the Hot Flash section but we do try to publicize
general interest happenings.
Write up the info on a regular
sized piece of paper, include
your name and phone number
and drop it off at the aforementioned address.
BICYCLE!
STUDENT SALE
CRITERIUM 12-speed
The Hot New Apollo
Sale 299.95
Look at the new Apollo Criterium. Compare the features, then
check the price — it simply can't be beaten I
POINT
YCl£S
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th
224-3536
Also The Peddler
620 E. Broadway 874-8611
4256 E. Hastings 298-4322
NEED AN EXTRA KEY?
Keys,   study   lamps,   bulletin   boards,   mirrors,
housewares,   appliances,   paint,   and   almost
everything you need — just outside U.B.C.
HEWER HARDWARE
4459 W. 10th Ave.
224-4934
Large selection of wicker ware
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS
(While Stock Lasts)
LUXO LAMPS       $18.95
PRO LIGHT BULBS
40w
60w
100w
2/69c
PROCTOR
TOASTER    $19.80
DEBBIE COLIBABA
Joins our Staff
KEN HIPPERT HAIR CO. LTD.
5736 University Blvd.
(Next to Lucky Dollar Store in the Village)
DEBBIE WELCOMES HER CLIENTS
AND FRIENDS TO HER
NEW LOCATION
For Appointment
228-1471
Teaching Assistants!
Markersl
Tutorsl
FIND OUT WHAT
YOUR UNION
CAN DO FOR YOU
(and what you can do for your Union)
CUPE 2278
GENERAL MEETING
THURS., SEPT. 18
12:30
GRAD CENTER
FOR INFORMATION CALL: 228-4883
OR DROP IM AT OUR OFFICE IN THE GRAD CENTER
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
has a great place for eating . . .
and a great place for relaxing . . .
"La Trattoria"
A variety of fast foods
with an International flavour.
Open Mon.-Fri. 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
"GATE 4"
Lounge — Refreshments
Open Mon.-Fri. 7 p.m. - 11 p.m.
For Further Information Call:
228-5021
HATES: Campus - 3 lines. 1 day $1.50; additional lines, 36c.
Commercial — 3 tines, 1 day $3.30; additional lines
50c. Additional days $3.00 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:00 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
36 — Lost
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING Wednesdays starting Sept. 10 International
House. Beginning class 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Everyone welcome. Information: Marcia
Snider 224-0226, Richard Spratteg
228-8415.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
40 —Messages
60 — Rentals
66 — Scandals
15 — Found
OOTCHAI
Caught you looking at the Classified again —
you'd better get the Buy and sell and get it
out of your System!
BROOCH   found   in  War  Memorial   Gym.
926-4863.
70 — Services
20 — Housing
80 — Tutoring
FREE ROOM BOARD in exchange for 15-20
hours house sitting weekdays. Private
room, bath. 25th & Arbutus, 738-8685.
QOTCHAI
Caught you looking at the Classified again —
you'd better get the Buy and Sell and get
it out of your System'
86 — Typing
25 — instruction
EXPERT  TYPING.   Essays,   term   papers,
factums   $0.85. Theses,    manuscripts,
letters,   resumes $0.85+.   Fast  accurate
typing. 266-7710.
TYPING.  $.80 per page.   Fast and  accu-
ate.   Experienced typist.   Phone   Gordon
873-803;
30 — Jobs
90 - Wanted Feeling frustrated?   Follow our flowchart
White European of means. You live west of Cambie, your biggest
concern is the lineup for your perking sticker; you're going to university because Mom always said you would. Select one of £om-
merce. Engineering, Commerce, Arts, Commerce or Law. You
could take Theatre or Finger-Painting and.still end up on a fat
wage in a large corporation.
I
Registration. Wednesday 9 a.m. Counsellor wertf to school with
your father, recognizes you, ensures registration takes 10 minutes. You get all the courses you want and wonder what all the
talk of lineups is about.
T
Student Loans. Your father's tax loopholes give him an apparent
income low enough that you get the maximum. You use it to finance part-time job: cocaine dealing.
I
Join fraternity or sorority. Market for cocaine dealership instantly
expands. Using secret handshake when meeting prof for first
time will take care* of marks.
You don't really have to do anything in this square. The scotch is
in the walnut cupboard. There's some coke and Thai stick there,
too. Have you met Doug and Erich and the boys yet?
I
Graduation. Select one of IT&T, Dow Chemical, Bank of South
Africa, B.C. Hydro or University Administration.
interior. You came here to experience the city and meet people at
your parents' expense. You find yourself off in the woods in a
residence full of other people from the Interior. Still, it beats
working at Overwaitea. Select one of Agriculture, Engineering,
Forestry, Science, Physical Education, Dentistry or Law. You wiH
end up working at the Overwaitea.
I
Registration. Miss your slot because Hell's Gate was jammed up
with tourists going home to Toronto. Can't find" building you
register in. Prankster counsellor sends you to Stanley Park Zoo to
register for biology.
I
Student Loans. Your student loan is approved, so you borrow
money to finance a cocaine deal. You get your legs broken when
the disbursement turns out to be $75.
T
Residence. Your roommate has two social diseases and is learning to play the sousaphone. People pour water on you. The food
should be poked with a sharp stick, not eaten. For this you spent
seven months oh the waiting list.
You go in for a chat with your prof and find that he/she
equates sex with success and non-fomkation with feaure. You
have 30 seconds to choose between non-compHanca and an and
to your academic career in tha department or acceptance and en-
auing a) oult, b) disgust, c) thoughts of Wackmel or d) venereal
BaafcaNy in this scenario you can't win for toeing.
Having gained an idea of how to work with bureaucracy, grease
the right palms, cheat, lose all principles and ideals, and having
had the requisite lobotomy, you are now desired by the system to
be one of its instruments. You win selection to high public office.
Miscellaneous. You are hare mostly to avoid unemployment.
Leaving high school has left a void and this fills it. Select one of
Psychology, English, Education, Theatre or Law. No matter what
you-actually take, you wilt get your teacher's certificate and end
up either unemployed or in a high school.
I
Registration. Friday 3 p.m. Counsellor says your program doesn't
exist, puts you in lineup without saying what it's for. You are still
there.
T
Student Loans. You are told that you don't meet the residence
requirement because you spent the summer working in Alberta.
You appeal and are prosecuted by the awards office for fraud.
t"
First you find that taking notes la only useful If you want
to compile a trivia quiz about your profs pet theories on life.
Then you discover the readings are irrelevant and the prof hates
you anyway. After six weeks the most important fact you've
learned Is that attendance is not mandatory. This information
becomes increesingly useful.
I
The Library. Desperate for knowledge, or at least a passing mark,
you try to figure the library system out. On the off chance you
succeed, you discover the books you need are unavailable. You
put a hold on them and get them at last. After getting lost in the
main stacks and standing in line at checkout you discover you've
missed tha essay deadline anyway. There is, however, a tine collection of SF paperbacks in Sedgewick.
East End. You have worked hard and want knowledge. Silly you,.
You are the only person you know who went on to university.
You arrive here on a crowded bus after the driver abused you for
paying with pennies. Select one of Social Work, Political
Science, Sociology, Philosophy, Creative Writing or Law. You
will find your education useful in analyzing your job on the green
chain in the saw mill.
I
Registration. Friday 4 p.m. You are forced to change your major
four times because courses are no longer available and end up
taking six units of Medieval Static Physics.
/
Housing. Having tired of the waiting list for residence, you spend
seven months trying to find accommodation. You end up somewhere in Coquitlam sharing a crawl space with a medical student
who complains about the shortage of cadavers and is always inquiring about your health.
You come to the sudden realization that you are living in an unfair
and neurotic society that is lurching drunkenly toward nuclear
holocaust. Your economics prof doesn't seem to care. You want
to do something about it all, but there's no line between this
square and Drug Addiction.
I
Join the AMS. Yes, you are already a member, but so far that's
just been an item in your fee payment. For the price of selling
your soul to bureaucracy you can get your own office, an iHuvory
feeling of serf-importance, control over other people's money to
spend on grand schemes you dream up while sacked out on
opium, a natty hem for your resume and a supply of beer even
when there's a lockout.
Foreign Student. You have come here to get the skills to help
your country develop. Now that you are here, you are beginning
to wonder if development is such a good idea. Select one of
Social Work, Political Science, Sociology, Philosophy, Creative
Writing or Law. What happens to foreign students anyway?
/
I
Registration. Saturday 9 a.m. Building is locked.
/
You can't take it anymore. You have a sudden urge to commit
horrible mindless violence on a dog or small child.
I
m
c
00
-<
(fi
(fi
Join The Ubyssey. You find yourself encouraged to educate
yourself, think and create. You have a good time in an intellectually challenging atmosphere. You wonder what the rest of the
university is there for.
T
Drug Addiction. Mostly not alcohol.
Graduation. Select one of weiter, taxi driver, mill worker, secretary or McDonald's counterperson.
/
Inevitable Failure to Graduate. Return to Drug Addiction.
r I Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1980
'Birds beat Bisons under lights
By JO-ANNE FALKINER
Fielding their youngest squad
in the past seven seasons proved
no obstacle to the TJBC
Thunderbirds as they trampled
the University of Manitoba
Bisons 27-0 on Friday.
In their first night game
under the new lights at
Thunderbird Stadium the 'Birds
managed to erase any memories
of the last time the two squads
met, when UBC was defeated 23-9
in Winnipeg.
In the closing seconds of the
game 18-year-old Thunderbird
Sheldon Petri tossed the ball to
18-year-old teammate Chris
St anger, who made a spectacular 50
yard sprint to score UBC's final
touchdown.
Two field goals by place kicker
Ken Munro gave the 'Birds an early
lead and from then on they were
unbeatable. A holding call robbed
UBC's Al Story of his touchdown
early in the second quarter, but a
few minutes later quarterback Greg
Clarkson took advantage of a pass
interference call against the Bisons
to give Mark Townsend a one yard
dash for the second touchdown of
the game. The convert by Munro
left the score at 13-0 at halftime.
UBC's second touchdown came
in the third quarter when wide
receiver Mitch DesLauriers made an
over-the-shoulder catch on a 32
yard pass by Clarkson. The convert
by Munro made the score 20-0.
Prior to Friday's game coach
Frank Smith was concerned by the
fact that the Bisons have one of the
biggest offensive lines in the country. But constant blitzing by UBC's
defense kept this worry to a
minimum.
Glenn Sedum, the first-year
quarterback that Manitoba is going
with this fall, was overwhelmed by
the performance of the 'Birds'
defense. Outstanding play by
linebackers Mike Emery and
Graham Heal kept Sedum off
balance. With 18 seconds left in the
first half, Sedum ran out the clock
looking for a receiver deep in the
UBC end. It was one of the few
times Manitoba stood a chance of
getting on the scoreboard.
At the close of the game, Heal
was named Molson's UBC player of
the game. Heal's finest effort came
midway through the third quarter at
UBC's 40 yard line when Manitoba
'Birds rush Bison punt
kicker Pad Brookes faked a punt
and broke for the left. Heal made a
lighting dash and brought Brookes
down from an otherwise clear field
on the UBC 54.
For a chance to see some of this
action, catch the 'Birds' next home
game Friday, September 26. They
will be playing -the University of
Calgary at Thunderbird Stadium.
In other weekend college football
action the Acadia Axeman, defending Canadian champions, were
upset Sunday by St. Mary's Huskies
in a close 17-15 contest. The Mount
Allison Mounties defeated the New
Brunswick Red Bombers 24-13 in
the Atlantic conference's other
season opener.
In Western Intercollegiate conference play the Alberta Golden
Bears doubled the Saskatchewan
Huskies 26-13.
Needed: sportswriters
O.K. you're mad as hell and won't take it anymore because there are
no sports in the Ubyssey (well, hardly any). There's a pretty good reason
for that, as a matter of fact. There's no sports writers (well, one).
We know you out there would like to see more sports coverage, so
would we, but we don't have enough staffto give you the stories you
really want to see.
Are your friends tired of you telling them all about the latest football
game? Do you find superlative sport stories trip lightly off your tongue,
and maybe onto paper? Does your ego need a boost? Do you have a
sneaker fetish? Well, we can't help you with the last one, but the
Ubyssey has a cure for your problem. It's called sports writing. If you're
trying to seek a cure, why not drop by room 241K and see our resident
witchdoctor, Verne McDonald, or any other natives you see hanging
around. Remember, we can't cure sports-writing without your help.
^  >
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* CDrnrD,rM.,nnnTurATor *
Long Day's Journey
Into Night
by Eugene O'Neill
September 19-27
(Previews Sept. 17 and 18)
EARLY CURTAIN
7:30 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
Set and Costumes Designed by Brian H. Jackson
Lighting Designed by Ian Pratt
Student Season Tickets — 4 Plays for $10
Available for All Performances
Sept. 17-27 - Long Day's Journey Into Night (O'Neill)
Nov. 5-15 - The Skin Of Our Teeth (Wilder)
Jan. 14-24 — Brecht On Brecht (Brecht/Tabori)
March 4-14 — The Rivals (Sheridan)
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ROOM 207  *
Support Your Campus Theatre ^ Tuesday, September 9,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
THE m SllMER NEWS WRAP-UP
UBC RAZES KANE
Professor Guilty of Theft,
Fined $5,000, No Jail Term
In Four-Year-Old Case
UBC professor Julius Kane was
convicted in June on two counts of
theft from a National Research
Council grant but he will not be imprisoned for the crimes.
Judge A. A. W. Macdonell fined
Kane $2,500 on each count but rejected crown prosecutor A. G. Henderson's call for a prison term for
the UBC animal resource ecology
professor to deter others who might
misuse research grants.
The convictions arose from
charges that in 1976 Kane had paid
two UBC students to work on his
personal business interests with
NRC grant money. Henderson, in
calling for a prison term, pointed
out that Kane's personal gross assets amount to more than $2 million
and described the professor's misuse of grant money as "blatant."
Kane, in an impassioned half-
hour speech before being sentenced, said he was only guilty of doing
his work and added that other academic researchers would be
"shackled" in their studies because
fnr=reo99
of his case. Defence lawyer David
Roberts argued during Kane's trial
that Kane, an American citizen who
holds professorships in three UBC
departments, was a sick man beset
by personal problems and prone to
missing deadlines at the time of the
crimes. Roberts told the court that
Kane was simply an "absent-minded professor" and likened the case
to that of former provincial cabinet
minister Jack Davis, who was convicted of theft after cashing in first-
class airline tickets for second-class
fares and pocketing the difference.
Kane was originally charged with
seven counts of fraud and theft but
was found not guilty on four counts
and had the fifth dismissed.
Connaghan Quits
UBC administrative services vice-
president Chuck Connaghan resigned his position during the summer
to start up an industrial relations
consulting service in Vancouver.
'Connaghan has been replaced by
James Kennedy, the long-time
director of UBC's computing centre.
Connaghan had been a UBC vice-
president since 1975. Before that
Connaghan was president of the
Construction Labor Relations Association, representing 800 companies in contract negotiations with
construction workers. His reputation as a tough labor relations expert prompted observers to believe
he had been brought into deal harshly with the then-fledgling Association of University and College
Employees.
The appointment of Kennedy,
who does not have an extensive labor relations background, appears
to mean the university will not be
taking as hard a line in negotiations
with its employees as it had under
Connaghan.
Connaghan, known sarcastically
as "Chuckles" by union representatives and labor reporters, was a
UBC Alma Mater Society president
in 1958-59 and was a provincial government appointee to the UBC
board of governors before he became vice-president.
head of B.C. Research during the
summer.
But B.C. Research officials claim
that Allan Mode's background in
nuclear chemistry had nothing to do
with his appointment.
And they also said it was impossible to find a Canadian scientist
qualified to fill the position.
B.C. Research chair John MacDonald said Mode was hired for his
scientific management ability and
stated that there will not be a nuclear chemistry program at B.C. Research. MacDonald also happens to
be chair of Discovery Parks, the
company set up by the provincial
government to establish industrial
research parks at UBC and other
educational institutes.
Jack Sample, director of
TRIUMF nuclear nuclear medicine
research at UBC, was apparently
unhappy at the appointment of an
American to the post. "I've got
some kind of reservations about the
need to import someone for that
job," Sample told the Vancouver
Sun.
Nuclear Scientist
BC Research Head
An American nuclear chemist
from the Lawrence Livermore nuclear weapons research facility in
California was hired as the new
Hardwick Back
at UBC
UBC geography professor Walter
Hardwick has resigned his position
as B.C.'s deputy education minister
and returned to teach on campus.
Hardwick, 48, had been deputy
education minister since 1975, when
Point Grey Socred MLA Pat McGeer, another UBC professor, be-
icame education minister.
Hardwick said in a letter to current education minister Brian Smith
that the UBC administration warned him that he must return to the
university or forfeit his tenure as a
professor.
Hardwick will retain his position
as chair of the Knowledge Network
of the West, an educational television network set up by the ministry of universities, science and
communications.
SHHEQ
@DEE@
BACK TO CAMPUS
I
Gear Program
at SFU Soon?
"We are, we are, we are the engineers" could soon be heard echoing through the halls of Simon Fraser University.
A proposal introduced in the
summer and now under consideration calls for the establishment of a
four-year undergraduate engineering program at SFU. Currently
UBC boasts the only engineering
faculty in the province.
The program would cost the university $5 million a year, or about
10 per cent of its annual operating
budget. SFU estimated the program
would accommodate about 800
undergraduate and 85 graduate
students when fully operational.
The first graduating .class could
come as early as 1985 if plans proceed on schedule.
An advisory committee of industry and government representatives was examining the proposal
during the summer.
BEH 999
@HH
SQHES
WE NEED THE ROOM FOR NEW FALL & WINTER STOCK
ARRIVING DAILY. SO WE'RE PASSING
THESE SAVINGS ALONG TO YOU.
TRACK SUITS BY TOPHER
Men's & Ladies
Reg. $59.98 SALE $45.00
JOGGING SHIRTS & SHORTS
By HEAD, SPEEDO & NAKED RUNNER
Men's & Ladies 25% OFF
SKIS
ROSSIGNOL
ST. COMP, 1 pr. only, 185 cm.
STRATO'S, 3 pr. only, 190,195 & 203 cm.
ATALL 600,2 pr. only, 175 & 185 cm.
ATALL, 2 pr. only, 175 & 185 cm.
REG.
$286.00
$270.00
$190.00
$170.00
SALE
$225.00
$219.00
$169.00
$139.00
Nylon & Satin Shorts
Men's & Ladies
$7.88
TENNIS SHIRTS & SHORTS
Men's & Ladies
1/2
PRICE
DYNAMIC
VR 17 SLALOM, 1 pr. only, 194
Reg. $360.00
SALE
$285.00
RUNNING SHOES
PONY 25% OFF
NEW BALANCE320 $19.00
NEW BALANCE TRAIL   $23.00
OSAGA CALIENTE  26% OFF
ALL TENNIS RACQUETS less 10%
K2
233 MID, 3 pr. only, 170,175 & 180 cm.
244 MID, 1 pr. only, 185 cm.
255 MID, 2 pr. only, 180 & 190 cm.
710 COMP, 2 pr. only, 195 & 200 cm.
810 COMP, 2 pr. only, 190 & 200 cm.
$210.00
$240.00
$266.00
$260.00
$286.00
$186.00
$189.00
$215.00
$196.00
$225.00
35999
she
SQHHS
No Refunds or Exchanges on Sa/e items
Cash, Chargex-Visa and Cheques
LOWER MALL SUB   "ACROSS FROM THE PIT
OPEN 9AM - 5:30 PM 228-0414
ffl[=H999
SEHHQ Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1960
Lawsuit threatened
The commerce undergraduate society faces threats of law suits after
emptying  student  lockers in the-i
Henry Angus building two weeks
earlier than in previous years.
Jean Steadham, a third-year
commerce student, said Monday
she planned to renew her locker
lease during registration week, as
she has done in past years. But
when she got to UBC Wednesday,
Sept. 3 she found an empty locker.
"I was furious. They had snipped
off my lock and taken my and a
friend of mine's textbooks and
notebooks, plus several packages of
paper and a knapsack," she said.
Steadham said the CUS placed
posters in Henry Angus giving two
weeks eviction notice for the lockers, but they were posted in August
while many students were not on
campus.
"Students had no way of knowing the change in policy and they
made no effort to contact the locker
owners at home," she said.
According to Bruce Stuart, CUS
ombudsman, the system has been
changed for the sake of smoother
locker distribution in September.
He said the contents of the lockers
are being held under lock and key in
the commerce lost and found.
Steadham said unless her lock
was replaced she would sue the
CUS. "They've invaded my privacy
and I'm seeking some method of
legal compensation. I know several
other students who feel the same
way."
HONG KONG
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%  PHONE: 224-6121 fo
Are You Physically Unfit?
Are you 18-29 years old and physically inactive? Do you huff and puff easily while
climbing stairs or otherwise increasing
your normal activity?
You may qualify for participation in a
study to promote improved aerobic (car-
dio respiratory) fitness to be conducted at
UBC beginning in September.
Call today and if you qualify, arrange for a
FREE aerobic fitness appraisal that will tell
you exactly what land of shape you are in.
J. M. Buchanan Fitness and Research
Centra. U.B.C. Aquatic Centre. Cad
anytime: 228-4366. Deadline:
September 10,1880.
PERM SALE
cMcxix  ^JOAnioni.
4603 W. 10th Avenue
.228-9345.
Decorate With Prints •
THE Poster & Print
PLACE in B.C.
738-2311
3209 W. Broadway, Van.
—■—- Decorate With Posters	
Haircut from $8.00
includes Spray Wet Cut and Blow Dry
Johnart Hairstyling
Hairstyle from $12.00
includes haircut, shampoo, style and conditioner
Perms, Bodywaves, Hennas
\   Men's and Ladies' Appointment* )
738-8011 2691 West Broadway
Special
UBC crested T-shirt
$4.99
Royal blue in colour,
sizes 8, m, I, xl.
Back to College
Contest
Two 1st prizes — 1 man's   ^Penmans™ fleece,
4 piece jogging outfit.
1 woman's /r*Penmans«  fleece 3
piece jogging outfit.
3rd prize — Tyrol nylon jacket your choice to value
of $32.96.
4th prize — $15.00 gift certificate.
Contest closes 5:00 p.m., Sept. 26, 1980
Limit one entry per person
Between the bank and the pub on
the lower floor of SUB.
Hours:
Monday-Friday   9:00   a.m.-8:00
p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
224-1911
The First Canadian Bank
Bankof Montreal
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The two "Campus Branches" of the Bank of Montreal take great pleasure
in welcoming new and returning students to U.B.C.
We figure it this way: if we can be of help to you while you're a student, you'll stick with us after
graduation—when we can be of even greater assistance.
So, come see us for advice on handling money. We can show you a few things that Economics 201 doesn't cover:
how to save with a True Savings Account, how to cheque with a True Chequing Account, how to budget to make the most
of your money, how to avoid running short. And we can discuss loans too.
There's a Bank of Montreal nearby. Drop in, anytime. We want you to get your money's worth.
Start with
the bank
you'll stay with.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH - STUART CLARK. MANAGER
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BRANCH - GEORGE PEIRS0N, MANAGER Tuesday, September 9,1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
MIUH NIGHTS \EVVS
UBC Unions
Settle Wages
The Association of University
and College Employees reached a
new contract agreement with UBC
in June after four weeks of selected
strike action.
The two-year contract gives
AUCE members a 10 per cent wage
increase in the first year and a 9.5
hike in the second. AUCE represents 1,300 library and clerical
workers on campus.
During the strikes AUCE put
pressure on the UBC administration
by picketing university residences in
an attempt to disrupt summer convention business. According to
AUCE some groups who had booked space for conventions cancelled
out when they learned that the labor
dispute would force them to cross
picket lines to attend.
In July faculty members also
reached a new salary agreement
with the administration, giving
them an 8.6 per cent wage increase.
Faculty members, who are not unionized,, may also be eligible for career progress increments, merit
awards or salary adjustments to
eliminate inequities.
The 1,650 members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees
voted in June to accept a one-year
contract giving them a 10 per cent
salary raise. The campus locals of
the International Union of Operating Engineers and the Office and
Technical Employees Union also
negotiated a 10 per cent wage hike
during the summer.
Tuition Hikes
Hit Students
B.C.'s three universities hiked
tuition fees by up to 10 per cent in
May, dismissing arguments from
student organizations that higher,
fees limit accessibility to education.
The fee increases were made
necessary because provincial government funding of post-secondary
education is not keeping pace with
inflation.
University of Victoria president
Howard Petch explained that the
increases are "a compromise between what the university needs and
what the students can afford."
UBC students were hit with the
largest increase, averaging about 10
per cent. An academic year at UBC
now costs between $536 and $838.
Simon Fraser University hiked fees
by about 8.3 per cent, while UVic
students will pay seven per cent
more this year.   .
| table has not yet been announced.
! The B.C. Students' Federation
has called on both Smith and universities minister Pat McGeer to
tour the province's post-secondary
educational institutes so that students would have an opportunity to
express their concerns about inadequacies in education funding and
the B.C. student aid program.
Minister Tours
Education minister Brian Smith
will tour the province during October to gather views on education
from educators and the public.
Smith, who is responsible for colleges and technical schools but not
universities, will visit the Lower
Mainland in November but a time-
Prof Payless
UBC anthropology professor Cyril Belshaw has been dropped from
the UBC payroll while he awaits
trial in Switzerland on charges that
he murdered his wife Betty.
According to UBC spokesperson
Al Hunter, Belshaw was removed
from the payroll because he is not
able to meet his duties as a professor.
BUDGET OF THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY - 1980-81
19e0-81 A.M.S. BUDGET
Statement of A.M.S. Fee Revenue and Expenditures related to the A.M.S. Fees
REVENUE (Notes 1 & 21
Undergraduate Students
FuH-Time: 17,200 x $39
Part-Time: 2,800 x (2.67 units x $4 per unit)
—Part-time pool levy 2,850 x $2
Graduate Students
Full-Time: 2,360 x $39
Part-Time: 1,060 x (2.67 units x $4 unit)
—Part-time pool levy 1,086 x $2
Total Student Fee Revenue
Non-dlscretionery allocation from A.M.S. Fees
Student Union Building Repayment (note 3)
Full-Time: 19,660 x $16 $293.250.00
$ 670,800.00
29.904.00
5.800.00
91,660.00
11,214.00
2,100.00
$ 706,304.00
104.964.00
811,268.00
Aquatic Centre Fee Levy
Full-Time: 19,560 x $5
Part-Time: 3,860 x $2
97,750.00
7.700.00
Men's & Women's Athletic Association (note 41
Full-Time: 19,560 x $7 136,860.00
Part-Time: 3,860 x ($4 x 2.6 units
x 20.5%)
Intramurals Reserve Fund (note 51
Full-Time: 19,660 x $1.50
Part-Time: 3,860 x ($4 x 2.6 units
x 4.4%)
Total Non-discretionary Allocations
Tool A.M.S. Discretionary Fees
8.208.20
29,325.00
1.761.76
293,260.00
106,460.00
146,068.20
31,086.76
674.844.96
$ 236,433.04
Notes on revenue and expenditure related to tha collection of A.M.S. Fees
1. Projected student numbers are from Dr. Tatlow of tha Institute of Andysb & Plannirej, calculalxMi for the 8041
term.
2. Average number of units par part-time student based on summary of A.M.S. fees prepared by John Lomax of
U.B.C. Finance Deportment.
3. Amount applied to SUB buHdtng loan is based on the number of full-time students x $16.
4. M.A.A. and W.A.A. funds allocation from part-time students based on percentage of M.A.A. and W.A.A. fees
over total AMS fees ($7/$34 - 20.5%).
6. Intramurals funds allocation from pert-time students based on percentage of total AMS fee ($1.50/$34 = 4.4%).
BUDGET FOR THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY*
1980/81
Revenues
Total A.M.S. Discretionary Fees
$ 241,423.00
Building Budget
69,882.00
Social Centre Area
120,989.00
Interest Income
36.000.00
$ 467,274.00
Expenditures
Constitutional Margin 5% of 467,274
23,363.00
-By Law 11.
SUB Management Fund
10,160.00
—By Law
Registration Photography
23,400 students x $00.25
5,850.00
Student Government
*
Council
$ 56,340.00
S.A.C.
23,217.00
—Whistler Cabin Management
7,920.00
—Art Gallery Programs
External Affairs
7,437.00
Programs
20,314.00
Student Leadership
2.085.00
Ombuda
750.00
Ombuda
S.H.A.C.
T.A.S.C
Coda and By Law*
117.063.00
M	
General
226,364.00
Program Coordinator
21,860.00
Publications
40,109.00
Ticket Office
8.732.00
297,066.00
Service Organizations
CITR winter
2,591.86
summer
8,900.00
Speakeasy
2.126.00
13,617.86
467.108.86
Surplus
$        134.86
CLUBS BUDGET
These are all the clubs or special subsidiary organizations who have submitted budgets to date.
Balance
Fee Levies
Expen
Balance
April 30/10
and revenue
ditures
April 30/81
Amateur Radio Society
$
464.79
$
406.00
$
372.51
$
497.28
Aqua Society
2,724.03
22,730.00
22,706.00
2,749.03
Ballet Apprec. Club
187.30
7,000.00
7,000.00
187.30
Campus Cavaliers
83.34
1,110.00
1,160.00
33.34
Campus Crusade for Christ      *
47.35
5,520.00
5,297.50
269-86
Campus Pro Life
76.37
153.75
20.08
210.04
Cause Club
251-20
400.00
270.00
381.20
Charismatic Christian Fellowship
7.66
410.00
410.00
7.66
Chemical Engineering
1,926.12
790.00
750.00
1,966.12
Chinese Christian Fellowship
3.02
380.00
340.00
43.02
Chinese Students Assoc.
(583.30)
5,300.00
4,420.00
296.70
Chinese Varsity
(56.88)
6,125.00
6,015.00
53.12
Civil Engineering Club
898.31
16,000.00
16,000.00
898.31 .
Dance
1,594.16
19,300.00
20,020.00
874.16
Def. Human Rights
30.76
1,047.08
1,005.00
72.76
East Ind. St. Assoc.
117.93
5,750.00
5,620.00
247.93
Electrical Engineering
1,779.71
15,860.00
13,956.76
3,672.95
English Students Publ. Club
466.33
2,395.00
2,156.00
696.33
Him Society
87.45
15,560.00
16,210.00
540.00
Inter-Fraternity Council
864.38
2,015.00
2,000.00
879.38
Islamic Youth Society
168.09
1,376.00
1,300.00
143.09
Japan Exchange Club
186.65
1,560.00
1,430.00
306.65
Libertarian Society
101.25
180.00
115.00
166.25
■ Linguistic Circle
80.14
287.20
266.00
102.34
Music Students Dept. Assoc.
808.49
4,640.00
4,570.00
878.49
My Jong Kung Fu Club
220.01
1,200.00
1,200.00
220.01
Navigators Club
6.31
100.00
100.00    .
5.31
Newman Club
56.86
110.00
71.00
94.86
Pottery Club
364.24
1,126.00
600.00
879.24
Pre-Dental Society
164.03
290.00
290.00
164.03
Rugby Club
1,712.25
3,000.00
2,600.00
2,112.25
Sailing Club
3,089.96
12,300.00
8.566.66
6,833.30
Ski Club
10,873.21
36,230.00
34,340.00
11,763.21
Skydiving Club
1.649.22
7,700.00
7,670.00
1,679.22
V.O.C.
2,090.35
5,300.00
5,500.00
1,899.36
Wargamers
(142.11)
880.00
616.50
121.39
Windsurfing
54.00
3,960.00
2,850.00
2,154.00
Young P.C.'s
9.68
410.00
410.00
9.68
Slavonic Circle
-
4,780.00
3,720.00
1,060.00
SOCIETIES
Alta Undergraduate
Society
$     ' 292.00
14,800.00
14,660.00
342.00
Agriculture Undergraduate
Society
1,800.00
17.100.00
16,860.00
3.060.00
Commerce Undergraduate
Society
5,577.86
63,796.00
64,964.00
4,418.86
Dentistry Undergraduate)
Society
4,500.00
20,400.00
21,700.00
3,200.00
Education Students'
Association
300.00
12,660.00
12,230.00
620.00
Engineering Undergraduate
Society
940.00
30,100.00
30,100.00
940.00
Graduate Student
Association
1083.00
3,800.00
4,883.00
0
Foreetry Undergraduate
Society
94.25
17,675.00
17,660.00
19.26
Home Economics Undergraduate
Society
760.00
18,968.00
17,757.00
1,951.00
Medical Undergraduate
Society
4,294.00
5,689.00
3,375.00
6,608.00
Pharmacy Undergraduate
Society
3,266.00
18,870.00
18,177.00
3,969.00
Nursing Undergraduate
Society
4,364.00
36,473.00
36,723. Op
4,114.00
Physical Education Undergraduate
Society
1,900.00
2,010.00
2,060.00
1,860.00
Rehabilitation Medicine Undergraduate
Society
1184.00
6,040.00
5,340.00
884.00
Society Undergraduate
.
Society
1,000.00
10,300.00
10,600.00
720.00
SocW Work Students'
AsaoeiatJon
316.00
2,866.00
2,660.00
521.00
RESERVE FUND ALLOCATIONS AND EXPENDITURES*
Balanoe
Balance
April 30. 1180
Allocation
Expenditure
April 30.1«
SUB Repairs and
Replacement
$ 264,164.00
$    6,000.00
$   40,324.00
$ 229,840.00
SUB Management
27,463.00
10,160.00
17,000.00
20,613.00
Subeidsry Organization
Loan Fund
4,460.00
16,000.00
10,000.00
9,450.00
Special Projects
7,920.00
42,367.00
46,767.00
4,510.00
Programs
10,854.00
800.00
10,064.00
'See separate schedule for further breakdown
'For terms of reference see the code Article 10. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1980
Tbchnics sam     oapioneer cl70
An excellent value in
receivers, the Technics SA
80 delivers 15 watts x 2, providing plenty of
power to the Pioneer CL70 speakers, a 3-way
10" system.
Complete with the Pioneer PL 200 direct drive ^
turntable, this sensible choice in a mid-priced 9
system is only    	
599
DISCWASHER
The superior
record cleaner
only
14
88
TAPES
TDK SA C-90
Maxell UDXL 1-90 * M Qq
Base Fenricrom 90 Your Choice  .   **Zch
Tfechnics
mmamkmmaBoamm
Receivers
SA 202 - 30W x 2. new $299
SA303 - 40W x2, new $389
SA404-50Wx2, new $489
SA506-63Wx2, new $649
Or} PIONEER
PL-200
►$169
W & F .025%
S/N 75db
PIOIMrHrHR
fffc?
New from Pioneer
Receivers
SX3400 - 16 watts $229
SX3600 - 20 watts $279
SX 3800 - 30 watts $319
SX3700 - 46 watts, digital tuning $426
SX 3800 — 86 watts digital tuning $679
HEADPHONES
Or) PIONEER
SE2   Stereo
Headphones
Cassette Decks
CTF800 — fluoroscan meters $239
CTF660 — metal, fluoroscan meters $299
CTF 850 — metal, fluoroscan meters,
3 head $499
CTF 950 - deluxe 3 head    $619
Complete with
Cartridge
M PIOIMsHeER
Stereo Cassette Deck
MODEL CT-F500
■ IfeLrSLhaKrlat-W
$199"*
S/N69db
W & F .05%
30-15K±3db
150 watt
3-way
$199°»
EACH
Super Savings
on Pioneer Car Stereos
Eddie Money -
Playing For Keeps
Chicago —
XIV
Chris De Burgh —
Eastern Wind
Spyrogyra —
Morning Dance

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