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The Ubyssey Sep 9, 1986

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I Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
Reborn Katimavik privatized
OTTAWA (CUP) — A "new
and improved" and private sector-
friendly Katimavik will probably
start mid-October if the funding
already committed to the youth
program arrives on time, says
Katimavik official Guy de Grand-
pre.
"The program is now geared
towards developing young entrepreneurial skills," said de
Grandpre, also an aide to Liberal
senator Jacques Hebert, who
started Katimavik 11 years ago and
staged a 21-day hunger strike in the
senate last March to protest the
Conservative government's
cancellation of the program.
Katimavik's nine-month, three-
stage program will operate as
before, though participants will
spend three months starting up their
own business. "It's like Junior
Achievement," de Grandpre said.
He said groups of 12 "will do a
market survey to determine the best
thing to sell in a given community.
Then they will design it, produce it,
market it and sell it.
"By starting a business, running
it and terminating it, young people
will learn a lot about the business
cycle," he said. If the business is
successful, it will be sold to groups
within the community, or "it may
become a business owned by
Katimavik," de Grandpre added.
During the other six months, participants will work on a project in
two Canadian communities. "This
section of the program hasn't
changed at all," said Hebert advisor and University of Ottawa professor Walter Baker.
Both Baker and de Grandpre say
Katimavik has raised enough
money for 300 to 500 youths to participate this year. The money —
over $3 million — has come mostly
from the private sector, individuals,
and municipal and provincial
governments.
The federal government has not
contributed a cent. Last year $19.7
million of federal funds went to
Katimavik.
Baker says the decision to gear
Katimavik more to the private sec
tor was not a result of pressure
from the Tories, but resulted from
an experiment with one group last
year. But said de Grandpre: "We
do believe the new program will be
well-accepted by the present
government."
Baker said Katimavik organizers
originally planned to add a military
component to the program, "but it
was tried and rejected."
"One source of satisfaction we
have with the new Katimavik," said
Canadian Federation of Students
chair Tony Marcerollo, "is that the
military component has been dropped .''
Macerollo said CFS is "opposed
to a military buildup. Besides," he
added, "experience in the military
is not the kind of experience young
people need. Entrepreneurial skills
are much more valuable."
CFS hopes the new Katimavik
will be bilingual and accessible to
low income groups, and Macerollo
added the federation wants an
equitable representation of all
regions and both sexes.
He said the program "will change
for the better quicker now that it is
out of the hands of the government
bureaucracy."
Baker, hoping money promised
to the program comes through, is
confident "young people will come
out of the program with job skills,
so they'll be better qualified."
JERRY'S COVE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLB
Minutes away from UBC Campus
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from your friends at Jerry's Cove
Remember "DAILY SPECIALS"
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From 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
(Holidays: 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.)
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Ask at the cashiers for your
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Student/AMS card I.D. required. Minimum purchase $30.00
Details at Store
BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS
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Lower Level
Student Union
Building, UBC
224-1911
Monday - Friday
8:00 am-6:00 pm
Sat. 10 am - 5 pm Tuesday, September 9,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
B-lot users face longer gate wait
sity money.
He said the traffic and security
office must hire more people to
maintain the system mechanically
and to process the coinage.
"We don't know yet if we'll
benefit   from   the   gates,"   said
By EVELYN JACOB
The new gate system at B-lot will
give students one more line up to
wait in this year on campus.
The gates were introduced this
summer and are expected to reduce
the cost of employing security officers to patrol the lot under the old
decal system.
Students must now pay 25 cents
each time they exit any one of the
campus' seven B-lots.
But as drivers dig for quarters at
the end of the day rush, huge backups are expected, causing drivers to
wait longer than usual to get out of
the lots.
That has at least one student
angry.
"I think it's going to be a pain in
the ass finding the right change
everyday," said Arlana Berekoff,
physical education 3. "Somebody is
going to get irate when they can't
find a quarter and go barreling right
through those gates."
Martin Cocking, AMS director
of administration, called the new
system "ridiculous" and said he has
already received about 20 complaints about the gates. Cocking
predicted enormous traffic jams in
the lot at the end of the day and
criticized parking rates which have
more than doubled over the last
four years.
Last year, parking rates jumped
25 per cent from $24 to $32 per
academic year. On an average five
day week, vehicle owners must now
pay a yearly rate of $40, provided
they leave the lot only once a day.
Vice-president of finance Bruce
Gellatly called the new system a
"good one," but admitted some
drivers may be at a disadvantage if
they have to make frequent trips
out of the lot.
"Although some students may
have to pay more than 25 cents a
day, any additional money will go
towards updating and maintaining
the lot," said Gellatly.
"There is no extra money in this
for the university," said the vice-
president.
Parking fees collected in the past
have allowed the university to add
over 1,000 parking spaces and install new and safer lighting equipment.
According to Gellatly, additional
money will be saved by doing away
with    patrol   cars   and    reducing By RON STEWART
record-keeping of ticketed vehicles. A   petition    circulating   around
But traffic and security super- campus may give students a chance
visor John Smithman is not so sure to drop a first-term course within
the new system will save the univer-    six weeks of registration without of-
Smithman.
The new system will be advantageous to people who use car pools
since anyone will be able to park
without a decal.
"The disadvantage of this is that
we'll lose control of restricting B-lot
to students," said Smithman. He
said as a result, students may not be
able to find parking on certain
days.
But Gellatly said the possibility
of students not finding parking is
an   "unrealistic   problem"   given
B-lot's   approximately    5,500
available spaces.
Asked if he had heard rumors
that he had a ten year supply of
gates in case of gate crashing,
Gellatly said jokingly, "No, I
couldn't fit them in my closet."
andrew lee photo
THESE U.B.C. STUDENTS revenge themselves on the administration by stealing free parking at the infamous B-lot (or perhaps they're just cheap).
But don't worry if we caught you in the act. We'll never tell . . .
Student group fights for withdrawal
ficially failing.
"The senate should be making a
decision on the issue this year,"
said Alicia Barsallo, a member of
the    Students    for   a    Democratic
Transit chair nixes student fare
By VICTOR WONG
University and college students
will not be getting discounts when
paying for a bus ride, if the head of
the transit commission has his way.
Bill Lewarne, Vancouver
Regional Transit Commission chair
rejected a request for student concession cards by SFU student society president Robert Cliff last
Wednesday.
Lewarne said students could not
get concessions because the system
lost revenue when B.C. Hydro
reduced its transit levy.
"Lewarne told us the commission
must use any surplus available to
counter the loss of funds from the
rollback of the levy," said Cliff.
But according to municipal affairs minister Rita Johnson, the
commission will have a surplus of
$19 million by the end of the fiscal
year, due to increased ridership
from Expo 86 patrons.
Lewarne said students have
seventh priority on the list of transit
riders requiring concession rates.
"They rank behind welfare recipients, handicapped, seniors, ju-
nion and senior secondary schools
and the poor," said Lewarne.
Alma Mater Society president
Simon Sheshadri called Lewamc.'s
comments ridiculous. "A lot ofthe
poor are students," he said.
"The students on campus from
out of town can't afford their own
cars and they can't use their
parents' transportation. We have a
lot of students on welfare, and
some are using the food bank,"
Seshadri added.
Seshadri said while he agreed
that many groups on the list deserve
concession fares, a lot of the groups
on the list, such as aged and secondary students, already pay lower
rates.
The AMS last year organized a
campaign to obtain concession-rate
bus passes for off-peak hours but
their proposal was rejected by the
transit commission.
External affairs coordinator
Carol Pedlar was unavailable for
comment on whether a new campaign is planned for this year.
Winter registration
enthralls U.B.C. students
Another year, another registration. It seemed endless to some,
tolerable to most, and a distinct
pleasure to a lucky few.
"I must have walked at least ten
miles today," said Blaine Dixon,
Arts 3.
Ray Herman, Recreation 4: "It's
one day of the year I try to get over
with as quickly as possible."
Course selection was generally
judged to be chaotic, but successful. P. Johnson, education 3,
said "the only problem with course
selectiqn is that a lot of them clash.
Languages, for example, seem as if
they're all offered at the same
time."
Most seemed to want an improved registration system.
Doug Bryson, Arts 2, ssaid
UBC's registration system is archaic. "A lot of universities have
phone-in or pre-registration. To
line up for two days is just
ridiculous."
As of Friday, the registrar's office reported 22,330 registrations,
compared with 22,4J6 last year, ,   ;
University.
The Registrar said Monday that a
change in the present system would
not make a difference to his office.
He said the senate will discuss
withdrawal dates in November or
December. "A new solution will
not cause a problem in the time or
expense involved for us. We record
what the senate wants us to
record," he said.
Withdrawal deadlines are
presently two weeks after registration for 1.5 units courses, and four
weeks for three unit courses. The
senate ad hoc committee recommended to senate last March that
withdrawal deadlines be extended
to six weeks for 1.5 unit courses and
12 weeks for three unit courses.
Dean of pharmaceutical sciences
John MacNeil called for a compromise on the withdrawal issue.
"If students shop around for
courses, it could cause administrative problems for the larger
faculties, but it wouldn't be a problem in small faculties like ours,"
said MacNeil.
He said different faculties may
have to decide -on withdrawal
regulations for themselves. -
But Paul Tennant, a member of
the ad hoc committee, thinks the
petition is a waste of time.
"In the time they (petitions) take
to sign, most students are not made
aware of the full issue," he said.
But Barsallo said it was an SDU
petition which led to the formation
of the Ad Hoc Committee on
Grades and Practices two years ago.
She said the recommendations then
were a "small victory," but said the
system still has problems.
"There are no guidelines for
deans to decide when to implement
new withdrawal dates. The university should get rid ofthe bureaucratic
hassles of applying for
withdrawals," she said.
"Two weeks is a very short time
to find out if you can handle a
course," said Thomasin Tugwood,
Arts 2. "You Haven't even had a
mid-term yet," he added.
. i,«',«i<».''k tt *; < i \ y
Stqvg ch^ry phots Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1986
Health food, they nuke it for you
VANCOUVER (CUP) — A local
nutrition group organizing against
the construction of the world's
largest food irradiation plant in
suburban Richmond is calling on
the federal government to ban the
process from Canada.
"I am being deprived of my right
to buy fresh, health food, which the
body thrives on," said Lila Parker,
a volunteer of the Health Action
Network Society. "And Canadians
have a genuine, legal right to health
protection from the federal government."
Parker was one of 200 people
who protested Aug. 13 against QIX
Facilities' proposed $38.7 million
plant.
"We had a table painted with a
nuclear symbol and place settings
for six," said Parker. People supposedly   ate   'nuke   food',   "then
dropped dead and were hauled
away on a stretcher," she said.
The group's concern is .a process
which uses radioactive isotopes
from cobalt-60 or electromagnetic
beams to either kill bacteria, insect
eggs and larvae, or to prolong shelf
life of certain foods. Parker said the
process causes serious health problems, witri laboratory animals
developing massive heart attacks,
severe haemorrhaging, and
testicular and breast cancer after
eating irradiated food.
Parker also said an Indian study
found 10 children who ate irradiated wheat showed a higher incidence of polyploidy — or non-
dividing — cells, a condition similar
to leukemia.
But John Vanderstoep, a University of British Columbia food
science   professor,   disagrees   with
Parker's interpretation of research
findings.
"These concerns are blown out
of proportion from what could be
reasonably interpreted from the
data," said Vanderstoep. In the Indian study, for example,
Vanderstoep said the control group
also showed a higher incidence of
polyploidy, indicating the condition
was caused by another, unknown
factor.
"International experts, such as
those at the World Health
Organization, have evaluated all the
data and they say it is safe for use
under certain specific conditions,
usually under one kilogray of radiation," said Vanderstroep.
Health activists are also concerned irradiated foods will not be identified, a decision currently before
the federal cabinet. Even if labelling
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She said other problems with the
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Parker said the Richmond plant,
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day would be the world's largest.
UBC INTRAMURAL SPORTS
POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Applications are now being accepted for a variety of administrative positions in the Intramural Sports Program.
We are seeking enthusiastic and talented individuals to work
in one of a number of divisions:
• Fort Camp Ice Hockey League
• Nitobe Basketball League
• Weekend Tournaments and Events
• Tennis, Badminton and Squash Departments
• Advertising and Promotions Department
• Publications Department
— editors
— reporters
— photographers
— cartoonists
• Statistician
• Referees
— hockey
— volleyball
— basketball
— soccer
— floor hockey
Honoraria are available for most positions.
For further information, contact the Intramural Sports
Program at:
ROOM 66
Lower SUB Concourse
228-6688
Deadline   for   applications:    Thursday,    September    11
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4516 West 10th Avenue 224-1631 Tuesday, September 9, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Violence—torn Punjab.
Young Sikhs at radical core
H
By PATTIFLATHER
is tone is  fanatical.  He flits
from subject to subject.
The young man in the offices of
the All-India Sikh Students Federation in Amristsar, India is in a
hurry. He's getting ready to visit the
father of the late Sikh revivalist
leader Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale.
The father, Baba Joginder Singh,
is in another city and there's an
unofficial ban on driving out of
Amritsar after 5 p.m.
The fairly short, stocky Sikh says
he lived in Vancouver for several
months recently — at the Surrey
home of Lakbir Singh Brar. Brar is
a nephew of Bhindranwale and
leader of the International Sikh
Youth Federation.
The man won't give his name,
saying RCMP in B.C. know him.
He's vague about what he did in
Vancouver. He says he tried to promote Sikhism and "bring Sikh boys
back to the fold."
What does he think about the attack in late May on a Punjabi politician visiting Vancouver Island?
Four men are charged with attempted murder.
"Maybe some of those boys had
their relatives killed," he replies.
Outside of India he doesn't support the use of violence, he says.
The man, in his twenties, claimed
more Sikh men in B.C. are wearing
the saffron-colored turban
representing willingness to accept
martyrdom.
Students and young Sikh men
between 18 and 30 form a core
group in the Khalistan movement in
Punjab state, fighting for an independent Sikh nation.
The killings continue in Punjab
and elsewhere in India — of
political and army figures, ordinary
Hindus and Sikhs. No one is optimistic of a solution to the five-
year conflict.
The All-India Sikh Students
Federation, despite being fac-
tionalized, is a powerful force in
Sikh politics.
Bitu Singh is not active in the
federation. The 20-year-old science
student says only his parents know
that he supports the goal of a
separate Sikh state called Khalistan.
He's volunteered to guide me
through the Golden Temple in
Amritsar, the most holy Sikh
shrine. Suddenly he lowers his
voice, and furtively glances around.
"Have you heard anything . . .
you know ... in North America . . .
about him?"
"Him" is Bhindranwale, called a
terrorist and killed two years ago in
June, when the Indian Army stormed the temple in Operation
Bluestar.
"I can't believe he has died,"
says Bitu. "The government won't
show his body."
Bitu is slight. He wears a turban
but his beard is scraggly, not long
and full like those of most baptised
Sikh men.
Bitu thinks some killers are connected with all the All-India Sikh
Students Federation or the United
Akali  Dal — a militant political
group. Bitu calls the killers abnormal. He doesn't believe he could
murder anyone.
It's mid-June and the temple
complex is quiet, even peaceful. A
week earlier, near the two-year anniversary of the storming of the
temple, a crowd of militants charg
ed inside. The widow of one of the
assassins of Indira Gandhi led the
charge. One man was killed.
The parts of the temple damaged
by the invasion, which also killed at
least 1,000 people, are still being
repaired.
The streets of Amritsar, a city of
400,000, are almost deserted. But
Amritsar isn't the most dangerous
place. Not like the Pakistani border
areas in the districts of Amritsar
and Gurdaspur, the smaller towns
and villages.
Amritsar does remain a focal
point in the unrest. And the Golden
Temple complex houses offices for
political factions ranging from the
ruling Sikh Akali Dal Party to the
student federation.
The federation has two factions
— one follows Harinder Singh
Khalon, the other Manjit Singh.
The leaders of the former have gone
underground. Only scrawny
teenagers remain in their office.
The Khalon group is larger, considered more hardline. The Manjit
Singh group is willing to meet with
Punjab's chief minister to negotiate
the release of leaders from jail.
The split began after the army attack on the Golden Temple.
Almost 400 people were charged
with waging war against the state.
They remain in Jodhpur jail, in the
state of Rajasthan. Federation
leaders are among them.
The federation leader died during
the attack, and his brother Manjit
Singh is at Jodhpur. Khalon has
emerged as a rival leader.
The walls of both factions' offices are covered with photographs
of Sikh "martyrs", ranging from
young men killed in "encounters"
with police to Beant Singh, one of
Indira Gandhi's killers.
Simranjit Kaur works with the
Manjit Singh faction. She's unusual
for an Indian woman in that at 29
she's unmarried and wants to stay
that way. Yet for Simranjit all the
men in the office are her
"brothers".
See page 8: NOVEMBER
KARRAN SINGH KHALON . . . family killed.
Punjabi Hindus flee homes
In recent months more and more Hindu families in
the Punjab have fled their homes out of fear.
Some leave villages where they are a minority for the
relative safety of Punjabi cities, where most Hindus
live.
Others are no longer in Punjab. They stay with out-
of-state relatives or in Hindu temples waiting for the
situation to improve.
Just how many families have fled is disputed, with
the Punjabi government admitting several hundred
families have left and rightwing Hindu groups placing
the figure in the thousands.
Brij Mohan Shangari, 45, locked his home and left
his village in Fatehbad on May 10, at 1:30 in the morning, in a truck. His wife and four daughters went with
him.
In an interview at the Arya Samaj Temple in New
Delhi, Shangari says he was afraid terrorists would attack his family the next day.
"The terrorists went into the school where I was
teaching, searching for Hindu teachers," he says. "We
were not in school that day."
In his village of 10,000 people, there were nine killings in the space of a week. Of the 2,000 Hindus in the
village, he says only 800 still live there.
Many Sikhs agree that Hindus have been targetted
by Sikh extremists.
Amritsar playwright Gurcharan Singh says it's true
that in Fatehbad, near Amritsar, letters were posted on
doors of Hindu homes ordering them to leave or be
killed.
"The government didn't give them any protection,"
says Singh. "The poor people had to leave."
But most Sikhs cannot agree with the solution that
frightened Hindus demand — the deployment of the
army in the Punjab. They say that the army committed
many wrongs against Sikh people when it came in
1984.
They also contrast the massive attention given in the
Indian press to the Hindu migration with the scant
coverage when Sikh families fled to Punjab after the
November 1984 anti-Sikh riots. That's when mobs attacked Sikhs in retaliation for Indira -Gandhi's
assassination.
Some Sikhs fear the rightwing Hindu group Shiv
Sena (Army of the God Shiva) is gaining new strength.
Members of the Amritsar Shiv Sena are sitting on
the floor in a third-storey room at the Durgiana Hindu
Temple.
"We want peace," says Vijay Jugnu, general
secretary of the Amritsar Shiv Sena.
"But if somebody will attack us on our religion we
can do everything for our safety and defence."
One man says they have grenades. Jugnu won't rule
out military training in the future.
WORSHIPPERS ... at Golden Temple.
patti flather photo Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
Die for it
To those of you perusing this first issue of the 69th volume of the
Ubyssey, ignoring the wailing of the prof down in front, welcome
to a Tuesday and Friday tradition. Let us take you away from all
that rubbish. To those of you reading this over lunch, we hope it's
tasty. To those of you reading on the bus, we wish you a deeply
fulfilling journey.
And to those of you reading this and saying to yourself "Damn, I
could write for this damn rag," or saying, "I could never write for
such a fine publication", run as fast as your lithesome legs will
carry you in a safe and concientious fashion to SUB 241K and present yourself as an eager new staffer.
The Ubyssey is a service organization of your Alma Mater Society, and, your student fees, with a little help from our advertisers,
pay for its publication. Every member of the Alma Mater Society
(you're a member if you have a student card) is eligible and
welcome to write for his/her/its student newspaper.
There is no nasty hierarchy on the paper. Every decision is made
by the entire staff. The tone of the paper is determined by staff
vote, not the whim of a charismatic editor.
Ubyssey staff members, known affectionately as "staffers", are
the contributors to the paper, and compose the general assembly
that governs the paper, much like a similar assembly in ancient
Athens but often without the traditional Hellenic garb.
And as those Hellenes of old knew so well, there are many ways
for the amateur to contribute. The Ubyssey needs news writers,
reviewers, features writers, graphic artists, graphic scribblers,
proof-readers, headline writers, typists, aerobics instructors, dieticians, fashion models, and a friendly, vivacious receptionist who
can take short-hand and do light housekeeping.
Payment comes in the form of emotional fulfillment, inner peace,
notoriety, and the occasional perk.
If you want to contribute, regardless of your experience, wander
up and introduce yourself. If you're enraged at The Ubyssey's
political bent, or find the quality of writing below your exacting
standards, write a nasty letter. Or better, join the staff and make
your views and skills integral to this grand old publication.
As a Ubyssey staffer you may be starting along the road to the
successes of former staffers: you may be successfully sued for
writing a libelous column in a major Canadian periodical, become
the Prime Minister.of the second shortest government in Canadian
history, or get a job at the Yukon News.
The Ubyssey is your paper. Use it. Abuse it. Make it your voice,
make it your home. Make it your life. Die for it.
She'd prefer BMW
Thanks for the Rolls Royce, Jimmy Pattison — but no thanks.
I'm flattered by your interest and
attention, especially since we've
never met. I fear ulterior motives
because by your own admission
many, many times on television,
you emphatically stated you refuse
to help your children.
The offer smacks and has all the
ramifications of the Marjorie Mer-
riweather Post offer to give her
Palm Beach mansion to the U.S.
taxpayers — who very wisely and
very graciously declined the offer.
You obviously don't know much
about the late great humanitarian
John Lennon because your choice
of   presenting   the   Rolls   to   ex-
premier Bill Bennett screams of
sacrilege. Your choise couldn't have
been more crass had it been Richard
Nixon.
Bennett's parting shot of taking
every British Columbian for a ride
was scathing — after the $17 billion
deficit ride he took us on.
Take back the Rolls — and let
John Lennon rest in peace.
If it's okay with you Jimmy Baby
I'll just ride the bus, unless you'd
like to give me a new Mercedes
Benz, BMW, Porsche or Cadillac
— with no strings attached, of
course.
Mary J. Prinz
#207 — 1890 Haro St.
Vancouver, B.C.
THE UBYSSEY
September 9, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"This place is like a museum" chimed Corrinne Bjorge and Victor Wong, as they meandered con-
templatively through aisle 6 of the local mega market, owned by local tycoons Debbie Lo 6r Stephen
Wisenthal. The sign above them read Biscuits; Dry Goods; Dan Andrew's Sister's Cookies.
"Sometimes I just come here to gawk", said Conine, "Ouch! Ouch, me too," remarked Victor (in
agony).
Above them Patti Hather's thumb and forefinger returned to their pre-hensile state. On them were
shards of glass from the Peter Bums factory in Leiden mixed with sweat and Belgian pickle juice. Patti
had released two jars of Swartz and Kontic Lowland Dills, the juice of which resembled the sort of
chemical which challenges even the most abte dermatologist. Our museum goers were melting, while
6600 mites away Mr. Kontic could be heard chuckling "Just a bit of Flemish humour. . ."
Store clerks David Ferman, Rick Hiebert and Jennifer Lyatl, rushing to spray the produce after their
evening break, happened to see the disaster and turned hoses in hand down the aisle. The rubber
tubes stretched taut and crushed the M. Groverman Pig Butcher's Asthma pills on special in the prominent corner position.
Manager Robert Beynon, a marketing bon vivant, was horrified by this product damage from his
vantage in customer relations (where regular patron Evelyn Jacob droned on about the colour of the
dahlias). He bolted from the cubicle, brushing past the latest issue of Stuff magazine near the
checkout, which featured horticultural here Stevie C. on the cover, smiling glibly.
But in aisle 6, our produce trio had everything under control. With the help of yoghurt boy Ron
Stewart and an old Walloonian antidote involving terra cotta, the duo made the Charles and Di at
Madame Tussaud's look like mere shopping bagladies and gentlemen. Manager Beynon used their
statuesque torsos to full marketing advantage. Shopping is so high brow.
U.K.
CUSTOMS
PASSPORT
PLEASE-
VISA  OR MASTERACE?
Letters
A.M.S. spends lots for little
As another summer lingers to a
close we can again witness the unique, yet still extraordinary ability of
AMS Council to spend great sums
of money in doing so very little.
Never in the history of man have we
spent so much for so little.
While Sylvia Russell, a major
spokesperson for B.C. Food Banks
and advocate for the poor, decries
the possibility of an institutionalized food bank system our far-
thinking Council establishes a
distribution centre for students.
While nobody denies the high-
cost of tuition and its resulting effects, did our Council pause for just
a moment to answer some very
basic questions?
Where are the volunteers for such
a program going to come from?
Concepts are dandy, but programs
need people and students who are
lucky enough to have free time are
usually filling it with paying part-
time jobs. It helps deal with the
high cost of education.
And of course, let us not forget
the food. Food banks without this
basic commodity tend to be fairly
unpopular.   And   while   there   is
evidence of severe memory loss on
the part of Council, they might
remember food drives on campus
last year were not particularly successful.
Surely it crossed the mind of our
progressive thinking council that if
students are all suffering from the
high cost of education they might
find it difficult to be charitable with
either their time or money.
But the fundamental question has
to be how many students are we actually helping and at what cost? I'm
certain that Seshadri and Co. would
never spend our dollars on a potential shot in the dark.
Is it 10 per cent of the student
body at a cost of $50,000 per year
or some other combination? New
programs with nifty titles are great,
but actions which have little or no
effect provide nothing more than
the sound of one hand clapping.
Did our esteemed Council ever
consider working with the Vancouver Food Bank to establish a
service for students or did we just
blindly establish our own program
because it seemed so honourable at
the time?
U.S. to annex our territory
The failure of the federal government to reject outright U.S. territorial demands in the Dixon Entrance, Beaufort Sea and Strait of
Juan de Fuca should shock most
Canadians who want Ottawa to
uphold Canadian sovereignty and
independence in the face of growing
U.S. pressure.
The centre of the dispute has
been the U.S. demand for extending U.S. territory some 20
kilometres south from the present
AB line into the Dixon Entrance off
Prince Rupert.
According to the Globe and Mail
(Aug. 19/86) external affairs
minister Joe Clark wrote U.S.
secretary of state George Shultz in a
letter which has not been made
public, that now "is not an opportune time" to confront the sensitive
issue. The U.S. has apparently been
pressing the Mulroney government
for negotiations on the U.S. territorial claim.
In fact, Clark's letter gives support to the U.S. claim for an extension ofthe U.S. boundary into half
of the Dixon Entrance which is one
of the important fishing areas on
the B.C. coast, and which is also
rich in mineral, oil and gas deposits.
The letter makes it clear that
Canada would be prepared to
negotiate the U.S. claim at a more
"opportune time."
This is obviously a reference to
the free trade negotiations which
are now underway and it's quite
likely that the Conservative government sees this as a possible bargaining chip in Canada-U.S. negotiations.
Canadian territorial boundaries
and the resources within them
belong to Canada and the Canadian
people and should not be alienated
under any circumstances. Instead of
surrendering to U.S. pressure and
holding open the door to future
negotiations on Canadian territory
in the Dixon Entrance, Strait of
Juan de Fuca and Beaufort Sea, the
Canadian government should
declare its sovereignty over these
territories as irrevocable and not
subject to negotiation.
Maurice Rush
r provincial leader
Communist Party of Canada
And in the continuing battle
against B.C.        Transit's
discriminatory policies should we
be surprised to find our Council
hiding for cover? Not once did we
speak with a clear, firm voice in
protesting the recent regressive fare
hikes. An action which will result in
a direct increase in the cost of
education of $100.
But, of course, our President —
Simon Seshadri — deplored them.
Let's hear it for deplore!
As Jean Swanson and her End
Legislated Poverty Committee
fought these hikes in the B.C.
Supreme Court, our Council is
mysteriously silent on an issue that
has serious implications for a majority of students.
Our Council did not even have
the decency to contribute to Ms.
Swanson's legal costs. How's that
for appreciation?
Possibly, not that I would ever
want to suggest to Council how they
should do their job, they should be
dealing with issues which are more
universal to the student body.
Maybe Seshadri can let us know
the results of the Council's discussion with each of the Socred leadership candidates? I am positive he
will have realized the prime opportunity that was provided by such a
contest.
Also, is it possible to see the
presentation made to Labour
Minister Segarty regarding the
minimum wage? When protesting
the high cost of tuition we might
want to point out that our earnings
potential has failed to keep pace
with rising costs.
Did we consider hiring a student
to approach corporations for
student jobs? Instead of surrendering to circumstance, did we exam-
ing the possibility of marketing the
services of our student body?
This list is limitless: marketing
studies (Dept. of Athletics) and
research facilities. Did it ever cross
anybody's mind to sell the talent on
this campus or must we wait and
hope?
Yes, another summer has gone by
and we have again been ably
represented by our Council. Maybe
in the months ahead they will struggle with these very simple question
and provide the answers that a competent Council would have
answered before they ventured
forth. Dermod Travis
arts 3 Tuesday, September 9, 1986
THEUBYSSEY
Page 7
Vander Zalm offers hyperactivity
By LANNY BECKMAN
It took the Americans seven years
to make the transition from Nixon
to Reagan. On Hiroshima Day,
B.C. accomplished much the same
thing in two hours at Government
House.
Bill Vander Zalm, fresh from his
victory at the Ronald Reagan think-
alike contest, is actually the new
premier of this far from fair province.
A cat on the hot tin roof of
B.C.'s far-right politics, Vander
Zalm suffers from a hyperactivity
disorder that goes back a long way.
The delivery room doctor clocked
him doing 60 through the birth
canal. Young Bill entered the
world, stage centre, blabbing.
In 52 years of running on at the
mouth, Vander Zalm has been moving too fast to grab hold of a rational thought. In anticipation of
the first one, he keeps both sides of
his mouth perennially open. So far
the only thing that's passed his lips
is an unbroken stream of organic
fertilizer (which he religiously writes
off as a business expense). Should
the germ of a sensible idea occur to
him, it will fall on acres of knee-
deep fertile ground, much of it
under review by the Agricultural
Land Commission.
Vander Zalm had to pinch
himself all the way to his appointment with the lieutenant governor.
He was as surprised as anyone by
his victory. In fact, he had come
within a hair of not running for the
province's top job because of the
improbability of assembling 700
selected yahoos in that cramped
pigpen at Whistler.
Vander Zalm had reason for
doubt. His grassroots computer
told him his supporters had to be
drawn from a small, unstable sect
— roughly the political equivalent
of the Flat Earth Society. Fortunately for him, all of ifs members
are card-carrying Socreds. On July
28, 801 of them rode the Paranormal Express into beautiful
downtown Whistler.
Two days later, on the fourth
ballot, Vander Zalm's eleven opponents got a taste of B.C.'s new
geopolitics as they and their dreams
fell over the edge into the oblivion
of — at best — the same dull
cabinet posts.
The premier-elect rewarded his
delirious supporters by breaking his
first campaign promise in a record
27 seconds. Invoking the Lillian
Defence, Vander Zalm backed
away from his pledge to get rid of
the family plantation, Other Worldly Garden. Anyway, he said he had
already, put the thing in a blind
trust, B.C.-style, by placing the
deed on Lillian's night table. And in
a gush of ante-bellum sentiment, he
expressed deep concern for the fate
of his field hands should another
Massah gain control of the estate.
One can imagine the ghosts of
Sinclair and Nora Stevens hovering
in the Vander Zalms' bedroom
dispensing friendly warnings. But
they couldn't be expected to know
that B.C.'s conflict-of-interest laws
are as toothless as the average NHL
defenceman. (When Stephen "Old
Money" Rogers was found guilty of
violating the statute, the judge gave
him a pat on the back and the
legislation a slap on the wrist.) Still,
Vander Zalm is a little edgy about
the issue and he says he'll be taking
a close look at the Act. Translated,
this means he'll either extract its
few remaining molars or file them
down to the gumline, probably using B.C.'s human rights legislation
as a model.
The War of the Roses is one conflict Vander Zalm's determined not
to lose. To no one's surprise he easily won the first battle as the Commission rendered its impartial and
patriotic decision.
Soon after the fourth ballot tally
was announced, Vander Zalm's advisers encircled him and slapped his
lip in a sling. They then gave him
the task of learning a new language.
Soon his old freewheeling attacks
on the poor and the weak were being replaced by typed speeches
praising moderation, consultation
and similar virtues the man instinctively disdains.
In press conferences, Vander
Zalm picks his words so slowly and
clumsily that they seem to be taken
from a foreign phrasebook called
Say It In Moderation. On welfare,
Aug. 8: "If please they don't wish
shovels, everyone goes then for cooperation, yes?" On French Canadians, Aug. 12: "Can you show me
where is Quebec? My friends all are
living there."
Indeed, the man who called Rene
Levesque a "frog" and who hurled
other racist taunts at French Canadians now says he is going to learn
another new language — francais.
The road to bilingualism may be
paved with opportunistic intentions
but you can't help thinking that
when the sling comes off on election
day, Vander Zalm won't be able to
resist the pleasure of insulting
Quebeckers in their mother tongue.
Vander Zalm didn't get anywhere
near election day before tearing
away the restraint on his freedom of
speech. Egged on by the media, the
premier began issuing daily pronouncements that ranged from the
callous to the merely bemusing. For
example:
Native Indians are a privileged
minority because they pay no property tax on the castles on their
reserves.
perspectives
The premier wants to scrap the
sales tax (which provides one-fifth
of government revenues).
He proposes to make cheaper
beer more available so that workers
can more easily have a drink or six
after work (and so that MADD
members can ask aloud what
decade the premier lives in).
Further U.S. tariffs placed on
B.C. softwood exports will result in
chicanery at the border leading to
the exclusion of U.S. produce from
our dinner tables. Ensuing scurvy
epidemics will be chalked up to the
cost of war.
"Ladies" have superior powers
of intuition and ESP — but are
stupid enough to use abortion as a
method of birth control.
Like his White House counterpart, Vander Zalm is being called
the Great Communicator. Only in
Lotusland!
Back home, one question began
popping up as naturally as daffodils
in March: How do we explain this
guy to eastern Canada? Sensible
questions sometimes draw outraged
reactions. Sun columnist Pete
McMartin, a young man old before
his time, led a xenophobic chorus in
insisting that we don't hafta explain
nothin' to nobody. He had probably been watching his old George
Wallace tapes. The governor from
the Old South liked telling liberal
communists from up north that it
was none of their damn business
how Alabama treated its Nigras. No
one ever explained Wallace to the
Americans. Now there's a rumour
out that McMartin's on the shortlist
to become Vander Zalm's press
secretary.
Meanwhile the local media have
been hard at work inventing reality,
using public opinion polls among
other things, they are preparing an
arranged marriage between Vander
Zalm and the people of British Columbia. Their polls, which are
designed so amateurishly they'd
flunk a Statistics 100 class assignment, are fabricating a new persona
for the premier.
His past is sacrificed to our collective amnesia. The hacksaw he
lugged around in his portfolio as
BEAUTIFUL  BEER/S// COLUMBIA
?^s\s\?\r\su*
0|iv6Rj
Humanistic liberal blasts use of
deadly weapons by assassins
As both a humanist and a proud
Liberal, I am disgusted that there is
a lot of fuss in the media about a
game (albeit in a new sinister guise)
called Secret Agent. Despite intensive news coverage, very little has
been told of this preposterous and
potentially dangerous game. Look
at a poster sometime — a target, an
offer of $7,000 in prize money
(more aptly — blood money) and
the caption: "Killers told to play it
cool." What kind of "game" is
this? And on every poster a
shadowy reference to a nebulous
figure called "Tim" . . .
Reading a poster, you realize that
Secret Agent, a throwback to equally detestable games such as Gotcha
and Assassin, is as potentially
dangerous as those games ever
were. I am appalled, that this game is
allowed to go on, for the danger in
these games lies in the potential for
violence that they can incite.
On the one hand, there is the
violence that can occur when immature and reckless, not to mention
the psychotic players of this game
go at it all over Vancouver. What
happens when the water guns are
replaced by real guns and the game
becomes a virtual licence to kill?
You can well imagine a sudden increase in the Vancouver crime rate
on October 31st when the game
begins, ironically on Hallowe'en.
(You can well imagine there will be
a lot of "trickering" this
Hallowe'en!)
Second, there is the fact that
players will learn violent behaviour
from this game, learning (and liking) to kill. Just as cartoons teach
children hostile behaviour, Secret
Agent teaches players criminal and
psychotic behaviour. This much is
obvious. Further, Secret Agent is
immoral in that it promotes this evil
behaviour. This game should be
banned!
To "add to insult," the shrewd
bandits demand an exorbitant entry
fee of $45 (Come on Tim, isn't this
a bit steep for a poor peasant like
me?). Are we, the proletariet going
to put up with such open robbery?
Why should I have to pay to have
my moral ethics twisted into the
psychotic rage of a murderer?
It is a symptom of a sick society
that Secret Agent is allowed to exist
at all. Anyone who promotes it is
little better than an uneducated
criminal, its players equally so. I am
offended to be at the same university that would tolerate such toxin!!
In my opinion, a higher power
should have the authority to interfere and censor such a hate-
instigating game before this game
(and others like it) turn our society
from its traditions of freedom and
democracy into the nightmarish
world of Herr Hitler's Reich.
Hugh Richards
graduate studies
minister of welfare, municipal affairs and education lies forgotten at
the bottom of the Fraser. His
world-class collection of insect appendages just disappeared down the
toilet one night. While B.C. blinked, a new Bill Vander Zalm emerged — charming, charismatic, an all
around nice guy. Easy as putting
one face in front of the other.
On the domestic front, Vander
Zalm inherits a province whose
economy is in good shape. Several
speakers at the Whistler convention
said so when bidding Bill Bennett
farewell.   .
Bennett's successes are a matter of
record. In a few short years he rode
this tired old horse of a province
from second to ninth place. Vander
Zalm might decide to rest on Bennett's laurels and carry on with existing policies. Or he might choose
to put his own stamp on the office
by outsmarting Newfoundland into
passing us on the rail.
This horserace is about
unemployment, food banks, union
erosion, small business bankruptcies. The rich have made a good adjustment to these irritants and seem
prepared to go on enduring them.
So long as that is true, the change
from Bennett to Vander Zalm
means only that the jockey's smile
has shifted a shade to the right. According to the smart money, B.C.'s
going to keep bringing up the rear
in the StatsCan Sweepstakes until it
finds a rider with new colours.
Lanny Beckman is a concerned
Vander Zalm scholar who graced
the hallowed highways, byways and
classrooms on this campus in the
oft-recounted days of yore.
Divest now
1 note that UBC is indefinitely
postponing its decision to divest
itself of its holdings in South
African-linked companies, due to
the fact, they say, that the Hart
Report does not report on whether
these companies comply with the
Canadian Code of Conduct.
This code of conduct, with those
of the European Community and
the U.S., is supposed to increase the
standard of living of black
employees in South Africa.
However, within South Africa
itself, the vast majority of extra-
parliamentary organisations (such
as the UDF, COSATU, ANC,
SACTU and the Christian Institute
of South Africa) do not see such
"constructive engagement" as being beneficial or as productive of
political reform.
Instead, they see such policies as
being "immoral, evil and totally
unchristian" (Bishop Tutu) and a
"pretext for the continued investment in, and support for, the Apartheid regime" (SACTU). Winnie
Mandela has said, "No code of conduct will mean anything to the
black worker — it is irrelevant."
The majority of popular
organisations view divestment as a
force for fundamental change, bringing in the longterm a unified
democratic state at the expense of
greater hardship in the short term.
Bishop Tutu again: "It has been
proved now that economic prosperity does not lead to political
change. We want fundamental
change. We do not want our chains
made comfortable, we want them
removed."
The people of South Africa view
divestment   as   a   force   for   fundamental   change;   it   is   surely   a
policy UBC should actively pursue.
Chris Ponting,
physics 5 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
November 1984 riots source of anger
From page 5
Simranjit lives with her parents
but doesn't tell them about her activities. Two of her brothers died
during Operation Bluestar. She is
fiery and strident, insisting the
Golden Temple be called by its Punjabi name, Derbar Sahib.
"We need identity," she says.
"We are not Hindu. We are a nation."
According to Simranjit, young
Sikhs are not safe in India. She
wants international human rights
groups to recognise violations
against Sikhs.
Her complaints about human
rights are echoed by many, including independent Indian civil
liberties associations. Laws such as
the 1985 Terrorist and Disruptive
Activities Act give police sweeping
powers.
Persons suspected of terrorist
acts can — and do — remain in jail
up to a year without formal charges
or trial.
Sitting across from Simranjit is a
30-year-old woman who says her
husband has been jailed in the state
of Haryana for six months. She
spent one month in police custody.
The couple were with relatives attending a marriage ceremony in the
city of Ambala. Three men including her husband and his brother
were arrested under the terrorist
act.
She says her husband has done
nothing wrong, but has also been
tortured. According to her he was
given electric shocks, was left hanging from the ceiling, and was cut on
his arms and legs.
The woman, a mother of four,
said she was afraid to give her name
because police may arrest her again.
Civil rights groups such as the
People's Union for Civil Liberties
argue that while terrorist violence in
Punjab is a real danger, existing
laws were adequate . . . and that all
people in Punjab are being deprived
of rights guaranteed in the Indian
constitution.
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MARTYRS ... in office of student federation (Khalon faction).
patti flather photo
The November 1984 riots remain
another bitter spot among Sikhs. In
the days after Indira Gandhi's
assassination an estimated 4,000
Sikhs were killed outside Punjab, in
New Delhi in particularly. Women
were raped, businesses and temples
destroyed.
Many people believe at least some
of the attacks were organized and
senior Congress (I) Party politicians
have been implicated. The killers
had lists of Sikh homes, the army
and police did nothing, and large
quantities of a white flammable
substance were available to burn
Sikhs. But there has been little com
pensation of victims and no charges
against those responsible.
This June in Amritsar a group of
riot victims who migrated from outside Punjab occupied an unfinished
government housing colony. More
than 200 families broke open locks
at the colony on June 15, saying
they'd been waiting for promised
housing long enough.
Karran Singh Khalon, 27, from
New Delhi, participated in the occupation. His mother, father, two
brothers, and sister-in-law were killed in the riots, and the family property destroyed.
"I am living on the mercy of
friends and relatives, and on
loans," he says.
The organizer of the housing action was Harminder Singh Shammi,
in his mid-twenties and president of
the Sikh Riot Victims Association.
On June 20 he was shot and killed
by police, reportedly after failing to
stop his moped on request at a
police checkpoint.
Gurcharan Singh, a 58-year-old
Amritsar playwright, believes Hindus and Sikhs in Punjab are fed up
with the killings.
In his home in a working class
area of Amritsar, Singh says neither
the Sikh government in Punjab nor
the Indian government under Rajiv
Gandhi are controlling the violence
or solving the problems.
Singh estimates that 80 per cent
of employable Sikh youths in Punjab are without work. Five years
ago these people formed the core of
rebel leader Bhindranwale's support.
Singh believes the terrorists have
infiltrated groups like the student
federation, but have their high commands elsewhere.
Leaders of the All-India Sikh
Students Federation are no longer
students but have a strong following among students.
Singh says what the federation
leaders really want is power — a
place in the government, similar to
what students in India's Assam
state accomplished. In Assam the
student political party is now in
power.
He thinks the terrorist high command has links in Canada — to
which it communicated the news of
a Punjab minister's visit in May.
The minister survived an assassination attempt on Vancouver Island.
Singh doesn't believe Canadian
Sikhs are sending much money back
for the fight for Khalistan since the
Air-India crash in June 1985.
"(Support for) Khalistan has ebbed down in Canada, America, Britain," he says. "It has erupted
here."
"The future is quite dark."
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! MUSICIANS NEEDED !
The following ensembles at the School Of Music
wishing to participate this year:
UNIVERSITY CHAMBER SINGERS
Cortland Hultberg, director 228-2246
UNIVERSITY SINGERS
James Fankhauser, director   228-6539
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
James Schell, director   228-2598
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Gerald Stanick, director   228-3322
UNIVERSITY WIND SYMPHONY
Martin Berinbaum, director   228-5739
UBC CHAMBER STRINGS
John Loban, director   228-3529
are available to any qualified students
UNIVERSITY OPERA WORKSHOP
AND THEATRE
French Tickner, director   228-6434
COLLEGIUM MUSICUM ENSEMBLE
John Sawyer, director   228-3524
CONTEMPORARY PLAYERS
Steven Chatman or Eugene Wilson,
directors   228-3468 or 228-3406
STAGE BAND
lan McDougall, director
ASIAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE
Alan Thrasher, director    228-2331
Please contact the director of the ensemble of your choice to arrange an audition, or call
228-3113 for further information. Students in some Faculties can receive credit for ensemble work in the School of Music. Tuesday, September 9,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page9
We'll do
Anything
to stay
your
Favourite
Club
You asked us for Beach Nite
We put 4 tons of sand on our dance floor.
You asked us for Cowboy Nite
We brought in 200 bales of hay.
You asked us for Animal Nite
We started the original.
You asked us for Special Prices on the weekend
We started 'Beat the Clock' on Friday Nites.
And now, your U.B.C. student card will provide you
no cover privileges at Tommy Africa's
any night of the week. (I.D. required.)
3        1010
Beach Avenue
683-1993 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
WANTED
ALIVE & KICKING
j 'ft...
\
4h
sm
%
'Vs
K
^m
f
'v,._j
X
l!Vk:
LOIS LANE, NEWS REPORTER: wanted for writing
factual stories about the university community. Often
seen talking to major university figures, such as the
AMS and administration presidents. Has also written
on speeches by major public figures lecturing on
campus, such as John Turner. Tends to keep her
prose as factual as possible. May develop into an
editor if she is not stopped. Can potentially destroy
careers of any misbehaving academics or student
politicians. Willing to risk getting bad grades to get a
good story.
JON ARBUCKLE, CARTOONIST: Wanted for
creating devastating caricatures for use on editorial
pages. Will attack anyone and anything the editorial
collective agrees on (see below). Has occasionally
acted on his own initiative, with the collective's
approval. Also responsible, along with Opus Pingouin,
for making small, decorative spaces for use in spaces
unoccupied by neither news copy nor advertising..
Contrary to popular belief, he may not necessarily be
an art student.
OPUS PINGOOIN, TWEENS EDITOR: Wanted for
typing little notices of upcoming events for the
classified pages. He is not experienced in journalism
but would like to learn as much as possible. Can alert
Lois Lane, Peter Parker and Clark Kent of any
interesting events in the event that Cathy the
Paranoic has not delivered a press release. His job
fulfills the most basic function of the campus
newspaper; consequently, his job is the most
indispensable.
<i i c. ^:
&
m_
LUCY VAN PELT, LETTER WRITER: Wanted for
presenting views often in conflict with The Ubyssey. j
Expresses herself clearly on many topics. Her precise
occupation varies. She often writes out of outrage for
incorrect coverage, exaggerated coverage, lack of
coverage, and occasionally all of the above. Valuable
to the Ubyssey organization as an outside watchdog.
The Ubyssey Office, SUB 241k
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during the Depression, opens at the
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ALSO PLAYING!
The smash hit musical comedy Sex Tips
for Modern Girls, held over through September at
the Arts Club Seymour Street Stage.
And Ain't Misbehavin', the Fats Waller Musical
Show at the Arts Club Revue Theatre
from September 22.
VISIT our booth #9 in SUB this week from 9 - 5 p.m.
and inquire about our sensational
SEASONS TICKETS! Or call the Arts Club
at 687-5315. Tuesday, September 9, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Conference debt ires profs
By JENNIFER LYALL
Revelations of a $300,000 deficit
on a World Conference for Youth
at Nanaimo's Malaspina College
last summer have the faculty
association demanding the immediate suspension of the college's
former president.
The association accused ex-
president Bruce Fraser of "fiscal
irresponsibility and mismanagement."
The conference lost 75 per cent of
its budget when a major oil company withdrew funding after the
drop in oil prices and conference
planners were left with a smaller
amount of mostly federal government funds. The conference lost
$750,000 in funding with the oil
company's withdrawal of support.
The organizing committee was
left with $250,000 in federal funding, but spent at least $290,000
more than that, said college board
chair Doug McBride.
The faculty association believes
the conference was allowed to continue despite the lack of funding,
stating in a press release the project
"should never have been included
in the college budget in the first
place."
McBride said the conference was
authorized by the board only on the
condition that expenditures not exceed revenues.
"Given that that was the board
policy and that there was an over
expenditure we have a serious problem," he said.
McBride is calling on all members
of the college community to pull
together to help find solutions. "It
is a college problem, which all of us
must work closely together to overcome," he said.
Faculty  president   Steven   Lane
disagreed. "The faculty feels
strongly that this is not their problem," he said, adding since the
debt was not incurred through normal college operations faculty and
students should not suffer from it
through layoffs or program
changes.
"We consider this an emergency
and feel the board should appeal to
the (provincial) government for
emergency funding," said Lane.
Lane echoed the faculty sentiment that the conference should not
have been included in the college
budget. "When the revenue did not
appear to be coming in the project
should have been cancelled," he
said.
Present college president Richard
Johnston also held Fraser responsible for the deficit. "Let's put it this
way — the conference was run out
of Bruce Fraser's office," he said.
"Ultimately it comes down to
whoever has signing power."
McBride, however, was reluctant
to point any fingers. "I'm disappointed   that   they   (the   faculty
association) have apportioned
responsibility before determining all
the facts," he said.
The college board has hired Vancouver accounting firm Price
Waterhouse to conduct an inquiry
into the management of the conference, he said.
"The process of appointing an
independent investigator will ensure
that all parties involved have the
opportunity for a fair hearing,"
said McBride. "Our primary objective is not retribution but
knowledge that will prevent us from
having this problem again."
Fraser denies being personally
responsible for the conference
deficit.
"1 held the position of chief executive officer at the time it occured
so I was left holding the bag," he
said.
"My instructions to the operating
team were to tailor the conference
to fit the funds. If I had known it
was not proceeding accordingly I
would not have allowed the conference to go ahead."
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom rejoiced at the arrival of
another twice-weekly fishwrap of
their own special way.
"Ooga, bpoga schloggle woggle!!
What a great issue, I think I'll wrap
a salmon in this one," cried the
blorgs.
Mottled mauve blorgs at the AB-
solutely Muddled Society bunker
inhaled deeply outside exterminator
affairs blorg Careless Meddler's office and started talking about
worlds inside worlds inside worlds
inside worlds orbiting in atoms.
Daily Blah co-conspirator Rabid
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the program next spring. Make an investment in your future
— inquire about The Graduate Admission Program.
For further information, contact your Employment Centre on Campus or contact Jan Arnold at the Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia before
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Vermin rejoiced in another communique from the land of industrious lilac blorgs learning
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Maniacal Doberman, another
member of the new order, introduced the assembled Blah Blorgs to his
not-very-altered ego who had more
puce hair and a shirt that wasn't as
loud.
But Pango Pango wan't a
carefree tiny tropical kingdom, no,
no yes, Sneezun' Weasleballs was
suffering a traumatic Neep fit
which involved hallucinations in
which he believed he could carry a
tune.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
sndaieo uo
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eaje „6u!d88|s„ paoo —
>|09a eu,0|V — suouobjuv
•Abuolu 6uug - juap
-nis aDjaujoiOD b jaauj oi aaoh
■uoiionpojdaj
jenxasuou joj aBuno-]
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S,lN3QIS3dd Page 14
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
CFS hires task force co-ordinator
By EVELYN JACOB
The Canadian Federation of
Students has hired a coordinator to
oversee its newly created task force
on student aid in B.C.
Sue Stroud, past coordinator of
the Alliance to Defend Education,
will be actively involved in organizing local hearings at colleges and
universities across the province.
Stephen Scott, executive officer
for the CFS Pacific Region, said the
federation was able to hire Stroud
after it received $6,000 from the Defend Education Services Coalition
which includes The B.C. Teachers
Federation, The Vancouver
Regional Municipal Employees
Union, The Canadian Institute of
Educators, the CFS, and The Canadian Union of Public Employees.
DESC will pay for Stroud's wages,
travel, and promotional material.
The task force was created in
response to the provincial government's poor handling of student aid
in B.C. The first hearing is set for
Sept. 22 at Langara Campus.
"The idea is to bring the community on to the campuses and to
make people aware of the financial
state of students in this province,"
said Scott.
"Alberta has been in a recession
for two years and its government
has spent $110 million on student
aid compared to $12.5 million spent
by the provincial government in
B.C. The government has to be
questioned about this," said Scott.
The provincial government began
slashing funding to student aid in
1984,  replacing the grant  system
with an all-loan program. Provincial allocating decreased from $33
million in 1983 to $12 million in
1986. The average debt loan for
students graduating in B.C. is close
to $22,000.
Post-Secondary education
minister Russ Fraser said he hopes
the CFS task force is successful.
"The public will be impressed
about what we've done," said
Fraser. "I welcome the effort."
But Scott's anticipation of
government reaction to the task
force is pessimistic.
"Fraser has made up his mind
before he looks at anything. He
thinks colleges and universities
serve a privileged miniority so
students should pay more," he said.
"But   the  more  you   restrict   ac-
Persky calls papers biased
B.C.'s two major newspapers do
not reflect the diversity of political
thought in the province, an author
and professor of political science
said Wednesday evening at the
Graduate Centre.
"Over 40 per cent of the public is
not given a voice in the media,"
Stan Persky told about 35 people at
a debate with Sun columnist
Vaughn Palmer on B.C. politics
and the media.
Persky said the mainstream press
does not repesent social democratic
viewpoints and that major Sun col-
Bookstore
Get in line.
The annual AMS used bookstore
is open for business in SUB 119 and
125, giving students an opportunity
to sell their used books and pick up
the texts they need for less than the
bookstore charges.
"Approximately 4,000 books
have come in so far, and more are
coming in all the time," said AMS
vice-president Rebecca Nevraumont
who oversees the used bookstore.
Students with books to sell can
bring them to SUB 119 until
September 17. Those selling books
set their own prices and the AMS
keeps a 15 per cent commission
from the books sold.
"There's no profit for the
AMS," said Nevraumont. "The
commission covers operating expenses, including wages, forms and
pricing stickers. "I picked up a
book for half price. It was great,"
Martim Emig, pharmacy 1 said.
The used bookstore will be open
Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 8
p.m. until September 25.
umnists are "actively hostile" to
that political perspective.
But Palmer dismissed Persky's
allegations as untrue. He said the
Sun often holds positions similar to
those advanced by the NDP. The
Sun and Province newspapers have
been hostile towards the Social
Credit government, Palmer added,
particularly on issues of restraint,
native land claims, the northeast
coal project and education cuts,
and there has been little support for
the government in the Sun's
editorials.
According to Palmer, the press
has done a better job of hurting the
Socreds chances of re-election than
the NDP.
But Persky said criticism of
Socred policies is different than
promoting ideological diversity,
and charged the press has never
seriously discussed political issues
from a social democratic perspective.
"The intellectual character of
most issues . . . doesn't get explored," said Persky. He said the
media invents a "scandal world"
which "misleads and obscures the
understanding of political issues."
"The electronic media is even
more shallow than the press, said
Persky, likening it to a "vacuum
cleaner that gets bits and pieces of
what is lying around."
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major, honours, graduate, and diploma
students in each of the departments and
schools of the Faculty of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and
Second year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings of the
Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the
Dean of Arts' Office, the Faculty Adviser's Office, and the Arts
Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar of the
University not later than 4:00 p.m. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1986.
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations have been received by
the deadline, there will be no representation.
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cessibility, the more elitist educational institutes in our province will
become," he added.
Scott said the federations attitude
towards the task force is one of
"constructive criticism" rather
than "Socred bashing." Asked if a
shift in leadership would bring
more sympathy to the financial
state of students, Scott said: "I
don't think we can assume we'll
have a better time with a new party.
Policies always change after promises are made."
After the last hearing, scheduled
for October 21 at the University of
Victoria, the CFS will submit a list
of recommendations to the education minister.
UBC is not a member of CFS and
will not participate in the hearings.
But Scott said he hopes the AMS
will make a presentation at the
Langara hearing.
AMS president Simon Seshadri
said he has not heard from the CFS
and knows nothing about the hearings.
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Page 15
outfall angers beachgoers
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Vancouver has a sewage problem. The question remains how to
treat it. High coliform counts have
plagued Wreck Beach and other
Vancouver beaches all summer.
In 1980 the Iona sewage treatment plant on the North Arm of the
Fraser River released effluent into
Sturgeon Bank, depleting the supply of oxygen in the water and suffocating thousands of fish.
In 1981 the Greater Vancouver
Sewerage and Drainage District was
charged under the Pollution Control Act and the Fisheries Act and
fined $10,000. A study group was
appointed by the Richmond provincial court to examine the problem.
The study group spent over $1
million to come to the conclusion
that a deep-sea outfall must be constructed. A $57 million deep-sea
sewage outfall is now under construction at the Iona Sewage Treatment Plant. It will be nine
kilometres long and discharge effluent 100 metres below the surface
of the Georgia Strait.
But Judy Williams, chair of the
Wreck Beach Preservation Society,
says that will not solve the problem.
"The GVRD is building an outfall
that is obsolete before it is built.
Why not benefit from Seattle's
mistakes?" says Williams.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has ordered Seattle's
five major deep-sea sewage outfalls
to install secondary treatment by
1997. Iona, which only uses primary
treatment, will not implement
secondary treatment on the basis of
study group recommendations.
Chlorination of the discharged effluent will also be discontinued
after the outfall is completed.
Will Paulick, a member of the
Fraser River Coalition and the
Society Promoting Environmental
Conservation, says there is no way
the system is going to work.
"I think the studies done are
suspect. It's a $60,000,000 boondoggle. Taking the sewage further
out of the Point Grey baseline is not
going to solve any problems."
Paulik believes an error in siting
,»J$&jU ^j^. ^             .,          ^
\y%
>^i?^r
-a*   '
has been made with the Iona plant.
"It's not too late to relocate. It
would cost less money to mothball
Iona."
One of the places that a sewage
treatment plant might go is Annacis
Island, according to Paulik.
The Iona sewage treatment
plant is located directly across the
Fraser River from the Musqueam
Indian Reserve. The currents carry
the sewage around Point Grey to
Wreck Beach, one of Vancouver's
most popular bathing spots.
The plant treats sewage from all
of Vancouver, the University Endowment Lands and about eight
per cent of the sewage from Burnaby. The plant was built in 1962
and has been expanded three times
since then.
Sewage is discharged through
three large pipes. The plants collection system is "combined": both
sanitary sewage and stormwater
runoff enter the same pipe and flow
into the plant.
Presently, treatment effluent
from Iona is discharged at the
shoreline onto the tidal flats called
Sturgeon Bank.
Williams says the system is antiquated but would cost a great deal
to replace. "It would cost
something like $7 billion to
renovate the current system. The
real issue is source control that the
city can't afford."
Chlorination is not always the
solution because it is synergetic,
says Williams. "When you put two
household chemicals together you
can create a third chemical element.
Chlorine can cause more problems
then it solves."
Williams says one of the biggest
problems with source control is the
everyday use. "People have to be
educated so they don't flush various
types of cleaners down the toilet."
Dr. John Blatherwick, city health
inspector, agrees. "We have to go
after source control. The incident in
Annacis Island with the acid spill
killing bacteria is a classic
example."
Earlier   this   year   an   unknown
company   dumped   acid   into   the
See page 16: MORE Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
More sludge
From page 15
sewage system. The acid broke
down bacteria that helped decompose sewage at the Annacis plant
causing a stench that still exists.
Dr. Bill Meekison, a director and
a medical health officer, says the
primary treatment being used is not
antiquated.
"The question is not really one of
antiquity but whether primary
treatment is sufficient. The most
important thing is the dilution factor. The larger the body of water
the more diluted the product
becomes," says Meekison.
Meekison adds the system can be
improved but the GVRD does not
want   to  go  ahead  with  it   now.
"There was an outcry then from
swimmers using polluted water so
the sewage plants were installed and
intecepted 98 per cent of all sewage
in 1963."
Talbot adds health officers have
to examine all industries, find what
they produce and see what waste
treatment equipment they have.
"The waste by-law needs to be
revised. It is 20 years old and does
not cover many of the new
chemicals."
"Iona treats weak sewage. Only
seven per cent comes from the industrial sector," says Talbot.
But Williams points to the fact
that a decision was made on
November  18,  1985 to dump  118
"We may be looking at a situation where soon there
will be no fishing or swimming in the showplace city of
ours," warns Williams.
Secondary and tertiary treatment
are needed when there is a limited
amount of water, he says, but Vancouver does not lack water.
Fraser River Coalition's Paulik.
says primary treatment retains only
35 to 40 per cent of the sewage
sludge. Secondary treatment, on the
other hand, retains about 85-90 per
cent of it.
Brian Talbot, a GVRD deputy
engineer, said indications are the
present system will work well.
"Secondary treatment doesn't
remove all the pollutants. It reduces
some of the dissolved oxygen so you
still have an oxygen problem."
Talbot says the outfall will solve
the sewage problem for the next 15
or 20 years. "Serious treatment
never stops," he said. "There was
no real sewage treatment right up
until the late 1950's and early
1960's.
million gallons of raw sewage into
the Burrard Inlet. "I think they are
just waiting for Expo to end and
then they will do it," said Williams.
The GVRD claims its storm
sewers are so outdated in the case of
heavy rain that more sewage will
enter the ocean without dumping
than with the proposed dumping into the inlet, says Williams.
"We may be looking at a situation where soon there will be no
fishing or swimming in the
showplace city of ours," warns
Williams. The recent sewage spill in
Gibsons on the Labour Day
weekend — closing area beaches —
emphasizes her point.
City officials seem intent on
pushing a solution through here
that has already failed in Seattle.
The consequences of that system
may even be greater for
Vancouver's beaches.
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224-9116 I Tuesday, September 9, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Tories would make sex right
By SUZETTE CHAN
George Orwell was two years off.
In Nineteen Eighty-four, equality
meant conformity, so the state
formed the Anti-Sex League to enforce state-approved sexual activity
(or non-activity). In 1986, sexuality
means deviancy, so the state is using
legislation to stamp out immorality.
The difference is that you can close
Orwell's book, go to bed and forget
about it, but you can't wish away
the tide of 1986 conservatism and
go to bed without thinking of the
ramifications of what you do there.
June and July saw major new attacks launched on individual
freedoms in both Canada and the
United States. A U.S. Supreme
Court decision upheld the right of
State legislatures to ban sodomy
(i.e. oral or anal sex), undoubtedly
a first step in building the case for
quarantining AIDS victims. Then a
U.S. Justice Department ruling
allowed businesses to fire
employees who have AIDS or are
suspected to be in a high-risk group,
in order to "protect" the other
workers.
In Canada, meanwhile, a prostitute was being hunted down by
police for fear she would spread the
disease. Her own health was not an
issue.
On June 10, John Crosbie (then
Canada's Justice Minister) introduced two bills in Parliament,
one dealing primarily with the sexual abuse of children (although
Crosbie managed to sneak in a
clause having to do with the sale of
sexual aids and with buggery between adults), the other with pornography.
Both bills reflect a spreading conservative backlash against the
liberalism of the '60s and '70s. The
Canadian Right blames the breakup
of the nuclear family, rampant sexual disease and a general weakening
of moral values on these liberal attitudes. AIDS is an obvious
scapegoat for the new conservatism
on sexual matters, but taking away
AIDS will not solve the problems
defined by the Right. The election
of the Mulroney government two
years ago paved the way for
people's fears .of herpes, incest,
child abuse, and rape to be projected in public legislation.
The Crosbie proposals could
become the telescreens that monitor
Canadians' sexual behavior and
social attitudes, if the Tories get
their way.
But so far, bills C-113 and C-114
have  prompted  a  general  outcry
from all sides of the political spectrum in Canada. As Christine Bear-
chell writes in an editorial in the
August issue of the Body Politic,
"the anti-porn proposals have been
almost universally assailed as anti-
sex." Co-worker at the Body Politic
Andrew Lesk agrees: "The bills tell
us that what goes on between two,
loving and caring individuals — be
they heterosexual or homosexual —
is sick and somehow unnatural."
The two bills, which, among
other things", recommend a maximum ten-year jail sentence for
"touching, directly or indirectly,
with a part of the body or an object,
any part of the body of a person
under the age of 14," and define
"degrading pornography" as pornography (the depiction of sexual
activity, according to Crosbie)
which shows defecation, urination,
ejaculation, or expectoration by
one person onto another, lactation,
menstruation, penetration or a
bodily orifice with an object, or any
act in which one person attempts to
degrade him or herself or another,
are scheduled for committee hearings later this .year, most likely in
the fall.
Lesk is afraid much of the bill
will become law. "We're resting on
the hope that it doesn't," he says,
"but, let's face it, there's a conservative majority at the moment."
Lesk sees the creation of the committee to look at the bills in the fall
as a "token gesture," aimed at
assuring thel average Canadian
"that we live in a democracy."
"The committee is already stacked," says Lesk, pointing to the appointment of Jim Jepson, MP for
London East, to the five-person
committee. "Jepson is anti-sex,
period," says Lesk. "For him, it's
not even a matter of homophobia
— he just thinks sex in itself, no
matter who it's between, is 'dirty'."
If Crosbie's bills, or parts of
them, do become law, says Lesk,
"there will be continuing fights on
our behalf to have them repealed."
The fight has already begun.
Edmonton lawyer Ritter formed
the Citizen's Committee for
Freedom to Sexual Choice with
Regard to Sexual Morality after
reading Crosbie's bills. A report circulated by the committee calls the
proposals "a puritanical approach
to sexual morality by the government, and an attempt to enforce
conservative, restrictive and right-
wing values on the Canadian
population through the force of
criminal legislation."
Even though the Tories' major
election platform was to minimize
government intervention," says
Ritter, "they have been out of
power so long they're overpowered
by the power of the law. They've
thought they could right every
wrong through legislation."
Ritter contends that the bills ignore the common law and betray
public expectations. "Canada has
long had a tradition of liberal
governments that protect rights,"
he explains. "We are used to a
paternal kind of government; we
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trust the government to do the right
thing. We never expect the government to be extreme."
The Mulroney government, Ritter suggests, has proven it is not only parental but also condescending.
The proposals were tabled without
prior briefs, secretively without
consultation. Crosbie ignored the
proposals of the Fraser commission
on pornography and prostitution, a
Trudeau government creation that
travelled across Canada hearing
briefs from citizens.
A close reading of the bills belies
Crosbie's claim that they affect only visual matter that is pornographic. One section restricts the
sale of sexual aids to persons under
the age of 18 — even though the age
of consent to marry is 16. In
another, the depiction of menstruation is listed under "degrading pornography."
To be exempt from prosecution
after goods are seized, an accused
person must prove that the
"degrading pornography" has a
"genuine educational or scientific
purpose" or "is a work of artistic
merit." The accuser does not have
to prove that the work is
"degrading" or is "pornography."
The law takes care of that. And,
says Ritter, this cheats Canadians
See page 18: PORN
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v Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
Porn bill pushes puritanical ideal
From page 17
out of the right to due process of
the law: you are guilty until you
prove you are innocent. Moreover,
the fact that judges will be precluded from considering community
standards, as is traditional in common law, "would backtrack on
hundreds of years of legal
tradition."
Susan Morrow, director of the
Princess Theatre, a repertory
cinema in Edmonton, expects the
new laws, if passed, to make it easy
for police to lay charges against the
theatre — Pretty Baby would be
banned outright" — and is concerned with ramifications on a
larger scale. "It would make it very
difficult to portray any gay relationships on film," she predicts, noting
that Crosbie's bills closely follow
the American legislation on
sodomy.
Morrow fears that legislation that
presumes to define what the public
can look at is not an unlikely
forerunner to censorship of ideas.
"We just went through a controversy when we showed the Godard film
Hail Mary, which had a religious
theme. There was some nudity in it,
so it was easy to make a connection
(between nudity and what protestors called the blasphemy of the
film). But where do you draw the
line? Will they soon say I shouldn't
show films that deal with
philosophical issues while other
theatres can show films of solid
violence?"
The Princess imposes a kind of
"self-censorship" with the interests
of the community in mind, Morrow
says. "When I first started here, the
precedent was for showing Russ
Meyer films." But Morrow discontinued the screenings of T&A
movies. "I don't show sexist films,
films like Rambo, and I turned
down Caligula. But I wouldn't have
that element of choice if the law
were to be enacted."
Morrow says the Hail Mary controversy and Crosbie's proposals
are not enough to steer her away
from showing films people want to
see, films that she believes are important to the community. She will
be interested to see what happens in
October when the Princess screens
Mixed Blood, a bloody satire involving street kids. The Ontario
censor board (famous for taking
clippers to The Tin Drum) has
already banned it, essentially
because it has children in it, but it
passed in Alberta. Morrow believes
the violent scenes in Mixed Blood
have a point to make, and wonders
whose standard of "artistic merit"
will determine the validity of certain
films if Crosbie's bills become law.
In live theatre, everyone from the
owner of a theatre to the stagehands
would be liable to prosecution if involved in a performance deemed
pornographic. Under section 163 of
Bill C-l 14, "we would step back 20
years," says Jane Buss, executive
director of the Playwrights Union
of Canada.
Buss recalls the controversy over
the performance of the musical
Hair in Toronto, when the morality
squad showed up at the theatre
every other night because of scenes
simulating group sex in a tent. At
the time, however, community standards applied. Crosbie's law would
have theatres closed until they prove a performance is not "pornographic."
"One is not presumed innocent,"
says Buss. "What we're talking
about is censorship."
"These people would have arrested God," comments Mike Rit
ter. "God made the fruit available
to Adam and Eve. He would have
been arrested as the distributor,
owner and manager of a property
that promoted actual or simulated
acts of vaginal, anal or oral intercourse, masturbation or group
sex!"
Ritter, Buss, and Morrow believe
that the right of the individual to
choose is being compromised by the
wish of the government to arbitrate.
Ritter suggests the proposed laws
would make Canada more
repressive than many religions.
"Catholics are not excommunicated if they do not follow
edicts from the Pope. Christianity is
based on choice." Ritter proposes
that restrictions and definitions of
pornography take into account
freedom of choice.
"Anything can be degrading if it
is not done on a consensual basis,"
says Ritter, but he concedes that
there is a grey area when it comes to
the matter of consent. Many people
still hold the opinion that someone
who is raped somehow "deserves
it" — either she was a "slut" or he
was a "fag." "This is obviously not
a black and white issue, in spite of
parliament trying to make it black
and white. There is always a grey
area, and that's for the courts to
decide. When does something
become mutual consent? When is it
a questionable consent?
Ritter says churches, schools and
regional social services should be
educating children and adults about
the kind of sexism and exploitation
that precipitates pornography. "It
is not a matter for the law. Morality
is a matter of conscience and that is
a matter for education.
Essentially, the government sees
sex as evil, Ritter believes. Why else
would it link graphic depiction of
sexuall activity with violence, child
abuse and degradation? "No
evidence exists to support the
theory that explicit sexual activity is
harmful," he points out. "There
have been studies that show that
violence is probably bad, but that
sex itself is not harmful."
Even feminists who advocate the
censorship of pornography are
disturbed by the two bills. Susan G.
Cole, a contributor to the Toronto-
based feminist review Broadside,
told the Body Politic in August that
the bills revealed "anti-woman sentiments." She hinted that feminists
were being used by the Canadian
Right in their crusade against sex.
As an editorial in the July issue of
Broadside points out, "... the in
terests of the two groups (the Right
and pro-censorship feminists) are
not the same."
The bills may be anti-sex, but
they're hardly anti-sexist. In fact,
says Varda Burstyn„ co-founder of
Feminists Against Censorship,
"they ignore feminist concerns
altogether."
Ritter hopes the new Justice
Minister, Ray Hnatyshyn, heeds the
opposition and either scraps the
bills or uses them as an election
platform in a couple of years so
Canadians can more directly comment on the proposals and the
authoritarian and secretive style of
the Mulroney's boys in blue
pinstripes.
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BY STANLEY PARK WW       \J\JI       I Tuesday, September 9, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
This was the summer that was
By EVELYN JACOB
Even before the doors of our
great academic institution closed to
many of us for the balmy summer,
important issues were already looming on the UBC horizon — none of
which escaped the ear of our intrepid reporters.
Here's what happened this summer at UBC:
Critics slammed the provincial
government's illustrious Excellence
in Education Fund, which they say
was money taken out of the univer
sities' operating budgets in previous
years and re-wrapped in a glitzy
$600 million Socred public relation
package.
Despite President Strangway's
optimism about the fund, op-
positon leaders say it will not even
cover the cost of inflation. Others
blasted the fund because it does not
represent a long-term commitment
to education, but funds priorizing
government initiatives instead.
In the midst of the excellence
hype, the arts did not receive a cent.
A disappointment, according to the
president and the dean of arts.
To continue in the spirit of excellence (the only spirit which
haunts the province these days), the
provincial government approved
$1.2 million in student aid from the
excellence fund for proposals submitted by B.C. Student Societies.
But society presidents say the
money will help only the best
students in the province.
The SFU student society called
once again for a return to an all-
grant aid program, but the ministry
of education gave them a flat no.
The perhaps not older but wiser (?)
AMS however, didn't ask for the
reinstatement of the grant program
because they said they knew the
ministry would reject their request.
They played by the new rules of excellence instead and got the money
they wanted.
The Canadian Federation of
Students continued to be disgusted
with the government's way of dealing with the education crisis in B.C.
SOME TALK.
SOME run. All,
alas, must now
put aside
summer
pleasures
to pursue the
finer goal of
aquiring
knowledge . . .
They decided to put together a task
force on student aid this fall which
invites any individual or group to
voice their concerns about the
financial burdens of students.
But the federation is not overly
optimistic they will get the help they
want from post-secondary minister
Russ Fraser. By publicizing the
dismal financial state of students
(some carrying student debt loans
of up to $22,000 after graduation),
the Federation hopes the community will join forces to exert pressure
on Vander Zalm and company.
Dastardly deeds continued to
plague post-secondary students in
B.C. Politicians and student
societies were shocked when only
one in seven non-profit organizations in B.C. received funding from
Challenge '86, the provincial-
federal government employment
scheme which was to create up to
118,000 jobs for students and.
youths in Canada.
College and university student
service organizations in B.C. received significantly fewer challenge-
funded jobs this summer compared
with last year; the great bulk ofthe
jobs went to the private sector instead .
The AMS applied for 47 jobs, but
received funding for only two positions.
But not all was dismal on the
employment front this summer.
Statistics Canada reported
unemployment figures for students
aged 20-24 dropped to 12.1 per cent
this summer, a decrease of 3.5 per
cent from the same time last year.
The   most   recent   labour  force
survey  showed   947,000  returning
students were employed this sum-
See page 21: MORE
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Opening Nov. '86 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
— file photo
GREAT MOMENTS IN T-Bird History #17. Before the T-Birds first game, the team spent its     score the touchdown and then you spike the ball . . ."
first practice learning the essentials of football. Quarterback speaks: "Get it right! First you
Boss 'Birds bash beastly Bears
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The UBC Thunderbird football
team defence came to the rescue
once again in their Saturday evening home opener at Thunderbird
stadium, holding the powerful
Alberta Golden Bear offence to only five points.
The 23 to five victory gave the
T-Birds a share of first place in the
Western Intercollegiate Football
league with next week's opponent
Calgary. Both teams have 2-0
records.
The game got off to a slow start
with neither team doing much of
anything in the first two quarters.
The score at half-time was UBC
seven, Alberta four.
But UBC came alive in the second
half with 16 consecutive points to
end any hopes of victory for the
Bears.
Rookie running back Mark
Petros scored two touchdowns for
the 'Birds.
His first score came at 11:28 of
the first quarter on a one yard run.
Petros added his second score on a
three yard run at 5:47 of the third
quarter.
Head Coach Frank Smith said
the team's slow start was due in
large part to the strong play of the
Alberta defense.
"We played well in the first and
third quarters but we did have a bit
of a letdown in the second
quarter," said Smith.
One of the highlights of the evening came when veteran running
back Terry Cochrane returned a
punt 42 yards for a touchdown.
Alberta failed to score a touchdown
against the UBC defense.
"Our special teams were just
great. They gave us great field position all night long and that is so important in this game," said Smith.
Rookie linebacker Ron Crick and
second year defensive back Rob
Moretto turned in outstanding
defensive performances for UBC
while Mike Bellefontaine handled
the punting chores more than adequately.
UBC compiled a total net offense
of 246 yards compared to only 129
for Alberta. The Bears were held to
a paltry  56 yards passing on the
evening.
UBC's game this weekend should
be a classic confrontation at home
with the defending Vanier Cup
champion Calgary Dinosaurs.
Calgary features the leading
rusher in the WIFL, Elio Geremia,
brother of the 'Birds Mass
Geremia.
The Dinos Rob McNab is the top
passing quaterback in the WIFL
and has one of the best offensive
lines to protect him.
Smith stresses defense
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Long before classes started Frank
Smith had his UBC Thunderbirds
preparing hard for the new Col-
legate football season and already
the work has paid off.
On August 30 UBC crushed the
Manitoba Bisons 32-9 in Winnipeg
to start their bid for the Western
football title with a win.
Smith, football coach at UBC for
the last 12 seasons has a veteran
squad to work with this year with 18
starters returning to the lineup.
"One of our outstanding prospects Doug Shorman,wasn't taken
along for the last road trip (to
Manitoba). I mean that is unheard
of. A couple of years ago he may
have been a starter," said Smith.
Smith said he likes the situation
because it gives more time for some
of the players to develop. "It's
good for the immediate situation -
the majority of the kids are staying
with us."
It may be a cliche that defense
wins matches. But the 'Birds showed how true it is as they snapped up
seven interceptions on their way to
victory in Manitoba.
"The defensive team is as good a
defensive team as ever. All the starting linebackers have returned and
we only lost one guy out of the top
seven in the secondary," said
Smith.
"I make no secret about the fact
that I recruit defense first. Defense
wins games - especially in the winter
bad weather."
Offense is something that seems
to develop slowly in professional
and collegiate football and the
Thunderbirds are no exception.
"This is mainly a big play type offense considering that we only have
three downs to work with. That's
why I like the American game better," said Smith.
Smith's central philosophy is
team play. If the team does not gel
and play as a unit the 'Birds are in
for some trouble.
"We have to mix as a team. The
whole idea is the chemistry of the.
people around each other. They
have to like what they are doing in
order for us to be successful," said
Smith.
Smith says the team has been competitive every year except his, first,
1974. He expects this season to be
no different. "I inherited a disaster
when I came here. It was a joke."
The toughest opposition for the
'Birds will come from the Alberta
Golden Bears and the Calgary
Dinosaurs.
"The City of Calgary has as
many high school football teams as
does British Columbia. They have
about 100 kids turn up for every
camp and can really pick and
choose," said Smith.
People to look for on the
Thunderbird's roster this year are
All-Canadian defensive back Mark
Norman and Western Intercollegiate Football League All-stars
Jack Beestra, Matt Pearce, and Leo
Groenewegan.
Dwayne Derban was a second
round pick of the Toronto
Argonauts and attended their training camp.
Matt Fitzpatrick, Tyler Lorenz
and Shorman are new people to
look for.
— steve chan photo
FRANK SMITH . . . "HELLO? Yes, I'd like a large pepperoni pizza with
double cheese, some garlic bread, a salad, a rootbeer and a fullback that
can run the 100 in 8.0 seconds . . ."
Hay ponklos, iff you can't live it, write about It
'£**
Psssssstllilll So ya wanna write sports
don't cho. baby. Ya Just wanna be a
starlllll Well kids your chance to be a big
star awaits you at The Ubyssey.
There is absolutely no business like
sports business. Just look at John Turner.
He was once the sports editor of The
Ubyssey and may well be the next
prime minister of our nation.
You mp# not become the prime
minister of Canada but you win hear
your name mutterecV in Tow whispers
around campus. "Say don't you write
sports for The Ubysseyr
Listen kids, now reaHy is the time to
come on in to The Ubyssey and buy a
brand new Yugo. Oooopsllll I'm sorry,
this Is a non-commercial sports ad and
what we want you to do Is come in and
write. -■■•'",-
You can choose from a variety of
men's and women's varsity sports that
include: volleyball, hockey, track and
field, football,, field hockey, basketball,
skiing, rowing and wrestling to name
only but a few. „        ^
fill you have to do is come on In to SUB
241k and ask to speak to the sports
editor. That sexy, Intelligent and
frivolous human being will guide you into a world which will change your way
of life. The Ubyssey really is a way of
life for many people.
Not only does it oJlow you the opportunity to write. Interview and learn a
skill but you meet so many people.
TTIany people have created friendships
and bonds that last, a lifetime. We are
one big happy family and as a
legendary sportster you are an Intergral
part of the family.
Now going back to what I said about
learning a skill, think of all the great experience you will get interviewing and
writing. You will get the opportunity to
meet some of the top athletes and
coaches In the nation and many times,
the world.
Writing sports is fun and it is open to
both men and women. All Joking aside,
we would like nothing better to have
women writers and more coverage of
women's sports. The Ubyssey needs
people and it is a great growing experience. If you are at all interested,
please don't be shy to come in and say
hello. We will be more than glad to see
you. Tuesday, September 9,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
More that you didn't know
about last summer
From page 19
mer, an increase of 120,000 over
last year's figures.
The Campus employment centre
filled over twice the number of jobs
this summer than in the summer of
'85. About 40-50 per cent of the
positions were at Expo.
While employment fever was running high, things were not so rosy at
Joblink.
The AMS-sponsored summer
employment centre placed
significantly fewer jobs this year
than last. The reason for the
decrease, a joblink worker said, is
that students don't want to work.
But conflicting evidence showed
that UBC'ers were not totally laid
back this summer.
According to the director of
extra-sessional studies, students
preferred to work at Expo this summer than attend classes. About 400
fewer students enrolled in summer
session this year than last.
As students were busy working to
save their pennies, or falling asleep
in oven-baked classrooms this summer, a food bank was being planned for the fall for the first time at
UBC. The food bank will serve
those students who cannot afford to
eat after paying for the high cost of
tuition.
Eating was not the only thing
students could not afford to do this
summer.
Student representatives joined
local poverty groups to call for a
rollback of the hydro levy which increased 300 per cent on April 1. Student groups also pushed for concession fare cards, but were turned
down by the transit commission.
The Canada student loan maximum
monthly allowance for transportation is $40, less than the cost of a
monthly one-zone bus pass.
And students were not the only
ones who had complaints this summer.
Deans and professors of SFU and
UBC warned their universities will
lose their competitive edge in the
market place if the provincial
government does not improve
faculty salaries. The average salary
of a professor at UBC is $49,000,
compared with $57,000 at the
University of Toronto, and $55,000
at the University of Alberta.
Because of dismal wages, UBC
lost 50 professors to other universities this year (twice as many as last
year), and SFU suffered a loss of
approximately 20.
But president Strangway promised that merit-based increases to
salaries - to be introduced over the
next three years - will raise wages to
match those of peer universities in
five years. The exact amount of the
increase has yet to be announced.
While UBC was losing professors, $500,000 was donated to
the university from Canadian and
Korean business and political
leaders for a new chair in Korean
studies.
Money continued to flow in and
out of the university.
A ground-breaking ceremony for
a new $40 million bio-medical centre - sponsored by the Terry Fox
Medical Research Foundation and
the British pharmaceutical company, Wellcome Foundation
-became the first step towards the
discovery of agents to prevent
diseases such as cancer and arthritis. The centre will be built near
the health sciences hospital.
As doctors were busy gazing
through microscopes, important
decisions about far-off places were
also being examined this summer at
UBC.
The board of governors decided
not to decide about the fate of its
South-African linked investments.
Earlier this year, the board said it
would not take any action on its investment policies until it received a
federal report which analyzes the
conduct of Canadian companies
that operate in Pretoria. The board
received the report in July but it was
found inconclusive because it failed
to investigate the operations of the
8 companies it identified.
The board was criticized for not
taking its own initiative to divest independent of government, and for
being more interested in money
than human rights.
But the board was not the only
institution unable to free itself of its
South-African connection this summer at UBC.
The AMS continued to insist it
"FOSTER BEER and PEPSI"
PRESENT
THE THIRD ANNUAL
m
PLUS
WITH
1 HE ^INUwHICN
"LOUIE LOUIE"
AND
PATRICK MCMAHON
FRI. SiPT.lI
MACINNIS FIELD
NOON
JTOg
PM
IT'S FREE
BUT
BRING I.D.
cannot make moral decisions for
students on the Apartheid question.
Carling O'keefe, Rothmans, and
Growers products were still being
sold in SUB this summer.
While neither government at
UBC would assume responsibility
for educating students on the evils of
apartheid, anti-Botha government
groups were also victims of the
warm summer breeze which continued to breed lethargy at UBC.
Despite the June 12 state of
emergency, censoring of the press,
wide-spread violence and the continual detention of black workers,
not one group at UBC established
new policies or planned protests for
the fall to combat Pretoria's racist
regime.
And last, but not least, the province got a new premier this summer.
Bill Vander Zalm, the 52-year old
son of a tulip salesman, plans to be
less politically confrontational this
time round. According to the UBC
Socred club president, the new
premier loves to visit the universities. He does not have a degree.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
****presents****
Sharon Pollock's
BLOOD RELATIONS
Directed by Charles Siegel
SEPTEMBER 17 - 27
Special Previews - Sept. 17 & 18
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8 p.m.
September 17-27
• STUDENT SEASON TICKETS ;
4 Plays for $13 •••
BLOOD RELATIONS
Pollock
THE CRUCIBLE
Miller November 12-22
THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
Mo,iere January 14-24
THE WINTER'S TALE
Shakespeare March 4-14
BOX OFFICE * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
^
M
This coupon entitles you ONE FREE
"Appetizer of the Day"
with a purchase of a dinner-entree of over $5.00
Nightly Dancing with our D.J. from 10:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
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Wide assortment of
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30-50% off Sugg. List.
Accessories for everyone
at the Lowest Prices
. . . a new kind of discount store.
NORTH VAN
128 LONSDALE
988-1754
KITSILANO
W. FOURTH (AT ALMA)
733-0603 Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
More money
^^^2z^r
MONTREAL (CUP) — More
than 100 groups of university
students, professors and administrators have sweated out the
summer months putting together
their vision of how Quebec universities should be financed.
The Liberal government — eager
to re-evaluate the orientation and
financial framework of Quebec's
post-secondary system — has set
aside the entire month of September
to receive briefs, and interested
organizations are poised and ready
for a battle of wits.
"We're sure (the various groups)
don't all have tne same idea of how
the financing of universities should
be done," said Luc Rheaume, press
aide to education minister Claude
Ryan. "We hope to come up with
solutions for the serious financial
problems we have had."
Funding of Quebec's schools has
slipped in recent years from the
poor to the chronic. A recent report
of the Council of Universities of
Quebec says the province's universities face accumulated budget
deficits of about $90 million.
The commission will look at
university funding levels, debt
loads, tuition fees, financial aid,
and alternative sources of revenue,
and, if the need is found, may call
for a complete overhaul of the
system.
"The general feeling is that the
underfunding situation is so well-
documented and so well-known,"
said Concordia University official
Lucie Beauchemin, "that we hope
to come out with very strong recommendations for the government to
follow."
Beauchemin said most groups
will likely propose changes to the
enrollment-based funding formula.
Many groups are also insisting that
the formula account for the actual
cost of educating a student in a
given program.
Concordia recommends that the
long-term orientation and
autonomous nature of universities
be respected through a higher level
of funding that is comparable to the
national average, ft also wants a
complete moratorium on compressions and 'prelevement', the practice of juggling funds from one
university to another.
Many groups will also call for tuition fee hikes, signalling an end to
the freeze most Quebec students
have enjoyed for about 15 years.
The Council of Universities recently
recommended that fees be doubled,
and Ryan has publicly stated that
students and universities must help
the government keep public spending in line.
The largest student organization
in the province, l'Association na-
tionale des etudiantes du Quebec
(ANEQ), will not accept a tuition
fee increase.
Jean-Pierre Paquet, ANEQ
secretary general, said his group's
brief does not contain any
"miraculous recipes" to solve funding problems, and will not propose
piecemeal solutions. Instead, he
said, the association is submitting a
more global presentation studying
both the philosophical and practical
consequences of doubling tuition
fees and other possible recommendations.
"We intend to fight any proposed increases and we're convinced we
have good arguments," said Paquet. "It is not only a question of
money — we are also worried about
the utilitarian and elitist attitude the
government has shown toward
education.
"This can be seen in the large
number of arts programs that have
had quotas imposed on them, or
have been cut altogether. The right
to education is being attacked, and
we will not engage in false compromises."
See page 23: Quebec
TODAY
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick Libraries, everyone
welcome,  10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Meet at
Main Library, entrance hall.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Executive council retrospective, note new office,
11 a.m.-l p.m., SUB 241A.
WEDNESDAY
CITR RADIO
Bzzr garden, 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m., SUB partyroom. CITR orientation meeting for new and
present members, 1:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m., SUB
partyroom. CITR provides "The Best in Dance
Music," 8:30 p.m, to 1:00 a.m., the Pit Pub,
SUB.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick Libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Meet at
Main Library, entrance hall.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting for present and prospective
writers, lay-out artists and general contributers,
12:30 p.m., SUB room 241k.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Executive council retrospective, note new office,
11 a.m.-1 p.m., SUB 241A.
Your chance to dance for peace
is happening Saturday, September
13 at the York Theatre, 639 Commercial Drive. Presented by Tools
for Peace, "Dance for Nicaragua"
will feature Annette Ducharme and
Holly Arntzen. Tickets are $8 for
those with jobs, $5 for the
unemployed and students. Call
879-7216 for more information.
Things will be heating up at Chile
Day from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday, September 13th at La Quena,
1111 Commercial Drive. The day's
events will include music, information tables, refreshments and a
political and cultural evening event
and update. Advance invitation
tickets sold at la Quena for $2.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
AGENDA
Wednesday, Sept. 10,1986 at 12:30 p.m. in the Graduate Student Centre Dining Room
1. Presentation of the 1986 financial statements
2. Report of Council for 1985/86
3. Proposed amendment of the GSS Constitution
"Moved by special resolution of the members, that Section 2 of the Constitution be amended so as to
read as follows (changes in italics):
The Purposes of the Society are:
a) to promote and serve the academic, social, intellectual, cultural and recreational interests of its
members, the University of British Columbia, and persons associated therewith, and without
restricting the generality of the foregoing, in particular, to promote inter-departmental
activities within the University.
b) to promote the principle and practise of graduate student representation at all levels of decision
making at the University of British Columbia and on all agencies or other bodies which
deliberate on the affairs of graduate students,
c) to provide, maintain and operate the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre as a centre
for the recreation and convenience of members of the Society and their guests,
d) to do everything incidental and necessary to promote and attain the foregoing purposes, and
e) to carry out the foregoing without purpose of gain for its members, and
f) to use any and all profits or accretions to the Society for the promotion and attainment of the
foregoing purposes.''
4. Proposed amendments to the Bylaws.
a) "Moved, by special resolution of the members, that an additional Executive Officer, the External
Affairs Director, be established, and therefore that the following:
g) the External Affair Director" be added to the list of Executive Officer in Bylaw 6.1, and that
the following duties:
"g) The External Affairs Director shall:
i)    be the chairperson of the External Affairs Committee,
ii)    be responsible for the representation of the Society to external organizations,
iii)    develop and maintain contacts with organizations that deliberate on the affairs of
graduate students, and
iv)    perform such other duties as directed by the Council or members."
be added to the Duties of Executive in Bylaw 6.6.
b)Moved by special resolution of the members, that Bylaw 2.9(a), under Fees, be amended to read as
follows:
"a) Fees for ordinary members may be set from time to time by ordinary resolution of the ordinary
members through referendum and subject to the approval of the Board of Governors of the
University."
5. Any other business and motions from the floor
6. Invited talk to the members by Dr. David Strangway, the President of UBC.
ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND,
THURSDAY
THE UBYSSEY
Invites new and aspiring photographers to meet
at 12:00 noon, SUB room 241k. Contact Dan Andrews at 228-2301 for more information.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick Libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Meet at
Main Library, entrance hall.
SHITO-RYU KARATE
Practice — all interested persons welcome, 12:30
to 3:00 p.m., SUB partyroom.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, 12:00 noon, SUB room 215.
CITR RADIO
CITR provides "The Best in Dance Music." 8:30
p.m. to 1:00 a.m. at the Pit Pub, SUB.
SORORITIES OF UBC
Rush kickoff,   12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m.,  SUB
plaza north.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, noon, CEME 1202.
THE UBYSSEY. TWEEN CLASSES
Deadline for Tweens, 1 p.m., SUB 241k.
FRIDAY
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick  Libraries,   10:30
a.m. and 12:30 p.m., everyone welcome. Meet
at Main Library, main entrance hall
SORORITIES OF UBC
Rush  kickoff,   12:00 noon to 2:30 p.m.,  SUB
plaza north.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional!
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day \
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER. Hermes 2000.
Bought at Poison's. Asking $75. Good condition. 875-8938.
'73 CHEVELLE. Exc. cond., power steer.,
power br., cruise, pulse wipers. Perfect car
for student. Propane. $2000. 325-7638.
LANCIA BETA BERLINA '75. 4 dr., 5
speed, fwd., digital am/fm cass. 70K miles.
Navy. $1800. 255-0054.
30 - JOBS
MATURE BABYSITTER needed Thursday,
Friday afternoons, alternate weeks. Phone
224-9283.
SITTER required Tuesdays & Thursdays,
12:30-5:30 p.m., my home. Call 261-6948,
evenings.
PART-TIME BABYSITTER needed two to
three mornings per week. Near UBC.
224-7703.
40 - MESSAGES
NEVER RETYPE AGAIN!! Wordprocess
now at $100, not $2500. Free info. ROBINSON BOOKS, POB 76799U, VANCOUVER,
B.C. V5R 5S7.
POTTERY CLUB MEMBERSI Old members
pis. clean out lockers before Sept. 18, or
contents will be confiscated.
ST. MARK'S CHURCH
KITSILANO
West 2nd & Larch    731 -3811
Anglican        Episcopal
SUNDAY SERVICES
8:LX) a.m. EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG MASS
WEEKDAY EUCHARISTS:
Tuesday at 7 a.m.
Wednesday at 10 a.m.
Thursday at 6 p.m.
We welcome the UBC Community
to our Parish!
75 - WANTED
THE VANCOUVER Philharmonic Orchestra
is recruiting musicians for the coming
season. We perform 4 concerts a year.
Wed', night rehearsals, starting Sept. 3. Call
Kathehne: 261-6193.
END WAR THRU
WORLD GOVERNMENT!
Free Brochure: Box 58232
Stn. L., Van.,
V6P 6E3
PACIFIC LEGAL
EDUCATION ASSOC.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED
Are you looking for some practical experience? We need people
to work one-to-one with
teenagers referred to us by the
Corrections Branch. Ongoing
training is provided.
736-6667
#203-1159 West Broadway
85 - TYPING
70 - SERVICES
TEX TYPESETTING SOFTWARE now avail,
for P.C. $349. Wide variety of output
devices distributed in Canada by
DOCUSOFT SERVICES Ltd. 687-0354,
1152 Mainland.
MINIMUM  NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
CUSTOM
SILK SCREEN
Your Group's Logo
on
• T-Shirts
• Sweatshirts
.   •  Golf Shirts
• Canvas Bags
• Pillow Cases
Call clothworks at
669-0127
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES
$1.50/page double spaced text
Equations & Tables: $14.00/hour
Resumes: S5.00/page
50 personalized form letters only $35.00
Cerlox Binding & Photocopying
Fast professional service
Jeeva's Word Processing
201-636 West Broadway
876-5333
M/C & VISA
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY
Recreation UBC presents
SHOTOKAN KARATE
Monday and Wednesday
8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Gym E, Osborne Centre, UBC
Beginners classes start Sept. 15
For further information
Call Rec. UBC 228-3996
"T. Ohshima - Shihan" Tuesday, September 9,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
Quebec universities facing deficit crisis
Concordia University Students
Association (CUSA) and ANEQ are
concerned about the government's
policy about-face on the protection
of arts education. Both fear the
'virage technologigue' will bring
dangerous consequences in the
future.
"It's a short-term market approach. We critize the prioritizing
of technological education because
students are being trained, not
educated," said former CUSA vice-
president Francois Desrosiers.
"They don't learn to write or how
to express themselves. Communication skills are dying and this will
have a negative impact on job creation in the long run."
Other groups have said that they
are prepared to accept some form
of fee increase — but not without
conditions. Many groups, for example, are not willing to accept a
fee hike if the extra funds are used
to offset the provincial debt.
The McGill Students' Society and
the McGill Association of University Teachers collaborated on a joint
brief. Said society vice-president
lan Brodie: "We took a realistic approach to the funding question.
Everyone agrees that there is a need
for new money and we tried to
demonstrate the concrete ways that
McGill has suffered."
Brodie said the McGill brief does
not oppose fee increases, and in fact
proposes a 75 per cent increase for
1987-88, and additional annual increases of $500 until a ceiling of
$2500 is reached in 1990-91.
MSi/fK. Mm,il£j> To
tit Potato ^ad?
"The increase is not without conditions however," Brodie said. "All
the money resulting from the increase would be passed on to the
university and none retained by the
government." He added university
accessibility must be maintained
through changes to the loans and
bursaries system.
"Finally, there must be increased
student representation on the
university's highest decisionmaking councils," Brodie said.
The Concordia brief also includes
conditions for an increase.
Desrosier said indirect fees have
been "tacitly approved by the
government through pedagogical
material fees". If we were going to
agree to an increase we would have
to have a guarantee of better quality
and accessibility to justify the increased costs."
Most groups also agree that the
current financial aid system should
be scrapped completely, and a
whole new set of criteria be created.
"We want the system completely
reformed, not just adjusted, to
make it responsive to the real needs
of students," Desrosier said. "The
independent status should be easier
to obtain. Part-time students
should have access to financial
aid," he said.
"Without an increase in the
system of financial aid to
students," states the McGill brief,
"a tuition fee increase would
reverse the progress in accessibility
to universities which Quebec has
made in the last 20 years. To encourage qualified students from
lower socio-economic groups to attend university, methods should be
found to increase awareness among
secondary school and CEGEP
students."
"It's the first time since the 1960s
that it appears that Quebec doesn't
have   a  government   which   really
believes that universities are important   to   its   development,"   said
Brodie,' "and that's pretty scary."
The Liberals have already slashed
$20.6 million from the
government's contribution to
universities this year, despite vowing during last fall's election campaign not to make further.cuts.
"""" ■'■ « ««« mvmwm m m hithihih^I
\jaAhion± On <Sight
^OPTICAL BOUTIQUE/^    \
^15% DISCOUNT^K
k_) TO STUDENTS \^
A-s.
TO STUDENTS
IN ADDITION TO OUR ALREADY LOW PRICES
(WITH AMS STUDENT'S CARD)
Conveniently Located Outside University Gates @ 10th Ave.
4572 w. 1 oth Ave.     224-3937
ORIENTATION   WEEK
SEPTEMBER 1986
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
PARTY FEVER
ACCAPELLA CONCERT
CHERRY-COKE
STAGE
SUB PLAZA   12:30 pm
SUPPORT THE USED BOOKSTORE
Rooms  119 &  125 in the SUB
BUY YOUR TICKET FOR THE
AMS TUITION FEE LOTTERY
ALL EVENTS PRODUCED
BY AMS PROGRAMS
ROOT BEER
CHUG-A-LUG
CONTEST
SUB PLAZA
10
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presents
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LINES
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SUB PLAZA       12:30 pm
▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
11
12
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OCT 3  SUB BALLROOM
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12:00 Noon-2:00 pm
LABATTS
HOT AIR
BALLOON
MaclNNIS FIELD
ALL DAY
WIN A RIDE
DRAW IN THE PIT
WEDNESDAY, SEPT 10
FOSTER BEER & PEPSI present
AMS 3rd ANNUAL BBQ
WITH
THE KINGSMEN
LOUIE LOUIE
AND
Patrick McMahon
bring I.D.
MaclNNIS FIELD
12:00 -7:30 pm
AMS CONCERTS    »
PRESCNTS
IDLE EYES
ANO
MADELEINE
SUB BALLROOM
ADVANCE TICKETS AT
AMS BOX OFFICE
^TjsM    At-L AGES WELCOME
%iL- - Page 24
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 9, 1986
Tune in your mind while you tune up your body.
The amazing new Sportsband Walkman (SRF-F1) is another
great idea from Sony, a unique FM Stereo Radio that simply
attaches to a headband or armband and lets you stay tuned to
the times while you're jogging, playing tennis or working out.
The Sony Sportsband is about the size of a credit card. It's just
half-an-inch thick and weighs only 1.4 ounces. So it won't get in
your way while you're making all those moves. What's more, this
rugged little radio is built to resist splashing and sweating.
The Sony Sportsband Walkman runs on two built-in recharge
able Ni-Cad batteries. You get about three hours of listening
from a single charge and the batteries are good for
approximately 1000 charges.
It's available in yellow, red, blue and pink and the Sportsband
comes complete with miniature in-the-ear headphones, headband
and armband.
That's using your head.
There's a Walkman for every walk of life...including the way You Live!
*> it '-
/Oljj^l
J»lHlW
WM-F107 Sports
WM-F77 AM/FM
WM-F45 Sports
WM-F18 Stereo
WM-F41 AM/FM
WM-F75
TCM-12
Walkman AM/FM
Stereo Cassette
Walkman AM/FM
Cassette Player
Stereo Cassette
Cassette Player
Handheld Tape
Stereo Cassette
Player, Dolby,
Stereo Cassette
with EQ
Player
Water Resistant
Recorder
Player with Solar
Auto Reverse
Player
Dolby, Auto
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•CtSS*-?" ■
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
**«£•»«
«jpy*«**w HCTin'ttTemueVitj-'a-ranmi  ""■ .-?*<•--.*■>•«.«>«*'•-!■■»*„nv*

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