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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1973

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Array Res rents 'tactic of division'
By DAVID MARS
The administration promise
not to increase current Acadia
Park residents' rent is really a
tactic to divide opposition to
the 20 per cent rent increase
over four years in two other
residences, spokesman
Derrick Booth said Thursday.
Booth, of the Acadia Park
tenants' association, and
chairman of the inter-
residence action committee,
said the four consecutive and
compounded rent increases in
Place Vanier and Totem Park
ultimately amount to a 20.1 per
cent increase, while rents~4n
Walter Gage will rise by 14.7
per cent.
Acadia Park and Acadia
Camp residents now living in
the quarters will have no rent
increase as long as they stay in
their present accommodation.
All new residents and those
moving to different Acadia
residences will face 6.5 per
cent increases.
Previously announced rent
increases of 10 per cent over
one year drew organized
opposition from both single and
married students in on-campus
housing.
And apparently this
resistance to the rent increase
originally proposed by housing
head Les Rohringer came
mostly from Acadia residents.
Booth said the no increase
policy to those who will be
staying on at Acadia was
designed to split the students
organized against the rent
increase by pitting the Acadia
residents against those in
single units.
But Booth said the residents
at Acadia voted to support the
IRAC and were not going to
split the organization of the
students.
The IRAC was promised a
breakdown on the fincial
operation of the housing
services which would justify
the proposed rent increases.
Wednesday's issue of
UBC PReports, the
administration news sheet,
contained a breakdown of the
costs but the spokesmen for the
IRAC say that it is not
sufficient.
What the administration has
presented is a breakdown of
figures for the combined
Acadia residences and another
set of figures for the combined
single student residences.
The IRAC sent a letter to
William White, deputy
president and bursar,
Wednesday    outlining    the
'Rethink
budget?'
-Dailly
Education minister Eileen
Dailly told the legislature
Thursday she is willing to take
a second look at the post-
secondary  education   budget.
In a brief statement she said
the $100 million budget for
post-secondary institutions
could be changed if she was
provided with proof that this
would hamper students'
educational programs.
"If they (the universities)
can show that students and
programs are going to suffer,
we're willing to listen," she
said.
Dailly could not be reached
for further comment.
FIRST IN  PICTORIAL series on architectural delights: the fearful
symmetry of Gage towers. Towering majestically over UBC campus,
—mark hamilton photo
dwarfing even the Clocktower, the towers are a source of awe to
tenants   and   housing   directors   alike.   Next  week:   the Buchanan.
of
the
shortcomings
information.
According to this letter the
administration has presented
the information in general
categories so the precise
location and nature of
increased costs cannot be
determined. Place Vanier
representative Bruce Gillespie
said: "We hope the university
or the government will make
available the financial records
of the UBC housing
Administration for the IRAC."
Gillespie said that the
figures published in UBC
PReports were not only too
general in not giving a
residence-by-residence breakdown but did not detail the
expenditures sufficiently.
Gillespie cited the figures for
utilities for Acadia, which
show the average expenditure
for the last three years for
utilities has been $69,000. In the
projected expenditure figures
for Acadia for 1973-74 $81,000 is
alloted for utilities — an
increase of about 17 per cent.
According to Gillespie the only
reason offered for this was that
the housing administration is
banking on a very cold winter
next year.
A telephone bill is also listed
in the lump sum of $81,000 but
the Acadia residences have
less than six phones, including
one in the daycare centre.
All other residence phones
used by the students are paid
for by the student, Booth said.
Booth and Gillespie said they
are both convinced the
university is able to provide a
more complete breakdown of
the financial situation for the
student residences.
They said they suspect that
the administration is refusing
to divulge the exact figures
because they are hiding
something.    '
"Initially Rohringer said
that he would not give us any
more information than a pie
showing what percentage   of
TlfCflOUa*4*f V
incvofs) »it/
Vol. LIV, No. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1973
48     228-2301
the revenue was expended
where. The bursar has since
come up with more complete
figures and there is no reason
to believe these are the best
available."
Booth said the rates schedule
at universities across Canada
did not justify raising the rates
at UBC.
In this schedule UBC
averages the fourth lowest
rates out of 21 universities.
Booth contends this
comparison is useless because
it does not take account of the
differences in the provincial
financing of university
accommodation nor does it
consider the income of
students from summer work in
those regions.
Considering only the western
universities, UBC's rates are
relatively high.
One reason they may be
relatively high is surpluses
from the housing
administration in past years
have not been kept in housing.
The various residences have
projected deficits for the years
ahead but have not been
operating at losses before. The
IRAC has been unable to find
out what happened to the
surpluses from previous years
— particularly from Place
Vanier, which was largely
funded by donations.
The IRAC also has an idea
that the housing administration is not doing a
first-rate job of managing the
residences, Booth said.
The IRAC spokesmen said
students are unable to stay on
campus during the summer
unless   they   are   going   to
summer school, in which case
they may stay at Place Vanier.
The IRAC thinks that the
administration might be able
to increase their revenues by
allowing any students who
wanted to work in the summer
to stay on campus, he said.
Housing administrator
Rohringer said while it is true
most of the residences are
reserved for conventions
during the summer any
student wanting to staying on
campus during the summer
may do so at Place Vanier,
which is operated on a "stay-
through" basis.
The IRAC also said the
available rooms in Acadia are
not being rented until the
proposed rent increase is
approved because otherwise
the university could not
increase the rents for one year
under the Landlord and Tenant
Act, but this policy is losing
more money than foregoing a
rent increase.
Gillespie said that the
students are required to pay
$400 in advance and yet the
See page 2: RENT
Invalidation
is ploy—secretary
The Alma Mater Society executive's resolution to declare the
first slate elections invalid at the upcoming general meeting
March 16 "is just a ploy to get people out to the meeting," AMS
secretary Sally Clark said Thursday.
"It's a silly thing and beyond me why they are doing it," she
said.
The resolution asks that elections be held for president,
secretary, internal affairs, coordinator and Ubyssey editor
between March 26 and 30.
But AMS vice-president Gordon Blankstein said today the
motion was a serious proposal submitted for consideration by
Engineering Undergraduate Society president Harold Cunliffe
and Agriculture Undergraduate Society president Peter
Legget.
Neither Legget or Cunliffe could be reached for comment.
AMS president-elect Brian Loomes said if it is a ploy then it
just shows what the current executive has to do to get students
interested in their policies.
"But if it's serious, students will recognize it for the dumb,
desperate move that it is."
Loomes said it was a change from when the AMS resorted to
hiring dance bands to attract students. "The campus is moving
forward," he said. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9; 1973
Community chest
By ELAINE BEST and ART ARON
It has been encouraging phoning people
about their organizations — everyone we talk to
is involved and excited about what they are
doing. Even before we find out what kind of
help they need, we are ready to join each group
just from their enthusiasm.
Scott Elam is a peaceful, meditative man —
into Zen, gardening and nature. Yet the needs
of other people, especially young kids, just
would not leave him alone. So he found himself
involved with the Crisis Line in Campbell
River, B.C. Soon he carried a major portion of
the responsibility. Yet all the time he felt this
was not enough.
Campbell River is not an easy town for kids.
There's not much to do and a lot of heroin
around. Then lots of other lost souls are drifting
from job to job, sometimes from pub to pub.
And many torn and troubled families live
behind the nice middle-class facades. Scott
wanted them all to have a centre. There needed
to be a sanctuary to offer people calling on the
Crisis Line.
He dug into the grant-and-community-
support-fund-raising muddle and suffered and
struggled with apathy and prejudice.
It took more than six months, most of which
time it looked hopeless. But his centre is there
now — pulsing with music, conversation,
smiles, helpful and helped people.
Now for your part . . .
Housing is a big problem. It's a seller's
market and renters are more and more easily
intimidated and mistreated. The Vancouver
Tenants' Council exists to advise tenants of
their rights. They receive a heavy load of phone
calls and letters asking for help. They need
people who would like to be advisors to tenants,
arming people with knowledge so that they can
protect themselves. They could also use
lawyers and law students to give legal help.
Call 872-0296.
The Women's Centre at 130 West Hastings
offers support for women's activities —
especially artistic and political action. They
have a theatre workshop and are now
organizing a bookstore and library of
information that all B.C. women can use, a
music workshop and directory of women
musicians, a publication of women's writings,
and an art gallery for women artists.
The Women's Centre supports strikes such
as the stewardesses' and at Denny's, and
believes they are "fairly radical politically".
But they also help women with the practical,
mundane problems as offering child care at the
centre while a woman is busy downtown. They
can always use women to help with these
chores. And they have a special need for
writers for their paper The Pedestals. The
phone number is 684-0523.
The Vancouver Free Clinic is an alternative
to conventional health care — it tries to reach
out to everyone, be open to new ideas and some
very old ones, offer a choice, make us less the
"passive patients" and more self-knowing and
self-healing. It needs people who are interested
in initiating new kinds of activities related to
health and healing — for example dental care
or physical fitness — they really need
somebody interested in teeth! Degrees don't
matter — interest and real knowledge or a
willingness to learn do matter here. Phone 731-
6929.
Rent subsidies examined
From page 1
breakdown of the figures did
not give any indication
whether this money was
invested or sitting idle.
At the moment the IRAC is
concerned with getting a
precise breakdown of
expenditures to determine if
the residences do need more
money.
Once they have this
information another problem
arises.
If the rent increases
requested are needed because
of mismanagement then the
IRAC believes that the
students should not have to pay
for it. This can be determined
from the housing
administration records.
However, if the increase is
justified then students must
decide whether they will
accept the entire cost of the
rent hike or if they will insist
upon a subsidy beyond certain
percentage increase.
The leaders of the IRAC
refused to give an unequivocal
statement on their position
regarding subsidies.
Both Simon Fraser
University and the University
of Victoria have subsidies for
student housing and the
leaders of the IRAC would
clearly like some sort of
subsidy if an increase in
residence fees  is  necessary.
On Thursday the spokesmen
for the IRAC said the question
of what portion of any required
rent increase would be borne
by the students would not be
discussed until the IRAC
received a complete breakdown of the financial situation.
However they did criticize
the administration for not
looking to other sources of
possible revenue to cover any
increase.
Gillespie said possibly a
grant from the provincial
government would suffice to
cover any increase until the
convention business increased.
It is doubtful this would
satisfy the long-term financial
requirements of the residences
however, because the
convention business at UBC
subsidizes the residences now
but even at its peak it could not
carry the projected deficit.
The question of subsidies
may divide some of the
students on the campus
because what is proposed is a
preferential subsidy — the
IRAC was not specific but they
did have in mind someone
other than the students paying
the cost of a required increase.
This subsidy to the
residences would place the
students on campus in a
position of having their rent
subsidized while those students
who lived off campus had to
pay the entire cost of their
rent.
Once the issue of release of
detailed financial information
is resolved the students and the
administration are going to
have to discuss two further
issues — student parity on a
new housing authority and the
question of changing the
provision of housing services
from an ancillary self-
supporting service to an
integral subsidized service in
line with other services on
campus.
The UBC administration is
proud the residences are self-
supporting, Booth said. Many
of those in the residences think
that the residences are the
same as other services
provided for students and that
they should be operated at a
loss if necessary.
The difference between
housing and other services,
however, is that all students on
campus benefit from non-
ancillary services while only
those 3,800 students in
residence would benefit from a
policy of subsidizing student
housing.
Debate on this continues.
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3121 West Broadway 738-3211
Presents — Mar. 12-17
DIRKBOGARDE in
DEATH IN VENICE
'Directed by Visconte"
(Mature)
-9:20 p.m.
A Masterpiece—A film of rare beauty
—New York Daily News
2nd Feature
PERCY 3B9S.
Dealing with a unique transplant
-Shown at 7:30 p.m. ONLY
ADULTS & STUDENTS ONLY $1.00
CONFESSION
by COSTA GAVRAS
Yves Montand Simone Signoret
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 — 8:30
CAMPUS WELCOME
AT HILLEL - SERIES & IND TICKETS AVAILABLE
iqt HILLEL HOUSE;
WE NEED YOU
Written applications are now being sought
for the following positions:
Speakers Committee—Chairman
Education Committee—Chairman
Special Events Committee—Chairman
Bookstore Committee—4 members
Food Services Committee—3 members
Traffic and Parking Committee—4 members
Men's Athletic Committee—2 members
Women's Athletic Committee—1 member
Discipline Committee
Students Court
Deadline for the last two is noon, Tuesday and applications should be
submitted to the President, A.M.S., SUB.
Deadline for all others is the following week and should be submitted to:
The Secretary AMS Off ices SUB. Friday, March  9,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Money diverted
from strikers
to posters
By RYON GUEDES
The Alma Mater Society will
not be donating $50 to a fund for
striking Denny's restaurant
workers after all, but will
instead pay for $50 worth of
anti-Denny's posters.
At a Wednesday council
meeting, members of the AMS
voted to rescind the decision
from last Wednesday's
meeting to allot $50 to the
blacklisted restaurant
employees.
"Spending the funds on
activities not connected with
the university contravenes the
AMS constitution," said
treasurer David Dick, who
made the motion.
Secretary-elect Stan Persky,
who seconded the motion, said
at the meeting he was
concerned by student reaction,
including a letter appearing in
the March 6 Ubyssey written
by four commerce students.
Denny's restaurant is being
picketted by 14 former
employees, fired after
demanding a chance to air
their grievances with the
management.
Although the management
has secured injunctions
against picketting by former
staff and their supporters,
demonstrations have
continued since Feb. 12.
The letter supported the
AMS' involvement in the strike
in principle but expressed
concern over the spending of
student money "to support
various causes which are
completely divorced from
student affairs."
Persky told the council he
had originally put forth a
proposal consisting of five
parts.
"The first part was to give
our support to the strikers, the
second to boycott Denny's
restaurant, the third to send a
telegram to labor minister Bill
King, the fourth to urge
students to participate in the
strike, and the fifth to donate a
sum of money to their strike
fund," said Persky.
"The proposal to donate the
money was made because the
strikers, not benefitting from
any union, had no access to
union funds."
"But it is not my intention to
fritter student money away,"
he said.
Persky moved the AMS
grant $50 for posters
publicizing the AMS position in
the Denny's dispute.
The motion carried.
President-elect Brian
Loomes said supporters also
planned to start picketting the
new Denny's Restaurant at
Burrard and Smith when it
opened 7 a.m. today.
"There will be an additional
strike at the Denny's on
Broadway that evening around
9 o'clock," Loomes said
Thursday.
Council also endorsed the
resident students' demands for
a new housing administrative
authority with student-
administration parity.
President Doug Aldridge
said he had attended the
Tuesday meeting with housing
director Leslie Rohringer,
bursar William White and
other       student       housing
SMITH
—mark hamilton photo
IN A FRANTIC attempt to get the jump on fair-weather players, tennis buff cuts through cool, wet
winter air, stretching his long-unused muscles to the tune of fuzzy ball.
where   convention centres were very
representatives,
Rohringer presented his
revised case for rent increase.
"I got the impression the
rent increase was not high
enough to support housing
costs," said Aldridge. "The
figures they gave us for
estimated summer income
from the Gage apartments as
Ubyssey
hacks
to wed
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Ubyssey Society Editor
The Ubyssey is pleased to
announce the marriage of
former rag editor Nate Smith
and current co-city editor
Sandy Kass, to be held Sept. 2,
1973.
optimistic at best."
The housing department's
new increase rates were also
discussed at the meeting.
Persky noted the new
increases for single residences
would average at 5 per cent per
year, amounting to a 21 per
cent hike in four years.
JMucfr
KASS
"Instead of the $840 residents
at Totem and Vanier pay for
room and board now, they will
be paying about $1040 in four
years," said Persky.
Also passed was council
approval of the abortion action
committee's request for $292
from the council's conference
fund to send two women
delegates to the second cross-
Canada conference for
abortion law repeal.
The council also voted to put
the proposal for a student fee
levy on March 23, the same
date as the National Union of
Students referendum.
Dick also told councillors the
society lost $3,500 at the Feb. 28
Poppy Family concert.
At last week's council
meeting, the treasurer told
council he expected a
substantial loss because not
enough people turned out to
meet the costs of the group and
added publicity, necessary to
publicize changing the
concert's date to Feb. 28 from
earlier in the month.
The concert was a special
events presentation.
The following column was written by members
of the Women's Grievance Commission.
Recently, the women's action group qublished
A Report on the Status of Women at the University
of British Columbia. The report indicated that
women are discriminated against in every
category and at every level. The women's
grievance commission is made up of faculty, staff,
graduate and undergraduate women from the
women's action group. Its purpose is to
investigate and remedy sexually discriminatory
practices and structures in the university. We
hope that you will tell us about any such problems
you have as an individual or as a member of a
group of women at UBC.
If you tell us about a personal problem of
discrimination, you can»be sure that we will keep
the information confidential, and that we will take
no action either to investigate the problem or to
remedy it without your explicit permission to do
so.
The commission has some specific questions to
ask women who work, study or teach at UBC:
If you are a part-time student, how do the
university structure and regulations help or
hinder you in your efforts to obtain scholarships,
fellowships, or loans to finance your education?
When you went to counselling services on
campus, did you feel that all fields of study and
professions were open to you as a woman?
Were you unable to obtain student housing for
your family because your husband is not a
student, even though you are a full-time student?
Do you believe your faculty has a quota on
women students?
If you are a student, is there material in your
courses presented in such a way as to imply that
women are inferior or restricted to certain roles in
society? Do you have a teacher who treats the
women in the class less seriously than the men, or
who makes sexist remarks in class?
Have you been asked about your husband's
income when applying for financial aid? Do you
believe that you have been discriminated against
in obtaining scholarships, fellowships or loans?
Is it more difficult for you to obtain summer
employment than for the men in your field? When
you do obtain employment, do you receive equal
pay for equal work? Do you believe you have been
discriminated against by employers holding
interviews on campus?
If you are on the staff, has it been impossible
for you to obtain MSA for your family because
your husband is neither a student nor
permanently disabled?
Are you getting paid less than a man who does
comparable work?
If you belong to a union, is your union working
for equal pay for comparable work?
Do you know of or suspect cases of sexual
discrimination in hiring at UBC?
Have you been told that UBC policy is to
discourage the hiring of more than one member of
a family?
Can you find adequate day care for your
children while you work or study here?
Have you ever been sexually pressured by a
teacher or boss?
If you are a teacher, do you believe your
department discriminates against women in
hiring, promotions and tenure, salary or teaching
loads?
If you are a part-time teacher, do you believe
there are any policies of the university which
discriminate against you?
If you have questions about preparing a brief,
or if you want to talk to someone about your case
before writing it down, please call 733-7514, or 224-
0065, or 731-7846, or 732-8444, and leave your name
and number for us.
The Women's Grievance Commission of UBC:
Faculty: Helga Jacobson, anthropology; Vera
MacKay, education; Hilda Thomas, english; Jean
Weakland, education.
Staff: Andrea Fleming, psychology; Mary
Kaspar, library; Mary Patterson, library; Lori
Whitehead, international relations.
Students: Graduate: Gene Errington,
sociology; Diane Erickson, anthropology; Bonnie
Johnson, philosophy. Undergraduate: Diane
Latta, arts 2; Joanne Lindsay, arts 2; Bronwen
McGarva, arts 1; Terry McNeney, arts 2;
Charlene Moriarty, science 2. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Priday, March 9, 1973
Woman's day
There have been a lot of working women's struggles
recently.
To name a few: Wardair stewardesses are on strike,
waitresses at Denny's are striking clerks and pharmacists are
striking at Shoppers' Drug Mart and the women at the
Victoria Telephone Answering Service have been organizing.
The reason we mention this because Thursday was
International Woman's Day. A day which commemorates
the militant activity of the women in industry in the early
1900s. Since 1910 this day has been traditionally
recognized as an international working class holiday in
honor of women's struggles.
The Alma Mater Society has given $50 to the Denny's
workers to make posters. The student council has also urged
students to boycott struck premises and has sent a telegram
to labor minister Bill King call ing for the repeal of Bill 43, the
Socred labor law that prohibits strikes by unorganized
workers.
This is an important step for the student council to
take. Students could and should be instrumental in citizens
pickets and boycotts.
Support these women and other workers in their
demand for better working conditions and wages.
Pocket fluff
One of society's cruelest, most insidious killers is
pocket fluff.
No racial minority, age group, or political ideology is
exempt from this dread disease. The total cases of pocket
fluff in North America are estimated at twice the number of
recorded cases of syphilis.
Sources of a breeding ground for pocket fluff are
countless. A used Kleenex, a few grains of sand or tobacco
— anything left in a pocket while the garment is being
laundered — can support a colony of this virulent disease.
Along with its related strain, cuff fluff, it first became
known to man in the heyday of the industrial revolution,
resulting from the increased accessibility of clothes made of
cheap textiles, more notably cotton and wool.
The eventual design of clothes with cuffs and pockets
caused the disease to hit epidemic proportions, engulfing all
heavily-populated areas by the early 1900's.
Pocket fluff clinic co-ordinator and part-time dry
cleaner Sybil Defence said that today the disease is
especially serious among primitive cultures just recently
exposed to the present fashions.
Any contributions, cash or cheque, can be mailed to
the Canadian Pocket Fluff Fund, c/o The Ubyssey.
< STRIKE
AT
SHOPPERS DRUG MRT
WOMEN STRIKE .. . outside Shoppers' Drug Mart
Letters
Red ink
The last thing one would expect -a "democratic" organization
to do would be to cut off communication with the people who put
them there initially, unless they
fear criticism of their policies. I
was, therefore, shocked to hear of
yet another cut back in Ubyssey
publication to once a week.
For most of us the paper is the
only means of information and
expression at easy access. Communication at this university is in a
bad enough state without making
it worse. The paper serves important functions like soaking grease
off soggy chips, littering hallways and emergency toilet material.
The new executive appears to
be turning out as I expected;great
front, lousy backing — and they
haven't even begun. Is this what
we are to expect from them? It
was this paper which was predominantly responsible for getting
them in. There must be other
solutions to the red ink-red tape
dilemma.
We,    as    students,   need   all
TWF UBYSSEY
MARCH 9, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
"Ah," cried Lesley Krueger, Mike Sasges, and Vaughn Palmer in
unison, "'Tis time for the annual reactionary attempt to take over The
Ubyssey again. "Yawn," kibitzed Jan O'Brien, John Andersen and Kent
Spencer, "It's nothing to get excited about: they try it every year." "Do
they indeed," chorussed the kiddies, Len Johnson, Gary Coull, David Mars
and Ryon Guedes. "What assholes .not to realize that it always fails."
"Yup," quipped Kent Spencer, Simon Truelove and that MacQueen fellow
wittily. Mark Hamilton and Kini MacDonald took a picture of the whole
affairs. Jonathan Livingston Slug just slithered merrily toward the distant
reaches of the sky.
possible means of knowing what
goes on here, at our university.
The more ways of getting to know
the better. The new executive
should be planning ways to increase student participation (was
this not part of their platform?)
instead of decreasing it. The student paper ensures that we are
aware of what's happening, and
therefore encourages concern in
this institution's affairs. We cannot
allow ignorance.
Bruce Ward
science,* 2
We never said The Ubyssey
would definitely be cut back to
one issue a week. We only gave
areas of possible cutbacks and
speculated editorially that The
Ubyssey budget would again be
singled out for slicing. But thanks
for your support.
Authority
So the RCMP have nothing
better to do than to hassle people
who pick up hitch-hikers. as an
anonymous (fearing retaliation?)
letter-writer reported in Tuesday's
Ubyssey. True there are special
posts for hitching but many cars
detour past them and University
Boulevard, in front of the village,
is an ideal place because cars
converge from three directions.
Now at a real universitv the
students decide what they want to
do and then take action so that
administration, RCMP and the
profs all make the necessary adjustments. After all it would be
easy to replace NO STOPPING by
the sign SLOW HITCH-HIKERS
BEING PICKED UP. Would car
owners be freaked at this violation
of the right to drive fast on the
highway?
It's the kind of situation that
appears in many guises e.g. lack of
representation, boring courses,
too many classes, all of which
oppress the students. Perhaps we
ought to shift a little attention
from women's lib to students' lib.
It only requires a change of attitude — from regarding the university authorities as some kind of
computer which controls our lives
here to realizing that we control
our own lives and we've come
here to be educated (as defined by
us and our ability to interact with
the world.) The system should
work for us, making us more
educated, i.e., aware, tolerant,
self-actualized, etc.
Doesn't UBC look too much
like a factory and are the people
who graduate educated? Too
often universities only try to
make people academic and since
only a small percentage of students become academics then
they simply waste the time of the
rest. Surely they would be offering a greater service to the world
if they tried to generally educate
the masses (of students).
In the modern world, education means almost entirely communication; both inside your own
head and with other people of
different political, religious and
sexual beliefs. A university which
is the artificial association of
many different groups of people is
an ideal place to try and promote
interaction. This means more free
time and facilities for open debate
— not just on academic topics but
also and more important at a
personal level. This is not just
something to be done in SUB
while eating lunch — it should be
recognized as an integral part of
our education.
It's unlikely that the board of
governors, who just want people
for their industries, will see any
sense in this. The only hope is
that students can get together and
demand it (rather than swimming
pools). At a less apathetic university one could imagine thousands
of large letter anti-administration
posters appearing all over, but at
UBC perhaps the best that can be
done is for undergraduate societies to insist that students aren't
gradeable products.
I feel it's sad that election
platforms   are  largely  based  on Friday, March 9,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
which slate will improve services.
The underlying assumption is that
students are in control but unfortunately the system works so well
that they've even been made to
forget that they are pawns in
academic and industrial games.
Colum Grant
grad studies 7
Denny's
As one of the persons proposing the Alma Mater Society
motion concerning workers at
Denny's Restaurants, I would like
to explain what I had in mind.
The motion passed as to a)
support the striking workers, b)
urge all UBC students to boycott
Denny's, c) send a telegram to
labour minister Bill King asking
for the repeal of the anti-labour
Bill 43, d) urge UBC students to
participate in citizens' pickets and
e) contribute $50 to the strike
fund.
A letter from students Lewth-
waite, Barton, Hardern and Clemens, published in Tuesday's
Ubyssey objected to section e)
about giving money.
First, and most important, I
would emphasize those parts of
the motion which calls to the
attention of UBC students the bad
situation at Denny's and commits
the AMS to publicly supporting
these workers. (The letter-writers
grant that these employees have
"legitimate complaints and deserve our sympathy", so we're
agreed on the basic issue.)
Second, the complaint about
giving money to the strike fund
seems to me a valid criticism. The
reason I was in favour of it was
because    the    Denny's   workers
aren't unionized and therefore
don't have access to normal union
strike funds. Admittedly, I may
have been mistaken. In the light
of the criticism, I proposed at
council last night (Wed.) that the
money instead of be spent for a
poster on campus publicizing the
situation more widely. This
motion passed.
Finally, let me state that it is
not may intention to dribble away
student funds. Speaking personally, it will not be my practice to
advocate such expenditures as regular AMS policy. It is my intention, however, to make the
campus more aware of the just
struggles of workers in our society
(the one that presently comes to
mind is the, retail clerks' strike at
Shoppers' Drugs which involves
both clerks and pharmacists).
I think that students have a
valid part to play these issues in
order to make sure that the university isn't isolated from the 'real
world' and because many of us
will soon be directly affected by
similar economic conditions.
I want to thank Lewthwaite et
al for their support of the Denny's
workers and for their constructive
criticism.
Stan Persky
AMS secretary-elect
Sicfc
Lewthwaite, Barton, Harden,
Clemens - you make me sick.
Can't your types realize that
it's only a collective force that we
can exert any power over the
greedy Denny's managers of this
world. The picketing waitresses
never asked for Alma Mater Society support in their strike. It was
offered because we have a student
government that stands behind its
slogan "We Care". If enough of an
issue is made over Denny's disgusting employment practices it
might not be necessary for the
workers of hick and Bull to come
a runnin'. Just because we can't
help every underprivileged worker
in the business, doesn't mean we
shouldn't take the opportunity to
help one. Your problem is that
you mistake "minding your own
business" for just plain apathy. If
you think the cause has nothing
to do with the students, then
you'd better to take a look at
some of the people working at
Denny's. How far do you really
think $50.00 will go towards
"cleaning up our own backyard"
or improving food services on
Campus. It will probably go a long
way helping Denny's employees
make an issue of their case.
The community looks to students as a kind of hope for the
future. Don't you remember your
high school graduation speech?
Get your story straight, Mr. Harden. You want us all more concerned yet you're crying over the
almost negative amount you personally spent helping a "REAL"
issue in the "REAL" world. No
wonder you feel "denotated,,
enumerated, referendum-
med...", you asked for it.
Anne Lingley
arts 3
Blatant
After my letter Election
appeared in your paper there
appeared at Totem Park a giant
letter in green ink which I per
ceived to be addressed to myself
since it was addressed to a Mr.
Weir.
In this letter my previous letter
was described in a derogatory
manner with the anonymous
writer even going so far as to use
foul terms. This person blatantly
in so many words called the whole
opposition slate (team of independent totem students united for
progress) a bunch of TlFs despite
the fact that some of these students did attain council seats
through acclamation. It seems
that were equality is lacking between political candidates this
person feels that he can anony-.
mously call candidates by any
term he pleases. People have sunk
to a new low when under the
cloak of anonymity they feel that
they can publicly be as irresponsible as they please.
Although this person did give
some figures on the election
which should have been released a
long time ago one is,left to won-
Woman's Day militant
International Woman's Day was celebrated
Thursday in many part of the world. This
excerpt from Leon Trotsky's History of the
Russian Revolution describes how the event
gave an interesting side benefit in 1917.
The 23rd of February was International
Woman's Day. The social-democratic circles
had intended to mark this day in a general
manner: by meetings, speeches, leaflets. It had
not occurred to anyone that it might become the
first day of the revolution. Not a single
organization called for strikes on that day.
What is more, even a Bolshevik organization,
and a most militant one — the Vyborg borough-
committee, all workers — was opposing
strikes. The temper of the masses, according to
Kayurov, one of the leaders in the workers'
district, was very tense; any strike would
threaten to turn into an open fight. But since the
committee thought the time unripe for militant
action — the party not strong enough and the
workers having too few contacts with the
soldiers — they decided not to call for strikes
but to prepare for revolutionary action at some
indefinite time in the future. Such was the
course followed by the committee on the eve of
the 23rd of February, and everyone seemed to
accept it. On the following morning, however,
in spite of all directives, the women textile
workers in several factories went on strike^and
sent delegates to the metal workers with an
appeal for support. "With reluctance," writes
Kayurov, "the Bolsheviks agreed to this, and
they were followed by the workers —
Mensheviks and Social Revolutionaries. But
once there is a mass strike, one must call
everybody into the streets and take the lead."
Such was Kayurov's decision, and the Vyborg
committee had to agree to it. "The idea of going
into the streets had long been ripening among
the workers; only at that moment nobody
imagined where it would lead." Let us keep in
mind this testimony of a participant, important
for understanding the mechanics of the events.
It was taken for granted that in case of a
der who his person is and of what
validity are his figures. I myself
could publish all the election figures I wanted if I could do it
without being responsible for
them. One can clearly see that
democratic corruption is very
much exposed when any oppo-
stion to my letter on the democratic lacking at Totem Park must
be answered by anonymous and
irresponsible posters.
This attempt to smother the
exposure of an undemocratic election by such foul means should
not be tolerated.
Steve Weir
geology 4
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
demonstration the soldiers would be brought
out into the streets against the workers. What
would that lead to? This was war time; the
authorities were in no mood for joking. On the
other hand, a "reserve" soldier in war time is
nothing like an old soldier of the regular army.
Is he really so formidable? In revolutionary
circles they had discussed this much, but
rather abstractedly. For no one, positively no
one — we can assert this categorically upon the
basis of all the data — then thought that
February 23 was to mark the beginning of a
decisive drive against absolutism. The talk was
of a demonstration which had indefinite, but in
any case limited, perspectives.
Thus the fact is that the February revolution
was begun from below, overcoming the
resistance of its own revolutionary
organisations, the initiative being taken of their
own accord by the most oppressed and
downtrodden part of the proletariat — the
women textile workers, among them no doubt
many soldiers' wives. The overgrown breadlines had provided the last stimulus. About
90,000 workers, men and women, were on strike
that day. The fighting mood expressed itself in
demonstrations, meetings, encounters with the
police. The movement began in the Vyborg
district with its large industrial
establishments; thence it crossed over to the
Petersburg side. There were no strikes or
demonstrations elsewhere, according to the
testimony of the secret police. On that day
detachments of troops were called in to assist
the police — evidently not many of them — but
there were no encounters with them. A mass of
women, not all of them workers, flocked to the
municipal duma demanding bread. It was like
demanding milk from a he-goat. Red banners
appeared in different parts of the city, and
inscriptions on them showed that the workers
wanted bread, but neither autocracy nor war.
Woman's Day passed successfully, with
enthusiasm and without victims. But what it
concealed in itself, no one had guessed even by
nightfall.
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I  I I  I  I  I I  I Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,  1973
^%ofvlo9o
ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING
Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the
Alma Mater Society will be held in the Plaza between Sedgewick
and Main Libraries at
12:30 p.m. on Friday, March 16
to consider the following matters:
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
TREASURER'S REPORT
APPOINTMENT OF AUDITORS
RESOLUTIONS
and such other business as may properly arise.
SALLY CLARK
AMS Secretary
LONELY BEACH is a Mark Hamilton acrobatic special. The Ubyssey photbg really put himself out on the
limb of crumbling Point Grey cliffs to take this shot of shoreline below the campus.
RING DAY
AT THE
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TODAY
MARCH 9th and FRIDAY, MARCH 23rd
10 A.M.-2 P.M.
ORDER YOUR GRAD
RINGS NOW TO
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IN TIME FOR
GRADUATION
IBM
Students oppose
American direction
WATERLOO (CUP) — Students in the University of
Waterloo's school of urban and regional planning are opposed to
the recent selection of an American as director.
. But their disapproval of Sydney Saltzman appears to be too
late. The only thing that may stop Saltzman's official
appointment is his refusal to take the job. He was expected to
decide by Wednesday, but the date passed without any word.
The students object to Saltzman's selection on several
grounds. Students believe implementation of his conceptual
framework and educational philosophy would be detrimental to
the development of planning education at the university.
They also say the only undergraduate planning program in
Canada must have a Canadian director.
More than half of the planning students signed a petition in
late February opposing Saltzman's selection.
But the petition appears to be more of a reaction to the
selection than part of a complete campaign to ensure he was not
selected.
The selection process allowed some student involvement and
gave students chances to meet the candidates they did not
know. Only two candidates of the final five on the possibility list
were from within the University of Waterloo.
Two undergraduate students and one graduate student sat on
the nine-member search committee.
The committee began work in March, 1972 and held 13
meetings until mid-February when it recommended Saltzman
despite a faculty vote which showed five of 15 members opposed
to Saltzman.
The selection committee itself first voted Feb. 5 by secret
ballot. The student representatives had talked to a meeting of 38
of the school's 200 undergraduate students and took the
recommendation of 35 who voted for Waterloo faculty member
Kyo Izumi.
Because the vote was five out of nine for Saltzman — not a
clear majority — the committee took a second vote. Members
were asked to select a second preference. With no clear
mandate from their constituency on a second choice, the
undergrads acted on their own knowledge and voted for
Saltzman. The final tally was five first choices and four seconds
for the American — a sufficient mandate to offer him the
position.
Environmental studies dean P. H. Nash, an influential
faculty member of the search committee, is quite clear about
his priorities for the department. And he is enthusiastic about
Saltzman. The school is a division of the department which
Nash heads.
The problems in the school are not all at the undergraduate
level, but at the Ph.D level, he said, so Saltzman is a most
important faculty addition.
Nash sees Saltzman's contribution mainly in the area of
"serious problems at the advanced graduate level."
Nash described the proposed director as "an engineer with a
thorough grounding in engineering who was aroused in his early
adult years by the poor, the disadvantaged slums, and so
became sensitive, left engineering and got into the mainstream
of planning ten years ago."
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AGENCY Page Friday Anybody who thinks that Lewis Carroll's
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the play created by the Manhattan
Project's Company at the Dorothy
Somerset Studio. It's not Mother Goose
after all, innocent child rearer as we think
of her who would present Humpty Dumpty
as your local politician and word slaver,
and neither would she let you see your
history as a prejudiced dormouse.
My word: no. That would be seditious!
And what about games as a subliminated
form of people bashing? Why do you think
the Red Queen plays croquet anyway?
What does Alice find out about women's
roles from the Duchess and White Queens
approaches on her way to being made
queen over her own house of cards, or is it,
on her finding herself, whoever that is, out
pf her own adolescence.
But for Alice (Coralyn Sheldon) who
wore the expected pinafore and blue dress,
the rest of the company wore body
stockings. This minimal costuming made
us realize how close to our world Alice's
new one was, for we were not allowed the
fancy buffer of costumes. There were few
props, the ingenuity and athletics of the
actors supplying the rest.
The actors are an able and perceptive
half dozen people all of whom (except
Semple) played many roles. The actors'
roles were well chosen and consistent.
Particularly memorable were Marigold
Semple's mouse and White Queen, Barbara
McColl's frantic housewife Duchess and
Buzz Benses' spaced-out caterpillar were a
pleasure to watch; his Mad Hatter
demonstrative. Reg Tupper was a
demanding and dominant Humpty Dumpty
and gave the March Hare character and
appeal. Antony Dunn was a funny dry
mouse and an appealingly human White
Knight.
Semple's Alice was gayly curious, but
stubborn and petulantly tearful at times.
Particularly imaginative in this
production was the rabbit's (Tony Dunn)
echoes of Alice's Questions of size, and his
various romantic metamorphoses.
Carroll's poetry and its irony was
brought to life with the guitar, which added
much to its effect.
The athletic and swift movements of the
dancers particularly in Alice's fall through
the hole and in the menacing jabberwocky
sequence contributed greatly to the
atmosphere of the play. Especially
compelling was the reverse movement —
and finish of the play.
The Manhattan Project's performance
was well orchestrated and delightfully
funny and absurd. The actors' talents
added to the humor's depth.  —Jennifer Alley
Alice
no
'kid stuff9
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BOOKS
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,  1973 THE ELDER BRANCHES
The hazy feeling of these
late hours
increases the odour of resin.
We watch the fire take
the colours of fresh cut
logs, leaving a fine
network of ash.
The sky has passed
over on a wind —
the bowl of air accepts us,
pressing us together.
You tell a story
of sun swallowers.
Branches frame the images.
Once in summer
I caught wind in a flute,
blew it back at the treetops,
a turbulent song rising
to the high note.
Rain falls ticking
to the pavement.
The air is a dark fluid
warping around us.
Close your eyes —
the streetlamp is
a cartographer's glass globe
glowing through the lids.
We turn and gather
our footprints, cupping
them in our hands.
Returning to a dark room,
we leave the moon to dangle
from the elder branches.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 or the final assumption there are only guesses:
1. decisions will be finite
2. there will be no clowns, only you ;
and you will be naked as a fly {
in an inkpot j
3. the difference between roan and ape
will be found only in the female
and she may not exist
4. some days there will be only sunsets
She passed him
a football filled with nelium
and he ran.
She was the goal
of his6 ??f" TS an OM ac^intance
vi ms, hxs mistress
and she flew into her mouth.
So he'd made her a bible
■and swore on her
peeping her New Testament intact
as he punted and spiked
her in the face.
(undercover she was also the football'
disguised as the goal    '  XOOtt>a11   c^
the goalie, you understand,
was made to sit on his lap
and play ball.
Even though he had decided to «wi *„v, *.
left fiAir? ,»„ *..,,      to switch teams,
eic r3-eia was still the same.
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1973 She fluffed it up
wrote "from Marilyn M.-" in red crayon
on the edge and turned it over
rested fifteen jumbo curlers
on the epoxy stripe down the middle
iarranged five crackers broken
in half around the curlers and
stuffed it into an inflated safe
placed a stamp over the -entrance
and labelled it "address unknown"
Friday, March 9,   1973
THE"    UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 BETTER BUY BOOKS
pays CASH FOR BOOKS
TEXTBOOKS, QUALITY PAPERBACKS, ETC.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
MONARCH - COLES - SCHAUMS - & OTHERS
We Trade Used Pocketbooks and Magazines
Located Near the Varsity Theatre at
4393 W. 10th Ave. 224-4144; Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
EnMSATOMf
too
ill
MM MT(S
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Volumes 1-4
Soft cover Edition $5.80 Cloth cover Edition $9.00
SELECTED MILITARY WRITINGS
OF MAO TSE-TUNG
Soft cover Edition $1.35 Cloth cover Edition $2.50
Subscribe to Chinese
Periodicals in English
PEKING REVIEW
A weekly political and theoretical journal
of Chinese news and views.
Airmailed all over the world.
One year - $4.00 Two years - $6.00
Three years - $8.00
CHINA PICTORIAL
Published every month in Peking for
readership abroad.
Each issue has 44 pages or more, 12
to 16 in color.
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literature and arts.
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Add "Plus exchange" on cheques only.
How about the every popular and practical
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ORDER FROM:
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& Crafts
33 EAST HASTINGS STREET,
VANCOUVER 4, B.C., CANADA.
PHONE: 681-4916
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«*ft
LOAD YER TROUSERS GEORGIE              an naw com'on georgie laddie
(fer George McWhirter)                             are vee blind an' canna see -
see she's old an'tough an'hard
well now load yer trousers                               nah n°w look me laddie
georgie baby                                                 ner ^ace is but a swayin' lamp
cum loadem' georgie boy!                                an'er tongues a crack'o fire!
new look laddie                                                  sucn a much consenting woman
the goitered swelling                                          would be but a wife for hire!
*
in her eyes
has but cleft'er                                                    so its bells up me me bonny laddie —
to yer skinny thighs                                         com'on while the cummin's good
which now slip and jiggle                                leave 'er screwin' with 'er wrists
limply in the din                                             an' laddie lets get back
lying body friendly                                          to our good ship's tits!
like a slick frog jumpin' in                               yes. beware all witchy woman boy
fer they hold but devils
so move out me jerky georgie                            'twixt their thighs!
com'on load yer trousers lad
hoot' you've proved yer point                         wel1 hell's bells
an' you've made 'er bed                                   me pretty georgie baby -
but our good ship's leaving                              n°w load yer trousers boy!
eight bells in the 'stead                                    Ya Jest let yer legs
an' we na canna be left behind                        dangle limply cross the deckin'
so you's launch yer stern                                   an' cum dance a jig
ya salty young rind!                                           with me . . . . ?
ERIC IVAN BERG
RUSH GENUS
mushroom skin
with your dust powder my fingers
through my moss maze ooze your milk flow
to my roots
root the rush to rip the round that encompasses               SUCSEX
cave
consume, constrict, concede, conceive                        lucubrate
the Moses capsule                                                         and
conch                                                                                    lubricate
sound the birth                                                                     to
opiate
and
ANNE-MARIE KRAUTTER                    copiate
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYS'SEY
Friday, March  9,   1973     " SWIMMER
Occasionally I
cross the beach to dig for fossils
where they swim
through stone,
negatives in
frozen film.
The Ocean rolls back
and they are exposed,
petrified spaces
surviving past their time.
Eyeing the broken rock,
I think of drownings.
DAVE CONN
MOUSE MAN
brown blotches on gangrenous flesh
darting blind blue eyes
why don't you do like Joyce says?
'Pull out your eyes. Apologize'
You did this to yourself
Your weasel nose warts
with frayed fingers
in garbage cans
Your tongue is in your left shoe
Skeletons have stronger crutches
Your tallowy teeth
trap your haggled hair
Bronchitis breathes through your mouth
so wearily
Do you have something to tell me?
ANNE-MARIE KRAUTTER
NOCTURN
it is coming
soon are seen
the love brushed lines
of soft blue curling
in the long
and easy strokes
of evening
wrapping warmly
around our minds
we naked swimmers
in the night
glide dancing
towards each other .
everything is
moving
distances
soon subaqueus
the liquid animals
flow glowing
spurting their
incandescent
star tracks
across the blue
marine fog carpet
of this fragile night
and we are only
submarine
whisperings
in the deep sea shell's
circular ears . . .
ERIC IVAN BERG
—Catherine berry photo
One of many helpful directional signs placed for Open House visitors.
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
Quality Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
225 E. 2nd Ave.
879-0491
■
u
The Centre for Continuing Education
With Co-operation of the Dept. of Religious Studies
present
Spiritual Awakening: Be Here Now"
AN AFTERNOON WITH
BABA RAM DASS
(Formerly Dr. Richard A Ipert)
2-5 p.m. SUNDAY, MARCH 11
SUB BALLROOM - ADMISSION $2
Tickets at Speakeasy or at Door!
J •"''
:•».
:H
' +$
.*."
>
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FOR LESS
249
$
PRCIFIC UJESTERn
.     RIRLinES
Charter Flights from
Vancouver
For all the facts on
Europe air fares
CALL TODAY
224-4391
WE'RE IN THE VILLAGE
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
burke's
world wide travel
Schedules and Fares subject to Terms
and Conditions published in Suntours
LONDON FOR LESS programme.
ROYAL BANK
Suntours
Friday, March 9,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 DRAGON MOUNTAIN MORNING SURVEY
(from Cariboo Country)
the morning's bold arsenal
for here i am harmonium -
fires the sunalive
the soft sonar circles
leaking down thru the trees
quietly widening their wet eyes
to where the naked river runs
,
as sundrops leaning from solar places
around the colored mountain's breast
to kiss the lakeline jewelery
the rim drops its blue ointment
down upon the liquid jewels
yes lord i am alive
of the necklace lakes
in this the dawnfire burning
strung down curving along
thru my thick forested self
the timberline's neck
the morning minstrel's sing -
play me softly as a melody
here verdant gold -
flowing skyblue
the softgreen sunshine glowing
down the river mirror
meandering lazily down
around the baseline rim
from the high held birth
i ride this morning's magic
of my erect majesty
of crystal mountain streams -
am carried carpeted along
beauty almost held
soft body friendly
apart from me
with the lifting wind
and from this -
to eddy amid the currents
to nook in quiet places
this magic morning
that i am . . .
under the warmglow
glinting from above
ERIC IVAN BERG
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,  1973 Friday, March 9,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
Missionaries future in
Africa still undecided
RENT A TYPEWRITER
MANUAL OR ELECTRIC
By
EUGENE AGU-ONWUMERE
From The Cord Weekly
A Christian missionary who
lived in the early 19th
century said we hate some
people because we do not know
them and we will not know
them because we hate them.
This statement is
representative of the current
incompatibility between the
evangelist and the African
nationalist.
Throughout Africa, a war
has been developed against
evangelism. It is viewed as a
naked mechanism of neocolonialism. In the forefront in
the war against evangelism
are the African nationalists.
According to the ideology of
the nationalists, the
evangelists are regarded as
the front-troops of
imperialism. This logic sees
the Bible as an exploitative
instrument used to soften the
heart of the people in order to
gain an advantage over them.
Armed with this ideological
belief, the nationalists have
intensified their campaign
against missionaries all over
Africa. The situation is so
alarming that any right
thinking person would feel that
the future of missionaries is
hanging in the balance in
Africa. The ingenuity of the
ideology is so forceful that the
good work and motivation of
the evangelist have been
thrown away overnight.
Of all the many religious
sects operating in Africa, the
worst victim has been the
Jehova Witnesses. Their
persecution started from
Nkrumah's Ghana, when they
were accused of inspiring
troubles in Ghana because of
their abject refusal to honor
the national flag. Their
influence was too thin for
religion to smother the outcry
that followed their activities,
and as a result a temporary lull
followed. The same threat
followed them in the Biafran
War when they were accused
of lowering the morale of
people, by not supporting the
war. Ever since then, their
activities have been meeting
stiff opposition in many places.
The most recent one was in
Malawi, where president
Kamuzu Banda banned the
Jehovah's Witnesses. At the
time of his uprising, most of
the members were tortured
and considerable numbers
detained.
In Nigeria recently, the state
administration of East Central
State, Dr. Ukpabi Asika told
the representatives of the
Anglican Synod at Onitsha the
age of the missionaries has
gone. This, I believe, was in
reflection of his policy and
action   at   the   end   of   the
Nigerian Civil War. All the
Irish priests who worked in the
former Biafra were expelled
from the country at the end of
the war. Because of this
nationalistic feeling, the
institutions owned by the
voluntary agencies were taken
over by the government.
Although massive help was
required at the time, the
government still preferred
other sources like UNICEF
and UNESCO. The same
feelings are not confined to one
area of the country, all the
states are beginning to
nationalize the hospitals built
by missionaries and thus
compensation is paid to them.
The most effective idea at
present is that of changing
names with English and
Christian connotations. The
president of Congo Republic in
search of authenticity,
changed his name from Joseph
Mobutu to Mobutu Sese Seko,
and further decreed that all
Congolese should discard their
Christian names in favor of
authentic African names.
Today and more than ever,
the Pope and Catholic
institutions are beginning to
crawl and crack in Africa. The
nationalists look at the
operation of the Catholic
church as a hegemony. The
indigenous priests have started
to challenge the wisdom and
authority of the Vatican on
several issues. All the
Christian ethics and the idea of
celibacy are beginning to be
questioned. To the
astonishment of all, one of the
best educated, and a diehard
revolutionary priest, resigned
from the Catholic
establishment  in  Nigeria.
Also in the crusade against
evangelists are the African
students overseas. They report
home with mixed feelings of
the horror stories and films
being        jlisplayed by
missionaries about Africa in
metropolitan countries. They
accuse missionaries of
distorting the image of their
countries through such actions,
thus creating the impression
that Africa is still in the dark
ages. Furthermore, the
evangelists are seen as a part
of the ideological plan by
developed countries to invade
Africa. In fact, they are looked
upon as agencies of
psychological warfare.
Unfortunately, those of us
whom have remained
sympathetic to evangelists and
their teachings have been
dismissed as apologists and
tools of colonialism. We have
constantly reminded the
nationalists of the
contributions of missionaries
in the educational and spiritual
advancement of Africans. But
the present attitude overrides
all other considerations. At the
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The evangelists should as well
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Warning: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked. Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9,  1973
— mark hamilton photo
PUPPET THEATRE is Bill Dalrympse's speciality. He makes the little
devils himself and has been in the business for five years.
Right to organize
means fighting
By DAVID SCHMIDT
Union organizer Tommy McGrath says he can't see why
trade unions are not accepted at UBC.
The president of the seaman's.section, local 400 of the
Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General
Workers Union spoke noon Thursday to about 30 persons on
behalf of the Association of University and College Employees.
AUCE was formed at UBC in October and has been organizing
campus clerical and library staff since then, with a view to
eventual certification.
"No one's going to make changes in your working conditions
unless you're organized," McGrath said.
He told the staff organizing would not be easy.
"The right to organize has to be fought for. You have to have
a halo on so bad it chokes you," he said.
He said many people have in the past put their jobs on the
line to organize unions with the result that trade unions are now
strong enough to demand and get good wages and working
conditions.
He used the example of his own union which he said is now so
powerful that "no tug can be built without our approval."
He said it isn't hurting the owners to give them better wages
or better working conditions: "It's hurting them to concede to
us.
"When we were bargaining we were told our demands would
make it impossible for any more tugs to be built. Since then,
four more tugs are on the drawing-board," McGrath said.
He said people should not worry if their union is only a small
one.
"A great many changes have been made by a small group of
people organizing to change," he said.
"I'm hoping to read in the paper your union is applying for
certification," McGrath said.
Some UBC staff formed AUCE after they became
disillusioned with the efforts of the Office and Technical
Employees Union and with the Canadian Union of Public
Employees.
"Right now, we are confined to the UBC campus, but we
hope to expand to include all universities and colleges in B.C. -
We want to keep this union on a provincial level so it doesn't
become too unwieldy," said AUCE secretary-treasurer Mary
Mclntyre.
So far, only 300 of the approximately 525 persons needed to
apply for certification have signed up for membership.
FRI. & SAT.
The West Coast's
Swinginest Show Group
THE
BLACK &
WHITE
AFFAIR
Thurs.$2. Fri. & Sat. $2.50
I             tHFATRE RESTAURANT           1
I    b.^hOfr'.BY      '.tM.uii.IR   CANADA   1
OPENING MAR. 14
for 4 Days Only
JOHN
LEE
HOOKER
& his great Blues Band
Admission
Wed. & Thurs. $3.00
Fri. & Sat. $3.SO
THE CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
PRESENTS: the taping of yet another
DR. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM
MEDICINE SHOW
"Live Radio Comedy"
FREE
SUB Movie Theatre—Thurs. Mar. 15
AT NOON SHOW BEGINS AT 12:30
(booooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooc
. J»\.*s
W   NOTICE of RESOLUTIONS   M
This shall serve as notice that the following resolutions will be considered at the Alma
Mater Society General Meeting at 12:30 noon on Friday, March 16th, 1973.
ELECTIONS
Be it resolved that:
The Alma Mater Society elections held February 7th, 1973 be declared invalid and that
campus-wide elections be held March 30th with advance polls on March 26th, 27th, 28,
and 29th for the following positions:
A.M.S. President A.M.S. Coordinator of Activities
A.M.S. Secretary Ubyssey Editor
A.M.S. Internal Affairs Officer
GRAD STUDENTS
Be it resolved that:
All Graduate Students registered at the University of British Columbia shall pay the
regular fees of the Alma Mater Society.
PART-TIME STUDENTS
Be it resolved that:
For the purposes of membership and collection of fees By-Law 1(1) (a) shall include
any undergraduate registered in any coulee for ihe attainment of credit toward any
degree or diplomas granted by the University.
FOOD SERVICES
Be it resolved that:
The A.M.S. acquire control of the Food Services areas of the Student Union Building;
provided that:
(a) Expenditures involved shall be repaid from
(i) Revenue from the  Food Services operation therein
and
(ii) The $15.00 Student Union Building fee.
(b) Total capital expenditures shall not exceed $900,000.
NATIONAL UNION OF STUDENTS
Whereas the A.M.S. Council has passed the following motion: "That the A.M.S. Council
recommends that the U.B.C. students approve the entry of the U.B.C. A.M.S. into the
National Union of Students providing always that the membership fee therein shall not
exceed thirty cents (30c) per full, fee-paying student per year."
Be it resolved that:
The Alma Mater Society join the National Union of Students providing always that the
membership fee therein not exceed thirty cents (30c) per full, fee-paying student per
year.
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY FEES
Be it resolved that:
By-Law 10 be amended to authorize Undergraduate Society fee levies, once instituted
pursuant to the By-law, to remain in effect from academic year to academic year unless
rescinded or modified in the manner by which such levies may be instituted, and that
this amendment be affected by:
(a) deleting the existing By-law 10 (6)
(b) substituting a new By-law 10 (6) as follows:
"10 (6) A request given by the Council of the Alma Mater Society to the Board of
Governors pursuant to By-law 10 (5) which has resulted from a request given to the
Council pursuant to By-law 10 (2) shall remain in effect from one academic year to
the next unless rescinded or modified, such recision or modification to be affected
pursuant to the procedures contained in By-laws 10 (2), (3), (3). (4). and (5) -
EXCEPT THAT WHERE:
(a) A capital fund is designated in the request, in which case the request for that
portion of the fee shall be made for a minimum of five (5) years and the
Council of the Alma Mater Society shall have power to review the fund thus
created and purchases made pursuant thereto, and may at any time request
such fee levy be continued for the purpose designated in the original request
received by it until any indebtedness incurred by, for, or on behalf of the
Undergraduate Society which made the request is satisfied, or
(b) The management of mismanagement of the funds of an Undergraduate Society
which made a request pursuant to By-law 10 (2) has resulted in expense or the
incurring of an indebtedness by or to the Alma Mater Society, in which case the
Council of the Alma Mater Society shall be deemed to have received a request
pursuant to By-law 10 (2) and shall request the Board of Governors to levy a
fee in an amount sufficient to defray the expense or discharge the
indebtedness."
Secretary,
Alma Mater Society Friday, March 9,  1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Hot flashes
Nanaimo ferry
meet set
A meeting to discuss organizing
a protest against the provincial
government's proposed relocation
of the Nanaimo ferry terminal to
the Gulf Islands will be held noon
Friday at Wesbrook 201.
Creative minds
A symposium on the science of
creative intelligence will be conducted 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Simon Fraser University.
The symposium will explore
SCI and its application to education, welfare, science and government.
For further information call
936-3005.
Mail the I Oth
The Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) is celebrating the 10th anniversary of
the founding of the Internationalists, parent organization of the
CPC (ML) and will be sponsoring
a series of talks 7 p.m. Tuesday in
the Fisherman's Hall, 138 East
Cordova.
Hardial Bains, founder of the
Internationalists and editor fo the
People's Canada Daily News, will
be the lead speaker at the celebration, held in Vancouver because
this is the seat of internationalist
thought.
Also speaking will be spokespersons from the Communist
Party of Ireland (Marxist-
Leninist), Communist Party of
England, (Marxist-Leninist),
Afro-Asian Latin American
People's Solidarity Group, Indian
Progressive Study Group, Communist League, U.S.A. and the CPC
(ML).
Rosenthal
Poet Helene Rosenthal will
speak on "The poet as woman —
shapes of experience," as a part of
the women's studies 1973 course
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the SUB
ballroom.
Baroque trio
D. M. McCorkle of the music
department will be conducting a
concert of the baroque trio of the
Schola Cantorum of Basel noon
Monday in the recital hall of the
music building.
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Reg Bullock speaking on "125 years
of   the   Communist   Manifesto"   8
p.m. 1208 Granville.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker    from     Marpole    Training
Centre noon SUB 105B.
tJAY PEOPLE
Social  evening etc. 8 p.m. Arts  1
Blue Room.
WOMAN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting noon Education 1211.
CUE
Lunch noon Grad Centre.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
S.   Bernard   Chandler  speaking  on
"Time   and  the   Romantics"   noon
Buch. 202.
SKYDIVERS
Meeting noon SUB 211.
.SATURDAY
DANCE CLUB
11th     Annual     club     competition
featuring general  dancing and professional     demonstrations    7    p.m.
SUB ballroom.
NVC
Car rally 7 p.m. Oakridge parking
lot. Party after 10 p.m. clubs
lounge.
SUNDAY
AUCM
Third World speaks on Development
demands Justice 7:30 p.m. IH.
MONDAY
ELCIRCULO
Play reading by Spanish dept. profs
noon IH room 402-404.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, election of executives  7:30  p.m.  Upper Lounge IH.
TUESDAY
COMMUNIST PARTY OF
CANADA (MARXIST/LENINIST)
Celebration  to hail the tenth anni-
Terry Jacks
CYVR, UBC's petit bourgeois
imitation of CKVN, is hosting
Terry Jacks of the Poppy Family.
The station invites all to come
and meet the singer between
11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesday in
the CYVR studios.
O'lfaru's life
A film called The Life of
O'Haru (English subtitles) has
arrived in Vancouver and will be
presented by Cinema 16, 6 and
8:30 p.m. Tuesday.
All series two tickets will be
honored. For further information
contact Filmsoc.
versary of the founding of the Internationalists 7 p.m. Fisherman's Hall
138 E. Cordova.
AUCM
John Dillon noon SUB 207-209.
WEDNESDAY
FENCING CLUB
Elections   nad   general   meeting   7
p.m. Gym E New P.E. Building.
KUNG/FU
Practice 4:30-6:30 SUB 125.
SPECIAL 3-DAY SALE
CRAFTSMAN PRESENTS
Indian Sweaters, Capes,
Shawls, Ponchos, Socks
14-17 MARCH
AMS CO-OP SHOP
Student Union Bldg.
LINO'S
TAKEOUT
PIZZERIA
3621 W. Broadway, near Alma
Get   a   taste   of   his   delicious
50c OFF
LINO   Says   .   .
home-made pizza!
This coupon entitles you to
pizza, picked up or delivered.
Offer Expires March 30
We also deliver Flavor—Crisp Chicken
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. to 2 a.m. — Fri. & Sat. to 3 a.m
Sun. to 1 a.m.
any size
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S.B. Tuxedos
+ D.B. & S.B. White Coats
+ D.B. & S.B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
On Stage
• •}
'WILDROOT"
PHARAOH'S!
Social Club and
Boogie Parlour
364 Water St. 681-0541
Tonight from 8 p.m.
f\na«ce
treateCo^ttee-°      nori-foesdaV
France u noor> i d
ne* n^le mee^* ' ° ,aV - noon-
tne corona       ^^ *,*«**«
TV,Comm*tee-- J0nn^ect
cii8.
SAJ-B-
BINGO
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
Delightful Food Restaurant
Genuine Canton Chinese Food
Hong   Kong   Barbecue   and   salt
baking    chicken;    Chinese    crisp
roasted duck and Won Ton Mein
High Quality - Low Price
277 E. Pender 684-1916
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional Unas
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. DeadKnr is 11:30 a.m.. the. day before publication,
Publications Office. Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8.B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Lost & Found
13
LOST: MINALTA TRIP S-135
Camera removed from Chemical
Engineering Room 313 on Saturday during Open House. Owner
is Australian on first daay in
Canada. Please return camera to
Room 313 and all will be forgiven.
Special Notices
IS
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/wk. Ph. 732-0174
eves, or before 8 a.m.
SPECIAL 3-DAY SALE. CRAFTS-
man present: Indian sweaters,
capes, shawls, ponchos, socks.
14th-16th March. AMS Co-op
Shop,   Student  Union  Building.
WHAT? BACK AGAIN? YES, DR.
Bundolo and his Medicine Show
return this Thursday, Mar. 15, at
12:30 in SUB movie theatre. It's
FREE! ! !
CASH FOR YOUR USED RECORDS
or trade. J'oy Music, 6610 Main
St.   (at   50th),   11:00-7:00   p.m.
Special Events 15A
BRUCE COCKBURN AT U.B.C. ON
Saturday, March 17 in the SUB
ballroom. Two shows 7:30 & 10:00.
Tickets f2 at AMS office. Sound
by Kelly-Dey ong. Buy tickets now
and avoid disappointment.
NOW $75 FOR 25c
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
BUY YOURS TODAY!
— Bookstore and SUB —
Travel Opportunities
18
AFGHANISTAN OVERLAND FROM
London. 3 mos. leaving June 4th.
733-6707 after 6:30 p.m. 1942 Mc-
Nicoll   Ave.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'69 CORTINA 2 DR. SDN. 4-SPEED
excellent running, $275 or nearest
offer.  224-4071  after  5:30 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1963 VOLKSWAGEN,
tested,   new plates,  $375.   873-3039.
Auto Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
Babysitting 8c Day Care       32
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
— PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS —
 By Ulli Steltzer	
Camera and darkroom work for
beginners and advanced. 4 two-
hour sessions, $25, four people per
class. 731-8322, 9-12 a_m. for information. Classes start March 17.
Jt^JUnis ano gutter
'^ Cameras
SPECIAL
TOSHIBA 707A
Automatic Electronic Flash
Takes all the calculation out of
flash photography, perfect every
time. Was $37.95 — NOW $».95
SAWYER PROJECTOR-VIEWER
It's a Slide Projector — Slip the
lever, it's a Slide Viewer
Was S35.00 — NOW S29.60
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Rentals—Miscellaneous 36
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OB' ES-
says and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 888-6235 —
weekends and evenings, 263-4023.
YEAR ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
ten a.m. to nine p.m. Quick service
on short essays.  Reasonable rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
263-5317. 	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates.  Mrs.  Ellis. 321-8838.
"ESSAYS, THESIS, PAPERS. FAST,
efficient, accurate. Near 41st and
Marine Drive. 266-5063.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC." DONE
efficiently. 35c per page. Phone
224-0385_after_5j30 p^m.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—THESES,
essays, etc. Phone Mrs. Brown,
732-0047._ _____     __
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing, IBM Selectric — Days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at  738-8745—Reasonable  rates.
TYPING OF ESSAYS. ETC.. DONE
efficiently. 35c per pagea. Phone
224-0385   after   5:30   p.m.
FAST AND ACCURATE TYPING,
IBM Selectric, reasonable rates.
879-8578. 	
ELECTRIC TYPING — PAPERS.
theses, other MSS. Experienced
editing if desired. Client supplies
stationery.   Reasonable.   685-6688.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
THE SURREY PARKS AND RE-
creation Commission has openings for positions in the area of
Recreation for the Handicanned.
These positions start in mid-May,
continuing to September, with the
possibility of continued employment in the „ fall. Wage rate:
$3.00/hour. Please contact the
Surrey Parks and Recreation
Commission. 10341—135th Street,
Surrey,  or  telephone   588-9541.
Work Wanted
52
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now) 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
Communal Housing
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
HORNBY ISLAND SUMMER COT-
tage for rent, well water, electricity, veg. garden. Nr. Ford's
Cove.   681-8068   after   6  p.m.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified
I Page  18
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
UBC has become renowned
across Canada in the past week
for the prowess of its women's
athletic teams.
In the past week women's
teams from UBC have won
three national titles and a
Canada   West   championship.
Best right here in our
own backyard
In Montreal on the weekend
the Thunderette basketball
team overwhelmed their
opposition, defeating
Dalhousie University 67-39 in
the semi finals and crushing
the University of Manitoba 50-
30 in the finals to take the
championship.
Meanwhile in Wolfville,
Nova Scotia, the Thunderette
volleyball team had a tougher
time as they lost their first
game to the University of
Western Ontario but came
back to win three straight
games to win the best of five
final of the Canadian
championships.
And in Calgary UBC women
dominated the Canadian inter-
collegiate swimming
championships to win the meet
with a total of 311 points.
UBC picked up three firsts in
the meet.
The freestyle relay team of
Arlene Henderson, Pat
Gilmore, Karen James and
Jeanne Warren set an intercollegiate record in the 400
meter relay.
UBC also won the 400 meter
medley and James picked up
another win in the 400
individual medley.
UBC women also won seven
track and field events and the
aggregate   trophy    at    the
In rugby:
Rest not really
rest at all
By PETER MacQUEEN
The UBC rugby team will have a rest from intercollegiate
play this weekend, but will have their hands full as they play
against the Vancouver Reps in the opening round of the
McKechnie Cup 1 p.m. Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium.
Other contenders for the cup are Crimson Tide from the
island, Nor-West from the outskirts of Vancouver, and
Vancouver.
The McKechnie Cup playoffs are a round-robin affair this
year, with every team playing each other once. In the past it has
been a two game playoff.
The round-robin tournament will give the selectors of a B.C.
side to face Wales later in the spring. A very good opportunity to
see all the players. Wales will tour Canada in May and June.
Last weekend the Thunderbirds remained undefeated in
intercollegiate league play as they defeated Western
Washington State Vikings 34-0.
Spence McTavish and Will McKenzie led the try scorers for
UBC with two a piece, Warwick Harivael scored one try and
kicked two converts, Leigh Hillier and Rick Bourne added one
each, while Mel Reeves kicked the other convert.
This was McKenzie's first game back for the Birds since a
shoulder separation last October put him on the sidelines.
Hillier suffered a torn rib cartilege last Saturday and is a
doubtful starter for this weekend's game.
The second annual rugby Birds vs. Braves hockey game gets
under way 6:30 p.m. Sunday.
The Birds will be out to avenge their previous loss of 5-4 at
the hands of a very strong Brave side which features such stars
as Stan Fuller and Jay Dickenson.
However, the Birds have a ringer of their own as the
Tasmanian devil straps on the blades and takes to the ice.
Beys loaded with
more than talent
The new edition of the varsity rowing eights pulled off a
major upset Sunday as they won over a telent laden old boys
crew by four seconds in the 2,000 metres.
The old boys crew featured such UBC greats as former
Olympians Trevor Josephson and Mike Neary but appeared in
the race to be suffering from too much easy living.
"We could have beat those punk kids by a mile if half the
guys had not spent the whole night whoring and boozing at the
Cecil," said Joshephson. "John Wilkinson was so drunk when he
showed up for the race that he didn't know which end of his oar
was which. He rowed the whole race with the wrong end in the
water."
The winning time in the race was 6:23.5.
Canada     West     meet     in
Edmonton.
Penny May won two events,
the 50 meter hurdles in 7.4
seconds and the long jump with
a leap of 18 feet nine inches.
The success of the women's
teams at the national level is
all the more astounding when
the obstacles they face at UBC
are considered.
The women must play and
travel on a lower budget than
men's teams and are usually
faced with poor press coverage
and a lack of fan interest.
Thunderette basketball
coach Norm Vickery
commented on the fan interest
in  the  Thunderettes,   saying
there  was   "much  room  for
improvement."
He said Thursday fan
support for the Thunderettes
was much greater in Montreal
than at UBC.
For example, Joanne
Sargent received a standing
ovation from the crowd in
Montreal for her fine play and
consistent effort, he said.
Vickery gave some reasons
for his team's success on the
national level.
From a coaching standpoint
he felt that the Thunderettes
'were   the   best   and   most
dedicated players that he had
ever coached.
He had praise for Sargent
saying that she played every
game "as if her life depended
upon it."
He felt that the players'
enthusiasm, their ability to
work together as a team and
the ball control of the guards
carried them to the national
championship.
Vickery said women's
athletics in Canada was
entertaining and of high
calibre and interest at UBC
was slowly improving.
He mentioned that in some
areas of the U.S., particularly
Iowa, women's basketball
draws crowds of over 10,000,
outdrawing the men's teams.
If current trends continue at
UBC perhaps the same thing
will occur here.
It would not be surprising to
see a shift in fan interest from
men's athletics to women's if
UBC women's teams continue
to dominate while many of the
men's teams flounder in their
own mediocrity.
—kini mcdonald photo
BRIAN FULTON of p.e. goes up
for the rebound in last Friday's
intramural final as Tom Fell
opposes
In judo:
Team
hits
stride
UBC's judo team is hitting
stride with a major
tournament nearly every
weekend.
Next on the UBC judo agenda
"is the B.C. open tournament at
Vernon March 10. March 24
they will be entering the B.C.
trials for the Canadian
nationals.
On Feb. 17 UBC sent
competitors to the Pacific
Northwest-American Athetic
Union invitational
championships in Kent,
Washington, where UBC's Joe
Laing and Hizakazu.
Takahama won the 250 and 205
pound divisions.
Meanwhile, Fred Nuszdorfer
placed third in Ihe under 176
class.
For the first time, on Feb. 24,
UBC   entered   the   Canadian
Ready
for gun
BySIMON TRUELOVE
The intramural track meet
starts 11 a.m. Saturday at the
John Owen Pavilion.
The running events presently
scheduled are the 100 yards,
220, 440, 880 and mile.
There is also competition in
all field events except the
hammer and the pole vault.
Finally, there are the 4x110
and 4x440 relays.
The basketball tourney last
Friday night was won by p.e.
56-38 over dentistry.
The key to the final was
hustle, and dentistry just did
not have it.
The dentists were missing a
star in Rick Cuttel, and they
failed to get the ball to Graham
Burns, the only other player
who could have pulled them
through.
Physical education has won
eight of eight games since
Christmas.
Rugby in intramurals is
reputed to be the roughest
game played on campus.
Engineers are the favorites
now in the division I playoffs,
having beaten p.e. (football) in
the semis. They must now take
on the winner of dentistry vs.
education on the field outside
SUB at noon today. Don't miss
it.
The division II final will be
12:30 p.m. Wednesday on the
rugby fields adjacent to the
Winter Sports Centre between
forestry and dekes.
'j^-^Sififr*.^
TAI-OTOSHI, ANYONE? UBC's Charles Maingon (facing) is
attempting to perform the throw against his opponent at the Pacific
North-western judo championships held in Kent, Wash.
we stern collegiate
championships held in
Lethbridge, Alta.
The UBC team as a whole
tied for second place with the
University of Lethbridge. First
place went to the University of
Alberta (Edmonton), who had
sent a team of 10 black belts.
The team is coached by Doug
Rogers, former 1964 Tokyo
Olympic games silver medal
winner in the heavyweight
division.
Birds travelling
The UBC soccer team heads
for Vancouver Island Saturday
for a 2 p.m. game against
Victoria Gorge of the Pacific
Coast League.
Coach Joe Johnson is not
taking the game lightly
because Gorge will be working
hard to stay in the top half of
the league and the consequent
playoff spot. Tuesday, March 6, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
In skiing:
UBCS  ELLEN  McDONNEL/ produced top results throughout the
season: above, she is en route to a slalom win
Season ended
on winning note
The Thunderbird men's and
women's ski team ended a
successful season last weekend
by winning the Northwest
collegiate ski conference
championships at Crystal
mountain, Washington.
The women's team had an
excellent season, winning all
three meets they were at
during the year. The men's
team took only two of the four
meets they competed in
because of the lack of crosscountry ski athletes, but the
alpine team cleaned up the
whole way.
At the National Collegiate
Athletic Association race held
at Banff, Alta. in February
they easily took the alpine
combined, lead by Dan Irwin
with two second place finishes.
They placed second over-all
because of stiff competition
from the University of
Montana's Norwegian cross
country and jumping
specialists.
Pam Aiken lead the women's
alpine team by winning five out
of five races this season. She
was backed by Karen.
Williams, who took two of three
skimiester titles (equivalent to
most valuable skier), and the
league skimiester trophy for
the season.
Ellen McDonnell, Kathy
Snowball, Debbie Sigalet, and
*$&%
GUY WOODS ... finishes third in
cross country event
Lee Ellis also produced top
results throughout the season
to insure their first place
position.
The NWCSC championships
held last weekend at Crystal
Mountain were attended by
five universities from Oregon,
five from Washington, two
from B.C., and three from
Alaska.
Aiken's two firsts, Bruce
Goldsmid's second in slalom,
as well as a third by Williams,
a fifth by McDonnell, and an
llth by Guy Woods, gave the
team a good lead in the alpine
part of the competition.
In the cross country some
difficulty was encountered, as
usual. Williams, Snowball,
McDonnell and Sigalet placed
8th, 9th, llth and 13th
respectively, while Woods had
the best men's cross country
result at 14th, with Irwin 18th.
They were defeated by
specialized cross-country
teams, mainly from Alaska.
The ski team has had a
successful season, and
although there are no more
collegiate races this season,
members of the team will be
racing in open Canadian Ski
Association races for the next
few weekends.
FOUR SEASONS
General Manager Terry Kelly Says
OUR 1973
BOATS, MOTORCYCLES, CAMPERS
& TRAILERS HAVE ARRIVED.
WE NEED ROOM
LADIES' SIZES
NANCY GREENE
DOWN JACKETS
$
29
.88
ANY Size or Model In The Store While They Last
KOFLACH
SHINS'**
$CQ.88
1973 SALES LEADER
Reg. $85.00
CLEARANCE
SUPER SAVINGS ok
SUPERSTAR-SKI $^g88
Fibreglass  reinforced,
one piece edge, P-tex bose.
Manufacturer's    Suggested
List $65.00
CLEARANCE
\/j*oIicl
DELUXE 900/2000
Reg. 49.50    $QQ.88
CLEARANCE    OO
STEP-IN BINDINGS
Most Popular 90/100
Reg. 37.50
CLEARANCE
28
.88
100%
WOOL
SWEATERS
19.88
WMm   ami up
NANCY GREENE WATERPROOF
WIND PANTS
100% NYLON
MFG. SUGG. LIST $35.00
CLEARANCE
*9
Weekdays 9-9
• TERMS • NO DOWN PAYMENT • CHARGEX
"Deal with us and bank the difference"
FOUR SEASONS
LEISURE WORLD
Weekends 'til 6
1503 KINGSWAY
873-2481 Page 20
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 6, 1973
Greek government—American style
ANDREAS PAPANDREOU, a former cabinet minister in Greece and now a prof at York University, says
United States government is sponsoring military junta in his homeland. Papandreou will speak again at 8
p.m. today in Buchanan 106. -mark hamilton photo
By LEN JOHNSON
The military junta ruling Greece is an executive arm of the
United States government, a former Greek cabinet minister
said Thursday.
Andreas Papandreou, cabinet minister in 1964-65, said at a
press conference the Americans are pursuing a foreign policy in
underdeveloped countries which supports right-wing military
dictatorships. They believe these are the safest methods of
achieving democratic government without running the risk of a
communist takeover, he said.
Papandreou said Greece is the best European example of
this policy, where a U.S.-supported military coup laid to rest
"pluralist democracy" in 1967 to prepare the country for a
"genuine democracy" and rapid "modernization."
He said this modernization has included a "brutally
repressive regime buttressed by martial law and torture of
opponents, as it has included an open door policy toward
foreign, especially U.S., investment.
"Any military regime is difficult to topple no matter how few
roots it has in the country. This is because acts of desperation of
the oppressed are considered illegitimate and the acts of the
oppressor are considered legitimate — the stronger the
oppressor the more legitimate the acts," said Papendreou, an
economics professor at York University.
Violence is a last resort, but if it is the only means that
remains it is fully legitimized, Papendreou said.
"We are pleased by the action of the Greek students.
Unarmed and en masse they have confronted the military in the
streets.
"This is an active form of resistance but is not violent. They
are offering themselves to the violence of the state," he said.
"The student demonstrations have begun a pattern of civil
disobedience which will escalate and destroy the myth of the
invincibility of the junta."
Papendreou said the junta has found itself incapable of
liberalizing the regime and has had to keep martial law
imposed since it took control nearly six years ago. He compared
Greece to Vietnam, where President Thieu did not find it
necessary to impose martial law until only a few months ago.
He said he sees a hope for a resurgence by the people not
visible a few months ago as Greeks now feel they can talk back
to the junta, especially after the student protests.
There is complete censorship of the press, he said, and the
only news the Greeks receive is from the government radio
stations in Britain, France and Germany.
Heavy restrictions have also been placed on the freedom of
students, said Papendreou, and termed the junta's policy
toward education "the saddest part of all."
He said the junta has cut the number of mandatory school
years to six from nine and has discontinued teaching popular
Greek in favor of "clean Greek," which he termed a dead
language.
'Transom peeping' in credit bureaus
By NORM GORDNER
From the Ryersonian
Your credit rating is your lifeline to
nearly every necessity in modern life.
It affects your ability to borrow money,
to get a job, win a promotion, buy a
home, insure your automobile, or
obtain a license for certain
occupations.
What can you do when that lifeline is
fouled or cut? What do you do when the
company responsible for investigating
you has reported erroneous information
to your bank or insurance company?
In Canada the odds are slightly in
your favor. But in the U.S. there's not
much you can do. What few laws exist
in this area put the burden of proof on
the victim to establish his innocence of
judgments made by the sometimes
poorly qualified investigators paid to
snoop into his life. For countless
Americans, this experience has
resulted in everything from
exasperation to heartbreak, from
embarrassment to complete financial
1957,     businessman    David
rum.
In
Weinberger, after verbally" being
promised a job with IBM, was refused
employment after an investigation by a
credit bureau wrongly stated that
Weinberger had been the business
partner of a man indicted for mail
fraud.
In Canada similar cases are either
well-hidden, more easily corrected, or
non-existent, but one somewhat
celebrated case does exist. Bruce
McGrath, an Ontario businessman,
was denied a series of jobs — after
having been told he was hired —
because a report by the branch office of
an American-based investigating firm
said he had been fired from his
previous job and had "loose morals."
After  a  Toronto   magazine  began
looking into McGrath's case, a new
report by the same firm reported
McGrath had actually resigned from
his previous job to seek a better one.
His morals? The new report read: "No
criticism of subject's reputation or
associates."
Milton Pearson, general manager
and president of the Association of
Credit Bureaus of Canada Ltd.,
representing 152 member bureaus
across Canada, states that credit
bureaus deal with the credit history of
an individual and nothing more.
"For an average fee of $1.50 a bank,
insurance company, contractor or
employer will receive the credit report
of a person. We don't make any
judgments or use of personal data in-
our files.
We don't have the financial resources
to investigate the personal lives of
people. We make our checks by phone,
and deal only with an individual's
financial history," he says.
"Canadians have from time to time
worried about a blacklist, but none
exists. Periodically, different
individuals have tried to start one but
that didn't last long. If someone is a
slow billpayer, even if he eventually
pays his bills, is he apoor credit risk?
"We don't presume to have the
answer to that question. It would be
unfair to the person investigated."
A touchier subject in Canada is not
the credit bureaus but the investigating
bureaus who are hired to peek into the
private lives of people.
The largest company of this kind,
with files on almost one out of every
four Canadians is Retail Credit
Company of Canada Ltd., an American
branch-plant operation.
In their defence, it is only fair to say
that no file is closed to the subject even
though they could legally withhold the
information in nine of 10 provinces.
And if conflicting information is
found, the material is usually
reinvestigated. If nothing is found to
change the original report, a brief
submitted by the subject of the
investigation will also be included in
the file.
But the question arises, what
business does business have prying into
private life?
This situation is not the fault of the
investigating bureaus alone. Insurance
companies are the biggest users of
such information and have done little to
stop the practice.
Instead, the insurance companies
enforce their own set of moral
standards. (Allstate, in the U.S.
frequently cancels the auto insurance
of anyone who is divorced or is in the
process of being divorced.)
In today's complex, highly mobile,
credit-oriented society, credit and
investigating reports are a vital,
legitimate, even indispensible, tool for
every business — providing they are
accurate both for the consumer and
business.
This is not necessarily true today;
there sometimes seems to be a
tremendous vacuum in legislation
applying to credit and investigating
companies. And what few laws do exist
have loopholes.
In the U.S. the reporting industry
shows no signs it wants to discipline
itself and there is a great need for
strict, clearcut regulations to establish
limits on what investigators can do.
In Canada the reverse seems to be
true. Pearson states: "For years we
have been forming our own guidelines
to ensure fairness to both consumer and
business but with no legislation of any
kind giving clearcut definitions, it is a
difficult  task.   We   welcome   good
legislation."
Until last year, there was no way for
victims of the reporting industry to
protect themselves, or even to know
what was being reported about them.
The fairness advocated by most
agencies is done voluntarily and not
governed by any legislation.
A small but important first step was
taken through passage in Manitoba of
the Personal Investigations Act.
The act still puts the consumer on the
defensive, still makes the consumer
responsible for initiating corrective
action, and contains no provisions for
preventing damaging mistakes before
they occur, but it does give the
consumer a few rights.
For one thing, the act marks the first
time the consumer has the legal right
to see the contents of his dossier.
The Manitoba act is the best, chiefly
because it is the only piece of
legislation dealing with these agencies
in Canada today. Soon Ontario will
have an equivalent law but the other
eight provinces of Canada, and the
people in them, will still be at the
mercy of the reporting industry.
How many other Bruce McGraths
are there in Canada, people who are
unemployed because an investigation
by a reporting agency stated they are
"alcoholics," or have "loose morals?"
Larry Solway, CBLT-TV news
commentator, once said in a televised
editorial that what these reporting
agencies do is "nothing more than
transom peeping."
"I wouldn't give them the time of day
if they called to verify the character of
one of my neighbors, even if my
neighbor and I were the best of friends.
It's none of their business."
Not a bad rule-of-thumb to live by.

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