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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1967

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Array &$%  THE US YSSE Y
Vol. XLVII, No. 55
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY,  MARCH  9,   1967
224-3916
Alberta students
remain out of CUS
— al harvey photo
SPRING IS ICUMEN IN and all that slippery skiing stuff
on the mount melteth. Grey granite of Union College in
foreground of picture taken from atop Lasserre building
symbolizes eternal values of life.
Voters squash
action plebiscite
An AMS referendum urging student action against a tuition fee increase was quashed Wednesday when it failed to get
the necessary quorum of voters.
Only 1,870 students voted; at least 3,400 are needed for a
quorum.
"There was a dropping of enthusiasm among students for
the idea anyway," AMS president Peter Braund said Wednesday when the results were counted.
The announcement Saturday by president John Macdonald
that enrolment will be restricted makes the action almost irrelevant," said Braund.
The action program to "take steps to insure withdrawal
of the fee increase" was to be co-ordinated by the three universities, UBC, Victoria, and Simon Fraser Academy.
The University of Victoria had already voted to support
the program. SFA voted Wednesday on the referendum.
"The matter could just have gone through council," said
Braund. "We put it before the students to get student support
on any action we took."
"We won't hold another referendum."
A referendum to pull Science Undergraduate Society out
of the AMS was heavily defeated.
At the same polls, SUS gained it's new president — a
woman. Elected was third year math major Robin Russell. She
defeated Mike McPhee 530 to 212 votes.
Miss Russell was the SUS women's rep 1965-67.
EDMONTON (CUP) — University of
Alberta students Friday cast an overwhelming vote against the activist Canadian Union of Students.
A referendum asking them whether
they wished to end their six-month absence
from CUS was defeated 3,556 to 1,641.
The vote, seen here as a vindication of
students' union president Branny Schepanovich who led the Alberta walkout last September, also saw anti-CUS forces win the
1967-68 council presidency.
Commerce student Al Anderson, who
campaigned against student voting power
on university governing bodies and opposed
U of A memtoership in CUS, easily defeated
two other candidates by capturing more
than 60 per cent of the votes cast.
Voter turnout was approximately 50 per
cent in the elections.
A poll taken during last week's campaigning had predicted CUS president
Doug Ward's call for an Alberta return to
CUS would go unheeded.
Schepanovich was quoted as saying after
the vote results were known that Alberta
students would lead a mass walkout from
CUS in the next few months.
He predicted students across Canada
will force CUS to discard its current activist bent.
CUS vice-president Dave Young said in
Ottawa Monday that while the referendum
results were "hardly unexpected, CUS was
disappointed that Alberta students had decided to remain out of CUS for another
year".
But at McGill University, students supported an activist policy, electing Peter
Smith, Mark Wilson and Danny Trevick to
the Students' Society executive.
The three, who describe themselves as
having compatible aims, all took activist
stands during the campaining.
President-elect Smith termed the election "a reaction against last year's student's
council".
"I think students should be concerned
with society," he said.
Council president Jim McCoubrey, commenting on Smith's remarks, said only, "At
least we've preserved the clique of graduate  students running the  executive."
EX-PRES WANTS NEW HEAVEN
EDMONTON (CUP) — Canada's major student centennial
project opened here Monday
with a call for a search for
"a new heaven and a new
earth".
At the opening ceremonies
for Second Century Week, Dr.
Norman A. M. MacKenzie,
Canadian Centenary Council
president, issued a challenge
for students to share in Canada's future.
He told part of the 1,100 students engaging in athletic,
cultural and academic dialogues in Alberta this week
that "patience, tolerance, generosity, wisdom and intelligence can and will overcome"
Canada's problems of race,
color and culture.
Senator MacKenzie examined youth's role in changing
social establishments.
"You may be bigger, healthier and better educated than
NORMAN MACKENZIE
.   .  . superficial
my generation — or generations before mine — but these
changes, while for the better,
are superficial and when you
come to power and take over,
you too will face the same
basic problems that we have
known.
"You are experimenting
with all behavior, with sex
and with drugs in new and unlimited ways. You are rejecting the policies and actions of
those in authority on many
issues," he warned.
"All of this is exciting and
I do not condemn it — for
I believe we should be free to
find our own heaven or our
own hell, provided — and I
emphasize provided — you
understand and realize what
you are doing and make sure
that you do not injure other
human beings or trespass upon
their rights, well-being or freedom."
New special events man
will start free university
A student-run experimental college is
being organized by two UBC arts students.
Gerald Cannon and John Higginbotham,
in an open letter Monday to UBC president
John Macdonald, discussed the aims and objective of the proposed experimental college.
They critized the present educational system as serving the interests of the business
community, the student-professor relationship as formal and unfriendly and the low
retention of knowledge by students.
"The experimental college will be a new
way of looking at the educational process.
That process is not now efficient," said
Cannon.
Cannon Monday was named by AMS
council to replace Brian Plummer as special
events chairman next year.
He told council he plans to integrate
speakers brought in by special events with
the college.
"The university is basically behind in
development. Most learning now at university is factual, not conceptual," he said.
Cannon said an example of the increasing conceptual education was the new high
school science program in grades 11 and 12.
"Students enjoyed conceptual learning
in high school but when they come here
they're stifled."
Cannon said the experimental college
would be run three days a week — Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday in the afternoon.
"Monday there will be a lecture with
discussion following.v Wednesday and Thursday there will be seminars with a chairman
and resource person leading."
To page 3
SEE: NEW LOOK Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9,  1967
ir"-.
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—kurt hilger photo
ENGROSSED IN HIS STUDIES, a long student wanders into this midst of the Big Band
Jazz   concert.   The   sound   happened   Tuesday noon in Brock.
Prof soc plans to push
student reps in senate
A faculty association recommendation
that students be elected to the senate will
be brought up at the senate's next meeting
in April, says association president R. W.
Stewart.
At its last meeting the association, called by Stewart a "faculty trade union,"
passed a floor resolution that four students
be admitted to the 80-man Senate. The resolution was later passed by an overwhelming majority through a mail ballot.
"One major difficulty in getting students
on the senate," said Stewart, "is the university act clause which stipulates members of
the senate must hold office for a period of
three years.
Since probably only senior students
would be allowed on Senate, then succeeding years of students would have no active
representation.
"Another question was whether students
elected to the senate would express their
own views or would be responsible to the
students,"  Stewart said.
Roughly half senate membership is from
UBC faculty. The other half are administration personnel and convocation and provincial government appointees.
Each faculty has one elected representative on Senate, and approximately 25 other
faculty members are elected by the facul
ties in joint meeting.
The faculty association move to have
students on senate was partly due to a new
interest by student leaders in university
government," said Stewart.
He said student participation on senate
would give students some feeling about
how the university is run.
It will probably be a year before the
technical problems of having students on
senate are worked out, Stewart said.
"Faculty members of senate usually regard the job as a chore, but if you have a
feeling that faculty should run the university, you have to do your share."
Junk objects born
The UBC fine arts gallery is presenting
two exhibitions of crafts starting Friday.
Items of curiosity, whimsey, nostalgia,
and magic are presented in the first exhibition entitled The Birth and Rebirth of Objects.
A special hippie fashion show and dance
performance in the fine arts gallery at
noon, March 16 will emphasize this showing.
The second exhibition entitled Designer
Craftsmen of California will include weaving, jewellery pots and metalwork.
NOW PLAYING
Tickets on sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., MU 3-3255; all Eaton's Stores (charge them);
and Town & Country Home Furnishings in Kerrisdale and Richmond.
STUDENT SPECIAL:  HALF-PRICE FOR ALL EVENING  PERFORMANCES
$1.00 FOR SATURDAY MATINEE
ALL THESE  METALS
ARE  AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL  DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
SPECIAL
EVENTS
and the
The Department of Anthropology
presents
Dr. Jules
Henry
in critical
dialogue
.. a
"Sham, Innocence and Identity
12:30 - Friday
Frederic Wood Theatre - Free
Friday evening Dr. Henry will lecture on "The U.S.A.
from Barbarism to Decadence Without Civilization" in
the Hebb Theatre at 8:15 sponsored by the Extension
Department.
ALL LUCIA TICKETS ARE SOLD SO NO L.M.T/s
COMING
March 17 — Joan Baer
BROCK HALL - 12:30 - 50c
March 22 - Country Joe & The Fish
One of the biggest rock groups from the
Bay area of San Francisco
Brock Hall - 12:30- 50c Thursday, March 9, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
81
11
II
II
— chrii Make photo
UNDAUNTED  APPARITION   RECENTLY   haunted   Buchanan,   returned   today   despite
physical   plant's   late   efforts   to  erase   him. Photog spied him at the back of the library
—this time embracing a female companion—a sure sign of spring.
ACCORDING TO HOYE:
'Up fee or chop jocks'
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Focus Editor
Your Alma Mater Society is going broke.
Faced with a $13,000 deficit for next year,
council Monday decided in desperation to
call another vote on an AMS fee raise.
If it fails again, council will try to trim
the $76,000 given to athletics, plus other allocations.
And if that fails, the rest of the budget
will have to be slashed. Undergraduate societies, special events, clubs, publications, all
would have to get along with much less from
AMS coffers. We'd have to pull out of CUS.
How did the AMS get in this fix?
Briefly, expenditures next year will rise
while income remains fixed.
"I anticipate a rise in enrolment of about
200 students next year," says treasurer-
elect David Hoye.
"This will mean about $5,800 more in
AMS fees. However, income from various
funds and a profit decrease of about $3,000
when we close the College Shop at the end
of the year will wipe out this increase, and
we'll be about in the same position as last
year.
"Non-discretionary grants to the student
union building, athletics, CUS, the Brock art
fund, the Brock management fund and so
on, vary with the number of students. The
total expenditure per student is $20.75.
"With 200 more students, these grants
will go up $5,015. Also, our office staff is
underpaid: I've budgeted increased administrative costs of $6,135. I'd like to raise the
publications budget $2,000 to cover increased
printing costs. All this adds up to a deficit
of $13,000."
What does Hoye propose to do?
This year $5 of your AMS fee goes to
extramural athletics. Men get $4.20, women
80 cents. Hoye and treasurer Lome Hudson
want to trim this to $3.70 and 65 cents.
Monday night, AMS council slashed it to
$3.20 and 50 cents.
Hudson and Hoye felt that a bigger cut
would make the program insecure and harm
the continuity that athletics needs.
Council, however, questioned the philosophy of trimming everyone the same relative amount. Some thought drastic cuts
should be made in athletics, to save the rest
of the budget; others say AMS should withdraw  all  support  from  extramurals.
Hudson and president Peter Braund don't
think the revised cut will be approved at
the March 22 general meeting. They walked
out in disgust when council made the decision.
If the reduction goes through, other cuts
will still have to be made.
"It is suggested that the new students'
council negotiate membership in the Canadian Union of Students at a much lower cost
and divert possibly up to $2,000 of this reduction to the promotion of higher education within the province," recommended
the budget cuts committee Monday.
CUS doesn't set fee rates till this summer's congress — but CUS officials on campus have warned that the above suggestion
sounds impossible.
Is Hoye advocating a CUS pullout?
"It's hypothetical, but so is this budget,"
says Hoye. "It's impossible to say what will
happen in September, when this budget has
to be approved."
What if the athletics reduction doesn't
pass the general meeting?
"Everyone will feel the pinch," says
Hoye.
There has been no increase for operating
expenditures in AMS fees since 1955. Twice
students have voted to support capital projects (Brock extension and the SUB) and in
1957 we voted another dollar per capita for
athletics.
FILTHY PICTURES?
Advancing cops
seize  obscenity'
The police visited the Arvance Mattress Coffee House
Tuesday and seized a magazine showing a painter before his
work which reads in part, "fuck hate."
An estimated three to 15 copies of the so-called "objectionable and obscene" magazine, the East Village Other, and a
sign reading The Kennedy Assassination Discussed Tonight
were ampng the literature taken by police.
"The policeman just came in and seized all copies of
the Village Other and said he was taking it to the city prosecutor to see if it was liable for charges," said Advance Mattress
shareholder Gabor Mate.
"Later the same officer came back and said he didn't
like the sign on our front door announcing the topic of discussion for the evening."
"He ripped it off the door and left,"  said Mate.
A police morality squad spokesman claimed Wednesday
he didn't know what bearing the sign had on the newspaper
copies.
"Originally a citizen complained to the officer about the
cover of the magazine being visible in the coffee house window," he said.
"One word on the title page could be construed as being
offensive."
"The constable involved obviously felt there were objectionable and maybe obscene words in the paper," he said.
"A decision will be made Wednesday afternoon on the
literature if there is nothing wrong with the confiscated articles we will likely drop them off at the coffee house."
Dislike indicated
by library survey
Although the library questionnaires completed last fall
are not tabulated, there are strong indications that students
dislike the library service.
"The general feeling of the students is that they don't
have good library service," said Sedgewick head librarian
Ture Erickson Monday.
About 4,600 students filled out the questionnaires.
"Because of the tremendous number of questionnaires
there is a large amount of paper work. This is why the results
have not yet been released," said head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs.
"We feel the whole problem is caused by lack of money,"
said Erickson.
"Our facilities are not adequate to handle the flow of
traffic. At times 2,000 people go in and out of Sedgewick during class breaks."
Final results are expected to be released by April 1.
Company recruits Indians
as city social workers
WATERLOO (CUP) — The Company of Young Canadians
will recruit young Indians for social work among the isolated
Indians of Canada's major cities.
Jeannetter Corbiere, the only Indian woman on the CYC's
head office staff in Ottawa, will begin the program in Winnipeg. If successful, it will be expanded to Vancouver, then
Toronto, home of 12,000 Indians.
"There is no limit to the areas a group such as this could
expand into," Miss Corbiere told an Indian study seminar at
the University of Waterloo Saturday.
NEW   LOOK   PLANNED
FROM PAGE 1
Cannon said they have gained encouragement from the
administration and have many "semi-commitments" from
professors.
"We're depending upon students having something to say,"
said Cannon. "The classes won't be centered on the professor—
there are some students who know more about a field than the
professors."
"The big problem at other free schools was the lack of
groundwork and the involvement of only a small group of students."
"We thought that most students were satisfied with their
education but by talking to many of them we found they were
dissatisfied. Their biggest complaint was they were studying
for four years and learning nothing."
The experimental college will have a loose structure and
the curriculum will be developed as the project progresses, says
Cannon.
Financing of the college, which will be held on the campus
in regular classrooms, has not yet been fully decided. THE MSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
MARCH 9,  1967
<^
ker-LEER
On receipt of a citizen's complaint, the city police
seized some copies of the East Village Other from a
student coffeehouse Tuesday. They will examine same
with the city prosecutor, and may press charges of
obscenity against the paper's distributors.
Thus the old obscenity question rises in Vancouver,
and the police seem to think obscenity is words on bits
of paper rather than deeds and conditions in society.
The newspaper cover carried a noble statement
when you think about it. So what really is obscenity,
anyway?
Obscenity might be described as the arrogance the
officers displayed at that coffeehouse. One ripjped down
a window poster which read "The Kennedy assassination discussed tonight" because he said he didn't like
it.
Maybe obscenity is the cop who arrested a student
last week and pitched him in the jug as a suspected
thief. But the alleged theft — of the car the student was
driving — had not been stolen, and the arrest was really
because the student asked the cop to identify himself
prior to answering questions. It's obscene when a kid
with long hair spends six hours in the city jail simply
for offending a cop's sensibilities.
To cease attacking our motley men in blue, obscenity might be engineers leering at a naked prostitute at
a smoker. Or it might be people publicly flagellating
each other by dousing themselves in house paint — as
happened here last week. That particular exhibition
of masochism was rather like the medieval priests who
ran through the streets of Rhiems whipping each other to
atone for their sins.
Maybe obscenity is several hundred people dead
each year in B.C. traffic accidents, or ugly hordes of
high school kids massing in a shopping centre, or high
school principals placing students in a form of solitary
confinement for daring to have hair and like it.
How about Volkswagen ads (does the stickshift
scare your wife) or Joe Pyne or airbrushed, hairless
and absolutely sexless playmates.
Obscenity is material offensive to contemporary
community standards, without redeeming artistic or
social value. Maybe obscenity is hate, and maybe fuck
hate is a rather good old American way of expressing
distaste for hatred in all forms. It will be disturbing if
the contemporary community standard is what a cop
thinks, or if the guardians of redeeming social value
are Vancouver's police courts.
Stan the man
Arts president Stan Persky should be declared a
public menace and locked away from AMS activities.
This most destructive fellow, taking a look at the
paucity of arts participation in what seem to be worthwhile events, has taken his office and his meetings to
the people. The first, Monday, was held in a Buchanan
corridor, and the voting members were everyone
present.
Jeez, Stan, you can't conduct a proper meeting that
way. People who aren't even artsmen might vote, and
your executive might find it had nothing to do if it
doesn't meet regularly, privately and secretly.
Stan says he's planning other meetings in the auditorium caf, at lunch time, where everyone who cares
to pay attention will have voice and vote.
If the AMS doesn't crack down on Stan, he might
make the whole electoral process — where you delegate
all your responsibility to office seekers — useless and
might even begin to erode the very bastions of student
government with such illegal practices.
The two years touted and never happened before
arts anti-calendar will certainly be published this year,
but Stan, why, he's never had an executive meeting to
approve the idea, acid he's even giving it away free.
Scandalous, that's what.
More scandalous is his proposed arts newspaper,
with more depth than The Ubyssey. Now he's really
shaking the powers, really attacking the domain of
the 12-year-old university mind. We warn arts students:
to let this man continue in office is to deny all we hold
sacred in our student government. We must be vigilant
and contain the creeping Persky menace.
^
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And I have always thought that the value of these discussion groups over classes lies
in  the  cosier atmosphere and limited number of students . . .
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Dirty frog
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I object most strongly to
certain statements made by
Daniel LaTouche. In his article "How Calgray's rednecks killed confederation
and   Quebec   at   one   blow,"
LaTouche has thoroughly discussed the alleged poor diplomacy and childish or racist actions of Alberta's David
Estrin.
As there are always two
sides to every story, and I've
only heard one, I will not
comment on this aspect of La-
Touche's article, but in his
criticism of Estrin, LaTouche
has himself uttered childish
and racist statements.
I object to this man's narrow-minded, parochial and defamatory statements. He is
certainly no example of diplomacy. He appears to want
to carry a grudge: "We will
remember this for a long
time." and *te lot of water
will flow under the Jacques
Cartier bridge before this is
forgotten."
But this might be expected,
for some Quebecers have not
forgiven Britain and English
speaking Canadians for the
defeat of Prance on the
Plains of Abraham.
This Canadian of French
heritage has slighted all Canadians of other ethnic origin, particularly Anglo-
Saxon. I quote: "I am beginning to realize that Anglo-
Saxons are really obsessed
with money." "Maudit Anglais" — cursed English, ie,
Canadians who speak English. "Anglo-Saxons are indeed all the same."
I and most Canadians who
speak English are not obsessed with money, nor are we
cursed, nor are we all the
same, nor are we the many
things   LaTouche   claims  we
all are.
When he name calls, LaTouche should expect to be
called a dirty French frog in
retaliation, for if you run
down another man's culture
and heritage and he snaps
back at you, don't plead prejudice or race hatred to me.
I feel that if Daniel LaTouche truly believes in the
equality and integrity of all
men, he should apologise to
me and the other Canadians
he has wrongly and maliciously blamed for others' and
his   own errors,  faults.
Let us all cease this childish
bickering and name calling
and act as mature men. You
can help make a start, M.
LaTouche.
TERRANCE   ROBERTSON
science   2
'Maudit Francois
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Let us sincerely hope that
the cynical and completely
uncompromising attitude expressed by Daniel LaTouche
in his Second Century Week
article in The Ubyssey is limited to a very small minority
of French Canadians.
As a "generous" and "condescending" Anglo-Saxon Canadian, I • have always attempted to understand the so-
called French Canadian problem. I have always felt it
essential that somehow, someday, a compromise between
the English and the French
nations be reached. A compromise  which  calls for the
union and not the disintegration of Canada.
After reading what I think
is an exaggerated and unjust
criticism of the "paternalistic" attitude taken by those
Albertan students who organized Second Cenutry Week,
I can only say that I hope
that the sooner M. LaTouche
and his fellow French Canadian students shake that
monstrous chip off their
shoulders and try to co-operate rather than dissent, the
better off we all will toe. Remember, M. LaTouche, for
every "maudit Anglais" there
is  a  "maudit  Francais".
SHEILA  DYER
grad   studies
Gardol  shield
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I concede you a point well
made in Tuesday's editorial.
Scientists and engineers all to
often speak out on pressing
socio - scientific problems
<chemical warfare and pollution, to cite but two examples).
The reason (or is it rationalization?) they offer for their
silence is "We must be objective". Their so-called "objectivity" is nothing more than
a push-button defense mechanism used to cloud a lack of
conviction. They use this
"Gardol shield" to reinforce
their sophism that these questions are too, too "complex"
to allow any answers.
ROBERT   DUMONT
mech. eng.
EDITOR: Jehn Kelsey
City      Danny Stoffman
News _. Al Birnie
Photo  Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Gwinn
Sports   Sue Gransby
Managing  Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News - Al Donal*
Ass't City  _ Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
Hardly anyone writ. Quietly
pondering, Morguer and Fetish
manned tha rim, aided and abetted by Truist. Morris griped and
Ussner proofed. Copyrunner appeared — wearing green, expectantly -waiting for a good thing
to come, Gransby opt out, left
spaces to fill. Laughing Val Thom
tweening Marg Eadbury, phoning John Rogers, and able Wes
Johnstone turned in the copy. Rabbit   received   guests.
Pio Uran and Tony Hodge made
the sports scene. Al Harvey,
Chris Blake and Kurt Hilger developed. Somebody forgot to write
a masthead. Thursday, March 9,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
HONORS  GODIVA
Grad class allots loot
By VAL  THOM
A long and rowdy grad class meeting
Friday resulted in a tanking for AMS treasurer Lome Hudson, law 3.
The mechanical and chemical engineers
voted unanimously to tank Hudson as their
centennial project following Hudson's long
speech promoting SUB as being worthy of
receiving  the  $7,000 grad   class gift.
The annual gift is donated by the grad
class to a cause they deem worthwhile. Each
grad gives $7 to the fund.
The SUB suggestion was one Of seven
put before the grad class meeting held in
Ang.  110.
Other suggestions included a statue of
Lady Godiva on a white charger to be erected in front of the library, ten xerox machines for the library, and a $7,000 grant
to World University Services.
The grad class decided to give $5,000 to
Chance and choice
probed at seminar
Chance, risk and uncertainty in business management and applications of decision theory will be examined from 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday in a seminar at St.
Mark's College.
Speakers include: Dr. J. E. Brenner,
mathematician; Dr. W. A. Duerr; Dr. G. F.
Menges, professor of economics; and Dr. W.
M. Petrusic, department of psychology.
For further information and registration forms, contact the UBC extension department, 228-2181.
finance a scoreboard in the gym. The remainder, $2,000, is to be used for three
scholarships to be administered by WUS
for political exiles in Africa.
However, the engineers had the last
word. They moved that one of the WUS
scholarships be named the Lady Godiva
scholarship. The vote was carried, 114 to
83.
University heads
want commission
TORONTO (CUP) — Ontario's university presidents Thursday recommended a
full-time commission to study higher education in the province.
The recommendation — which includes
a proposal to give every university entrant
$100 — was made in a study of opportunities and facilities for post-secondary education in Ontario over the next 10 years.
The study, From the Sixties to the Seventies, says the commission is imperative if
adequate higher education is to be available
to all who can profit from it.
The report also recommends a special
commission on student housing be established immediately to solve the problems
of student living accommodation.
In recommending each student receive
$100 upon entering university, the report
said, "if a student is worthy of admission
he is worthy of support."
But awards above this amount would
be subject to a means test, the report said.
Boylan hits
CUS pull-out
AMS first vice president
Charlie Boylan said Monday
UBC withdrawal from the
Canadian Union of Students
would be "a very bad thing."
He was commenting on president-elect Shaun Sullivan's
proposal to pull out of CUS
if the AMS budget is not increased next year.
"There are other areas that
can be cut," said Boylan.
"English Canadians are being fragmented. Premier W.
A. C. Bennett is trying to do
this. We need a strong
national union of students in
Canada."
Boylan felt CUS has been
filling this need during 1966-7.
you are
more than
135anumner
Sometimes it may look at though
your identity has been reduced to
a number or a punch card.
But you are more than a number.
Your real identity is spiritual. And
you have unique and unlimited opportunities to be an individual to
be yourself.
Won't you join us at our informal
meetings where this and other vital
subjects are thoughtfully considered?
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Tim*: Neon
Place:  Hut  0-12
Behind  Education  Bldg.
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE -  1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15. 1967
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS   — 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.**
SATURDAYS   — 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.**
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   — 12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons  —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —    Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
JOHN FORD'S
BLOODY INCESTUOUS ELIZABETHAN  REVENGE TRAGEDY
'TIS PITY SHE'S A WHORE
An  M.A.   Thesis   Production
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO,
March 8-11, 8:30 p.m.
Matinee — March 9 at 12:30 p.m.
Adults $1.00 — Students 75c
Tickets at door or call 288-3880
Announcement
to
UBC STUDENTS
The Northern Miner, the foremost authority
on Canada's Mining industry now extends to
students a special yearly subscription rate.
This weekly mining newspaper published continuously since 1915 has the largest mining
circulation in the world. It is a valuable
source of information for the man, engaged
in, investing in or selling to, the mining industry of Canada.
Start reading The Northern Miner each week
— become acquainted with what's happening
as it happens in Canada's fast changing,, ever
expanding mining industry.
Take advantage of this special student offer.
Complete the coupon below and return this ad.
•dJjeHottkrn (miner
77 RIVER STREET      —      TORONTO 2,  ONTARIO
Please send me one year's subscription to The
Northern Miner at the. student subscription rate of
$5.00.    Remittance enclosed.
Name
Address .
City.    Zone
University Attending	
Faculty	
Province
..Year of Graduation
Representing the Incomparable
JON HENDRICKS
with the FLIP NUNEZ TRIO
Twice Nightly Ends Saturday, March 11
SPECIAL MATINEE SAT. 3 p.m.
STUDENTS  WITH  CARDS  ONLY  $1.50
Shanghai ^unL
442 Main St.
Res. 683-1912 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9, 1967
Schwarz answers critic
says report still valid
UBC psychiatrist Dr. Conrad Schwarz
has defended his report on Canadian campus health and psychiatric facilities.
The report was attacked last week by
Ottawa  psychiatrist  Dr. Ronald Trites.
Trites, psychologist at St. Patricks College, was upset that "the Schwarz report
found health facilities almost totally lacking at St. Patrick's College and the university of Ottawa."
Trites claims the health services there
have "model programs."
In reply Schwarz wrote: "Both counselling and psychiatric services are necessary
on the average campus. Local conditions
must be taken into consideration."
Trites had charged: "In this report,
mental health and mental illness are consistently confused. Schwarz equates them."
"I stressed in the report that psychiatric
services were only one aspect of mental
health services  on campus,"  said Schwarz.
However, Schwarz says: "The report
states 55 per cent of university students
have felt a need for counselling or advice
regarding emotional or psychological problems."
Trites criticized CUS officials for "entrusting the full responsibility for the de
velopment  of  any  major program to  one
individual."
Schwarz writes: "The report was intended as a base-line survey and, in fact, no
specific recommendations are made in it. I
certainly would not wish to claim full responsibility for the development of any
major program."
Loan backed
TORONTO (CUP) — A $13 million rest-
dence at the University of Guleph will be
the first of a number of Ontario university
residences to be financed by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation through the
Ontario Student Housing Corporation.
CMHC will make an $11,634,000 loan
to OSHC, an offspring of the Ontario Housing Corporation, to build the 1,662-bed residence.
"It is the largest single CMHC loan ever
made through the Ontraio Housing Corporation for such a project," said economics and
development minister Stanley Randall.
P. E. H. Brady, OHC's managing director,
said proposals have been invited from architects for a residence at the University of
Toronto to house 950 married students.
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
Student teachers seeking employment for the school year
1967-68 may arrange interviews at the Student Personnel
Offices for March 20-22, inclusive, with representatives
from the Supervisory Staff of the  District.
E. Marriott-
District Superintendent of Schools-
Box 820, Cloverdale, B.C.
REGIONAL
WATER SAFETY SUPERVISORS
required for
The Water Safety Service of the
Canadian Red Cross
Applications are being accepted for positions in the
Okanagan, Kootenays, Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island
and Central Interior for the period May through August,
1967.
Qualifications must include a current instructors certificate and leadership experience. Candidates should
have completed at least 2nd year of academic studies.
Complete resume available by telephoning 683-2221
local  35.
Applications, accepted to March 15, 1967, in writing to:
Director, Water Safety Service, Canadian Red Cross Society, 1235 West Pender Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
SOCIAL WORKERS
A representative of the B.C. Department of Social Welfare will be on
Campus Tuesday to Friday, March 31st inclusive, for the purpose of interviewing the following persons interested in social work:
1. MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK GRADUATES - Salary $559-$670 per month
2. FIRST YEAR STUDENTS, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK -
Salary $496-$580 per month
3. BACHELOR OF ARTS GRADUATES: —
The Department provides an eight-week m-Service Training Course
commencing July 10, 1967. A training allowance of $62.50 per week
is paid, on successful completion, the starting salary ii $476 per month.
All salaries quoted are those proposed for April 1, 1967.
Applicants must be Canadian citizens or British subjects, and hold a valid
B.C. driver's licence; be free to accept a posting in any part of the
Province, and be prepared to accept a commitment to work for the
Department for a minimum of two years.
Appointments for an interview can ibe made through the Student Placement Office. If you are unable to arrange an appointment on these dates,
write or telephone:
Training Supervisor,
Dept.  of  Social Welfare,
800  Catsiar Street,
VANCOUVER 6, B.C.
Telephone: 299-9131.
A special report to UBC
New  life  policy  backed  by  Stocks
National Life plan provides
hedge against inflation!
Always a pioneer in the life insurance industry, National Life is proud
to report the introduction of the
National Equity Life Insurance Policy which makes available, for the
first time in Canada, a life policy
partly based on common stock investment.
Why common stock? There is a
tendency over the long haul for the
:ost of living to move in the same
direction as the stock market. The
equity element incorporated in the
design of this policy provides buyers with a substantial hedge against
decline in  dollar values.
The Equity Policy is basically an ordinary life participating policy with
the same premium rate and regular
dividend scale as for a regular ordinary life policy. Where it is different is that the assets held to
back up the policy are divided and
an amount equal to one-half of the
policy reserve is invested in common stocks.
Over the long term common stocks
have shown a higher rate of return,
inclusive of. capital appreciation,
than fixed income investments such
as bonds and mortgages.
To the extent that the yield from
the common stock investments exceeds the regular net interest earnings of the Company plus 25% for
investment expense an  extra   divi
dend is credited to the policyholder.
This extra, together with the regular dividend, is used .to purchase
additional paid-up insurance. Should
the market value of the stocks decrease, the extra dividend could be
negative. If this negative amount is
greater than the regular dividend,
the amount of insurance will decline.
Tables prepared to show how an
Equity Policy would have worked
out had it been issued at various
times in the past demonstrate that
despite wars and stock market collapses the Equity Policy would, over
the long term, have produced an
amount of protection which would
have compensated for increases in
the cost of living. In only two
years — at the bottom of the depression — of the forty covered
would the amount of insurance
have fallen below the original face
amount. When compared against
the performance of a regular ordinary life plan with dividends also
used to purchase paid-up insurance
additions the Equity Policy would
have provided more insurance in
36 of 40 years studied.
Complete information on this spectacular new policy, including the
performance tables mentioned
above, may be obtained, without
any obligation, by telephoning Mr.
Dick Penn at MU 5-7231.
NATIONAL LIFE
OF CANADA
VANCOUVER BRANCH
1131 MELVILLE ST., VANCOUVER 5 - MU. 5-7231
n Thursday, March 9,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC seizes volleyball
title: WCIAA in lead
CALGARY (CUP) — The west assumed
a commanding lead at Olympiad '67 after
the close of the second day of competitions
during Second Century Week at the universities of Alberta and Calgary.
Only national titles in women's volleyball and two of 13 judo and gymnastics competitions have thus far escaped domination
by the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association.
The British Columbia Thunderbirds
showed surprising power here to win the
men's national volleyball championship
undefeated in six games the Birds roared
through Tuesday's final rounds in straight
sets by defeating Mount Allison 15-7, 15-10,
and 15-11 and Sherbrooke 15-6, 15-10 and
15-2. The Vancouver team entered the final
round top-seeded after dumping previously
favored Toronto Varsity Blues 12-15, 15-
17, 17-15, 15-12 and 15-11 in Mondays qualifying round.
Sherbrooke entered the final game by
disposing of Toronto 15-11, 15-4 and 15-9.
The Blues finally rallied Tuesday afternoon
to capture third place with a straight set
victory over Mount Allison.
The Blues' female counterparts were
also upset in Monday's qualifying round
but they turned in a dazzling performance
Tuesday to win the national championship.
The Toronto girls lost the number one
seed to Manitoba in the qualifying round
15-8, 15-12, 6-15 and 15-13. They fought
their way into the final game Tuesday with
a victory over New Brunswick, and then
proceeded to the championship' 13-15, 11-
11, 8-15, 15-8 and 15-2 over Manitoba in the
best games of the tourney.
Manitoba entered the final round with
a victory over Windsor, who finished third
by stopping New Brunswick in four sets.
Charles Maignon and Don Sayle of Montreal prevented a clean sweep of the west of
judo and gymnastics.
Maignon won the lightweight championship in judo Monday, while Sayle captured the rings competition in gymnastics
Monday.
Alberta's Rick Danielson won gymnastics events on the side horse horizontal bars
and parallel bars to win the individual title
with 45.5 points. Danielsons mark was five-
hundredths of a point better than UBC's
Bill Mackie who won th? free exercise and
vaulting events. The western league won
the national team title with 129.50 points
against 125.65 for the Ontario-Quebec Athletic Association. The Maritimes finished
third with 109.70  points.
The team title in judo went to the
WCIAA by virtue of a 40-10 victory over
the Maritimes and a 22-5 defeat over Ontario representatives from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute.
Alberta's Ron Lepage and Don Hames
and Manitoba's Brian Mitani won the heavyweight, light heavyweight and middleweight  judo  titles Monday in  Edmonton.
EXCURSION TO
EXPO 67!
with CYVR of UBC
and   universities  from   Edmonton,   Saskatchewan,
Calgary  and  Manitoba
for only $154.00
Travel by CN
7 DAYS AT EXXPO
Accommodation  with   breakfast  in  Montreal
Tours arranged upon  your request
RESERVE  NOW   SPACE  IS  LIMITED
Contact CYVR Radio
South Brock Hall, under the AMS Office
Phone 224-3242, Local 34
Write UBC Radio AMS, UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
Open gymkana on campus
Sunday: in eight classes
This Sunday 9 a.m., UBC
campus will host the largest
gymkhana in B.C. It will be
staged on B and C student
parking lots at Agronomy
road and main mall.
The "Lion and Lamb" regional championship gymkhana, sponsored by the UBC
Sports Car Club, is open to
all comers in small and large
sedans and sports cars, with
a separate ladies' class.
Participants will compete
for many trophies in eight
classes and on two courses.
The fast Lion slalom will
favor the larger cars, the
tighter Lamb circuit will
favor the smaller cars. All
cars must pass a safety technical inspection open from 8
a.m,. to 10 a.m. Seat belts are
mandatory for this event.
The entry fee is $3.00 for
each entrant and this will
give him or her two runs
on each course, the winning
times taken from the fastest
runs.
For further information
contact Brian Gardiner. YU
8-1537 or Len Winter LA 4-
3550.
Annual bonspiel
here on weekend
Spectators are welcome to
attend the Inter-collegiate
Bonspiel, March 10-12 at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre.
Entries include all colleges
in B.C. — UBC, SFA, UVic,
BCIT and Notre Dame.
This is an annual affair,
with mixed curling rinks
competing for trophies and
prizes.
_>V J^lamond with Confidence
Special   10% Discount to all  UBC Students
on   Diamond  Engagement  Rings
FIRBANK9S
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK  ROYAL
GETTING MARrFeD?~"I
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME    	
ADDRESS.
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
I
I
I
MU 4-4011    1
art in action 1
ART ft CRAFTS
IN THE MAKING
Friday, March 10th 7-10pm
Saturday, March tlth 2-Spm
Sunday, March 12th 2-5pm
art in action 2
FILM: A DEMONSTRATION
OF ITS USES ft VERSATILITY
Friday, March 17th 7-10pm
Saturday, March 18th 2-Spm
The Vancouver Art Gallery
COMPACT
CONTACT
CONTACT UNS
ENSINE
\M:[RSNf-
Why carry around a whole
chemistry set full of potions
for wetting, cleaning and
soaking contact lenses?
Lensine is here! It's an all-
purpose solution for complete
lens care, made by the
Murine Company.
So what else is new?
Well, the removable
lens carrying case I
on the bottom of |
every bottle, that's
new, too. And it's
exclusive with
Lensine, the
solution for
all your contact
lens problems.
for contacts Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 9,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Marriage money mouthed
ATC
Financial aspects of marriage discussed tonight, 7:30,
ATC students centre, 6050
Chancellor.
HENRI'S   CAMPAIGN
COMMITTEE
Expanded    Chicoutimi    kazoo band practice with guest
soloist  G.   Dreger   on   spoons
tonight, 6:30, Robson 325.
WOMEN'S GOLF
Girls interested in lessons
meet today, 4 p.m., fieldhouse
or Musqueam driving range.
WAA
Annual general meeting today, noon, women's gym.
SUS
Mixer in the ed lounge today 12:30 to 2:30. Music by
the Brave New World. Guys
25 cents, girls ten cents.
UBCSCC
Tinsnip rally today, noon,
top of C-lot. Non-members
welcome. City map required.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Ed  Gregory spoaks  of   his
liberating experience with
Holy Spirit today, noon, Bu.
202.
COMPUTER CLUB
Film and meeting to discuss
upcoming social event today,
noon,  chem  250.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film "Festin des Morts" today, noon, Bu. 104.
GEOPHYSICS
Dr. R. J. Uffen speaks on the
origin of volcanoes in chem.
eng. 206, today, 3:30.
IH
Tea   in   upper   lounge,   IH
today, 3 p.m.
ENGINEERING  INSTITUTE
EIC     counselling     service
discusses opportunities with 25
practicing    engineers    today,
noon,  eng.  201.
PLACEMENT   OFFICE
Registration     for     summer
jobs    all   this    week,   noon,
auditorium.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets available for Italian dual pianists
appearing in QE theatre,
March 18. Apply special
events office—only  35  cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
No     last    minute     tickets
available    for    VOA    Lucia,
Sold out.
MARKETING CLUB
Dance to the sound of the
Shockers,   Saturday,   9:30   to
1 a.m., Brock lounge. Admission $1.25 per  person.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Cars to Seattle leave Brock
hall 4 p.m., Friday.
INTERNATIONALISTS
No meeting Friday so that
you can attend Jules  Henry,
famous      phenomenologist,
8:15, Hebb theatre.
PRE MED
Slipped Discotheque  Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Canyon
Gardens.  Tickets from members and AMS office.
COMMERCE US
Business ethics seminar,
Saturday I.H. Register sixth
floor office Ang.
Award jack
for students
augumented
TORONTO (CUP) — Ontario
university students will have
triple the award money they
had last year.
E. E. Stewart, assistant deputy minister of university affairs, announced last week that
funds for the student awards
program will jump from last
year's $4,750,000 to $12,500,-
000 for the 1967-68 school
term.
Stewart also said the university affairs department will
probably follow as closely as
possible recommendations
made in a recent report by the
special committee on the student awards program.
Already the department has
revised the application forms
for  the  awards,  he said.
Families of students will no
longer be required to make
personal statements, and questioning of family assets will
be restricted to annual incomes, Stewart said.
Some things
You DESIRE...
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success.
Now you need it just to get
by! YOU know this. Consult
us. Vancouver's first tutoring college. (Still here because we get results). To
third year University — Our
staff is fully qualified. Success ^rate? Above 90 per cent
pass in subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
571   Howe  Street
683-8464
(Vancouver) Ltd.
LOOK TO
KITIMAT
There will opportunities for appointments at all grade levels and in almost
every subject area in both the elementary and secondary fields for
September. 1967.
Modern, well-equipped schools—progressive educational programmes-
active support for professional in-service programmes—full credit for
equivalent teaching experience outside B.C.—summer school assistance of
$50.00 per unit after probationary year—moving assistance for all single
teachers and married male teachers—housing assistance, rental and purchase—group  life  insurance and  medical  plan, cost  shared  by the Board.
SALARY SCHEDULE
EC 3919 - 4695
EB 4713 - 6789
EA 5287 - 7964
SC-PC    5859 - 9024 (B.Ed. 92.88)
SB-PB     6432 - 10322
SA-PA    7005 - 11407
Persons interested in teaching in School District No. 80 (Kitimat) are
invited to contact district representatives at the Office of Student Services
(Placement) of  U.B.C.
Interviews  will  be  held  9:00  a.m.  - 5:00  p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
FRIDAY,  MARCH   17
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start ihe new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is on-
changed, a fashionable
new frame can do wonders
for the  disposition.
tybfaQptocl
1701 W. Broadway
731-3031
Hycroft  Med.  QMg.
3195 Granville
733-8773
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
VILLAGE   CAFE
"Where good friends and fine food meet"
5778 University Blvd.
(In the Village) 224-0640
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost Sc Found
11
LOST—BROWN LEATHER CASE
outside Microb. 104. Please return
case or at least notes to Gopaul,
6560   N.W.   Marine  Drive.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took John Grant's briefcase please
at least return glasses to lost
and   found.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
brown suede coat taken from
Lower Mall Commonblock, Thurs.,
Mar. 2. B. Johnstone, Robson 214,
224-9064.
LOST AT OPEN HOUSE PEARL
and gold bracelet in Hebb Theatre
or Field House. Great sentimental
value. Reward. Phone Carol 266-
0796.	
FOUND: A BLACK RAINCOAT
with fur lining in library (Eaton's
Birkdale coat). Phone: Rob RE 3-
5786.
FOUND: ASSORTED KEYS,
glasses, gloves, and rings. Claim
at Publications Office, Brock Hall.
TAKEN FROM A.T.C. SUNDAY
5th March: Dark brown brief
case, Law II notes. Peter Kin-
caid, 349 A.T.C. CA 4-9020. Reward.
LOST PLAIN SILVER BROOCH
five dollar reward. Keepsake.
Phone 683-2070 evenings after 5
p.m.
Coming Dances
12A
PRE MED "THE SLIPPED^DISC-
o-Theque" with the "Organization"—March 11 at the Canyon
Gardens — Tickets AMS. Non-
members   welcome.
WIRED  FOR   SOUND?
If so,   plug  in   and   get   turned   on
to   the   electrifying   sound   of   the
Shockers  this   Sat.   nite   in   Brock
Hall,   9:30-1:00,   $1.25/person.
EDUCATION
SCIENCE
MIXER
FEATURING
THE
BRAVE
NEW
WORLD
Thursday    noon    in    the    Education
Lounge.   Guys   25c,   Girls   10c.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other Jewelry,   tl   up.	
REWARD FOR INFORMATION ON
who the idot was that struck a
black '64 Sprite in B-Lot Feb. 28,
Phone   433-1896.
JUST SIT AND KNIT BABY
clothes for Vietnam. Ring 224-
6308.. Evenings   preferred.
UBC FOREST CLUB PRESENTS
Incredible Forest series films,
noon  Friday.  F.   &  G.   100  free.
Transportation
14
DESPERATE, NEED RIDE TO
Williams Lake or vicinity, will
share any expenses. Contact Vince
at   224-7219.
Wanted
15
WANTED
Additional crew for Cal 28, cruising-
racing sailboat for 1967. 8 overnight
plus 10 day races. Apply only if
you are really keen to win and prepared to turn up every race — come
hell or high water. Phone: Vern
922-0406,   682-2844.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO CHARTER MAY 6-14; FOR
information ph. 224-6734; Information booth outside Bookstore,
noons,   Mondays   and   Fridays.
AUTOMOTIVE  & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
V.W. NEW TIRES & BATTERY,
radio, good upholst., mech. excel.,
$250.    CA.   4-0196.
CONVERTIBLE — 58 HILLMAN,
new clutch, tires, radio, good
transportation, $150, phone Rob
AM.   6-8018.
1964 M.G.B. IN EXCELLENT CON-
dition W.W. — Charcoal blue
metallic. Phone 224-9054 ask for
Bob.   Rm.   410.
1962 VAUXHALL VICTOR OWN-
ed by teacher and in excellent
condition. Phone 224-9054 ask for
Bob.
1961 SIMCA ARIENE GOOD COND.
new clutch, battery, truely 41,000
miles.    $300   or   offer.    266-0879.
SPRITE MK I $500 and ALFA
Romeo Giuleha Spyder $1,250 ph.
435-8764.
'58 ZODIAK MECH. GOOD. 60,000
miles. R & H. Body rusted. Call
Peter CA   4-9020.
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED — LATE-MODEL M.G.
T.R. A.H. etc. Call Peter, CA. 4-
9020.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
STUDENTS OF THE GRAPHICS'.
Comes the Revelation. Leave your
L.S.D. at home and take a trip
in velvet. You will need your
sanity and brushes, the rest is
un  to me.  Peter Klemm.  435-9888.
FLOWERS 'N BUTTERFLIES 'N
sunshine 'n warm sand 'n long,
happy days 'n yellow sub-marines
'n sandals. Leathersmithe. 2057
W.   4th   Ave.   736-6177.
GIANT HOOT-NANY SUNDAY 8
p.m. at the Advance Mattress Coffee  House.   Bring  your  Guitar.
Sewing  &  Alterations 40
REMODELLING, ALTERATIONS.
Separates, skirts, etc. Special attention to graduation and wedding gowns.   224-6471.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-45J0
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurateily typed on I.B.M. Selectric. Phone 325-0368 after 5:30
p.m.
YOUR MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS
theses, what - have - you, typed
neatly and reliably at reasonable
cost.   224-4561.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS,
theses,, regular rates. 41st Ave.,
Dunbar,  Marine area.  261-9027.
TYPING DONE MY HOME, EX-
perienced.   Phone   255-9483.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST FOR
home typing, essays, theses, etc.
Phone   263-7120.	
THESES, ESSAYS, REPORTS OF
all kinds. Correspondence (shorthand or dictaphone). Many years
experience. Mrs. A. Bownick.
Phone:    224-4257   or   228-2245.
FULLY EXP. THESES TYPIST.
Be wise, book ahead. Elec. type-
wrtier. Inger; 872-7380.
WILL  DO   TYPING  —   MY   HOME
Al   5-5541.
ESSAYS,    THESES    EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.
INSTRUCTION—SCHOOLS
Music
63
BASS  FIDDLE —  GOOD  TONE —
needs   finish.   224-1631   —   Marve.
SILVER PEARLED DRUM SET
minus floor torn—$90.00. Phone
Steve  C,  224-9726 after  6  p.m.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent -tutors: Sci-
ences and arts.  736-6923.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
March   Registration
TUTORIAL    COLLEGE
Experienced   tutoring   in
University
Secondary
Elementary   courses
Educational   Consultation
in Industry
THE  HUBERMAN  EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE
B.C.  Owned  & Licensed
263-4808        2158   W.   12th        732-5535
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen'a Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle   Drive-in
at Rear of Store
"BE IN SHAPE FOREVER" A
lifetime pass to Surfside Health
Club is yours for $70.00, phone
Steve   C.   at   224-9726   after   6.
SONY TC-102M TAPERECORDER
& 5000 ft. tape. 2 yrs. old. $125.
phone  224-9029,   Dick,   Room   9.
FOR SADE 4872 Metallurgy Open
House pamphlets contact C. S.
Samis,   Met.   Department.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
 11
SLEEPING ROOM FOR GIRL,
near campus. Private facilities
$35.00. Available after March 16th.
Phone   224-6389.
Room 8c Board 82
EXCELLENT ACCOMMODATION
summer also, lowest rates on
campus, congenial atmosphere,
Phi-Delt. house, Jim, CA. 4-9073,
6-7.

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