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The Ubyssey Nov 13, 1968

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Array •^— dick aNrtton photo
LOOK AAA, no sidewalks — but who needs boots when you can use alj those nifty bridges from mud to puddle, or even (for adventurous) from puddle, to mud.
Protest  has
a  price  but
the  price
we  protest
Vol. L, No. 27
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,  T968
228-2305
Hare digs teaching,
clears the mind'
"I like to teach and I have no intention of giving it
up," said Dr. Kenneth Hare on Tuesday.
Hare is giving two lectures to each section of Geography 101, this week.
Hare said he would like to teach a section of Geography 101, but that he doesn't have enough time to do so.
Hare is lecturing on "Regional Climatology of North
America". He said he may give more lectures during the
winter.
"Teaching is good for you," he said. "It clears the mind
and keeps you fit."
Hare's book, The Restless Atmosphere, is used as a
supplementary textbook in Geography 101.
-hfto\    «***#•?&■••
Beer garden  tickets
to go on sale Friday
"The time has come," the ombudsman said, "to talk of
many things. Of cabbages, kings and beer garden tickets."
Ombudsman Rob Gilchrist announced Tuesday that ID
-. tickets for the beer garden will be on sale starting 11 a.m.
Friday in his office across from the SUB information desk.
The tickets will cost $1 and are obtainable by presenting
suitable pieces of ID, one of which must be your AMS card.
They will carry the photograph of the bearer to ensure
there will be no faking ID.
Location of the garden will be the party room, starting
Thursday, Nov. 21, from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. until the south-
■*.-west corner of the SUB basement is finished, when the beer
garden will take up permanent residence there.
AMS pays token
prof-pad damages
Council isn't going to pay for more than
$6,000 damage done to the faculty club during
the Oct. 24-25 sit-in.
In a letter to council, faculty club board
chairman David Huberman, asked for $6,122.61
to repair or replace such items as "one broken
W.C. $190; one missing 18" by 24" teak coffee
table $65, and two Mark IV cigars 80 cents.
"We have no legal obligation to pay for
this damage. However, in the interest of goodwill, we should give them a few hundred dollars," said law president Peter Braund.
Internal affairs officer Ruth Dworkin said
the estimate was too high.
"Some of the items they have listed are
ridiculous. I don't think anyone could walk off
with 15 dozen terry towels ($66.15).
"I would like to know when the last inventory was taken at the faculty club. Much
of the damage and theft could have happened
before the sit-in," she said.
Council also discussed the validity of the
Canadian Union of Students.
Stuart Clark, arts 3, told council that CUS
was no longer relevant to UfeC.
"We are spending $13,500 a year on CUS
and we are getting very little in return. Education is a provincial matter and CUS is not
relevant. Most people don't know what CUS
does," he said.
CUS field worker Jim Russell said CUS is
still relevant to local university problems.
"Education is very much a federal concern.
Eighty per cent of financing is provided by the
federal government—student loans for example.
CUS was responsible for the lobbying that led
to the student loan and tax exemption bills,"
he said.
Arts rep Ralph Stanton was concerned that
the anti-CUS movement was a political one.
"The argument that we spend too much is
meaningless. Clark opposes CUS because it is
a progressive political body. If CUS was conservative he wouldn't be here," he said.
Braund supported CUS.
"A national student union is essential. CUS
was the prime mover behind the student loan
lobby, and they provide specific services such
as insurance and travel plans.
"They also help with specific local issues.
CUS is relevant to local problems that may
have no meaning to other universities," he said.
Treasurer Donn Aven amused himself during the CUS debate by chuckling with engineering president Fraser Hodge over pictures of
bare breasted cuties in nursing rep Jennifer
Johnson's copy of Playboy.
In other news, council:
• Approved a $750,000 loan for additions
to the winter sports center;
• Referred a request from the Industrial
Education Teach Training Student Association
for a $500 grant to the finance committee. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
OLD PRESIDENTS never die
— dick button photo
they just strike out in the tenth frame.
VCC discrimination alleged;
SFU picket-protest planned
Vancouver City College and other B.C. students plan to picket the Simon Fraser University registrar's office Thursday noon to protest
what they allege are unfair selection and admission procedures.
The pickets, who will include UBC, SFU,
Columbia and Selkirk College students, are
demanding accreditation throughout B.C. for all
courses offered at VCC. They maintain that
Teach-in success
still being felt
A follow-up to the teach-in drew about a
dozen faculty and 80 students to the Delta Upsilon fraternity house last night for several
hours of informal discussion.
The discussions, sponsored by the fraternity,
followed a debate between poli-sci prof Micheal
Wallace and Malcolm MacGregor on the subject, "Anarchy — its implicationse on campus".
Wallace supported the case of anarchy against
MacGregor's self-described position as a reactionary.
The debate lasted about 45 minutes before
free beer, coffee and tea were served and the
group broke into discussion groups on a wide
range of topics.
A spokesman for the organizers, Glen Angus, poli-sci 4, said they were pleased with the
talk-in.
"We wanted to duplicate spirit of the faculty club — the free discussion between the
faculty and the students," he said. "I think we
did this, to some extent at least."
Angus also said at least three more "talk-
ins are planned for the spring."
Last Thursday, a similar event in SUB,
sponsored by the philosophy department, drew
about a hundred participants.
This group plans to meet again Nov. 21 and
invites everybody to come and/or leave a list
of grievances for discussion in Carey Linde's
office, SUB 258.
Positive results from the teach-in are also
in evidence in the biology department with the
formation of a student committee to study first
year courses.
The committee is preparing a questionnaire
to present to Bi. 101 students in their lectures
next week.
VCC students at present are discriminated
against by the SFU registrar's office when they
seek admission to the hilltop university.
A spokesman for the group, Michel Lalain,
said a rally will be held outside the southwest
corner of SUB today at noon to discuss and
plan the protest.
As well as immediate accreditation, the
group demands that the SFU registrar's office
open its files to a committee of students for an
investigation into the alleged discrimination.
They also ask that an appeal board be set up
so that students who have been refused admission at SFU can have their cases reviewed.
SFU associate registrar Dennis Meyers, who
reportedly handles all admission cases to SFU,
was unavailable for comment. A spokesman
said he is out of town.
SFU registrar H. M. Evans refused comment
Tuesday on the situation.
Lalain charged Tuesday that Meyers is the
person responsible for the misunderstanding.
"He often discriminates purely on the basis of
a student's socio-economic background when
deciding who he will let into SFU," Lalain said.
He said his information came from VCC
students including second-year student Lyle
Osmondson who have laid formal complaints
with VCC registrar Raymond Turner about the
SFU policy.
Turner said much of the misunderstanding
arises from the fact that VCC is an institution
primarily designed to prepare students for
UBC.
He said in an interview that about 100 VCC
courses are accepted by UBC while students
are given credit for only about 65 by SFU.
Turner said the reason for thas was. probably that SFU was attempting to maintain a
high academic standard and only wants the top
students from VCC.
"It's definitely true that they are trying to
shunt people from SFU to UBC," he said. "We
make it sufficiently clear to students through
our compulsory counselling program that some
of the courses they take may not be accredited
by the universities.
"This situation should be rectified immediately. We are absolutely in favor of the principle of accreditation, although we don't agree
with the students' tactics."
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
THE
FAMILY
WAY
NOV. 14: 12:30, 3:30, 600 8:30
NOV. 15:6:00,8:30
Admission - 50c in Old Aud,
CHEMCELL
will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
on
21 & 22 November
for
Chemical  Engineers
Electrical  Engineers
Mechanical  Engineers
Metallurgical  Engineers
Chemistry Graduates
Positions available at Edmonton, Alberta,
Drummondville and Montreal, Quebec.
For literature on Chemcell, job descriptions and interview
appointment, please visit your placement office.
(§) Westinghouse
will be on Campus
November 25 & 26
To  Interview
1969 ENGINEERING GRADUATES
Electrical — Mechanical
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on
.. performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed  information,  brochures and  interview appointment. Wednesday, November 13,  1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Clients committee approves
Wireless residence plans
— dick button photo
REAPING FALL'S HARVEST, a grounds worker is caught in
the act of sweeping leaves under nature's carpet by eagle-
lens Ubyssey photog who rose with the sun.
AMS committee
checks Ubyssey
If you don't like your student newspaper, you now have a
chance to air your beefs and meet The Ubyssey editorial board
in person.
The AMS has set up a committee under internal affairs
officer Ruth Dworkin to investigate the paper. It will hold a
public meeting Friday noon in SUB room M (upstairs on the
southeast side).
"This will give people an opportunity to talk about what a
student newspaper should be, and give them a chance a make
specific complaints," Miss Dworkin said Tuesday.
The investigation was prompted by complaints to AMS president Dave Zirnhelt about fabrication of news, distortion of
news, unrepresentative editorial policy, and refusal to print certain letter to the editor.
Miss Dworkin said the Friday meeting is one way for the
communications commission to get information for a report it
will make to students' council about The Ubyssey.
The communications commission is a group of ten students
who help the internal affairs officer co-ordinate communications
and public relations on campus.
The report, which will also be based on a random public
opinion survey, will look into the role of a campus paper, its
relationship to students' council and the students, the appointment of Ubyssey editors, and alleged shortage of funds for the
paper.
"Complaints have to be specific; I'm not interested in general comments," Miss Dworkin said.
She added that anyone who has complaints or suggestions
but can't make it to the meeting should drop off a letter in her
office.
"Hrrumpph," commented Ubyssey editor Al Birnie.
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Plans for the wireless site residence complex were approved Friday by the residence
clients' committee.
The clients' committee is a joint student-
administration-faculty committee studying plans
for the 1200-bed residence planned for the
area near the UBC traffic office north of SUB.
Plans must now be approved by the board
of governors before a Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation loan can be secured and
negotiations for the contract started.
Housing director Les Rohringer sees no difficulty in obtaining support of the board.
"Mr. Arthur Fouks, a member of the clients'
committee is also a member of the board, is as
enthusiastic about the project as the students,"
he said.
Terry Odium, one of three student members
of the eight-man commiteee, said the new type
of residence is a definite improvement.
"The residence offers plenty of flexibility
for senior students," she said.
Rohringer said Wednesday, "This new residence complex is a unique approach to residences — far ahead of any other in Canada or
the U.S."
The complex will have housekeeping suites
in low cluster dwellings to be shared by two
students, and single rooms in three high-rises
with common facilities shared by groups of six
students.
Residents will be free to  choose between
cooking their own meals, buying a meal pass,
or using food  vending  machines,  which will
provide a wide variety of hot or cold meals 24.
hours a day.
The complex is designed for students over
20 years of age and provides for libraries, seminar rooms, and social areas.
Indian poet
recites in IH
India's national poet Ramesh Gupta, whose
songs inspired Nehru and Gandi, will recite his
works in International House tonight (Wednesday) at 7:30.
Admission $1. Further information from Dr.
Parekh (228-3609) or Dr. Varma (228-2721).
"The design is based not only on the desire
of the students on the committee, but also on
the AMS housing survey, and a questionnaire
circulated in the residences," he said.
The residence is expected to be ready for
use by September, 1970.
Student housing
priority urged
by admin, brief
Student housing should have a high priority
with the federal task force on housing and
urban development, says a brief by the UBC
housing administration.
The brief was presented to the task force
Friday by housing director Les Rohringer,
resident student John Stewart, and Dewan
Callahan of the housing administration staff.
It said the average student income, including
loans and bursaries, does not pay for much
more than room and board, and tuition.
The board of governors at UBC has approved an objective of providing accommodation
for 25 per cent of the single' students enrolled,
it said.
The brief points out, however, that the university is over 2,500 beds short of this requirement.
The brief suggested that:
# 50 per cent of the overall costs of student residences be made available by a government grant and the rest come from a Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation loan;
• that overall interest rate of CMHC loans
be reduced from its present level to three per
cent;
0 that a slum clearance fund be made
available to absolve the cost of replacing the
old army hut residences (Acadia Camp and
Fort Camp).
Rohringer said Tuesday, "The public hears
a great deal of adverse publicity about students,
but it must not be forgotten that any investment made on these lines is made towards a
generation of better educated, better trained
people."
— gordie tong photo
WHILE THE MOB FIGHTS for lunch in the cafeteria and artists around the world starve, UBC
students find happy medium in the serenity of a lunch hour spent in SUB art gallery. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
NOVEMBER 13, 1968
Accreditation
Who says everyone in B.C. has equal educational
opportunities ?
Students at Vancouver City College and Selkirk
Junior College in Castlegar find, to their non-amusement,
that the Socred propaganda about decentralizing education, about establishing junior colleges 'separate but
equal' in standards of teaching to the two overcrowded
universities, is just that — propaganda with no basis
in fact.
As documented elsewhere in the paper, students
at these institutions, and in som****, cases UBC, find their
course credits are not accepted at SFU.
The reasons given for the discrimination may be
called 'attempts to maintain a high academic standing'.
But this standing is based on the fact that there is
inequality of educational opportunity for all citizens
in the province — those from out of town who cannot
afford room and board are obvious victims.
The fact that everyone who wants to cannot get
into Simon Eraser is not entirely due to the SFU
authorities — they have only sa much money for facilities with which to accommodate an unlimited number
of students — so the have to set some sort of unfair,
arbitrary standards.
For students who seriously want to pursue post-
secondary study with prohibitive cost to themselves,
however, the accreditation issue is just another barrier
in their path.
They can possibly get into UBC — but not for long,
if enrolment restrictions come into effect.
More and more students may be crammed into the
junior colleges, which may eventually grant four-year
degrees, but for what ends ?
If their two-year degrees are not accepted by other
universities, what value will four-year degrees have ?
And if the quality of education is so inferior, why go
to the trouble of creating junior colleges in the first
place ?
The reasoning, we say, is mainly for the purpose
of channeling youth off the labor market into largely
unnecessary academic pursuits, because of lack of places
for them in industry.
And as alienated youth questions the process and
drops out, they are doubly stigmatized by having neither
technical nor professional training, and the stigma as an
academic failure, with no possibility of gaining creative
employment.
No Moralman
Woe is us! Fellow Moralman fans, we share your
shock and disbelief at the vile change of character in our
beloved hero.
Moralman, defender of virginity, motherhood, and all
other forms of purity, has sold out! After years of faithful
true-blue righteousness, he has been perverted by Albert,
symbol of obtuse degeneracy.
Is nothing sacred anymore? What will be the reaction
of the tens of thousands on campus who regularly read
Moralman and looked to him for spiritual guidance, to
the shocking hypocrisy in recent strips?
The Ubyssey's reaction, as defender of truth and
wholesomeness on this campus, is quick and decisive.
After today, this filthy and obscene strip will
no longer appear on our lily-white pages. We must purge
this cancer immediately.
Adieu, and good riddance, Moralman. When you
refuse to conform to the virtues we have held in such
high esteem since time immemorial, you must be eliminated.
(P.S.—well miss you, Arnold.)
LETTERS TO THE   EDITOR
Discrimination
EDITOR: Al Birnie
News     John Twigg
Ass't News   John Gibbs
City    Peter Ladner
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Associate     Mike  Finlay
Photo ....  Dick Button, Powell  Hargrave
Sports   Jim Maddin
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
They're after us, but we ain't scared.
Alex Volkoff stayed up all night worry-
ing so James Conchieanxiously covered
council while Nader Mirhady looked on,
dumbfounded at the dashing wit and
sparkling debate. Michel threatened us,
so our most appauling obknoxious distorter did his story. Elaine Tarzwell
giggled apprehensively at Erik Bryn-
jolfsson's brief. Filthy, said Sue Gordon,
who stayed around to enjoy it. Frank
Flynn tried to pin down hedge-hodge
but Dick Button took down Woodd's
pinups in the darkroom. Norm Gidney
showed us the CP slant, so Gibbs adapt-
ed it to the newsdesk twist, a paltry
prelude to Phil Winch's sports stomp.
"If you get objective, I go," cried Irving as he fled, carrying Ann, with tears
streaming onto Ann A's bald pate.
"Hurrumph," was all AI could say since
his mouth was nailed close to avoid
any editorial bias. "This is getting
rediculous." commented Leo Tolstoy off
the  record.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Regarding the proposed Thursday picket at
SFU, I wish to offer my own experience pertaining to the alleged arbitrary admission
policy.
After four years in the education faculty at
UBC, majoring in math and physics, I decided
not to finish my fifth year, but instead accepted
a teaching position in Smithers, B.C. In 1968,
I applied to enter the dept. of sociology at SFU.
I had previously studied sociology at UBC and
had published papers on educational sociology
in Canada while I was teaching. I fully expected to lose some accreditation in the transfer from UBC to SFU, however I did not expect
the complete rejection of my qualifications.
After this, I continued my teaching post and
re-applied the following year under the advice
of the head of the sociology dept. at SFU.
Again I was rejected with no further explanation and no form of appeal. Being persistant,
I applied a third time and, with much work
being done in the dept. on my behalf, I was
finally accepted. I was credited with less than
one year of study for my four years at UBC
and received no credit for my sociology or my
publications.
Now working on my M.A. in sociology as
well as finishing my undergraduate requirements, I have so far received 77 semester hours
(2Vz years) of straight A's, have been nominated for the Woodrow Wilson scholarship, and
am currently working under a $2,400 department scholarship. Though the sociology dept.
is fully satisfied with my work, the registrar
at SFU still refuses to review my case of loss
of accreditation through transfer.
In personal conversation with the registrar,
D. A. Meyers, has stated that he feels my coming to SFU indicates "an attempt to escape the
industrial system", and he has suggested that
all mature students (I am now 35) who wish
to come to SFU do so because of the radical
element within the university. He refused to
accept my explanation regarding the excellence of the PSA dept. at SFU.
I have in my files all written communication between Mr. Meyers and myself. I am
also able to produce witnesses to verbal communications. I am sure that mine is not an
isolated case and I ask others in similar circumstances to appear with me Thursday at the
Registrar's office at SFU.
S.  LOCKHART
Joint conference
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
The issues concerning the student-senate
joint conference proposal have not been correctly presented in your front-page article
Nov. 7.
AMS prepared a brief of reform proposals.
Senate said, "O.K., let's discuss it", and set up
a committee for the purpose. The committee
method is how senate handles all its business,
and it works.
But this did not satisfy the AMS representatives, who said (and council has now backed
them up), "unless senate accepts the format for
discussion that we dictate, we won't play".
This in spite of the fact that on the few occasions when the AMS representatives have dropped the procedural wrangle and discussed real
issues, great progress was made.
There is nothing sinister or mysterious
about senate's refusal to buckle under to AMS
dictation, and "breach of faith" is involved.
The joint conference would be a new institution based on a new principle: that there
should be no role distinction between faculty
and students. This new principle is one of the
things the brief is about. To adopt the joint
conference as the format for discussion would
mean that senate must accept the brief's principles before it discusses them. Senate did not
think this was reasonable.
The point is evidently quite well understood
by Carey Linde who is quoted in The Ubyssey
as saying: "The idea of openness is not only a
procedural matter but inherent in the main
issues of the brief". Exactly. Linde insists that
Senate must accept the brief's premises before
the AMS will condescend to discuss the pro
posals based   on   them.   Surely  this   does "not
make sense.
Linde goes on to say (according to The
Ubyssey): "The manner in which we bring
about the reforms is more important than the
reforms themselves". At least he's honest.
A final word about the senate vote. I am
convinced that senate was essentially of one
mind on the point of principle I have discussed,
and that the vote represented in the main the
split between those who regard student leaders
as mature adults to whom one can simply say:
"Look, I think you are wrong", and those who
regard student leaders as well-intentioned children who are liable to kick up a tantrum if
they don't get their lollipop: the joint conference. I belong to the former group, and I am
still hoping we can get on with the job of discussing reforms.
Yours very truly,
G.  ROSENBLUTH,
professor  of  economics
Whither UBC?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Gentleman:
I am profoundly disappointed at what university has come to be. Beinng a young man
of the most correct breeding, I expected to find
in university many of the highest pursuits befitting my station. Here I feel the faculty has
indeed slighted me and my own kind. University was devised and developed for gentlemen
to pass their leisure time in pursuit of the finer
points in life, and more importantly functioned
as it still should, as a training ground for the
chosen few most suited to be the leaders of the
community.
I find it inexcusable that the current university policy allows for those of the masses,
the uncultured and the ill-bred, to attend university — none of this nonsense about the increasing demands made upon it by the industrial world. How do you expect to be properly
financed by business and industry when the
university ceases to play its most important
role, that of a tool of development for young
gentlemen to help prepare them socially for
the responsibilities of leadership that must
await any young man of the upper crust. Does
anyone expect the aristocracy to perpetuate
itself; surely not.
What is all this talk of rights, freedoms for
the masses — communism, that's all it is. Why
can't they accept their stations in life as we
all must? I did not come to university to learn
of poverty, but social grace; I care not of
death and misery, only of life and the pursuit
of happiness, which is the right of any gentleman.
I suggest that faculty get to work and restore this institution to one of high ideals. We
must reinvolve ourselves in studies of the classics, physics, metaphysics, in studying God's
word, correctly articulated speech, sophisticated carriage, horsemanship and proper life
styles. We cannot attempt to do that if we are
continually confronted by the riff-raff who attempt to make us believe that we must concern ourselves with pollution, hunger, poverty,
freedom or self-determination, etc. I suggest
therefore we stop offering loans and simultaneously raise the tuition fee to at least $2,000
per annum, lest we be overtaken by the Migrates and the impure who would have us
dirty our hands. For God's sake, gentlemen, let
us get on with our duty.
STEPHEN BLOCK,
Lambda  Sigma Delta '69
Socred stuff
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The UBC Social Credit club has been making successful steps to the improvement of
allocations to education while some of the
AMS executives criticize aimlessly with no
clear proposals that go beyond the university.
Our constructive lobbying is getting effective
results.
First, our proposal of having bursaries for
out of town students who have the liability of
having to pay room and board while many
city students are able to live at home without
this extra cost, has been fully supported and
accepted by education minister Brothers. He
has now set up a committee to study the details of implementing it.
To page 5.    See: MORE LETTERS Wednesday, November 13,  1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
Student movement
has limitations
By JULIUS LESTER
The Guardian (New York)
A student movement has its own built-in limitations,
both in terms of how much it can do and how much it can
understand. In some ways, a student movement tends to be
artificial, because the student lives in an artificial environment — the university. Thus, it is natural that a student
movement generally concerns itself with issues that the
majority of society has hardly any time at all to be concerned about. This is good to a point. Without the student
demonstrations against the war, * there would've been no
antiwar movement. Without student consciousness of racism, blacks would be even more isolated and vulnerable to
attack.
A student movement evolves to an inevitable point
where it realizes that wars and racism are the manifestations of an inhuman system and if wars and racism are
going to be stopped, the system itself must be stopped and
another created. And it is at this point that a student movement reaches the boundaries of its inherent limitations.
When this juncture is reached, the student movement finds
its members becoming increasingly frustrated and the
movement seeks to relieve that frustration through activism and/or by turning its attention to changing he students'
immediate environment, the university.
LOOKS ARE DECEIVING
A student movement which concerns itself with bringing about changes within the university is engaging in an
act which can have all the appearances of being important,
while being, in essence, quite unimportant. Regardless of
how unending one's stay in a university may seem, the fact
yet remains that after four years of serving time, the student leaves. The university is a temporary society for most
who live within its confines and as such, any radical activity aimed at it is of limited value.
Because the university is a temporary society, any
movement coming from it is in danger of being temporary.
The next student generation may have more traditional
interests than the one which kept the campus in an uproar
during the preceding four years. And while student movements are characterized by a great willingness to confront
the reigning social authority, there is nothing inherent in
a student movement that will insure its evolution into a
radical movement once the students leave the university.
POWERS TO DISRUPT AREN'T REVOLUTION POWERS
Perhaps the greatest liability of a student movement
is that it is only able to speak to other students. While this
is of limited value, the fact still remains that there is perhaps no group more powerless than students. Not only are
students without power, the instruments of power are not
even part of their world. If all students went on strike, it
wouldn't cause the society to pause in its step. The most
that a student movement can do is to disrupt. The power
to disrupt, however, cannot be equated with the power to
make a revolution. A student movement is only a revolutionary force when it can act as an adjunct with other
forces in society. It is needless to say that such a situation does not presently exist.
RADICALS LIVE IN OWN WORLD
When student radicals leave the campus, they can
avoid coming into direct contact with other forces in the
society by creating their own little worlds where they continue to live with each other, talk only to each other and
remain unconcerned about the concrete problems which
most people have to face. The student radical is never heard
talking about a rise in the price of milk, new taxes, real
wages or doctor bills. The student radical creates his own
society in which money is not an overriding problem and
because it isn't, the student radical thinks that revolution
is all about love, because he has time to think about love.
Everybody else is thinking about survival.
While the goal of revolution is the creation of the new
man, people turn to revolution when that becomes the only
means of satisfying their material needs. They do not become revolutionaries because of any ideas about the new
man.
CAN EVERYDAY RADICALS BE TRUSTED?
The student radical has to become an everyday radical before he can be totally trusted. He must know the
concrete problems which face the everyday person. And
while such issues as the war in Viet Nam, the repression
of Mexican students and the invasion of Czechoslovakia
are important, revolution is made from the three eternal
issues — food, clothing and shelter. Our job is to show
people that they are being robbed of their birthright for
a mess of pottage and that that is not necessary.
As long as the movement is dominated by students, the
movement will carry within it the seeds of its own death.
As long as the student, upon graduation, carries his radicalism to an apartment three blocks away from the campus
or to the nation's East Villages where a thousand others
just like him reside, his radicalism will remain theoretically
correct and pragmatically irrelevant, except as a gadfly
forcing  the system  to make minimal reforms.
MORE LETTERS TO   THE EDITOR
Second, a resolution passed
unanimously (with Brothers'
support) at the recent Socred
convention called for increased
per capita grants to universities.
Thirdly, a resolution calling
for lowering the drinking age
to 19 was narrowly defeated.
We feel that this resolution
will be passed for sure next
convention after lobbying of
members and MLA's by our
concerned members.
In addition to this we bring
out MLA's for speaking engagements and seminars which
familiarize them with the
needs of the university and its
students.
DAN BANOV.
president,  UBC Socreds
Nonleader
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Last Thursday a mob of engineers raided the science common room.
With the group was engineering president Fraser Hodge.
When they could not gain
admittance to the common
room, the engineers chained the
door closed from the outside.
And Fraser Hodge watched
them do it.
They then left the building
to finish their childish prank.
But once outside, they decided
that they, as engineers, could
perform any acts of violence
and vandalism that they desired.
And so they threw three bottles and rocks through the
closed windows and threw fireworks through the broken
panes. Finally one tossed a container filled with some dark
sticky syrup into the room,
ruining a large area of the
carpeting.
And their leader, Fraser
Hodge,  was there.
This is the third time this
semester that the engineers
have damaged the science common room, despite an agreement between science and engineering to exclude the common rooms from their infantile
rivalry.
And Fraser Hodge was there
this time.
Hodge vehemently claims
that he  went  along to  try to
stop the others. This explanation is not plausible when one
examines the strong position of
leadership that has traditionally existed for the engineering
president.
Had Hodge exerted positive
and forceful leadership the acts
of vandalism would not have
happened.
Clearly Hodge did not choose
to exercise his leadership.
Or perhaps he just isn't the
leader he could be.
FRANK  FLYNN
(Ed. Note: Hodge, when contacted at Tuesday's council
meeting, said he was walking
past the math building when
he saw a group of frosh engineers. "Remembering the trouble
with frosh last year, I took a
closer look and was in time to
prevent them breaking down
the door. I was not a member
of the pranksters," he said.)
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater Society
International Affairs Conference
Applications now being received for those interested in
attending the Ninth Annual Conference on International
Affairs from January 21 to 24, 1969 at the University
of Manitoba. This year's conference will center on the
theme — Latin America! Progress or Revolution in out
Hemisphere. Apply in writing to A.M.S. Secretary,
Room 248, S.U.B.
fcvsdijn. Wood.
Reading Dynamics
h, holding- 2 mohs,
FREE  MINI LESSONS'
this week.
Due io the unexpected response at the recent "mini-lessons" we will be
holding extra "mini-lessons" this Friday.
"Mini-Lessons" are free, and do not obligate you in any way. Many students,
just like you, have actually learned how to double their reading rate in
just one hour at our "mini-lessons". Here you will learn the theory of Reading
dynamics. You will learn why it works so well. You will learn about study
steps, recall methods, and many more reading aids that have proven invaluable to students.
Bring a friend. It only takes an hour, and it may change your life.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15
7:00 P.M. and 9:00 P.M. at
fcvsdyn. tOood.
Reading Dynamics Institute
1900 West Broadway, Vancouver 732-7696
&
-FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
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MAN IS MAN
Bertolt Brecht's farce-parable about the
transformation of a porter into a human
war machine
with
PETER JAENICKE-ALAN SCARFE-GREGORY REID
■ and an outstanding student cast
Directed by DONALD SOULE
Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Music by JOHN CHAPPELL
NOVEMBER 8-16
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00 (Available for all performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, November 11 — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14 — 12:30 NOON
Tickets: The Frederic Wood theatre Room 207
%\
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
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4-S Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
Dow Chemical sticks with it,
defends napalm manufacture
By STEVE PETRANEK
Maryland Diamondback
MIDLAND, Mich. (CPS-CUP)
— Dow Chemical Corporation
has elected to take a moral
stand on napalm—they're going
to stick with it.
"You can debate the war,
you can talk about whether or
not we should be there," Dow
president H. D. Doan said
Thursday, "but while our guys
are there we feel like giving
them the weapons they need,
and believe me, they really
need thjs one."
Although Doan feels the
Vietnam war has "gotten completely out of hand" and favors
an immediate troop withdrawal,
he also says that napalm is "a
fantastically useful strategic
weapon."
"There's only one tactical
weapon that can turn back the
human wave and that's napalm," he said. "This liquid fire
bomb is the only way to seep
death into concrete bunkers
and heavily protected troop emplacements."
Doan also said he believed
the American soldier would
have been pushed out of South
Vietnam in military defeat
without napalm.
With napalm representing
less than one-half of one per
cent of all Dow sales, the decision to continue making the
sticky and firey gasoline jelly
could be little more than
principle.
Dow is not forced by any
governmental pressures to continue making napalm. Government contracts represent less
than five per cent of total sales.
But Dow does have an image
problem.
Citing a recent student survey taken by the company,
Doan said that although no one
associated Dow with military
products in 1966, over 90 per
cent of college students polled
now know Dow makes napalm
and "the great majority of the
students think Dow is the number one supplier of war materials."
Dow ranks 75th on a list of
top defense contractors for
the war and Doan noted that
the top defence contractors for
Rentals and Sales
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he was "not a bit surprised to
see several universities ahead
of  Dow."
According to company recruiters, response of top students to Dow campus interviews has not been affected,
despite the more than 180
demonstrations in the last year.
Doan says the company feels
a "right and a responsibility to
be on campus for those students
who want to discuss job opportunities, and we have always
supported the right of others
to debate the issues, to demonstrate peacefully, and I hope we
always will."
Dow interviewer exits
in face of violence
WINNIPEG (CUP)—"I have a right to get a job where I
want to."
It's Dow Chemical Co. time in Canada again.
Violence erupted at the University of Manitoba Thursday
in the wake of a protest against the presence of a Dow recruiter
at the university placement office.
The recruiter was forced to leave after completing only
two of 13 scheduled interviews.
The protest began at 8:30 a.m. when 15 students gathered
outside the Canada Manpower centre. They carried signs reading: Students don't help Dow murder, Dow shalt not kill,
Engineers don't participate in murder, and Human beings are
not fuel.
By 9:15, nearly 200 people had gathered outside the centre.
Fisticuffs broke out between demonstrators and engineers.
"Sock it to 'em," "kill him", "pound the hell out of him",
cried the counter-protestors. Clothes were torn, people knocked
down and one demonstrator had his face cut.
Dean of arts Lloyd Dulmage had earlier notified the manpower office of possible violence and recommended the recruiter
leave. He left at 10 a.m., just before the violence broke out.
CAREERS AT CGE
for
Engineers and Science Majors
Canadian General Electric's GRADUATE ENGINEER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM provides an
avenue of entry into specialized careers among the
many functions in Engineering, Manufacturing and
Marketing, in any of the widely diversified Company
businesses.
There are continuing opportunities for professional
development. The broad diversification of the Company and its decentralized organization provide a
dynamic environment for self-development and the
opportunity throughout your career to move not only
across functions, but also between product businesses.
Company recruiting officers will visit
your campus to conduct interviews on:
(A limited number of penultimate year Engineers and Science
Majors can be interviewed for summer employment.)
November  19-22
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC
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it's the teamwork
that impresses you'
Bill Cuthbert of London Life's Actuarial Department
"When I discovered that my
maths courses were geared
for actuarial work, I began^o
look around at various insurance companies. I was
impressed by the people I
talked to from London Life.
And today, by the people I'm
working with. I get to move
around in various jobs here —
it helps give me the background I need for my actuarial
exams."
Like Bill Cuthbert, you can
earn as you learn at London
Life. Bill graduated from the
University of British Columbia in 1966 and has since
completed three examinations leading to Fellowship
in the Society of Actuaries.
To learn more about career
opportunities as an actuary at
London Life, consult your
placement officer. Or write
to the Personnel Department,
London Life Insurance Company, London, Ontario.
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada Wednesday, November 13, 1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
Stay away from trouble
by getting a summer job
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students
shouldn't worry about how
much money they make at a
summer job since "it keeps
them out of trouble", says a
student counselling official.
W. H. Rutledge, operations
director for the federal Manpower department was commenting to a commission on
jobs and student aid at the
annual conference of the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada.
Jobs are being phased out by
automation and students are
too choosy about the jobs left
over, said Rutledge.
"This is a capitalist system,
you can't change it — if you
don't   like   it,   get   out,"   said
Robert Pomerantz, a student
observer and director of the
McGill University Entrepreneurial Association.
He wants to be in management because "that's where the
action is."
Another student said "The
student is a capital investment,
like a stock or a bond. It would
be dishonest for me to accept
money for going to school."
Dr. D. C. Smith, head of the
adult education program at
York University, accused the
existing student aid system of
being "aristocratic", maintaining it discriminated against
lower income groups.
The commission's concensus
was that  there is  a problem;
there must be more aid and
summer jobs for students.
A vice-president of Union
Generale des Etudiants de
Quebec tried to bring the commission around to discussing
students as intellectual workers
and stipends for them.
However, he wasn't very
successful; his ideas were termed "impractical" and dismissed.
The commission decided to
set up "interim action committees" at various universities
and proposed a national study
of student  employment.
The plenary session of the
AUCC later voted to ask government agencies to study the
problem and help create student jobs.
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Conscience or reflection
AUCC choice'-Pelletier
OTTAWA (CUP) — A university with a
conscience or one which merely reflects society
was the choice Gerard Pelletier, secretary of
state, gave university administrators: Wednesday.
Pelletier, speaking to 600 administrators to
the annual convention of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of Canada, left no
doubt as to which alternative they should take.
"It is necessary for you to break down the
barrier of the aristocratic university and rebuild it as the university of the people."
Administrators, said Pelletier, must define
their role to be able to "rationalize" it.
"Surely your role must not be to maintain
AMS circus
dresses up
More AIMS offices have been decorated, but
this time seemingly without any repurcussions.
The reception room to the AMS executive
offices was given a layer of stars and other
decorations on Monday night.
About seven students raided Mamooks for
scraps and then went to work, creating stars
for the walls and name plaques for theoffice
doors.
Some mobiles were added yesterday morning by the secretaries who were very willing
to get into the swing of things.
the status quo," he said. "Rather you must
expand and develop techniques, practices, methods of learning and most important, the development of thought."
He said burning of the university would not
be stopped by holding "back-room meetings on
how to handle the student radicals."
"But, it would be stopped only by consideration of "why student radicals exist, what
role they could legitimately play in the university and by a serious consideration of their
ideas."
Pelletier examined the relationship of the
state, industry and the university in his speech,
particularly in reference to research.
He emphasized the necessity of extensive-
research for Canadian universities but added
"The university at all costs must avoid becoming the hand-maid of industry."
His comments should soothe the fears of
many administrators who had expressed worry
throughout the AUCC conference that a more
active university would mean more public reaction and death to the university.
The popular breakdown of the university
population into student faculty and administrative sectors was criticized by Pelletier. Instead, he proposed, all members of the community be regarded as apprentices with a "de
facto rank of apprenticeship" separating the
groups.
He also attacked the idea that increased
"participation" by students and faculty in university affairs would solve all problems. A far
more viable solution -would be a new definition
of the responsibilities of every member of the
community.
Association  reverses stand-
info wont be  public after all
OTTAWA (CUP) — Administrators have reversed an earlier stand against secrecy in university affairs.
Wednesday a commission of 50 delegates to
the conference of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada voted unanimously to accept a proposal that "all information
regarding a university ... be considered public
information unless specifically decided otherwise."
Thursday a plenary session shunted the proposal to the Association of University Information Bureaus for "further consideration" after
it met heavy oppostion from senior administrators.
Dr. James Gibson, administration president
at Brock University, opposed the motion, saying
many institutions could not comply with it
because of their charter.
Besides, he said, it would not be wise for
many discussions and decisions of the university to be made public.
Gibson was joined by Dr. H. H. Saunderson,
administration president at the University of
Manitoba, who said the proposal was "too
vague" and "unwise at this time."
Proponents of the proposals said there was
distrust of the university because many of its
activities were kept secret. The university has
nothing to fear, they argued, therefore the
public should be informed.
Less than 100 of 600 delegates turned up
for the legislative assembly. Only 20 supported
the openness proposal.
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November 21 and 22
Post Graduates — Graduates
Undergraduates
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Arrangements for Personal Interview may be
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UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE "-*>-
Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
Hockey Birds win-lose
rough and tumble games
The Thunderbird hockey
team split a pair of games with
Powell River over the weekend
winning the first game 4-3 and
dropping the second game 5-4.
In Friday's opener the Powell
River Regals came out skating
hard and hitting even harder.
Regals drew first blood midway through the first period
but Laurie Vanzella scored to
even it up at 1-1 at the end of
the first  period.
Mickey McDowell scored at
the 15:20 mark to make it 2-1
going into the final period.
The first eight minutes of the
final game saw both clubs
engage in wide open hockey
as the Regals scored twice and
rookie Barry Wilcox replied for
the Birds.
With the score tied 3-3 both
teams settled down to some
close checking each waiting for
a break, but again it was
Wilcox who broke loose at the
18:31 mark to score the winning goal.
Although a closely fought
game it was marred by many
bad penalty calls as the referee
made as many mistakes as some
of the players.
Before a crowd of over 900
the Regals came on strong Saturday night to take an early 2-0
lead but the Birds fought back
with two goals by Mickey McDowell to end the first period
2-2.
The Regals laid on the heavy
checking as well as the wood
as they attempted to physically
beat the Birds.
With the calibre of referce-
ing leaving much to be desired
the teams managed to get away
with   a   lot   of   high   sticking,
JACK MOORES managed to
gel a lot of ice time this weekend.
cross-checking and spearing.
Early in the game Cowboy
Richards was cross-checked in
the face but there was no
penalty.
Soccer 'Birds win,
now lead league
At least one team at UBC
has demonstrated its ability to
win consistently and take the
lead in their league.
The soccer Thunderbirds
under coach Joe Johnson are
currently in first place in the
Pacific Coast Soccer League.
In their game against the
Victoria O'Keefes, the defending PCSL champions, the Birds
played well to win by a 1-0
score, on a picture goal by
Harvey  Thom  who  connected
after receiving a pass from Ash
Valdai.
In victory the defence was
outstanding, holding the potent
Victoria defence scoreless.
Barry Sadler, the Bird goalie,
recorded his fifth shutout, and
now leads the league in that
category.
The Birds now have a six
win. two tie and 1 loss record.
The next game will be on
Wednesday Nov. 20 at Callister
Park  at  8  p.m.
Wrestlers win  all
UBC's wrestling team all but
swept a weekend meet against
Royal Roads. They won seven
of 'the eight weight classes,
losing the eighth by default.
Dennis McDonald of UBC
pinned Al Johnson when the
125-pound class match was only
45 seconds old. (This time is
amazingly fast for  wrestling.)
Alex Jamison of UBC deci-
sioned Carl Ripley 6-3 in the
138-pound class.
Wallace Shaw took the 145-
pound class unopposed as UBC
didn't field a wrestler at that
weight.
Pete Rombough pinned Mike
Bateman in 1:11, adding victory
in the 152-pound division to
UBC's total.
Bob Grafton pinned Desmond Hunter of Royal Roads
at the 8:45 point, taking UBC's
final opposed victory. Grafton
wrestled in the 160-pound division.
Les Burgener, Bob Ormond
and Cam Christensen, all of
UBC, were not opposed in their
weight  divisions.
Final score of the meet was
33-5 for UBC.
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Richards had his nose broken
and  required   several stitches.
The Birds outscored the
Regals 2-1 in the middle period
on goals by Barry Wilcox and
Wayne Schaab to lead 4-3 going
into the final twenty minutes.
Urged on by an enthusiastic
crowd the Regals tied the game
at the 9:32 mark on a goal by
McNeil.
Immediately after this goal
Laurie Vanzella was clipped
with a high stick in the eye.
This required several stitches
and forced Laurie to leave the
game leaving the Birds with
only two defencemen for the
remainder of the game.
With ten minutes left in a
tied game coach Bob Hindmarch was forced to shuffle
some of his forwards on to
defence.
Again the checking got close
as both teams were looking
for a break but this time the
tables were reversed as McNeil
broke loose for his third goal
of the evening to put the Regals
ahead 5-4.
Hindmarch pulled goalie
Rick Bardal, who had played
an outstanding game, in the
final minute in an attempt to
tie the game.
The Regals had three long
shots on the open net bringing
the crowd to its feet as one of
the shots hit the post.
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There are excellent opportunities for graduates to
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CAMPUS   INTERVIEWS:
November 18, 19, 20
We are looking forward to discussing your career
plans with you and in exploring how your interests
and talents could be best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time
through the Student Services Office. Wednesday, November 13,  1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 9
KALEIDOSCOPE '68
International
House's
annual iall fair
which happened
over the weekend
in SUB.
photos
by
Dick
Button Page 10
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
VARSITY
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KENT YANIW on the receiving end of quarterbacks Roger
Gregory or Murphy Costello's pass.
MORE SPORTS, P. 8
Apo/iL talk
By JIM  MADDIN
Ubyssey Spoils Editor
The UBC football team ended its season with a
0-8 win-loss record and an average score of 32.4 for
their opponents and 2.6 points per game for them.
Usually the team is excused because their opponents
have players on athletic scholarships and our team
doesn't.
Well, on Saturday they played a team with no
athletic scholarship program and got hosed again. The
Oregon College of Education offers no scholarships, has
a total enrolment of about 2500 students and of that
population more than half is female.
This speaks very poorly of the Birds; although the
game was played under bad conditions in the mud at the
Thunderbird stadium, the coaches thought before the
game the Birds should win.
They did not and there must be a reason behind it.
We can see the team is weak, that they do not block
or run with authority, that their passing attack is non
existant and their defensive coverage has more holes
than Swiss cheese, but there must be some way of
getting these problems solved.
Players that I talked to feel that the coaches know
what they are doing, but observing practises one quickly
sees that the team does not do the physical work necessary to remain in good condition.
The old saw about not having any players is true
here, because no one wants to play for a losing team,
unless they think that their addition will make the
team better.
Since UBC does not offer athletic scholarships,
then there must be other ways of enticing players to
come, or even taking the players that are here and
getting them out to the practices.
Possibly the bes+ way to get this attitude will be
if and when the athletic department and the coaching
staff get together as they are attempting to do next year
and make the athletes feel that they are both wanted and
as we know, needed.
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MATINEES 2:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Sat., Sun., Hols.
ORCH.        LOGE
$2.00        $2.50
$2.50       $3.00
$1.50
$2.00
$1.50
$2.00
Please Send me Tickets for	
at . each
Date.— .1st alternate date 2nd alternate date
Circle one (Orchestra) (Loge)  .
NAME .	
ADDRESS
CITY	
For Theatre Party and Group Sales Information Contact
MRS.  LUNN    -    PHONE  685-9262
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGSI & CORSAGES A
SPECIALTY
• GREETING CARDS & GIFTS
TBLEFLORA
^.^fflH^**
womi^SS'wn*!
"Flowers By Wire"
10%  STUDENT DISCOUNT ON
PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short   Blocks  From   UBC   Gates
4427 W. 1 Oth Ave.   224-1341
Under  New   Management
The; grin Ma
f&ftft * -en******,
gift* * jmtt «$(-*•*
PIZZA vfotfA
Across the street from Fraser Arms
Full Facilities
Dine  In - Take Out -  Delivery
1381 S.W. Marine    263-44401
willy van yperen
4410w.10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
STARTS THURSDAY,
NOVEMBER 14th, 8:00 p.m.
CAPITOL
683-2634
820 GRANVILLE  ST.
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Representatives from our Firm will be on campus on the
following dates to interview students for positions available
in offices of our Firm throughout Canada.
Monday, November 25: Tuesday, November 26
and Wednesday, November 27,1968
These positions are available for the graduates in
Commerce, Arts, Science, Engineering and Law.
Further information and arrangements for interviews
are available through the Placement Office. Wednesday, November 13,  1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 11
■   -* ***** ,wl3S!*P***l*_.3,*»* *
*m«9<%... ■***»Y*i5_W>-1 './>. ■■
Tifi^^^;?^*^^*;^
V^-h« v-KP ■   i* -._._.■- •   .» **- ■ ■-* *.r .     : . * *?-*■_>
-  ■. x^.^3-^   *£:?*:■ •4^*v:-.^-.^i^^r>- . -J
. ,**       -   .<■-••■•*-■-..._■-. V.   ■    .-J*. Jli* - »• ■•*•* ■*■*     ■■ * <c* ■»■
— dick button photo
DANYLIEU HEADING FOR LIGHT.  UBC halfback, Paul Danylieu has a hole opened for him on
a first and goal to go from the five-yard Sine.
SEASON TOTAL
259-21
Football Birds lose
last game of season
DICK   BUTTON
and
PHIL WINCH
The Thunderbird football
team topped off a perfect season
Saturday afternoon as they
were trounced 42-7 by the
Oregon College of Education
Wolves.
This made eight in a row the
Birds have lost this season, in
attaining their particular level
of perfection.
While doing this the Birds
scored a fantastic total of 21
points while holding their
opponents to a mere 259.
The game was an hour late
getting started, as Oregon's
plane was delayed by fog.
It was decided not to allow
them any warm up time. In
spite of the handicap, Oregon's
fine back Bob Zeigler caught
his first three touchdown passes
at 1:33 of the first quarter,
from the  arm  of quarterback
Don Ruecker on Oregon's first
play from scrimmage.
Not to be outdone, Ruecker
himself later scored two touchdowns and passed for the other.
Larry Koenig converted all
six Oregon touchdowns.
Zeigler scored his second
touchdown at 11:47 of the first
quarter, and his third at 1:10 of
the second quarter, again on
passes.
Keeping in the spirit of the
game, Oregon scored again at
3:27 of the second quarter as
Ruecker fired to end Jim
Rehberg for their 4th major.
At the magic time of 8:09 of
this same quarter, a miracle
took place as UBC back Bernie
Fandrich, running in place of
the absent Dave Corcoran, fell
into the end zone on second
down and goal from the two.
Dick Stein converted.
Ruecker ran the last two TDs
himself in the last quarter to
finish the slaughter.
In retrospect, all the football
team  really  needed  this  year
was a quarterback, a coaching
staff, a dozen linemen and a
dozen backfielders.
Other than these vacancies
the team was as solid as a rock.
This is the fourteenth season
that the football team has been
the shame of the university,
with one possible exception,
coincidently the same length of
time that Gnup has been here.
Since a good part of the
athletic budget goes toward
making this university look
foolish, it just might be an idea
if they would at least look
foolish gracefully.
The athletic department is
buzzing with ideas for improving the team next year, but
any permutation of this year's
version cannot be successful.
Perhaps it is time for a
change. Who knows what
hidden talents could be uncovered on the football team
if they had more time to devote
to the search for them.
Weekend action star
This box will appear in the first issue
after every weekend and will introduce
athletes who were individual stars in their
sport over the weekend; so congratulate
them when you see them.
In a losing cause, Bob Laycoe a twenty-
one year old six foot two inch guard who
weighs in at 235 pounds, was a standout.
The son of an athlete, his father Hal
made his name in hockey, Bob has received
pro rating from the staff out here.
He also received plaudits in other games
this year, for instance, Cal Murphy the coach
at the University of Hawaii said that he was
one of the only good players on the team
and that at times he carried the whole back-
field by opening the only hole in the line.
The UBC coaching staff can't take all the
credit though, as he played for Linfield College, and made all-conference tackle in their
league.
Bob is in his first year of grad school in
PE.
'-^s^y^**T**r*
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS —
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS —
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 pjn.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
U.B.C. NEW DEMOCRATS PRESENT
DAVE
BARRETT
'Opportunities for the N.D.P. in B.C/
— a Program for B.C. and the
N.D.P. in B.C.
FRIDAY, MOV. 15-12:30-BU. 106
Ifyou are interested
in seeking employment upon graduation with
a large organization, having well developed
training programs for management and professional staff, you might like to read some of
the detailed information which Ontario Hydro
has on file in your Placement Office. We are
engaged in an expansion, through which our
present capacity of 10 million kilowatts will be
doubled in less than 10 years through the use
of very large nuclear and coal-fired thermal
plants. This program will provide a continuing
challenge in a wide range of professional
careers.
You will find opportunities for professional
development in the areas of Personnel, Finance, Marketing and Computer Services both
in the area of business systems and mathematical analysis. Training based upon rotational work assignments is available in each of
these areas before the selection of a first
regular position. We are looking forward to
meeting you.
INTERVIEWING DATES - December 4, 5 and 6
Employment Officer
Professional and Management Staff
Ontario Hydro
620 University Avenue
Toronto 2, Ontario Page  12
THE
UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 13, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
Despite the odds:
young love wins
The Family Way, an English
comedy about sex and the
married girl, shows Thurs. at
12:30, 3:30, 6, 8:30 p.m. Fri.
at 6, 8:30 p.m., old Aud., 50
cents.
COMMUNICATIONS  COMM.
"What's a campus paper all
about? Is The Ubyssey doing
its job?" Your chance to say
•what you think. Meeting
noon  Friday,  SUB  M.
CIASP
Meeting noon today, SUB
105  B.
UBC SOCREDS
Herb Capozzi speaks noon
today, Bu. 106.
SDS
General meeting 7:30 p.m.
tonight, SUB clubs lounge.
HISTORICAL ASSOC.
Ian Ross speaks Thursday 8
p.m., Grad Centre.
NEW DEMOCRATS
General meeting to discuss
leadership, noon today, Bu.
217. Dave Barrett speaks Friday noon, Bu. 106.
EEC
Car rally, Thursday noon,
South end of D lot, entry 50
cents.
BIRD SKI TEAM
Tickets for annual Rossland
ski trip on sale in SUB main
foyer.
MUS
Concert today noon, Music
bldg. recital hall. Charles
Ives, "Concord sonata", Dae
Baird, piano. Faculty string
quartet, music of Barlok,
Smetana, Mozart. Thursday
noon.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Dancing Thursday, noon-2:30
p.m., SUB 207L.
FLYING  CLUB
Search and Rescue speech by
Capt. Madden, 7 p.m. tonight,
SUB 205K.
UBC LIBERALS
General meet, Thursday
noon, Bu. 106.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting for those interested
in international folk dancing,
SUB 113, Thurs. noon. Dance
Friday, Nov. 15, IH, 8:30 p.m.
LEGAL  AID   COMM.
Free legal advice in vp's
office, SUB, every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
GRAD STUDENT CENTRE
Annual general meet, grad
center assoc, Friday, Nov.
15; to open cenltre to all
members of academic community.
FINE  ARTS  GALLERY
Dr. Alfred Seimens conducts
tour of his exhibition, Wed.
Nov. 13.
SPANISH STUDENTS
Organizational meeting for
majors and honors, Bu. 203,
Wed,  noon.
PSYCH CLUB
General    meeting    Thursday
noon, SUB  111.
PRE-DENT HYGIENE, SOC
Meeting Thursday noon, SUB
117   D.
SUB  OPENING
Meeting    noon    today,    SUB
224   B.
MARKETING CLUB
General meeting Wed. noon,
Ang.   215.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Speaker on Juvenile Probation, Thursday noon, SUB
K. Willingdon volunteer interviews, Thurs. 1:30 p.m.
SUB K.
GOSPEL STUDENTS
Moody   film,   Red  River   of
Life, noon today, Bu. 104.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting noon today, SUB
211.
PRE-LAW
Harry Rankin speaks on The
Law & Social Change, Thurs.
noon, Bu. 100.
CIRCLE K
General meeting Friday noon,
SUB council chambers. Pamphlet staplers needed.
PHOTO  SOC
Contest for members, details
in Brock exten. 163.
CONSERVATIVES
Policy committee meets
Thursday noon, SUB 224.
DANCE CLUB
Learn groovy dances for
party on the 29th, today thru
Monday noon.
NEWMAN CENTER
General meeting noon today,
SUB   215.   Zirnhelt   on   Student Protest, tonight 8 p.m.,
SUB 211.
AQUA SOC
^ General meeting Thurs. noon,
SUB 125 F. Diving film, 8
p.m.  Hebb.
NISEI VARSITY
Dance at International House,
Sat.  9  p.m.,  Blues Crusade,
members   $1,   non - members
$1.50.
DEBATING UNION
Meeting of the tongues, Friday noon, SUB 111.
KOOTENAY MEN'S CLUB
Dance Friday, 9-1 p.m., Place
Vanier,    Tomorrow's    Eyes,
Seeds of Time.
CUSO WORKSHOP COMM.
Meeting  Friday   noon,   SUB
220.
CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
National director talks noon
today,  Ed.  201.
^ HOUSE ^
Casey Anderson
Reprive Recording^
Kov. 5-17 ""«
has recorded
5 LP's
latest single hit
just released
"Things You
PIZZAV
HANBU9K
£HERR|
FLASHJP
CLASSIFIED
Rates:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 Unes, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ad* are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline i* 11:30 a.m. tha day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SEEDS OP TIME & TOMORROW'S
Eyes playing simultaneously, light
show, two dances: $1.50, Place
Vanier.  Friday,   Nov.   15,   9-1.	
I'SYCH - SOUL, - ROCK — S.U.B.
Nov. 15, 9:00-1:00. Guys $1.50, girls
$1.25.
PAPA BEAR'S MEDICINE SHOW
Concert-Dance. November 14th, 8
p.m. to 11 p.m. 600 Campbell Avenue.
Admission $1.00. Committee of Progressive  Electors Benefit.
Greetings
12
THEUNKN0WN
SUBTLETIES OF
'68 - INVITATION - '69
1. SKIING—Mt.  Baker  ski  pass  is
valid  on  any  holiday.
2. MOVIES—12   movie   passes   are
valid during 3 week
Christmas holiday except  3  legal  holidays.
3. RESTAURANT—Valid  as  many
times    as   you
want anytime.
BUY NOW
Lost & Found
13
WILL PERSON WHO WALKED OFF
with grey ring-binder from oivils
Key-Punch return it to C-16 or
SUB info. desk.
LOST OCT. 25 NEAR ANGUS. ONE
Teak and Silver tie pin, sentimental
value.  Please phone 224-1578.	
FOUND CHANGE PURSE LEFT BY
girl hitchhiker from 70th and Granville.   Harvey,   278-1031. 	
FOUND: SILVER RONSON LIGHTER
with initials "EMR" and slide rule
in green leather case. Inquire at
Math  Office.   	
FOUND: ONE PAIR OF BOY'S
brown glasses by elevator In Angus
on Oct. 23. Phone 922-5683 for identification.
LOST: SLIDE RULE LEFT IN CAR
last Thursday morning. Driver please
call Diana at 266-4375.
Rides b Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokas, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find It across from
tha Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
•68 — INVITATION — 'If
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing (The Village) Canteens in ths
Residences and the Information
desk at S.U.B. $2.50.	
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY MALE
student volunteers to supervise Teen
Drop-in Centre, Wednesdays 7:30-
10:00 p.m.   Phone  John  224-3619.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
know.
REDUCE  THE COST OF  YOUR IN
surance   by   as   much   as   20<%.   All
risks   insured  and  no   cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott.
299-9422.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
a t «
and
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.  Lee  682-7185  or WE  6-2057
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Call at
1162  Seymour  St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
1956 DODGE SEDAN, 4 DOOR, MO-
tor, finish good. Phone days MU 4-
3941,  Eves.  WA  2-9249.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PRIVATE ROOM AND BOARD IN
exchange for babysitting, light
household help, U.B.C. Campus area.
224-0047.
XMAS? GIRLS TO WORK PART-
time in an expanding business. We
offer an opportunity for rapid advancement plus choice of working
hours. For interview phone Heather
321-3603.   Bet.  5-7  p.m.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
'61 FIAT-TUDOR GOOD COND. EX.
clutch, brakes $400 or best offer.
Ph.   224-1677,   7-8  p.m.
'60 METEOR AUTOMATIC. NEWLY
relined brakes. New battery. 4-door.
Good condition, radio. $375. 263-7327
evenings.	
1961 AUSTIN 850. GOOD CONDITION.
Private  sale  $200.   Phone  261-5840.
VW    1960.     RUNS    WELL,     NEEDS
new   clutch.   263-5350.
1968 MGB RED, black interior, wire
wheels, excellent condition. HE 5-
6102.
1965 ENVOY EPIC — LOW MILE-
age, good condition, $750. Call 263-
5248.
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
MUST SELL, LEAVING FOR
Europe. 1966 Suzuki 80cc only 3,000
miles. Exc. condition $175 or best.
733-0649.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating &  Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SILK SCREEN POSTERS. BEAU-
tifully made. Lowest Possible cost.
24   hr.   service.   731-7301.
PSYCH -  SOUL - ROCK.  SUB NOV.
15,   9-1.  Guys  $1.50,  Girls  $1.25.
Home Entertainment
35
GUARANTEED EXPERT AND
EFFICIENT  REPAIRS
Color  T.V.  —  Black  and  White  T.V.
Record Players — Radios
Stereo  Equipment — Tape  Recorders
ALEXANDER  AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W.   10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
CAR NEED REPAIRS?
.  COME   TO  THE   SPECIALISTS
AUTO - HENNEKEN
8914 Oak St. (at Marine) 263-8121
Volkswagen - Mercedes - Volvo
SKI   APEX —   STAY   TWIN   LAKES
GUEST RANCH IN PENTICTON
Make up a group for an exceptional
ski weekend. For a minimum of 12
people we provide accommodation,
lodge facilities and meals, Friday
night to Sunday for only $12 per person. For complete details write or
wire Twin Lakes Guest Ranch. Box
37,  Penticton.
C.U.S.O. WORKSHOP ON AFRICA.
Intn'l. Hse. Sat., Nov. 23, 10:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Panel discussion will feature African Students and returned
volunteers. Everyone is welcome.
HEAR DAVE ZIRNHELT SPEAK
on "Student Protest", in SUB. 211,
from 8-10 today, presented by the
Newman Club.
GORDEN SHAVE WILL GIVE AN
Introductory Talk on Logo-Dynamics,  noon  today  in  Buchanan   202.
AQUA   SOC   —   DIVING   IN   CARR1-
bean.   Film   &   commentary   by   Gino
Gemma,   Thurs.   14,  8:00  p.m.  Hebb
Theatre.
LIGHT SHOW FANTASTIC: FRI-
day. Place Vanier, "Andromeda
Voyage".
Travel Opportunities
IS
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 TR-4 GOOD SHAPE, LOOKS
sharp, 55,000 miles. Want to sell
soon.   Asking   $900.   874-9788.	
'66    RAMBLER   220.    4-DR.    STN.    6.
Clean.   Make an  offer.   733-6183.
THE GREAT E.E. CHALLENGES
all lower forms of eng. i.e. snivels,
comicals etc. to E.E. car rally Nov.
14th.
GASTOWN SOUL
FASTER THAN THE SPEED OF
Sound! That's how fast they'll read,
Friday, Nov. 15th, 7:00 & 9:00 at
Evelyn Wood's Reading Dynamics
Mini-Lesson.   1900   W.   Broadway.
GROUP FOLK LESSONS
10 Evenings $9.88 — Starting Soon
BILL   LEWIS   MUSIC
3645 W. Broadway RE 8-0033
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors.  736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.8.
Other languages offered. Phone 7M-
6923.
FRENCH LESSONS BY NATIVE
Frenchman. Reasonable rates. 738-
8400 evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
SCUBA '66 TANK, BACK - PACK,
boot, $60. U.S. Divers Calypo-J,
regulator $95. 224-9017, Rm. 410. S.
Lett Place Vanier.
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.
HEAD METAL SKI COMPETITION.
210 cm. 3 years old. $95. Phone 731-
6270.
SKIS HEAD STANDARDS NEW
base, new marker, rotomat bindings.
Overall excellent condition. $60.
738-6785   evs.
STEREO TURNTABLE, BSR McDonald 500, complete value $123.00.
Best offer. Call between 6-7 p.m.
682-7966.
TESTOR PULSE PROPORTIONAL
R/C single channel as new $70.00.
Phone  327-5508.
ENGLISH 200 NOTES SECT. "A".
Full term compiled by English grad
student $2.00. 24 pages. 988-0847 or
926-1205.
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD UBC't STUDENT
CALLS    TElEPHONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c at Bookstore
Also al Publications Office &
Information Office, SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT,
kitchen facilities, girl preferred.
Phone 879-8736 after 5:00 p.m.	
(M) $40.00. 224-9662 KIT PRIV. MEAL
Services. Close at hand. Lounge &
T.V.   2250 Wesbrook.
LINCOLN ALEXANDER—THE CON-
servatives Soul (sole?) Urban M.P.
Nov.   22.
RENT THE PAISLEY MULTICOL-
ored Strobic Light-Show to make
your party or dance happen. Reasonable rates. Paul 731-7301 .
AQUA SOC: — FILM AND LECTURE
on Diving in Carribean by Gino
Gemma. 8:00 p.m. Hebb Theatre,
Thursday,   Nov.   14.	
PSYCH   -   SOUL   -  ROCK
SUB,   NOV.   15,   9-1
Guys $1.50 - Girls $1.25
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typing
40
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phona  277-5640.	
ESSAYS    TYPED.    REASONABLE
rates.  Call June 261-4122.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, — ESSAYS,
etc.  Reas.  rates.   Phone  738-7881.
TYPING.   PHONE   731-7511.   9:00   TO
5:00   after   6:00  —   266-6662.
APEX  TYPING  SERVICE
(Mrs.  Gow)
Mimeographing,   Typing
4370   W.   10th 224-6033
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
(bd. optional) single or double. 30th
and Dunbar.  224-9303.
GIRL TO SHARE, 3 MEALS, LAUN-
dry,  extra study-studio room,   semi-
private   entrance.   224-0074.	
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE IN
Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity house.
Great Food and good facilities.
Phona   224-9866.
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD
in professional home for mature female student or married couple
without children in exchange for
light household duties. Phone 224-
7441.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
MALE TO SHARE LARGE FURN-
ished house near gates. Own bed-
room.   $50.00.   224-6643.      	
TWO GIRLS  TO   SHARE  FURNISH-
ed   house   near   UBC   gates.   Phone
224-7472.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
TWO TWO - BEDROOM UNFURN-
ished suite available December 1st,
1968. Rental $125 per month including heatng. Electricity at metered
rate. Applicants should be full-time
graduate students at this University *S~
with children. Please apply—Office
Housing Admin.  Hut 0-3.

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