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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1967

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol.  XLVIII, No. 52
VANCOUVER,  B.C. TUESDAY,  FEBRUARY 28,   1967
_«$!?■-,4S
224-3916
This year to see
student senator
— derrek webb photo *
"HOW DIVINELY YOU PAS DE DEUX," U of A at Calgary
Dinosaur Hans Schamp (14) remarks to UBC's Phil Langley
during basketball frolic Saturday. 'Birds came from behind
to stomp Dinos 69-67.. (Story page 6).
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student representation on the senate
may soon toe a reality, says Alma Mater
Society president Peter Braund.
Braund and members of the AMS executive will meet the senate committee on
student representation March 8, Braund told
councillors  Monday.
"The  faculty  council  has  recommended
that    students    have    a
voice   on   the   senate,"
Braund said.
"I am hopeful we will
get it this year."
Council approved a
report drawn up by
Charlie Boylan on criteria for selection of
UBC's next president.
The report calls for a BOYLAN
president who will be concerned about adequate university financing from the provincial government, the process of education, student representation and faculty participation at every level of university government, and the place of the university in
society.
Council   deleted   two   recommendations
for  president.   The  candidates  were  philosophy professor Robert Rowan and Canadian
Union of Students president Douglas Ward.
"The report attacks the current system
of hiring professors on the basis of marketability," said Boylan.
"For instance, a scientist who can get a
good job elsewhere is paid well by UBC
which boosts its rates to hold scientists here.
Classics and English profs, who are useless
except for making us better human beings,
are not courted by high salaries and suffer
under the 'publish or perish' system.
"Must of the stuff they publish in
scholarly journals is just crap."
Defending his suggestion of Ward for
UBC president, Boylan slammed our "really
bad attitude about youth in administrative
positions."
"We shouldn't be grey about these recommendations. Suggestions from students never
carry much weight anyway, so let's inject
a little color and life into the selection."
In other business, council set up a committee to study possible ways out of next
year's AMS budget squeeze.
Treasurer-elect David Hoye told council
he would be $13,000 short next year.
"We'll have to make cuts somewhere."
Hoye said.
"We could cut back on athletics ,or The
Ubyssey, or withdraw from CUS, or cut
everybody 13 per cent."
The committee will draw up suggestions
to present to the general meeting March 23.
WUS HEAD  CLAIMS...
...CIA  TIE 'COMMON KNOWLEDGE
Ward denies CUS knew of CIA front
OTTAWA (CUP) — Any speculation by student leaders as to possible sources of CUS funds
has always been just that—speculation, said president Doug Ward.
Ward was commenting on remarks made by
Douglas Mayer, general secretary of World University Service of Canada, who claims CUS officials knew as early as 1964 they were dealing
with a possible Central Intelligence Agency front.
"The   story's   about   a
rumor," Ward said. "A lot of
us   have   suspected  the   U.S.
National Student Association
received money from the U.S.
government for international
activities  and  that the NSA
had undue influence over the ^^
way U.S. money was used to        * ._______► ____■__!
support international student
activities.
"But   to   the   best   of  my
knowledge  it's  always been WARD
in the realm of rumor — a whole spectrum of
rumor about where money might come from," the
CUS  chief said.
Mayer contended it was "common gossip
among some CUS officials two or three years ago"
SUBtle $aving
UBC's Student Union Building will cost $400,-
000 less than the AMS estimated.
Grimwood Construction submitted the lowest
estimate of all five companies bidding and says it
can build SUB for $4,237,000.
The AMS has so far set aside $750,000 from
student fees towards SUB.
As for remaining funds, Braund said the AMS
is making "long term financial investigations"
and expects to have made these arrangements
within 60 days.
that the Foundation of Youth and Student Affairs, from which CUS received $3,000 to finance
seminars, was connected with the CIA.
"I know one person I can be absolutely certain knew or suspected that it was coming from
CIA," he said.
He refused, however, to name any CUS officials.
CIA funds partly financed the 1962 International Student Conference meeting at Laval
University in Quebec City, he said.
Ward said although he and others speculated
as to where the money really came from, they
never suspected  CIA involvement.
Meanwhile Canada's solicitor-general Lawrence Pennell supports RCMP questioning of
Canadian Union of Students officials.
It is essential that the RCMP interview persons
from all walks of life  if it is to discharge its
responsibility for  national  security,  he  told  the
Commons. This includes students, he said.
Pennell was commenting on statements made
Tuseday by Ward who told a press conference the
RCMP has approached CUS regularly for the past
15 years seeking intelligence information.
Pennell said he had been advised the RCMP
does not supply funds to students or student organizations to induce them to act on behalf of
the force.
The solicitor-general said he wished to "emphasize that the activities of the RCMP are limited to counter-espionage."
"Obviously, it is not possible for the RCMP,
which is charged with the responsibility for national security, to carry out its responsibilities
unless members of that force are able to ask
questions of people who have relevant information," he  said.
Shaun told CUS word
"You're in it or you're not in it."
So AMS president-elect Shaun Sullivan was
bluntly informed at Monday's council meeting "by
visiting Canadian Union of Students trouble-
shooter John Cleveland.
Sullivan, who is contemplating pulling the
AMS out of CUS next term, had asked Cleveland
about the possibilities of associate status in the
organization.
"There is no provision for this kind of status
in CUS," Cleveland said. "If you believe in a
national union you should be in it completely.
Associate status would simply give campuses an
excuse to isolate themselves."
Cleveland told council CUS's current "activist"
stance stems from an analysis of the educational
process and the learning environment undertaken
in the past few years.
"Before we were primarily concerned with
things like contests, carnivals, discounts, and
sports — but we came to realize this had nothing
to do with real life."
Cleveland said CUS has now become a "radical student movement in the true sense of the
word—a movement that analyzes the educational
process more critically."
INFILTRATED  GENERATION
See Page 5 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,   1967
Increased arts turn-out
elects activist Persky
In an election with a total votenOf 728,
Stan Persky, arts 1, Monday was elected arts
president for the year 67-68.
Even that small representation of UBC's
largest faculty was three times last year's
total of 250.
Persky defeated Linda McKim, arts 2.
In the vice-presidential election Harley
Rothstein, arts 3, running on the same platform as Persky, won over Clay Larson.
"The campaign is just beginning", said
Persky. "Council will begin moving this
week."
He attributed the larger turnout to an
active campaign of talking to the people.
"Pleased as we are with the increased
vote, it still represents 15 per cent of eligible voters, and we are not very happy
with this.
Persky received 489 votes to Miss Mc-
Kim's 231. '
Rothstein clomped Larson, arts 1, with
442 votes to 266.
Persky said: "I feel funny about making
a victory statement because I see no victory
at this point. We won a local election, the
only election in which students were presented with something and did not vote
against it.
"Local   elections   are better  than   large
ones because each student's vote is worth
more and the student feels more important.
"1 don't consider one man is holding the
office. It would work on a collective basis.
Everyone who wants to participate will be
able to."
SPECIAL EVENTS brings Indian folk-
singer DON CRAWFORD to Brock
at noon today.
UGEQ urges ed action
SHERBROOKE, Que. (CUP)—Delegates
to the second annual conference of l'Union
Generate des Etudiants du Quebec at the
weekend passed major resolutions aimed at
strengthening the union and spearheading
the plan for general accessibility to education in Quebec.
UGEQ president Robert Nelson had
earlier told delegates that "UGEQ is now
recognized as a legitimate and powerful
union capable of making valuable contributions to Quebec society."
In the field of education, delegates supported the establishment of a University of
Quebec, free public education at all levels
and a 20 per cent reduction in all university tuition fees beginning next year.
The convention also condemned the provincial government and its Bill 25, passed
in the Quebec legislature last week.
The bill removes the teachers' right to
demand   higher   wages   for   an   18-month
period. Delegates promised full support to
the province's teachers in their efforts next
September, particularly with teach-ins, demonstrations and other actions.
Expo trip on again
An all-inclusive student trip to Expo in
May is on again after being cancelled Feb.
15.
At that time, the half-price trip was
cancelled due to lack of student participants
at deadline for signing.
Organizers Denis Connor and Chuck
Curteis have extended the contract signing
date indefinitely.
An  organizational meeting  will be  held
Wed., March 1 in Bu. 104 at 12:40.
The price is still $215, half the usual
rate for the trip, a week of accommodation,
and Expo passes. Flight date is May 6.
Petition reaction limited
to   few scurrilous calls'
Reaction to the UBC professors' petition on Vietnam published in Saturday's downtown press was
negligible  Sunday and Monday.
Assistant arts dean Walter Young told The
Ubyssey reaction so far has been limited to "a few
scurrilous calls of the anonymous kind" to signers of the
document.
The petition, urging the Canadian government to
take a stand regarding Canada's complicity in the U.S.
Vietnam war effort has been sent to members of the
federal parliament including leaders of all federal
parties.
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frfZeirGatirtnasisiger   v Tuesday, February 28, 1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
INDIVIDUALISM .
...OR DEMOCRACY
CHAIRMAN JIM TAYLOR
— powell hargrave photo
hopes for good day sunshine
Open House swinging
Open House this weekend will echo to the sounds of a rock
band on the top of (Buchanan and the poems of bands of strolling
poets.
Subject to weather the Brementown Musicians will play
pop songs o nthe roof of the Buchanan building.
The poets, including Bill Bissett, Scott Lawrence, David
Frith, Greydon Moore and Chris Elsted and many others, will
also give away flowers and balloons to visitors.
Poet David Frith said some orginal poetry is being written
for the occasion using the theme of love-anarchy.
He urged any other campus poets who wish to participate
to call him at 228-8176.
South African lecturer
sentenced to 20 years
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (CUPI) — A South African
history lecturer at SaJisbuty University was sentenced
Monday to 20 years in prison for working with the
outlawed African Nationalist party.
The prosecution told the Salisbury High Court that
John Andrew Conradie, 29, had admitted charges of
taking part in a "diabolical plot which could have led
to the loss of many white Rhodesian lives."
Conradie also admitted he distributed money for
the African Nationalist party and passed on hand
grenades, said the prosecutor.
He said he agreed "for reasons of conscience" to be
used as a messenger for liaison work.
'Freedom is discipline'
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
The doctrine of individualism is destructive to democracy, morality and education,
said a University of California philosopher
at UBC Friday.
Dr. Joseph Tussman, political philosopher
and director of the experimental arts program at Berkeley, spoke to over 200 persons
on Individualism in Jeopardy, part of a
program sponsored by the UBC extension
department. 	
Although w e
tend to confuse the
two, said Tussman,
individualism actually .destroys the
idea of democracy,
leading to anarchy.
" D e m ocracy
calls for subordina-
ation of the individual and a high
degree of discipline
of its members.
"The cult of in-
TUSSMAN
cUvidualism, however," said Tussman, "allows
for no subordination of ideas to any community effort.
Morality and lawfulness are also destroyed toy individualistic whim, he said.
"The claim of each individual to pursue
his own sense of Tightness without a kind
of humility of social judgment is arrogant
self-interest and a denial of morality, he said.
He said the idea of personal conscience
is charming but arrogant and cannot be
pushed*.3
But the area of most dramatic conflict
with individualism is education, said Tussman.
"Education is the process whereby society, through institutions, transforms unruly
animals into reasonable members," he said.
"Although some will say they own their
minds and are suspicious of people trying to
shape them, it is clear that they do not own
their minds.
"None of the beliefs, attitudes or interests
with which a student arrives at university
belong to him."
Tussman said the possible mind of an
infant is a natural resource of a community
like an acre of land.
"People are not naturally democratic,"
he said. "To grow a democrat is a fantastic
horticultural feat. You must teach the habits
of listening, accepting judgment, humility —
all sorts of unnatural things."
Tussman said that another function of
education is to produce dissenters — those
willing to criticize and oppose at any price,
out of a sense of obligation to the community.
The only fruitful dissent comes if there
is an overriding consent to the idea of
democracy, said Tussman.
"It may be a good attitude to change
things," he said, "but stability is just as good
a value on its own terms."
■J
PROF   HIGH   ON   POT  VIRTUES
A UBC professor claims smoking
marijuana is a mark of civilized society.
"I think smoking marijuana and
drinking alcohol are marks of a civilized
society," said UBC pharmacologist Dr.
Harvey Sanders.
Sanders was speaking at a Vancouver
YMCA meeting Friday.
"Among people smoking marijuana
are those found in the top 20 per cent
of their classes at university," he said.
"I'm impressed with how articulate
these people seem."
He said marijuana has been tested for
over 4,000 years by users and there are
no known bad effects.
"The fact they use it doesn't seem to
affect them unduly and they are perfectly  happy  and well-adjusted people."
Sanders said he would not advocate
anyone using marijuana, but only because they would probably find themselves in jail.
"Violent behavior under marijuana is
rare, very rare, and suicides don't occur
after smoking the drug."
"There is no such thing as addiction
to marijuana, physical dependance is unknown."
Second Century committee
insult, farce to Quebecois
By BO HANSEN
The project that bills itself as "The
Major University Student Centennial Project" is a farce and insult to Quebec students, former Quebec student executive
Daniel Latouche charged Monday.
Latouche was former International Affairs Vice-President for l'Union Generate
des Etudiants de Quebec.
The project, Second Century Week is
another product of the attitude of Anglo-
Saxon generosity and paternalism, Latouche
said.
Second Century Week, set for March 6-
11 in Edmonton includes an academic seminar with the frame of reference: "a looking
to the future basing perceptions on the gains
of the first century-."
"We are not against Confederation, but
against celebrating confederation," said
Latouche.
He claimed the Second Century Week
committee's attitude to Quebec students is
"scandalous and an insult."
"The Second Century Week Committee
promised to seek approval of UGEQ and
CUS for the project. Instead, they approached only a few local student union people.
"Quebec students are mad. The only
delegates to the seminar from Quebec will
be a few individual students, going along
for the ride," says Latouche.
r I SAY THAT the Two sides MUSTArar mjx77
6UT TO SEE WHO IS WRONG, WE MUST SEE OF ) MUBYSSM
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editSt, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features,  sports, loc. 23; advertisirM, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
"No man but a blockhead ever wrote
except tor money."
— Samuel Johnson,   1787.
FEBRUARY  28,   1967
Thus
we
die
As America leaves NATO to the Europeans and
concentrates its forces in Asia, the prospect of war with
China becomes more an immediate certainty than a
distant prospect.
The draft treaty between the U.S. and the Soviet
Union for non-proliferation of nuclear arms, and premier
Kosygin's recent visit to Britain are symptoms of a
rapprochement with the West that will keep the Soviets
out of a China conflict. In effect, Russia's new love
affair with the west means an attack on China will no
longer be considered an attack on Russia. China's 700
millions stand isolated.
The war prospect is more bloodcurdling in an overall
Asian view. India as an effective force is neutralized
by famine and the U.S. economic grip — Mrs. Gandhi
needs American support to avoid massive death by
starvation in her own country, and needs American
industrial ownership of India's economy to maintain the
tenuous rule of her Congress party.
Indonesia, which might have been a powerful Chinese
ally, is wholly in the hands of the CIA through its
puppet Suharto.
Cambodia has been threatened and indeed bombed
—the next war escalation will attack Cambodian villages
providing refuge for Viet Cong forces.
Japan's economy is inextricably tied to the American
situation, and Japan now profits by about $1 billion
annually from the Vietnam war.
Despite China's protests, the American fleet patrols
offshore and fills seven miles of straits between the
mainland and the island of Formosa. It is as intolerable
as the Chinese fleet would be patrolling Puget Sound or
San Francisco Bay.
In Vietnam, the seventh fleet this week began hammering coastal rail lines and river mouths in an attempt
to slice supply lines to the south. The logical extension is
the port of Haiphong itself — as senator Barry Gold-
water urged Wednesday — and shelling of Hanoi-China
rail lines from offshore. Next, 175 mm shells into China,
which the U.S. must do, and soon.
U.S. intelligence sources admit the war can continue
for at least 15 years unless it is drastically, escalated. The
American people grow weary of a war against an almost
minute enemy with no visible end.
Besides her enormous visibility, China is on the edge
of becoming a major nuclear force — she has the bomb,
and will soon have a. delivery system. With Chinese
missiles, the sword of Damocles will be clutched by three
fists and America will be forced out of Vietnam without
a win. Thus could her colonial ambitions in Asia be
frustrated, and thus falls the monopoly capitalist economy as the world's brown men grow weary of endless
labor for white,  foreign   masters.
The 1968 presidential election is the key. Home
pressures mean Johnson must either escalate the war
by finding a visible enemy and give the populace a
glimpse of an end, or lose the election.
The war cannot simply end, although Hanoi has bent
as far as it can for peace talks. Even if it did, the American economy would find another rat-hole to fill with
billions of dollars and the cycle repeats. It cannot drag
on at its present level, or China will become a major
nuclear power and America loses. It must escalate into
China before she can strike back. Only thus can Lyndon
Johnson remain president and only thus can the American economy — in its present form — survive.
The world will pay the price, for nothing but utter
holocaust can ensue.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City - - Danny Stoffman
News --  Al Birnie
Photo Powell Hargrave
Page Friday ...      Claudia Gwinn
Sports Sue Gransby
Managing    Murray McMillan
Focus . _.      Kris Emmott
Ass't Mews   _■_ Al Donald
Ass't City Tom Morris
CUP           Bert Hill
Champ - watchers were Tony
Hodge, Mike Jessen, Vicki Trerise,
Pio  Uran,   and  Jim  Maddin.
Also these writers writ: Norman
Gidney, Bo Hansen, Charlotte
Haire, Val Zuker, Dave Cursons,
Kris Emmott, Boni Lee and the
Lachrymose yet quite silly Lin
Tse-hsu.
Potos were frought by Chris
Blake  and   others.
Who said that such things could
have happened without the nether
side   in  confab?   Tusions?
DEED
FUNCTION
SWITCH
Exam time
Ex-lax  and  CUS
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The headline of Friday, Feb.
24 conveyed the impression
that Shaun Sullivan is con-
siering a withdrawal from the
Canadian Union of Students.
Such is not the case.
Sullivan made two points:
1. The recent defeat of the
fee increase has left the AMS
in a greatly restricted financial position.
2. The AMS may be forced
to explore ways either of reducing its financial comitment
to CUS or of arranging a different status within the CUS
structure.
Of course there is no provision for associate-member
status for an obvious reason:
every campus would seek the
benefit or advantage without
paying for the upkeep.
No national union can exist
on those terms.
And Sullivan knows himself
that next year this campus
will need backing that the
CUS congress and member
campuses can provide. For the
third year in a row, tuition
fees will rise. Or worse: admission requirements may get
stiff er to limit the influx of
students.
And speak of strange bedfellows! Sullivan was beat to
the punch when SUS hopeful,
Mike McPhee, advocated cutting, not CUS, tout AMS fees,
proposing instead a fractional,
"relevant" government at 1/10
the cost.
Following McPhee would
destroy student government
on this campus.
The isolationism lurking in
tooth proposals must toe justified.   There   is  no   inherent
virtue, challenge or success in
"going it alone".
And whether or not CUS,
the AMS, or any existing governmental forum is more Ex-
lax than vitamin D, the best
plan is to reform it, and not,
with a wave of the hand, to
dismiss it.
STEPHEN M. BECKOW
arts 3
Vbyssey  fraud
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reply to your editorial
"Think and Do" of Feb. 23,
1967, it is striking how perceptive and objective you are
with respect to your charge
that the four political clubs
on campus have abdicated
from political activity. Your
keen appreciation of the matter escapes me since in the
same editorial you denounce
them for actively supporting
a political activist for the presidency of the AMS.
Further, it might surprise
you, but if you would pay a
little more attention to the
real world around you, you
might note that regularly
there are discussions, debates,
seminars, and conference held
on this campus and elsewhere
by these parties.
I would hardly call this an
abdication of activity. It may
just so happen it does not conform to the manner of conduct you title "activity".
You conclude your editorial
by suggesting that these four
parties merge to form the UBC
Chowder and Marching Society. With all due respect, the
campus does not need another
Chowder and Marching Society since it already has one,
as you are well aware.
As for these parties being
either  a  force  or  active  in
student affairs, your criticism
is hardly valid and is most
certainly unfairly biased. For
the past two years you have
seen fit to mock almost every
statement or undertaking of
these parties.
You even have the egotistical audacity to call the forthcoming discussions to take
place in the parliamentary
assembly toeing held during
Open House "meaningless",
which of course have not yet
taken place.
No doubt you find it your
duty to upbraid others for
their shortcomings, but I
would suggest that you reevaluate your standard of
measure.
You may find it a good
deal easier to offer criticism
than take it, but in the spirit
of constructive criticism I
will take yours into consideration and hope that you will
in the future look to the activities and expression of opinions of the political clubs on
campus with an open mind
and consider that although
their approach to the problems which so vitally concern
the students on campus are
different than yours, they are
sincere and hopefully have a
little more effect.
In conclusion if you should
be so kind as to permit us to
return your compliments in
print, may we suggest that
the foremost fraud perpetrated on this campus is the
Ubyssey, which most certainly operates in a vacuum and
lacks meaning.
REG. D.  GRANDISON,
President,
Parliamentary   Council Tuesday,  February  28,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MEET  THE...
... INFILTRATED  GENERATION
NSA image needed cash
By BOB  EWEGEN
Editor Colorado Daily
Well, scratch one dream.
The United States National Student Association, the leading voice of American
youth in the postwar era, has officially admitted that it has been supported for a
decade by funds of the Central Intelligence
Agency.
As in most parts of dishonor, it was
easy for both participants to rationalize
their actions. In the early '50s, the NSA
was desperately short of money, especially
to carry on their vital international program.
It is at this point that the CIA entered
the picture. The NSA had a liberal image
in America. But in the context of world
student opinion it emerged as a conservative one. The NSA's progressive ideals and
pragmatic Americanism were probably
America's best possible image to a world
student body which blinks at the jingoistic
term "un-American" and fails to understand our holy crusade against the forms of
socialism which many of their countries
practice.
BALANCED   COMMUNIST  IUS
Furthermore, the NSA was the most influential member, both financially and spiritually, of the International Student Conference. ISC, composed mainly of Western
and neutralist nations, was the only force
blocking the rival International Union of
Students from dominating world student
organizations.
The IUS, headquartered in Prague,
Czechoslovakia, was and is dominated by
Communist youth organizations. Thus, the
corrupt bargain was struck — by the NSA
out of apparent necessity, by the CIA out
of callous opportunism. For a while the
bargain worked. The NSA built a strong
financial base.
But the fruits of the poisoned tree cannot long endure when the baseness of their
genesis  is  known.
For a generation of student leaders the
NSA was the mainspring of their actions
and the fountainhead of their idealism. Now
that source is  tainted.
Many names have been proposed for
this generation. We are not the silent generation, nor the lost generation. We are the
infiltrated generation. We are the kept generation. We are the pre-empted generation.
The words coined in jest at Berkeley, "Don't
trust anyone over thirty," come back to
mock us now in earnest.
WE ARE KEPT RADICALS
In terms of the ideals of our greatest
organization, in terms of the seriousness of
our goals, in terms of the very sanctity of
human idealism itself, we are the Betrayed
Generation. Long accustomed to distrusting
the establishment, we are now dazed to find
that we have been kept radicals, allowed
to bray nobly while chewing for fodder
of those who have cynically herded us for
their own ends. The NSA will be a long
time recovering.
For its part the CIA will pay heavily
too. We have handicapped ourselves with a
permanent plateau of distrust through
world youth. It will be a long time before
an Asian, African or Latin American student
listens to an American visitor without wondering if he has been subsidized or screened
to parrot words not of his own choosing.
With the new generation of student leaders,
who will be facing us across negotiating
tables a brief generation hence, this may be
our greatest diplomatic catastrophe of the
post war period.
There are those who will say the present
outlived its usefulness. We disagree. If the
association is allowed to disintegrate,
another) weaker organization will no doubt
spring up to take its place, one which is
equally if not more vulnerable to political
entrapment. The best safeguard the American student community has against the danger of becoming a pawn in the cold war is
a strong, broad-based, vigorously-supported
national union of students. This is the NSA
can become — if we give it our support.
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566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,   1967
I
CHAD czass I
GENERAL MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 2
ANGUS 110 - 12:30 P.M.
ZERDAVOSIfeLL
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Show Times - 11:50 gr/i
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Sunday - 3:00, 5:02, 7:07, 9:12
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
J
Dinnies die dribbling
— derrek webb photo
DINOSAUR POUNCES on Bird stomping
on ball. Bill Mucklow (35) desperately
attempts to stop UBC's Bob Molinski (43)
with a spectacular Dinnie dive. But our
hero escapes. Birds won the WCIAA
championship.
By MIKE JESSEN
At the 'beginning of the ibasketball season
it appeared that the UBC Thunderbirds were
headed for a third place finish, at best, in the
WCIAA.
But on Friday night in the Memorial gym
the home club climaxed a fine campaign by
beating the U of Calgary Dinosaurs 90-73 to
take the conference title. The Birds took a
thriller 69-67 on Saturday night to win their
seventh consecutive WCIAA game.
Ian Dixon led the team with 25 points.
Neil Murray also had a fine night, scoring
21 points.
The closely-played first half ended with
the visitors trailing 39-34. The Birds came
on strong in the second half with Dixon
scoring eignt quick points to shoot UBC into
a lead they widened as the game progressed.
The Dinnies looked tired in the second
half. With the press working to perfection,
the Birds constantly took the ball away from
Calgary and outran them to the hoop. :
Ken Shields, a former Prince Rupert, B.C.
resident, topped the Dinnies with 21 points.
Robin Fry, wearing an aluminum face mask
to protect his nose, broken in Quebec, scored
19 points.
On Saturday the Birds, who were behind
most of the game, managed to win the
squeaker in the final 90 seconds.
Murray was the best of the Birds with 17
points. Shields topped the Dinnies, scoring
15 points.
The Birds now move on to the Canadian
Intercollegiate Championships to be held
March 9-11 in Calgary and Edmonton.
In the preliminaries to the Thunderbird
basketball games, the UBC Thunderettes
pulled out two victories in their games
against the University of Manitoba. On Friday the Thunderettes, paced by Pauline
Gensick's 25 points, won 76-47 to take the
WCIAA women's championship. In Saturday's game the score was 65-41. The victories
left UBC with a record of 8-0. .
The Jayvees won 62-57 in their continuing best of five series with Kerrisdale. The
JV's now lead the series two games to none
in the quest for the B.C. Jr. Men's title. Rick
Inrig had 21 points and Sam Vandermeulen
had 16. Vandermeulen was last week named
the most valuable player in the Inter-City
League. He also polled the most votes for the
centre position on the first all-star team.
Wrestlers pin third place
By PIO URAN
The UBC Thunderbird wrestling team
finished third last weekend at the WCIAA
finals in Edmonton.
In addition, two team members were
selected to represent western Canada in
the national championships to be held
March 8-9 in that city.
The finals tournament, held on the University of Alberta campus, wrestled off
teams from the universities of Alberta, Calgary, Saskatchewan, picked the team to
beat, had the only full team in the tournament while UBC had no entries in the 152,
160 or the 177 lb. divisions.Besides being
large in numbers, U of S had more experienced and heavier wrestlers, with most of
them just barely making the weigh-in limit.
Despite the team's third place finish, no
UBC wrestler lost ail three of his bouts.
In the 123 lb. division Chuck Tasaka,
in his first year of wrestling, lost two bouts
to taller, more experienced men but was
able to fight the Alberta wrestler to a 4-4
draw.
Wayne Cave, in the 130 class, won his
first two bouts with a pin on the Saskatchewan wrestler and a 14-3 decision over
Calgary. His only loss was to Alberta's Bill
Smith, picked Best Wrestler in last year's
tournament and again this year. This is
Cave's first year.
In the 137 lb. class Dennis Bolton,
another first year man, lost his first bout.
He won his next bout with a hold on
Calgary at 5 minutes 19 seconds and was
leading with points in his last bout when he
was upset and pinned.
Ron Turner, in the 145 pound division,
fought strongly 'but lost his first and third
bouts. In the second bout Turner's and the
Calgary wrestler's heads accidentally collided in an attempted takedown and the
bout had to be stopped for a few minutes.
Neither wrestler was hurt and the bout
continued until Turner won.
UBC's 167 lb. division man, Ken Ker-
showed his championship style, winning
all three of his bouts; 7-4 over Saskatchewan, 6-0 over Alberta and 12-3 over Calgary.
Bob Scott, in the 191 lb. class, won his
first bout by default, and second 4-0 over
Alberta but lost the third to Saskatchewan
by one point.
The team's heavyweight, Chris Nemeth,
had only one opponent in the tournament.
Clark was the one expected to win toy
virtue of his 11 years experience, larger
size and his win of the WCIAA heavyweight
championship when he last wrestled in 1965.
It was a close bout but Nemeth proved
more than a match for Clark and won the
fight 6-3.
At the end of the tournament the score
was: U of S, 113.5 points; U fo A, 70 points;
UBC 50.5 points and U of C, 25 points. This
makes it the second year in a row that
Saskatchewan has won the team trophy.
UBC won it two years ago.
In the team selected by the officials to
represent Western Canada at the CIAA
Championships, Nemeth is the heavyweight
representative and Kerluke is the 167 lb.
division representative.
Attention would be footballers
Football spring training begins tomorrow.
Anyone interested in playing next year
is invited to attend. Be at Wolfson field at
4:30 p.m. or see coach Frank Gnup in the
Memorial gym. Tuesday,  February 28,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  7
V
______ yB£      ^f       w.f^       SQCCer       fotf
^? 1 ^* ' The TTBr! Thunderbirds soccer team camp The   second   half   was   scoreless   as   the
back to  irk  Birds
Following up their revival in Quebec, the UBC ice
hockey Thunderbirds brought back a two-game souvenir
from Calgary on the weekend.
The  5-4,  5-3 wins left the Dinosaurs  sitting firmly
on the bottom of WCIAA competition.
Bob Apps opened the scoring for UBC Friday. Mickey
McDowell, Tom Koretchuk, Kevin McGladery, and Ron
Morris caught onto the idea, all marking up singles. The
game was won in overtime, being tied to the end of the
third period. Al McLean starred at assists.
Saturday's game was tied up until Bab Apps and Al
McLean scored one goal apiece in the third. It was McLean's second goal, following two by Miles Desharnais.
The Dinnies dare the Birds once again this weekend.
The teams meet at the Thunderbird arena Friday,
8:30 p.m. and Saturday, 2:30 p.m. UBC needs only one
more win to clinch the prize for the four-game league
series, the John Owen Memorial Trophy.
Wright way to score
By TONY HODGE
The UBC field hockey Thunderbirds dug deep into their
bag of tricks last weekend and came out with the ability to
score.
Over Grasshoppers A, the Birds won 5-0.
The Birds led 1-0 at end of the first half on a goal by Jamie
Wright. Five minutes into the second half he scored again.
Shortly after, Warren Bell scored two successive shots on the
run. Wright completed the scoring with another goal on a fine
pass from Bell.
Graham iDixon and Dave Johanneson also came up with
very strong play.
The win put the Birds back into first place, two points
ahead of Jokers, and with a game in hand.
With goal averages of both teams very close, the winner
of the league is still a toss-up. Two games remain in which the
Jokers and Birds meet.
In other field hockey plays, Braves drew 1-1 with Vancouver B. Lome Brown scored for the Braves.
Tomahawks played thrice over the weekend, beating Vancouver C 2-1, Hawks C 7-9, and losing to Vancouver C 2-1 on
Sunday.
Varsity rugby unscathed
The UBC Thunderbirds extened their unbeaten record in
the Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby League last weekend with
a 16-3 win over Western Washington.
Chuck Plester, returning from a spree with the frosh team,
led the scoring with two tries. Guy Swinnerton, and Dave
Austin also scored tries, with Keith Watson scoring two converts.
The Braves meanwhile, did not fare as well as the Birds.
Playing some of the worst rugby of the year, they lost to
Ex-Brits 14-3.
In Frosh rugby action, Totems lost to UVic. 9-3 while
Tomahawks manhandled Royal Roads for a 16-0 victory.
Bill Knights' "football-rugby-Teepees" won again as they
had no trouble demolishing Georgians first team by a score of
12-3.
Swimmers splash
The Thunderbird swim team returned from Winnipeg after
competing in the weekend WCIAA Championships.
The Birds were the overall runners-up of the meet, losing
only to the University of Saskatchewn and beating both the
universities of Alberta and Manitoba.
This was an important meet, for placing either first or second
here gave the swimmers a chance to compete in the Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union Championships which are to be
held in Edmonton next weekend.
The Birds will be represented there by a very powerful
quintet composed of Bill Gillespie, Bob Walker, Phil Winch, Jim
Maddin and diver George Fudge.
UBC NETS NUMBER ONE
The UBC volleyball Thunderbirds proved their supremacy
on the weekend as they won the Western Canadian championships at SFA.
After a slow start Friday when the team defeated the Win-
field Dominoes 2-0 but lost to the West Van Spartans 1-2, it
gained momentum to reach the Saturday finals.
The Birds rolled over University of Victoria 2-1 and University of Washington 2-0.
The finals were anticlimatic as the powerful Birds trounced
Washington 15-4, 1513, 15-6, in three straight games in pre-
paration for the Canadian finals in Calgary, March 6-7.
The UBC Thunderettes finished third in the volleyball
championships. Marpole took first place ahead of Calgary. The
UBC JV's were fifth.
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer team came
up with their best performance of the year
Sunday, as they defeated previously unbeaten Victoria O'Keefes 2-0 at Callister
Park.
Lieut. Governor George Peakes turned
out to support the Victoria team but found
the afternoon very disappointing as the
Birds ended the islander's unbeaten string
at 15 games.
With the support of the UBC cheerleaders and a pro-Italian crowd the Birds out-
hustled Victoria and dominated the entire
game.
Jim Berry opened the scoring at the 25
minute mark of the first half by rushing
up from his fullback position and driving
the ball past helpless goaltender Barry
Sadler.
Just before the close of the first half
Harry Lendvoy clipped a shot over the head
of a Victoria defender. Sadler came out to
make a routine save but lost control of the
'ball and center forward Harvey Thorn
cracked it into the net for the insurance
goal.
The second half was scoreless as the
Birds missed many chances against a confused Victoria defense.
Bird goalie Bruce Ballam recorded
another>shut-out but failed to have any hard
shots as- the defensive play of center half
John Humphries and others was at its best.
The win put the Birds in a third place
Pacific Coast Soccer League tie with North
Shore. The Birds will play North Shore
Saturday 2 p.m. at Callister Park. Those
unable to make it to the game can watch
it on Channel 6 or 8 Sunday morning.
ENEMIES  SQUASHED
The UBC varsity squash team won the
inter-school challenge trophy for the third
year in a row last weekend.
Playing at Shawnigan Lake, the team,
comprised of Bob Johnson, Bill Hamilton,
John Simpson, Ken Mackiwrot and Bob
Verner, beat Shawigan 4-1 and University
of Victoria 4-1.
French Graduates
200 requests for secondary
school teachers received
from Ghana, Nigeria and
Sierra Leone.
Apply CUSO, Brock Ext. 165
or International House
How To Teach
Your Mind
To THINK
Do you solve problems quickly?
Does someone else always seem
to come up with the right answer first—and then the solution is so obvious to you? Is
this mental struggling hurting
your career or your personal
life? In March Reader's Digest,
learn how your stumbling block
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March 1 to March 11
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Graduating Students -
A Career In
Elementary School Teaching
There is a great need today for young people with a good education
and professional training to serve as teachers in the elementary schools
of this province and of Canada generally. Particularly is there a need"
for young men who may eventually take administrative positions. Many
students in the non-professional faculties of Arts and Science arrive at
the point of graduation with no definite idea of a future career in mind-
Elementary school teaching may interest you. Currently over 90 graduates
of Arts, Science and other faculties are completing a one-year professional
training course (Programme A3) to prepare themselves for teaching in
elementary schools. The professional Basic Certificate which they will
receive will entitle them to beginning salaries of about $6,000, increasing
annually to a maximum of about $10,000- Opportunities for promotion
and administrative position: are very good for young men. Admission
requirements: a 65 % average in the B.A. or B.Sc. or other Bachelor's
degree or in lieu of this a 65% average in a suitable major. Applicants
for admission to this programme should arrange personal interviews
before September through the office of the Director of the Elementary
Division, Faculty of Education, Room 2515, fifth floor, south wing. Education  Building (Phone 228-2141).
F.   HENRY  JOHNSON,
Director,  Elementary Division,
Faculty of Education-
What CANADA MONTH doesn't -
and does - worry about
We don't worry about Communists. Every time oneof them opens
his mouth in Canada he sounds so silly that he does his cause-
more harm than good.
We do worry about much less sinister people - our neighbors
down the street, our business associates, the local barber, even
you. For from politicians, press, radio, television, scholars and
teachers, everyone is hearing an almost constant barrage of argument that government can do just about anything better than
you can do it yourself - and it is demonstrably true that if you
hear something often enough you begin to believe it.
But if statists make most of the noise, they certainly don't
make any of it in CANADA MONTH. CANADA MONTH is the
magazine that thinks you can do almost everything better than
government can. CANADA MONTH opposes further encroachment by government upon, the lives and businesses of Canadians.
In this it is unique.
This unique monthly usually costs $2.50 per year. But if
you use the coupon below, and enclose payment with your order
we will enter your subscription for a year at the special price
of $1.50.
To: CANADA MONTH.  The Magazine of Politics
and Government
4956 Decarie Blvd., Montreal 29. Que.    F-l
I enclose $1.50 and this coupon, which entitles me
to one year of CANADA MONTH at this special
price.     Send    to: Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,   1967
'TWEEN  CLASSES
Jockey hockey on ice
PE  US
First annual Steel Cup
hockey game — SFA vs.
UBC PE, today, 5:45, arena.
Dance with the Bremen-
town Musicians in Brock following (8 p.m. to midnight).
Admission 75 cents with
cards.
DEBATE
Blue Cloud-Red Baron debate of the year. Conservative
MP former agricultural minister Alvin Hamilton meets
Marxist AMS first vice-president Charlie Boylan in Brock
12:30 Wednesday to find
whether the new PC party is
a real alternative to con-
tinentalism.
UN CLUB
Dr. Chitepo, leader of
Rhodesian African Nationalist party speaks on the
resistance movement in Rhodesia, today, noon, Bu. 106.
PRE LAW OPTION
Arnold   Hean   speaks   today, non, Bu. 100.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Don Crawford, accompanied by Kaye Dunham in a
program of folk rooted,
blues oriented, electric
sound. Today, noon, Brock
Hall.
BADMINTON CLUB
Tournament starts tonight.
CYC
Movies   and discussion   of
youth problems, today, noon,
Bu. 106.
SCM
Rev. Jack Shaver discusses questions of theology and
belief, today, noon, Bu. 2202.
MATH CLUB
SCM
Dr. Westwick discusses P-
adic  numbers,   today,   noon.
Ma. 204.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Fr. A. Zsigmond discusses
Law or Spirit: The future of
the Church, today, noon,
Bu. 102. Discussion Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Newman
STRAVINSKY  CONCERT
The octet for wind instru-
How Does Your
Voice
Sound To Others?
Is it too harsh, or too high-
pitched? Does it give warmth
and assurance to help you make
the right impression? How can
you be sure whether your voice
repels or attracts? March
Reader's Digest reveals 5 ways
experts say everyone can improve his or her voice. Learn
how to overcome slurred speech,
and improve a voice that's
shrill, weak, grating or brassy
in "Put Your Best Voice For-,
ward"—get your copy of March
Reader's Digest, today!
SALE
RUSHANT'S
CAMERAS
4538> W. 10th Ave.
MOVIE PROJECTORS   mfg. list   SALE
Fuji-cope SMI
Single 8 Sound       369.50    249.50
Fujica M2 Single
Super  8 149.50     99.50
Kodak M80 Dual 8     249.50    189.50
Kodak M65 Dual 8     129.50      89.50
PHONE FOR SALE SHEET
224-5858 224-9112
ments,    Wednesday,     noon,
Bu. 106.
UBYSSEY
Be part of the voice of
your campus — work for
The Ubyssey. See us anytime in north Brock basement.
PHOTO SALON
Information on the annual
salon   of  photography available   all   this   week,   Brock
ext. 163.
VIETNAM  COMMITTEE
Professor    Willmott     discusses Elections, B u d d i s t
and    Government;    Wednesday,  noon,  Bu.  102.
BRIDGE  CHESS  CLUB
Meeting   Wednesday,   7:30
p.m., Brock TV lounge.
ONTOLOGY
Michael Cecil discusses
Science and Spirit are One,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
PRE MED
Lecture on who should be
admitted to med school,
Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
PRE  LIBRARIANSHIP
No meeting Wednesday.
Those who wish to tour the
on campus government agri
culture     research     library,
meet   Thursday,   noon,   Bu.
225.
CHORAL SOC
Concert   in   three   weeks.
Prectice    Wednesday,    5:45,
Bu.  106.
SCM
Information  on Inter city
summer   service   project
available   Wednesday,   noon,
Brock ext.  350.
GRAD CLASS
General    meeting    Thursday, nono, Ang.  110.
AAC-SCM
Lawyer Doug Sanders
discusses the draft dodgers
issue, Thursday, noon, Ang.
104.
WHEN THE NIGHT BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER IIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE   SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the  Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
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SPECIAL
U.B.C.   STUDENT  DISCOUNT
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ITALIAN PARADISE
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THIS   WEEK   ONLY
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
Don Crawford
Verve Recording Star Accompanied by
Kaye Dunham
"Blues Oriented, Folk Rooted,  Electric
Sound"
RED CHIEF  ELECTED
Engineers are keen.
More than 70 per cent of the redmen turned out to
elect Lynn Spraggs, civils 3, next year's EUS president.
Spraggs promised to send a separate representative to
AMS meetings, which he considers unimportant.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
BROWN SUEDE COAT, FULL
length, taken from outside BiSc.
3001.  Phone Kathy,  922-7991.
PROF. ARTHUR LINK LOST
wallet. Reward, return valuable
papers.	
DESPERATELY NEEDED. PHI-
losphy 100 notes taken from Fine
Arts library Wednesday. Return
to  lost  and  found.
FOUND MEN'S GLASSES, DARK
rims. "C" Minor Thurs. A.M.
Contact 876-3211, loc. 3123 "Joy",
eves.
LOST MAN'S WATCH IN L.M.R.
common block. Sentimental value.
$20 rewjard. Contact Vic, 224-9820,
Room 22.
Coming Dances
12A
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
SCIENCE ELECTIONS. ALL Positions open. Nominations close
March 1st at 4 p.m. Elections
March  8th.
WATCH THE FAST FLYING PUCK
at the Steel Cup hockey game,
SFU vs UBC-P.E. Tues., Feb. 28,
T'Bird ice arena, 5:45. Dance 8-12.
Brock to Bremen Town Musicians
all  for  75c.
THE CAMPUS SHOPPE (in the
Vlliage) 5732 University Blvd.
228-8110 announces new store
hours. Tues. to Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30
p.m., closing Mondays, commencing March 6th. Sale continues on
dresses, skirts, sweaters, etc. We
carry top brand names, "Dalkeith", "Panther Pants", "Shirt
Tales", "Shamrock", "Kayser",
etc.
ESCORTS UNLIMITED: OUR
unique service can provide a perfectly trained gentleman for any
and all social functions. Further
information,   1157   Steveston   Hwy.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — 3121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other jewelry,   $1   up.
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEET-
ing Thursday, March 2. Angus
110,  12:30 p.m.	
UBC OPEN SQUASH TOURNA-
ment, March 6-12; enter at AMS
Office  by March  3.
OPEN HOUSE PAINT-IN, MARCH
4. All materials supplied, interested? Bring a friend. Sign up today
in   Brock   106.
DON'T MISS EL CIRCULO'S
presentation of Le Cueva De Salamanca, March 3rd, 7:30 p.m.,
March 4th, 2:30, 7:30,Buchanan
106.
Travel Opportunities
16
EXPO CHARTER IS ON AGAIN
May 6-14. Price $215 Includes accommodation and Expo pass.
People from outside UBC can
now participate. We will definitely be signing people up at a
meeting to be held in BU. 104 at
12:40 on Friday, March 1. For information phone 224-6734 or 224-
3317.
AUTOMOTIVE  & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1953 CHEV. SEDAN. CITY TESTED. Good condition, $100. AM 6-
0732.        	
'53 CHEV. BELAIR. SOUND CON-
dition. City tested. Best offer.
987-1319.   '67   plates.
1962     SPRITE     MARK    II,    $995.00.
261-5042;
FOR SALE — '64 MGB, EXCEL-
lent condition, low mileage, radio,
682-5786.
B6 CHEV. IMPALA S.S., P.S. &
P.B., 327 h.p. 3700 miles. 731-1020,
after   5:00.
1956     M.G.A.     GOOD     CONDITION,
runs   well,   custom   radio.   RE.   1-
7084.
TR3   '62.   HARD  AND   SOFT TOPS.
731-0161,   evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
DESIRING TO MAKE MONEY—
Musicians, singers entertainers,
groups. Phone 688-3012. Have a
resume  &  photo  if possible.	
If your life is to dull,
And  no  fun  atol,
A   haircut   will   probably  right   it.
Then   go  out   prepared   to   fight   it.
CAMPUS   BARBER   SHOP
EXPO   CHARTER   IS   ON   AGAIN.
See   Travel  Opportunities.
Scandals
39-A
MUFFLERS, VALVES, TUNE-UPS,
overhauls, transmissions, and
electrical work. We do it all in
our own specially equipped Volkswagen hospital. 263-8121, Auto
Henneken,   8914  Oak at Marine.
MIAMI DIKKS (N.C.P.O.): YOU
promised to show me Vancouver's
"gay" life at the Castle. Lt. B.
A.  Grant.
I'M NOT PREJUDICED—I'LL FIX
any year Volkswagen! Signed —
"Hans" from Auto Henneken —
Oak   &   Marine,   263-8121.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4630
TYPING — 25c Single Page; legible
handwriting.    Call   after   10   a.m.
738-6829.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
ESSAYS,   THESES   EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone  733-7819.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays, theses etc. at home.
581-8660.
FAST,      ACCURATE     TYPIST     —
Electric.   224-6129.
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurateily typed on I.B.M. Selectric. Phone 325-0368 after 5:30
p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
102nd CUB PACK DESPERATELY
need an assistant cub master.
Contact Mr. Stan Stewart 224-
3782  or  Mrs.   Harris   224-7555.
Music
63
FENDER BASSMAN AMP. STU-
dent can't maintain payments.
Excellent condition. Only $395 ow-
ing.  Phone Pete 224-5958 (eves).
INSTRUCTOR WANTED IN POPU-
lar piano—two hrs. a week In my
home,   call   263-3466.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAH
subjects by excellent tutors: Sci-
ences and arts. 736-6923.	
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Mini-
mum 5 lessons. 876-1859.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923/
Instruction Wanted
66
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle  Drive-in
at Rear of Store
ITS SPRING! FOR SALE: GOLF
clubs and bag. Good clubs, excellent condition. Phone 736-0669
evenings.	
STEREO COMPONENTS AS NEW,
1 yr. old Electra 30 watt amp.
$70, 2 speakers (walnut bookcase)
$60 pr. HE. 5-6727.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ONE SLEEPING ROOM FOR SEN-
ior male student. Private entce.
Shower. Light housekeeping facil-
ities,   $50  mth.   CA 8-8814.	
RENT ROOM OR SHARE APART -
ment, UBC vicinity, with teacher.
Phone   733-3983.
ROOM. PVT. BATH—ENTRANCE;
kitchen; neaj; gates. Available
now.   224-6857.
LARGE ROOM FOR TWO ONLY.
5 min. walk from library. Phone
224-7030.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th. Phone
224-4866.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
TWO GIRLS TO SHARE FULLY
furnished and equipped modern
two bdrm. apt. Located 70th at
Oak. Available May 1st. Contact
Brenda   327-7541.   After   5:00   p.m.
GIRL    TO    SHARE    APT.     NEAR
Dunbar   and   16th.   $30,   224-4829.

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