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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 4, 1983

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 Board sends gears back to senate
By ROBERT BEYNON
The UBC board of governors
voted Thursday by a three to one
margin to refer a four year
engineering program back to
senate.
Board member Alan Crawford
and chancellor J. V. Clyne
engineered the referral, expressing
concern about the program's
academic quality.
"Our job is to turn out leaders in
whatever profession," Crawford
said. "I'm not interested in
generating sheep."
Board members questioned the
program's accessibility, expense,
lack of an entrance examination,
academic breadth, quality, and
businesses' demand for the program's graduates.
The program was  first turned
down by senate in January. After
revisions were made, senate accepted the program in late
February. The majority of student
senate members opposed it.
The board's veto of a senate decision on academic grounds is rare,
since it generally deals only with
monetary matters. The board last
overruled senate in October 1981,
when engineering enrolment restric-
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 41
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, March 4,1983 ^^ITs     228-2301 J
tions were proposed. The board
subsequently passed the restrictions.
"If the board has academic questions they should refer the program
to senate with the problems," administration president Doug Kenny
said.
Kenny said the arguments made
by the board had been discussed by
the senate and the faculty, and the
program should thus be approved.
Board members Joy McCusker
and Gerald Hobbs said an entrance
exam should be required for the
new program.
"We are denying people the opportunity to study first year science
with this program," student
representative Margaret Copping
said. Both she and fellow representative Dave Frank voted for the
program's return to senate.
"If we can meet accreditation
standards, UBC standards and professional engineering standards, we
should be able to proceed with
assurance," said faculty representative Peter Pearse.
Both Pearse and applied science
dean Martin Wedepohl said the
proposed program is adequate.
Student senator Lisa Hebert
welcomed the decision, but added,
"It wasn't good practice for the
board to reject the program on
grounds that are outside their terms
of reference."
Student board representative
Dave Frank was appointed chair of
a committee to investigate making
non-academic facilities available to
the public, possibly for profit, after
he recommended the idea.
"I think we have a potential
source of a large amount of
revenue," Frand said.
Frank said Wednesday the Alma
Mater Society makes more renting
SUB, than does the university renting out everything else on campus.
Student board representative
Margaret Copping said the idea
would be great for the university's
public image.
The board also agreed Kenny
should continue to press the provincial government for one million
dollars to continue the industrial
education teachers training program.
The program is the only one of its
kind in B.C. and will cease to exist
without the funds, Kenny said.
< Committee will
fight harassment
— imH luconto photo
ELECTION FEVER hits campus and candidates are off and running, some creating a blur that would put PC's to
shame. Joe was rumored to have been close behind this runner in Thursday's triathalon, but photog couldn't
catch 'im. Event involved swimming, running, cycling and backstabbing. A lot.
Grads emBoyled in controversy
By PETER BERLIN
The elections for the five grad
student council executive positions
should finish today. But they
won't.
An Arduous grad council
meeting Thursday night resulted in
the resignation of returning officer
Sean Boyle and the nullification of
two races.
The two elections, for president
and secretary, will be contested in
by-elections at a later date.
But secretarial candidates Jan
Mennell and John Davies announced they would not run in
another election.
The elections were made void
because it was discovered signatures
on the nomination forms for Mennell and presidential candidate
Robert Gordon had been faked by
former president Godwin Eni.
Boyle told council he had known
Mennell's signature was not genuine before the election had
started because she had told him.
Boyle said he did not bring the
matter to council's attention
because he had no written evidence.
Boyle urged that Mennell and Gordon be disqualified and Davies and
presidential candidate Don Holu-
bitsky be returned by acclamation.
Holubitsky said if he were elected
by acclamation he would resign and
force a by-election.
Minnell said she had been ill in
r n
Bookkeeping solution
Collecting overdue fines for library books could be the answer to
UBC's funding problems.
As of Feb. 4, $275,374 was owed to UBC libraries in overdue book
fines. Faculty and staff account for only $70,528 of the total with the
remainder owed by students.
Library circulation worker Mary Banham said most of the large
fines have been accounted for, but some still exist.
"We have on the book from the past some fairly large fines," she
said.
Libraries stopped renewing student cards in September for people
with fines outstanding, she said.
"I think (not renewing student cards) will be pretty effective from
now on. The effect will be felt," she said.
One of the highest student fines is $1,652, while one faculty
member has fines totalling $890.
Other than denying a student card to delinquent borrowers,
nothing more is being done about outstanding fines, Banham said.
Graduates or faculty who leave can get away without paying fines,
she said.
But Banham added, "In most cases the books come back."
bed on the day nominations closed
and that she had believed Eni was
entitled to sign the form for her.
Davies said it was clear, "The
true candidates are not the people
whose names were signed, by Godwin Eni." Eni resigned as president at council's request in
February.
When his motion was rejected,
Boyle resigned as returning officer.
He said the elections were now a
travesty and he could no longer act
as returning officer.
This week's elections are the first
since the Grad Student centre
became autonomous from UBC's
administration. It is the first time
those elected will exercise real control over the association's affairs
for a year.
The elections for vice president,
finance director and house director
finished today. Several candidates
privately said a 150 voter turn-out
from a membership of more than
4,000 would be "excellent."
Gel yours today
Yes folks! Student council got
theirs on Wednesday night. And
now we want you to get yours — a
chance to meet The Ubyssey staff in
person and let out your frustrations
or accolades.
The Ubyssey wants you to tip a
libation with us. We want to toast
your health. And yes, the
refreshments are on us.
We want to say we're serving beer
but it's not allowed. However,
amber liquids will flow noon today
in SUB 241k.
By PATTI FLATHER
"If I said something against him
now he could fail me."
The woman student knew she
would have to tolerate her professor's advances until the term
ended. Everytime she enters his office she faces sexist comments.
UBC currently does not have an
effective process for dealing with
sexual harrassment, but next week a
committee will be formed to investigate creation of a specific body
for the problem, Neil Risebrough,
vice-provost for student affairs said
Thursday.
The committee will have about
eight members and will be designed
to be representative of the community, he said. It will examine the
policies of other universities which
already have channels to deal with
sexual harrassment.
The committee will make recommendations to administration president Doug Kenny or vice-president
academic Michael Shaw, he said.
Risebrough said his goal is to
create a system where complaints
can be laid in both informal and
formal manners.
Complaints are currently dealt
with by the women's students office
and the Alma Mater Society ombudsoffice. Counselling is offered
by the WSO and the information is
kept private. But taking action
against the offender is difficult, said
Risebrough.
The women's students office has
long been working for a better
system and crisis counsellor Nancy
Horsman said the office "hopes to
be among the first represented if a
task force committee is set up."
The ombudsoffice also does its
best with complaints, writing to
discuss sexual harrassment at
meetings. Ombudsperson Gray
McMullen said this is not enough
and "the problems that come up are
not large in number but they are
serious."
UBC will be one of the last
universities in North America to
develop specific channels for sexual
harrassment complaints. Most
work at other universities has been
done in the past five years,
Risebrough said.
A historical day
By LISA MORRY
March 8, 1857. The first protest
march by women in New York
marks the beginning of the
women's liberation movement. In
March 1908, the bread and roses
protest takes place — bread for
economic security and roses for a
better life.
More than 70 years haven't
changed the quest for women's
equality.
The theme for March 8's International Women's Day (IWD), which
commemorates this struggle, is:
Hard Times Won't Stop Us.
According to a local IWD committee, the theme "relates to
massive unemployment, the six and
five axe, poverty, racism, and increased violence against women and
many more issues concerning the
women of Canada."
This year, many groups in and
around Vancouver have planned
rallies and celebrations to mark the
event.
On Saturday, March 5 there will
be a march starting at 11 a.m. at
Victory Square on Hastings and ending at Robson Square. Other
events are planned. There will be
consciousness raising workshops,
for example; there will be a porn
workshop at which the National
Film Board documentary Not a
Love Story will be shown.
Other workshop topics are peace,
racism, international struggles,
mothering, sexuality, and younger
and older women.
Two dances will be held — a mixed dance on March 5 featuring Jun-
co Run and Animal Slaves. Admission for this event will be $4 for
women and $4.59 for men. An all
women's dance will take place
March 8, with the Leftover Lepers.
Admission is $3 or one hour's
wages.
Daycare will be available for all
events. For more information call
253-5304. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 4, 1983
Vancouver
after Classes..
It's happening
at McTACO's
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March 2 thru March 9
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March 10 thru March 16
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This coupon is good fore one order of
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March 17 thru March 31
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Pen program in penniless plight
VICTORIA (CUP) — University
students often have trouble finding
time to study. At William Head,
they have nothing but time.
But even there, at one of four
penitentiaries where the University
of Victoria offers university-level
humanities courses, time is running
out. Solicitor-general Robert
Kaplan plans to terminate post-
secondary education in Canada's
federal penitentiaries this summer.
UVic officials first learned of the
plan in January, and once the news
reached the prisons, response was
swift.
"It was like a kick in the
privates," said history major Kevin
Lockhart. "Anyone who has been
in prison a long time is conditioned
to live in a restricted environment.
You suffer from culture shock. You
are told what to do all the time.
"The university program helps
you get over this and gives you
social skills to operate in society.
This is one of the most important
aspects of the program. This program is the light at the end of the
tunnel."
The 53 student prisoners at
William Head started a petition to
protest the cut, and in its first day
of circulation 128 prisoners signed
it.
About 150 prisoners are held at
— noil luconto photo
"WHAT AN INTERESTING sight," say self-proclaimed UBC 3 after nuking bookstore and Archie comic
books. "Nirvana exists in Sedgewick library (also off-camera)," they added. "Why else wold we look off the
page?"
Arts students head back to polls
A tie vote for the fourth arts position on student council means its
back to the polls for 5,000 arts
students.
Candidates Gordon Comer and
Miriam Sobrino each received 36
votes in Wednesday's elections.
Returning officer Renee Comesotti is recommending the entire
election be redone but no decision
has been made.
Meanwhile1 Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer Lisa Hebert
also urged for a re-election Thursday.
"The election wasn't very
democratic because people weren't
made aware of the election,"
Hebert said.
The arts undergraduate society
didn't follow standard procedures
charged Hebert. She said an all candidates meeting wasn't held, advertising was insufficient and candidates were not informed of election procedures and regulations.
But Comesotti said Hebert's
complaints were not .grounds for
rerunning the election..
"Requests for re-election came
about because of the tie and not
because of the complaint.
"Although the AUS did not
follow standard procedures, we did
Making left more right
Leftist forces in El Salvador will
not run candidates in elections next
year because they will be killed, a
student leader from El Salvador
said Wednesday.
The rightist parties want to exterminate the left Armando Parades
told 30 people in SUB 212.
"They will offer amnesty for all
guerrillas who lay down their
weapons and run for election, but
they'll kill anyone who does in just
a minute," Parades said.
He said instead of fielding candidates negotiation would occur
with support from Mexico, France,
and Venezuala.
But some members of the audience objected to not running candidates.
"You've got to run a candidate
even though he will be martyred so
the world will see the wrong.
You've got to play the game," said
one woman.
But   another  woman   said  the
rights of the El Salvadoran people
should be supported instead of
"playing the game."
Parades said the guerrilla forces
could win the war if the war was
allowed to run its course, but he
fears Reagan's newly proposd arms
shipments will prolong the war.
"We don't want the war. We
want to start negotiations," he said.
He added that the Pope's upcoming trip to El Salvador is a major
concern. "We want the Pope to
listen to the people, not just the
hierarchy," Parades said.
The Pope will carry a lot of influence because 90 per cent of El
Salvador's population is Roman
Catholic, he said.
Canadian students should support the El Salvadoran people with
public demonstrations, money, and
by writing letters, said Parades.
"If you demonstrate you will be
one of many groups all across
Canada," he said.
conduct the election with in the
guidelines of the AMS code and
bylaws," Comesotti said.
"It is true that the all candidates
meeting was common procedure
and it's too bad it wasn't done. The
entire arts society and I were just
too busy," Comesotti said.
.Although no decision has been
made on whether the two tied candidates will go to a revote or all five,
nominations reopened Thursday
for the March 16 contest.
Nominations close March 13.
An   all   candidates   meeting   is
scheduled for March 14.
Eva Busza topped the poll with
62 votes followed by Marina
Dimitracopoulos with 41 and Barbara Irwin with 37.
Arts students with similarly low
vote totals also elected Karim Gang-
ji, president, John Conti vice president, Larry Ostensoe, treasurer,
and Peter Mustapich social coordinator.
All executive candidates ran on
yes/no ballots.
the low-medium security prison,
and all have a minimum two-year
sentence.
"There is no other program like
it in the world," said UVic
sociology professor Phil Bartle. "It
exposes inmates to ideas; it doesn't
simply educate criminals. It provides a feeling of identity; a light in
a depressing situation."
This "light" is evident in the success of the program. Most people
who stick to their programs usually
pass. Not only that, they usually
don't come back to prison. About
55 per cent of those released from
prison eventually return, but the
rate is only 14 per cent for those
who take university courses.
But Kaplan insists the federal
government can no longer afford
the cost of educating prisoners.
Despite the success of the university
program, and the costs saved by
having fewer inmates return to
prison, Kaplan told the House of
Commons Jan. 24 "my decision is a
final one."
But continued public pressure
from students, educators, opposition leaders and prison officials has
forced Kaplan to reassess his decision.
"It (education in prison) sparked
a complete turnaround in terms of
my attitude towards myself and my
life. I came to realize there are some
alternatives I hadn't thought of
before," said one student.
"I plan to go into social work. I
hope to work with juvenile delinquents, I've seen the system, the
self-perpetuating merry-go-round.
We've got some 17-year-old kids in
here. My God — you're just starting to get ideas at 17."
Other prisoners agreed education
has changed their outlook on life.
Said one inmate: "I've been in
before. When I got out, all I had
was hate, and I ended up back in.
But now it's different. I look at
myself and am starting to like what
I see."
Judge denies
bail for five
Five people facing conspiracy,
sabotage and theft charges were
denied bail in provincial court Tuesday.
Judge Darcy McGee refused bail
application in a five minute judgement after adjourning for 40
minutes. Defence lawyers had
outlined their arguments for bail in
a two and a half hour summation.
The five defendants — Ann
Hansen, 29, Brent Taylor, 26,
Douglas Stewart, 25, Gerry Hannah, 26, and Julie Belmas, 21 —
were remanded to March 9, when a
date for a preliminary hearing will
be set.
Court officials estimate the
preliminary hearing could take
three to five months if all the
Crown's evidence is ruled ad-
missable.
Defence lawyer Stan Guenther
said after the bail hearing the
defence may appeal McGee's judgement to the B.C. supreme court.
Tuesday's hearing was held
before a packed courtroom of
about 100 supporters and media.
When the hearing was adjourned
defendant Taylor yelled out, "No
more of this bullshit like today.
We're proud we don't have to say
this shit anymore!" The crowd of
supporters shouted back, "We love
you," as the five defendants were
taken from the courtroom.
The "Vancouver five", as the
defendants have been christened by
various media, face 16 charges
relating to the bombing of two Red
Hot video stores and a B.C. Hydro
substation, conspiring to blow up
an icebreaker and sabotage a Canadian Armed Forces base, auto theft,
possession of restricted weapons
and robbery.
Hansen, Taylor and Stewart are
also charged with robbing a Vancouver IGA store in February.
Demonstrations in support of the
accused and against the media's
handling of the case took place in
Toronto, Montreal and Calgary,
following last week's rally in Vancouver.
Support groups for the accused
have formed in Montreal and
Toronto.
And about 25 people wearing
scarves and carrying signs
demonstrated outside CBC headquarters in Toronto Tuesday to
protest media coverage of the case.
"CBC has been one of the worst
violators," said Brian Burch. He
called the TV coverage "biased and
sensational."
A group calling itself the Montreal Citizens for Survival was
formed last month in reaction to
media reports on the arrest of the
five, which were "biased, irresponsible and fixated on cheap sensationalism and violence."
The group will defend the "rights
of anyone with dissenting politics to
engage in their political beliefs
without harassment from the
state," said the founder.
The group organized a
demonstration Feb. 21 against the
Montreal Gazette for its coverage
of the arrests. About 100 people
joined the demonstration.
Ooops!
Don't soy '#___ off'
WATERLOO (CUP)—Students at Sir Wilfred Laurier University
have to watch their language around computers or they risk losing
access.
The university computer department has programmed several
computers to ring a bell repeatedly in anyone enters swear words
listed as prohibited. The computer then locks the student's file until
that student explains to the dean why he or she swore at a computer.
One student was cut off for using prohibited words while accessing
the faculty's social work general account. This also froze the files of
80 other people using that account.
Dr. Bezner, the head of the computing centre, said every society
has "taboo words," and ours has very few. But when someone
crosses the threshhold and uses these words, violence could ensue,
Bezner said.
The Ubyssey should clean up its
act.
The paper, operating in a total
vacuum, erroneously reported
(Summer Cleaning, March 1), that
average earnings for students hired
by Electrolux was $1,007 last summer. That figure is the average per
month.
In addition, participants in the
program earn up to $3,000 in
scholarships, not bonuses, based on
their performance. Bonuses start at
$250 on the sixth sale and another
bonus of $500 is offered on the sixteenth sale.
The article also neglected to state
the company's reason for not using
their name on the poster, which is
to contact people who otherwise
would not consider direct sales
jobs.
The reporter and copy editor
responsible for the act have been
assigned to vacuum the B.C. Place
stadium for the royal visit. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 4, 1983
Letters
Carving a niche
The Ubyssey received a letter Monday in reference to one of our articles
in Friday's Native Rights issue. The author said he had been touched by it
and The Ubyssey should concentrate more on such material, and less on
politics.
The reaction seemed odd. The article, about a native Indian carver who
produced mostly commercial art rather than art faithful to his Salish
culture, was essentially political.
The problem is how the letter writer defined politics. Politics is not merely a profession for egomaniacs or how you vote (if you vote).
Politics is how people behave and interact. Politics influences decisions
about who sits where at the dinner table, and who lives and dies where in
this world.
Two individuals having sex is political. They can be married, lovers of
strangers. The initiative can be either partner's.The act can be by consensus, accident, or force. It can be dominant for one partner, submissive for
another; it can involve the missionary position or a free for all democratic
trapeze.
Politics is everywhere. J-walking is anarchy. Sharing your peanut butter
sandwich with someone who's broke is rank socialism. Spray painting is
pure subversion (and an eyesore). Shaking hands with an unmarried
woman, well, that unravels the very fabric of our society.
As for reading Ubyssey editorials . . .
Amnesty gets iibeP apology      Letters
James Wetherill has apologized
to me for his libelous comments
about Amnesty International in a
letter to The Ubyssey, Amnesty not
enough (March 2), and has agreed
to write another letter expressing
this. The apology has been accepted, but for the clarification of
your readers, let me briefly outline
the situation.
In his letter Wetherill appears to
state either that AI-UBC obtained,
or agreed to publicize, the presentation American Pictures last month.
He blames poor attendance on our
lack of effort. In fact American
Pictures was neither presented nor
publicized by Amnesty International.
Those responsible for the presentation approached our group for
help shortly beforehand, and were
told that our policy, laid down by
the international secretariat in
London, England, is never to endorse or aid a presentation of non-
AI material (unless an exception is
granted by the national executive).
As such we had no choice but to
decline. We did mention however
that individual members could certainly help in a private capacity
should they so desire (I believe some
in fact did). Nevertheless no official
support could be or was given by
Amnesty International.
While this policy may seem
harsh, there are important reasons
for it. Amnesty International must
never be seen to be partial to any
political or religious ideology.
Because we work for the unjustly
imprisoned who are often considered enemies of the state, it is
sometimes assumed we hold their
views. In the Soviet Union we have
been called "instruments of
capitalist imperialism"; in Brazil
"communist subversives." In fact,
of course, we are neither.
We simply work for the unconditional release of men, women, or
children imprisoned anywhere for
their beliefs, ethnic origin, colour,
or sex, provided they have never used or advocated violence. None of
these people deserve to be in prison.
This impartiality is the key to our
effectiveness. The organization has
become the foremost source of
human rights information, acclaimed for its integrity worldwide. The
1977  Nobel  Peace Prize and the
1978 UN Human Rights Prize are
tokens of this esteem.
Another unfortunate insinuation
in Wetherill's letter is that our
group prefers talking to action.
Nothing could be further from the
truth. Much of our work entails
writing letters to governments
which hold prisoners of conscience,
and one has only to look at our
postage bill to see how much we do
here.
Further information on Amnesty
International is available from AI-
UBC Box 24 SUB, or by dropping
into our office SUB 230D weekdays
at noon. I would urge readers to do
this first, before writing embarrassing letters to the editor.
Stephen Fetter
president
Amnesty International UBC
Luitjens reaction
The recent character assassination of botany lecturer Jacob Luitjens, perpetuated by the Dutch
government with the invaluable aid
of the Canadian media, is the
greatest injustice I have ever
witnessed. I have been fortunate
enough to work closely with Luitjens and I can honestly say he is a
man of high moral character.
Of the many lecturers I have encountered during the ten years I
have been a student here, Luitjens
Winnebago for George
According to UBC board of governors member David McLean,
president-elect George Pedersen needs a house refurbished with
$500,000 that the university couldn't put to better use in order to
establish better links with the community and students.
If McLean and the board are really concerned about a better link
between UBC and the real world I have a much more effective proposal.
I suggest UBC simply purchase George a large Winnebago motor
home and have him live in several campus locations throughout the
year. In the summer and on various weekends he and his family
could drive it around the province.
What finer way could there be to establish better links than by having our president camped out B lot, the faculty club parking lot or
even MacMillan Bloedels' executive car park? And as well as saving
literally hundreds of thousands of dollars, which could go into student job programs, bursaries, lab equipment, etc. the board could
turn over the vacant presidential palace for emergency student housing.
The UBC flag would be flown all across the province as the president visited Spuzzum and other localities, explaining that UBC really
isn't an elitist institution that wastes great sums of money on needless
frills in times of economic hardship.
Instead of being kicked around for the umpteeth time in the press,
UBC could be proud of its ingenuity and sound financial management for a change.
Since McLean also suggested that students help pay for the costs
of Pedersen's new accommodations I'm willing to donate generously. If the board will cancel their current plans and put George in the
Winnebago driver's seat instead, I'll gladly buy the first tankful of
gas. And I won't even stay for tea.
Bill Tieleman
graduate student
political science
stands out as one who truly cares
for his students. He always has time
for students. His thoughfulness
often goes beyond the call of duty.
He is a dedicated man of uncommon calibre. It is a dreadful shame
that our sensationally oriented
media has decided to sell
newspapers at the expense of Luitjens' character.
We live in an era when we are
constantly reminded of man's inhumanity to the Jews. The word
Nazi draws a pushbutton response,
and the mere accusation of being a
Nazi war criminal draws the
response we usually reserve for people convicted on the basis of firm
evidence.
We must realize that Luitjens was
tried in absentia and we must ask
ourselves what would our response
be to a trial in absentia? In what
civilized society are men convicted
without a chance of proving their
innocence? Surely this type of
kangaroo court ruling would lose its
significance were it not for its
association with the feeling of
revulsion that we have been conditioned to feel each time the word
Nazi is used.
The Dutch government's request
for Luitjens* extradition,
presumably to face sentencing since
he has already been convicted in
absentia, must be denied. He has
made an invaluable contribution to
this university over the years and
must be recognised and commended
for it.
Rabbi Danial Siegel's comment
that Luitjens should be extradited is
vindictive and should be recognised
as such. After the recent massacre
in Lebanon of homeless Palestinians by Jews, he should be the last
one to talk.
Ian Dube
grad studies 10
Violence questionable
An open letter to the spokesperson for rape relief quoted in Bail
Hearing Adjourned (Feb. 22).
You were quoted in The Ubyssey
as saying:
"We are a group of freedom
fighters. Many of us have done
limited property damage. It seems
to us the bombing of Red Hot
Video is in keeping with the suf-
fagrette tradition and had nothing
to do with terrorism."
I'm sure it is valid to say you
must see many terrible examples of
abuse against women during your
work with Rape Relief. Further, it
is probably also safe to say you hold
the belief — as many in our society
do — that pornography acts to exacerbate the problem of violence
against women and therefore steps
should be taken to remedy or
eradicate this problem.
With this I would agree with you
fully. Additionally I would agree
that Red Hot Video is not necessarily helping anyone solve the problem
of pornography. However, I must
seriously question your presumption that a small group of people
has the right to attempt to change
societal standards by violent means.
If one is to accept this belief,
one is to accept anarchy, the consequences of which are grave indeed.
What would our society be like if
we tacitly condoned vanguard actions against elements we found
distasteful to greater or lesser
degrees?
For instance, where would your
movement be if a faction radically
opposed to you bombed your place
of work and made open threats of
further attacks against you. Further, what if they decided you were
truly a barrier to their interpretation of what all of society really
believed — wouldn't it be more efficient to go a step further and
eliminate your movement
altogether.
Needless to say, the scenario can
be carried to truly terrifying ends. It
does not reach these ends in reality
however because the majority of us
have decided that social order must
be maintained.
Unfortunately, a social order
means that change takes time and
some injustice may prevail in the
short run. However, when faced
with the alternative this seems the
decided lesser of two evils.
As our society becomes more
violent it is clear we must all make a
greater effort to communicate rationally and seek change through
peaceful, democratic avenues.
John Dawe
commerce 4
Rude awakening
I am a resident of Place Vanier
residence who was shocked Tuesday
while waiting in line for dinner. On
the wall was a poster depicting a
man in uniform labelled as Sherwood Lett. Also on the poster in a
caption was a message with descriptions of the Hon. Sherwood Lett
and the residents who live in the
house named in his honor. Some of
the descriptions were rude and
distasteful.
Whoever was responsible for this
act of disrespect obviously has a lot
to learn. The Hon. Sherwood Lett
was a colonel in WW I, a brigadier
general in WW II, a hero at Dieppe,
represented Canada at the signing
of the Korean peace treaty, first
president of UBC's AMS,
chancellor of UBC, and chief
justice of the B.C. Supreme Court.
Referring to this man as the
founder of the Shit Licker Hotel
displayed a definite lack of
scruples. Unfortunately the person
or persons responsible did not
autograph their poor attempt at
caricature.
Dale Stran
concerned resident
THE UBYSSEY
March 4, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office in SUB 266. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising 228-3977.
The big day was coming, and KB, AH, BJ, and SS were anxious, but tried not to show it.
"We're cool," they sweated. Whom will PP call to arms, they wondered. JT and LM could
have cared less — and did. KGB and CW wondered about chances next year, as NL, RB, and
,SW waited in the ranks behind them - PF, WV, and RRx watched in amusement and told '
jokes about it. As MD realized, the subtext of anxiety was evident in everyone, but didn't see
it in herself (as usual). Surface tension broke when CB came in and announced the big news:
"It's an androgyny!" The fools, who thought they had finally gotten the word, relaxed and
forgot about ambition until next week. IU was coming up. Friday, March 4, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Redrum concert reveals duality
By PETER BERLIN
Feb. 23's concert at the Luv-a-
Fair exposed the current rock
scene's two main strands.
The support band was a local
favorite, Redrum. They played
clean, bright poppy music. They
wore short sleeved shirts and jeans
and had respectable haircuts. They
didn't leap around much on the
stage and didn't try to rouse the audience between songs.
The Bush Tetras were quite a different kettle of reptiles altogether.
The New York foursome looked
less than wholesome in appearance.
Their   drummer   had    recently
escaped from the skinhead-style
band Raybeats and looks like it; the
lead singer was dressed in gypsy
rags as she swayed trancelike.
But it was chiefly in the music
that the difference lies. The Bush
Tetras' sound is dense and murky.
Although the songs had clearly been
well rehearsed, they give the appearance of coalescing at the moment; they hold together for a while
then appear to disintegrate at the
end before another song forms out
of the swirling, chaotic wisps of
sound.
This hostile and brooding style is
not unique to the Tetras. They are
distinctive but there are other bands
doing the same sort of thing.
What Wednesday night's gig really showed though, was the extent to
which funk has become the greatest
influence on today's sounds.
Redrum was light and clean and the
Tetras dark and messy; both had
clearly been influenced by bands
like Earth, Wind and Fire. They
were heavily rhythmic and both
downplayed melody. In the case of
the Tetras they almost abolished it
entirely. But where Redrum has
taken the funk sound to the
suburbs, the Tetras have taken it, as
they themselves say, to the jungles.
And that's what made them so interesting.
Lords of Discipline is a big lie'
By ten Ubyssey staffers, only eight
of whom were masochistically able
to sit through this movie
Mythical Hollywood has once
again burdened us with a
neomilitaristic, racist film feature.
The Lords of Discipline follows in
the tradition of 198l's Taps, showing how American militaristic
policies are perpetuated.
The Lords of Discipline
Directed by Franc Roddam
Playing at Capitol Six
Taps dealt with a cadet takeover.
In The Lords of Discipline, the
takeover has already occurred; the
academy is run by a racist elite sect
simply called The Ten. It is the
Ten's aim to haze candidates who
do not fit into the academy's tradition. Those unwanted candidates
include blacks.
When the first young black man
admitted into the academy enters
the school, he is harrased and
tormented by the Ten.
It is the job of graduating cadet
Will (David Keith) to protect
Pearce, the new cadet. The Lords
of Discipline follow Will's initial
reluctance to help Pearce, and then
document his attempts to eradicate
the Ten.
Because characters are not
developed, the film never allows for
an emotional link with any of the
characters, including hero Will.
The cadets' trust in authority is
supposed to show American blind-
the   film   ends
a  basic   trust   in
up
the
ness, but
celebrating
system.
Will saves the day, and
everything turns out hunky-dory.
The ads for The Lords of Discipline
say "The Truth: It Was All a Lie".
Talk about truth in advertising: The
Lords of Discipline is a lie.
Nominations are now open for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
Application forms are available from Terry Jackson,
SUB 238.
Nominations will close Friday, March 4 at 4:30 p.m.
For information contact James Hollis.
Phone 228-3973 SUB 258
Nominations are now open for
vacant positions on the
Student Administrative
Commission (SAC)
Applications are available from the Admin. Assistant,
Terry Jackson, SUB 238.
Nominations close Friday, March 4, 1983 at 4:30 p.m.
For further information contact Alan Pinkney.
Phone 228-3961 SUB 254
>Mi/
INTRAMURAL
POSITIONS OPEN
FOR '83/84
Openings for:
—Associate Directors
— Directors
—Assistant Directors
— Sport Coordinators
in: Outdoor, Indoor, Leisure Sports, Finance, Publicity
and Recreation Instruction Program.
If you are interested sign up for an interview
Rm 203 WMG, March 7-11
Interviews take place March 14-18
COME AND GET INVOL VEDI
'jirffy
LOST and FOUND
If you have lost an item on campus this past term, check
with the Lost and Found Department located in BROCK
HALL, Room 208.
Hours of operation until March 31st, 1983:
MONDAYS  10:30a.m.-1:30 p.m.
TUESDAYS 11:30a.m. -1:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAYS   ... 10:30a.m.-1:30p.m.
THURSDAYS  11:30a.m.-3:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
and 2:30 p.m. -4:30 p.m.
LOST AND FOUND
TELEPHONE: 228-5751
CONTACTS • GLASSES                                       ^"^
SUNGLASSES •                                     ^    ^S^
SPORT EYEWEAR •                     <T$^>^
EXAMINATIONS •             ^C^L^tf0"
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SUB BLDG.
MAIN FLOOR
222-2251
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You Deserve The Difference
2053 W. 41St Ave. (Near Arbutus)
HH
263-0878
Closed Wednesday
Why do outstanding
systems programmers
work in Seattle, WA?
Microsoft
Microsoft   develops the leading edge in microcomputer
systems software Our BASIC is
world renowned. Our XENIX
OS, the microcomputer
adaptation of the UNIX v OS,
has computer companies
and others chomping at the
bit. We design state-of-the-art
system software.
We need programmers to
work on Operating Systems,
Compilers (FORTRAN, COBOL,
Pascal, BASIC, C). Word Processing, Data Base Management Systems, Graphics and
more.
Our OEM customer base is a
Who's Who of the hardware
business (IBM, Apple, Radio
Shack, Intel, Tektronix). As new
systems, like the IBM   Personal
Computerand new processors,
like the 6800CT are developed,
Microsoft's programmers get
their hands on the machines
before they go into production.
So your hardware suggestions
and software innovations
during R&D become part of
the computers of the future.
Microsoft provides the best
systems programming work
environment.
@
■ all the high-level hardware
(DEC   2060, two 11 70s,
and VAX   11 750 development systems) and the software development tools
you'll need, in a
■ small company with lots of
interaction and sharing of
ideas and methods where
■ you can develop your full
potential.
And, Microsoft is still in the
Great Pacific Northwest with
■ mountains, ocean, desert,
rain forest, rivers and lakes
all within easy reach.
■ major cultural, sports,
social, and commercial
activities in Seattle, just
fifteen minutes away
We are looking for outstanding
programmers—those with
intelligence, drive, and a
commitment to excellence.
We want programmers who
will advance The Standard in
microcomputer software.
Microsoft offers an exceptional
compensation and benefits
package
UNIX is a trademark of
Bell Laboratories
We will be interviewing on campus
Wednesday, March 9,1983. Please contact your
career placement office for schedule information
or send your resume to Chris Grimes, Dept. WZA.
BETTER TOOLS FOR MICROCOMPUTERS
MICROSOFT
MICROSOFT CORPORATION
10700 NORTHUP WAY
BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON 98004. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Yitouc
Tommy Dorsey Orchestra: Big Band. Mar.
5, Commodore. VTC/CBO outlets for tickets.
The Blasters: 7-piece rockabilly blues band
from LA, Mar. 10, 8:30 p.m.. Commodore
ballroom, VTC/CBO outlets.
Rhythm and Blues all-stars. Mar. 10-12,
Town Pump.
David Sereda. Geof Morgan, Charlie Murphy: new male awareness, March 6, Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 8 p.m., phone
254-9578. $8.
Sidney Harth: violin master, Koerner Recital
Hall, classes, sponsored by Vancouver
Academy of Music, 734-2301.
A Musical Evening with Ruth Nichol and
Leon Bibb: musical roots of two of Vancouver's finest, at Arts Club Revue theatre,
Granville Island. Wed.-Fri.: 8:30 p.m.; Sat.
6:30 and 9:30 p.m.; Tues. 2 for 1 at the door.
687-1644.
Romantic Comedy: by Burning Slugh (also
known as Bernard Slade), at Arts Club on
Granville Island. Mon.-Fri.: 8:30 p.m.. Sat.
6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday 2 for 1 at door
at 5:30 p.m. 687-1644.
Tempest: something found in a teacup, by
one Bill Shakespeare, an up and coming
playwright. Mon.-Sat.: 8p.m., Sat. Mat., at2
p.m. QE Theatre. Tickets VTC/CBO outlets.
Garage Sale: Everything's for sale, except
Morris Panych, who titters on the brink of
Last Call, by David King. At Vancouver East
Cultural centre, 1895 Venables. 8:30 p.m.
Mon. 2 for 1 at door. Sat. mat. at 2:30 p.m.
for only $3. Tickets also at VTC/CBO.
Clay: Breaks tomorrow Hast day); tragic comedy, panned by Bobby Beynon, smart-aleck;
by Lawrence Jeffrey, Firehall theatre, 8:30
p.m. 689-0926 for tickets.
Ticket-of-Leave-Man: Melodrama, by Tom
Taylor. At Freddy Wood, UBC, 8 p.m.,
228-2678 for reservations. Student discounts.
The Hollow: by Aggie Christie, promising
mystery writer, now trying her hand at plays.
We wish her luck. Vagabond playhouse,
Queen's Park, New West, 8 p.m., March 5-6,
9-12. 521-0412.
«
HoVl£6
Lunchtime Cultural Heritage series:
film/discussion dealing with "visible" ethnic
minorities in Canada, Downtown education
centre,-549HoweSt., 12to 1 p.m., Tuesdays,
March 8, 15, 22. 687-2677. Presentation Mar.
8: Whom am 17 Why Do They Call Me
Chinese? or East Indian?
Pacific Cinematheque: (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6119): Mar. 4: Long Day's Journey into
Night, 7:30 p.m. Mar.5: L'Amour Fou, 7:30
p.m. Mar. 9: Sacco and Vanzetti, 8 p.m.
Mar. 6: The Castle, 8 p.m. Mar. 7: Moliere,
Mar. 10: Lady in the Lake. 7:30 and 9:30
p.m.
At Robson Square cinema: 7:30 p.m.
March 9: Seven Beauties, 7 p.m., March
10/11: The Householder, 7:30 p.m.,
Shakespeare Wallah, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455): March 4-6: Forbidden
Planet, 7:30 p.m.; 2001: A Space Odyssey,
9:20 p.m., March 7-8: Teas, 7:30 p.m., March
9-10: Amarcord. 7:30; Juliet of the Spirits,
9:45.
Savoy (2321 Main at 7th, 872-2124): Mar. 4-6:
Personal Best, 7:30 p.m.; Body Heat, 9:45
p.m., Mar. 7-8: The Last Remake of Beau
Geste, 7:30, Young Frankenstein, 9:10.
Mar, 9-10: The Warriors, 7:30 p.m., The
Wanderers, 9:15 p.m.
SUBfilms (SUB auditorium): To Mar. 6:
Bambi. 7 p.m.; Robin Hood, 9:30. This is
not a 2 for 1. $1.50 per film. A rip-off.
Cinema 16 (SUB auditorium): Mar. 7-8: The
Naked City, 7 p.m. The Postman Always
Rings Twice. 8:50 p.m. Membership required ($4, plus $1 for film in series).
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-5112):
The Saragossa Manuscript, 8 p.m. $5; $4
for students with valid AMS card. Mar. 7-8:
Siddhartha, 7:30 and 9:45 p.m. Mar. 9-10:
Philip Agee in person and On Company
Business, 7:30 p.m. Mar. 11-13: Rosie The
Riveter, 7:30 p.m.; Northern Lights, 8:45
p.m.; Union Maids. 10:30 p.m.
Neil Wedman: Pez Beach, fascinating explorations in the art of Polaroid, black and
white and montage photography, Artistic
Gallery, 555 Hamilton, 687-1345.
$&&&
Irish Tales: hear Vancouver story tellers tell
tales about the Blarney Stones, La Quena
Coffeehouse, 1111 Commercial, Mar. 6, 2-4
p.m.
Gene Roddenberry: the one, the only, but
not the lonely, creator and producer of Star
Friday, March 4, 1983
RODDENBERRY
father and mother to James, Spock
Trek will be in the War Memorial gym Mar. 6
to talk about his interstellar exploits. The
original pilot of Star Trek will also be shown.
Advance tickets are $5 with an AMS card, at
the AMS box office or a VTC/CBO outlet.
Time is 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. Call 687-4444 for
more info.
DOA/Los Poularo/Brainteasers: come see
the punk concert of the year in the SUB
ballroom March 11. DOA will be playing some
of the hippest tunes of their latest War On 45,
Joey Shithead is raring to go. Tickets AMS
box office.
TODAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
An exhibition of Chinese historical art and
culture: bronze, pottery, porcelain, enamel, carving, lacquerware, rubbings, calligraphy and
contemporary paintings, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Asian Centre auditorium.
SPEAKEASY
Student health information on skin problems,
noon. Speakeasy.
GRAD STUDENTS
Independent's party — election expenses
benefit, 7 p.m., 2252 Allison Road.
GRADUATE STUDwiTS^rfbCIETY
Executive offtcer^mons, 1983-84, 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., Graduate^ffudffl^Centre foyer.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Intisar Ei-Wazir, representative of General Union
of Palestinian Women, has come from Middle
east, and will speak on "The Palestinian Struggle
After Beirut, 1962," noon. Graduate Student
Centre ballroom.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Important meeting: elections will be held for the
1983-84 executive, noon, Angus 326.
POLITICAL SCIENCE/
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS GRAD CLASS
Complimentary tickets now available for grad
wine and cheese to be held March 18, PoliSci
dept. office.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Nominations open for executive elections to be
held Mar. 16. All positions open. Forms available
STAFF
MEETING
It's time once again to
spread the knowledge.
And that's done through
democracy, in case that
hasn't been quite apparent.
So all Ubyssey staffers:
Run, walk, or crawl to
SUB 241k on Sunday,
March 6, at 1:30 p.m.
Important topics relevant
to vile rag's survival will be
discussed.
Dinner: Food Services catering.
from   PSSA   noticeboard,   4th   floor   Buch.
D-block.
ANTI-CUTBACKS TEAM (ACT)
Meeting, noon, SUB 260.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
D.A.O. field trip, 3:30 and 5:30 p.m., Geophysics
and astronomy lobby.
UBC SKI CLUB
Elections,   general   meeting,   all   members
welcome, noon, SUB 205.
SONGFEST '83
An evening of song and dance presented by
UBC  fraternities  and  sororities,   all  proceeds
donated to the United Way, 8 p.m.. Queen
Elizabeth theatre.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation   hour,   come  and  practice  your
French, noon, Buch. tower 7th floor lounge.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Presentation and discussion on Lust and Longing: A look at Pornography with guests John
Cooper, religion professor and Margaret Mar-
quart, Anglican pastor.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Social, cheap drinks and good music, open to
all, 7 p.m., SUB 205.
General meeting, executive elections and other
business, noon, SUB 209.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Special lecture by Michael Pentz, vice-president
campaign for Nuclear Disarmament in Britain, on
the Cruise missile, noon, SUB auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Display on cultural artifacts, artifacts and clothes
from around the world, 8:30 a.m.-11 p.m.. International House room 400.
Lecture,   The   Phillipines,   noon.   International
House upper lounge.
ISRAEL WEEK
Lecture by Uri Souir, the information officer
from the Israeli Embassy in Ottawa on Israel and
the media, noon, Buch. A204.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Folk night, everyone welcome, come and enjoy
the entertainment, 9 p.m.. International House
upper lounge.
Film, Gallipoli, 7 p.m., International House upper
lounge.
SATURDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Sailing-ski-windsurfing club's "biggest dance of
the year" with "Panic" performing. Tickets $4, 8
p.m., SUB partyroom.
Annual broken centreboard regatta, open to all
levels. Refreshments available. 9 a.m., Jericho
Beach.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Westwood driving school — club members only.
$10 entry fee. 8 a.m., Westwood Track.
UBC CHESS CLUB
UBC chess championship, 5-round chess tournament, 9:30 a.m., Angus 417.
SKI CLUB/SAILING CLUB/WINDSURFING
CLUB
Dance, 8 p.m., SUB partyroom.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Food fair, entertainment and dance, 6:30 p.m..
International House upper lounge.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ultimate car rally, bring navigators, map,
flashlight and calculator. Members S2.75, non-
members S3.75, 5 p.m., outside SUB loop.
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY
March and rally, 11 a.m.. Victory Square to Robson square.
Mixed dance, 8 p.m.. Royal Canadian Legion,
737 E. 49.
SUNDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Novice series slalom #6, awards after event. 10
a.m., B-lot.
UBC CHESS CLUB
UBC chess championships continued, 10 a.m.,
Angus 417.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome, 9 a.m., between
SUB and aquatic centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game vs. South Y at 5 p.m. Meet at 4:15 p.m. at
UBC aquatic centre.
Practice, 10 p.m., aquatic centre.
MONDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, executive elections, open to all
members, noon, SUB 205.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting, nominations for elections
open, 7:30 p.m., SUB 213.
TUESDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Sailing film, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB plaza.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, slide show, discussion and
vote on constitution, noon, chem 150.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Coastguard, boating safety, with video and
discussion, noon, sailing club centre, SUB.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Visit by the Queen and Duke of England, 11:30
a.m.-1 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology and
Asian Centre.
THURSDAY
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE AND
THE KOERNER FOUNDATION
Lecture and discussion, noon. Brock 223.
UBC SAILING CLUB
American Cup entrant Canada 1, demonstration,
noon, sailing club centre, SUB.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Oriental bake sale, 11:30 p.m., SUB concourse.
ISMALI STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Discussion with Alwaiz Amlani on prophecies in
Cinans, noon, SUB 211.
THE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 — Coming Events
30 — Jobs
80 — Tutoring
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. MICHAEL PENTZ
Dean of Science
British Open University
A EUROPEAN SCIENTIST
LOOKS AT NUCLEAR
WEAPONS
LECTURE HALL 2, WOODWARD
BUILDING, SATURDAY, MAR 5
at 8:15 P.M.
THE KEG PRIME RIB
and BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:30 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
11 — For Sale — Private
78 HONDA HAWK. Must be seen. Low
mileage. Many extras. $1050 o.b.o.
734-5362.
15 — Found
FOUND: One ring in SUB. 224-0563 btwn. 6
and 7 p.m.
FOUND: One broach/pin at Wesbrook bus-
stop, Wednesday, March 2. Phone
926-2663.
20 — Housing
ONE BDRM., Ivg. kit. with cable, washer Er
dryer, fridge, stove, patio super view.
Brand new. $400/mo. avail. Apr. 1.
732-1745.
GREAT LOCATION: 3rd & Alma. Female to
share 2 bdrm. suite. Available Mar. 8. $200.
738-2542.
QUADRIPLEGIC seeks quiet NS student.
Free room exchange for help 3 eves. 9-11
p.m./wk. Call 733-8015, Judy.
ROOM & BOARD: On-Campus living convenience in the student residences. Beat
the commuting blues. Vacancies for men
and women. Apply at the Student Housing
Office, 2017 West Mall. The Ponderosa
Building. Call 228-2811.
25 — Instruction
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners Course or
Basic Coastal cruising. 30 ft. cruiser/racer.
Hands on experience. Registering NOW
Feb. Mar. Apr., classes. Don't be left on
the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after
7. Sailcraft Ltd.
SET YOUR OWN HOURSI People wanted
who would like to lose weight, feel great,
and make money too. Call: Gary 681-5659,
Roni 687-0199.
CRUISE SHIP JOBSI $14-28,000. Caribbean, Hawaii, World. Call for Guide, Directory, Newsletter. 916-722-1111. Ext.
BritishColumbia.
35 - Lost
LOST: Engagement ring lost between swimming pool and Gage. Rsjward. Melanie.
224-3122.
40 — Messages
ST. MARY'S Ukrainian Catholic Young
Adults Club. Monthly meetings. For more
information please call either 255-0841 or
433-8627.	
IAN OOSTINDIE, the mellow magic Magus:
Here's to cute curls; SBG's, Swiss Cheese,
3's, rockets and life far from the maddening
crowds. Happy 19th. Love an "HB".
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
TYPIST in Burnaby. Legal experience.
Available for all types of assignments.
$1/pg..525-0772.
FAST, ACCURATE typing. Pick-up. Essays
Er theses. Ruch, tables extra. $1.20/page.
Call Andrea, 227-9758.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing Service.
Student discounts. 4326 West 10th. Phone
222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS. PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates. 5670
Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES: Theses,
papers, etc —reasonable rates. Please inquire 732-3647.
50 — Rentals
65 — Scandals
COME INDULGE your Childhood Fantasiesl
Bring your sweetheart to see BAMBI and
ROBIN HOOD this week in SUB Theatre.
Showtimes are Thurs. through Sun. at 7:00
for BAMBI and Thurs. through Sun. at 9:30
for ROBIN HOOD.
70 — Services
FOR PROFESSIONAL SEWING, dress
making, alteration, etc. at reasonable
prices. Call btwn. 4-8 p.m. 224-0964.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone-in, 224-6518.
HOLDER OF PH.D. In Classics (Toronto)
will tutor in Latin. Donald Baronowski,
324-3382 (evenings).
85 — Typing	
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 on
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
RESUMES TYPED on Xerox 860 Word Pro-
cessor — Very professional looking —
980-5163 after 2 p.m.
TYPING: Fast, reliable service. Pick-up.
435-8976. Mrs. B. Munro, 5560 Tyne St.,
Vancouver, B.C. V5R 4L4.
TYPING. Almost-on-Campus. Fast and
and precise. $8.50 per hour. Also editing,
term paper tutorials, by M.F.A., phone
222-2589.
90- WANTED ^
FEMALE HAIR MODELS WANTED
224-7440 Friday, March 4,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Experimental film accessible
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
The self-proclaimed experimental
film Scissere opens with a strong 20
minute montage and never lets up.
The images of nature and the
almost subhuman chants that sound
like holy choruses begin the film
and signify life and beauty.
But as the images of lake water,
deep and hardly still, and lush tundra progress, violent bursts of deep
color, like blood, violate the
relatively realistic images and signal
a new kind of abstraction. Without
warning, the imposed bursts get into sync with sounds of heartbeats —
of the film's subject, Bruno Scissere
(Greg Krantz), a clinic patient.
Scissere
By Peter Mettler
Playing at Ridge Theatre
Saturday, March 5 only, at 11:30
p.m. $3.
Juxtaposed with the fluidity,
depth and life of the opening montage is Scissere's own langerous existence — depicted in slides and
freeze frames that emphasize struggle and conflict — as he ventures
outside the institution. He heads for
the city, where he fixes his attention
on three people who emerge at a
subway station in Toronto. They
are: a wife (Natalie Olanicle) with a
small child, a heroin addict (Sandy
MacFayden), and an entomologist
(Anthony Do wars). Moments from
their lives are intercut, giving the
impression that they're all related,
but the connection isn't revealed
until the end.
No plot summary can accurately
reflect Wettler's film because
Scissere makes the usual conceptions of plot and characterization
secondary to visual and aural film
technique. Experimental films in
general place great emphasis on
visuals to confirm a distinctive film
language that does not rely on the
written text.
Although there is something in-
strinsically banal about Wettler's
conception of a mental patient's
world — because it is largely a
world that is not restricted to mental patients — the exuberance of the
images, due largely to editing, cannot be overlooked. Wettler's film
attempts to establish that it is possible to make a feature-length experimental film.
SUMMER
NEW YORK • LONDON • PARIS
•FLORENCE* ROME
Unique study-travel programs offered for full university
credit: New York studio • The arts of England • The
arts of France • The art and architecture of Italy.
On campus in Toronto: Studio courses in Dance, Film,
Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts.
FALL GRADUATE
STUDIES
Master of Fine Arts degrees in Dance, Film, Music,
Theatre, and Visual Arts.
Includes: Film production, screenwriting, film studies •
Ensemble training program in acting, directing, design,
production/management, criticism/dramaturgy/
play-writing • Studio art programs in design, painting,
sculpture, photography, printmaking, drawing,
multidisciplinary art
For information on Fall undergraduate and graduate
programs, and Summer courses, contact:
Room 206BB, Faculty of Fine Arts, York University,
4700 Keele Street, Downsview (Toronto), Ontario,
Canada M3J 1P3      Telephone: (416) 667-3237
ACTIVE, YOUR
NUMBER ONE
CHOICE
\ \n
QUALITY
SERVICE
AVAILABILITY
JwTI
~*'1&^tteJXJQ4pht<&Jq'r fhfe* \   '    ^
'    widest variety of factory
T--' Wsri^eiecfrdrvrc eorrSponini,
-- -   -    -   -    -   /'   '    *    *     ;    *   \    \
Extentfve Product Offlerirtg       \
— jsyTtinyontJ/m.tm's, trrregrateql cirgurre; iwrkro-
conrputyr Boards, Microprocessor art,d    \
c-    aopport Cir^UllS/"TrArjSI3*Of5, DIOOC3, > \
Capacitor^, Resistors, Optoelectronics,        *
/_Pc4enti£frneters, Relays, Multimeters,
/SWitcr>*s, knobs, Cbnnecttors, Sockets, PC.
/Board's, Enclosures, Data and Reference
i...- Books. Soldering Aids, AND MUgH MQrVE
Superior Service \
/   reliable deliveries. Active s all NEW comprehensive     \
Fall/Winter Catalogue^ is now a^vailableV— FREENOF
__CHARG£. L_ _^ 1 \ \	
3070 Kingsway, Vancouver,
(15 min. from Downtown, straight up Kingsway)
Tel.: 438-3321
Open Friday Night — Saturday until 5 pm
Some of the student experimental
films at UBC are boring,
repetititous and become pretentious
after the opening credits. Wettler's
film, a Ryerson student film project, is refreshingly dynamic and
vibrant.
Scissere, which won accolades for
Wettler in Toronto and is only now
making its Vancouver debut, is
worth experiencing. It proves, once
and for all, that a total and committed emphasis on technique — film
technique — can be worthwhile.
ATTENTION
20% Discount
for students
at
J2iin.ocrja.utE. (^oifjuxzi.
4532 W. 10th Ave.
224-7440
(for appointmenti
NOW OPEN
TOP 100 ALBUMS
PENNY ARCADE
RECORDS
Singles $2.25 Album $4.99
Rent any record $1.99 for
for 2 Days
Club Members No Deposit
Full  purchase price paid for album,  if
returned in perfect condition less $1.99
handling charge.
50c Discount with presentation of this AD
5439 W. BOULEVARD
261-0282
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
ROCK
Live in Concert
^ DAN I EL p
^ AMOS
with TOM HOWARD
Q.E.T. Mar 11
7 p.m.
TKTS: VTC/CBO
y            o^lins
c
Tfo'2
from
3 to4
CAKE & COFFEE'
(per person)
MUFFIN & COFFEE"
(per person)
*or lea of course!
$2,50
$1.25
J~                     MONDAY - FRIDAY                        rt
J^^             {at the back of the village)              ^-^
EVER BEEN TO SEA?
akw^"
>N*^so°
*9&
SAILING WEEK
DANCE
**
T*u
SUB Partyroom, 8:00 p.m.. Mar. 5th
Tickets: $4.00 in SUB 208, 210
yAi
GENERAL MEETING
Exec. Elections
12:30, Mar. 7 - SUB 205
COAST GUARD
PRESENTATION
Boat Safety, SUB Mall, Mar.
CANADA ONE DEMO
SUB Mall - Mar 10
LOOK
<o
BROKEN CENTERBOARD
REGATTA
All levels, Mar 5th
Register in SUB 208
SAILING FILMS
Mar. 8, 11 - SUB Mall
FREE SAIL
Mar 12, 13 - 10'00-2:00
Jericho Sailing Center
EVERYONE WELCOME!!
COME SAIL WITH THE U.B.C. SAILING CLUB
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 667-1515
BEN KINGSLEY'
7orvirvi
rn.'^y^-ni
Gandhi
VOGUE
MON. TO SAT. 12:00 4:00 8:00;
918 GRANVILLE SUNDAY 5:00 8:00
355434
Dusrin Huffman
CORONET
• 51   GRANVILLE
.685-6828
duiNDAR
DUNBAR at 30th
.214-7252
"TOOTSIE"1
WARNING: OCCASIONAL
VERY COARSE LANGUAGE-
B.C. DIRECTOR
CORONET 2:00 4:30 7:10 9:40;
DUNBAR 7:J0 6:40 PLUS SAT.-
SUN. 2:00
odcoN
881 GRANVILLE AT 2:15. 4:10. 6:06. 8:00. 10:00
.662-7468   -
' Mcrx/Stnrp
SOPHIE'S CHOICE
(MATURE) *
i'ARNING: SOME VERY COARSE
LANGUAGE AND SUGGESTIVE
SCENES—B.C. DIRECTOR
CORONET
(51   GRANVILLE
685-6828
AT 3:40 6:20 1:15
DARk
CAMBIi at 18th
876-2747
THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL
70IVHV1
Six TRAC« mca»-n«a
PRESENTATION
WARNING: OCCASIONAL
COARSE LANGUAGE—B.C.
DIRECTOR
AT T:J0 »:30 PLUS SAT.-SUN. 2:00 J
Jessica Lange
(3^55**
VARSITY
224 3730
4375   W. loth
WARNING: SOME VERY
COARSE LANGUAGE,
NUDITY AND SUGGESTIVE
SCENES—B.C. DIRECTOR
AT7:15«:4S
£%Z&,
i JOHNNY YUNEl
AT 7:30 9:30
DROAdwAV
(MATWt)
WARNING: SOME VIOLENCE;
,.,  OCCASIONAL NUDITY AND
70 7 W. BROADWAY    SUGGESTIVE SCENES-B.C
.874-1927 DIRECTOR
,   THE
STING
DROAdwAY
m?mTr      MAC DAVIS
ft Jl JACKIE GLEASOX
TERIGARR
WARNING. SOME COARSE
LANGUAGE AND SWEARING-B C
DIRECTOR
[70 7   W. BROADWAY
 874-1927	
AT 7:15, 9:15
VARSITY
224-3730
4375  W. IQth
<^^> PAUL SCOFiELD
PETER BROOK'S
SUNDAY 2 P.M.
I$ng Leaf Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 4,1983
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THE REDS
IN CONCERT
AT THE PIT (SUB)
MARCH 24th & 25th
LP/Cass*
STRONGER SILENCE
FATAL SLIDE
GET YOUR TICKETS AT OUR TICKET CENTRE H
VISA
Your Total Entertainment Centre
•IsMU •>
MAIN CENTRE: RECORDS AND TAPES, 556 SEYMOUR ST.       CAR CENTRE: TAPES, 2696 E. HASTINGS ST.

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