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The Ubyssey Sep 26, 1968

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Array Why are we
THE U8YSSM
Vol. L, No. 8
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY,  SEPTEMBER 26,   1968
224-3916
— fred cawsey photo
DEMONSTRATORS SIT-IN at City Hall in support of the Georgia Straight Tuesday. They were
successful as mayor Tom (terrific). Campbell couldn't get six supporters on his council to suspend the Straight on charges of obscenity.
SUB official opening today
but most doors remain locked
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Ubyssey SUB Reporter
The Student Union Building is finally open.
The doors were opened at 7:30 this morning.
Free coffee and donuts are offered while they
last.
The building is open, but large areas are not
operational.
"Students can use the snack bar, the lounges,
all the meeting rooms, council chambers, and
the general clubs area," said Al Wait, a mem-
her of the SUB management committee.
The entire ground floor, half of the top
floor, and the cafeteria, auditorium, art gallery,
reading and record rooms on the main floor
will not be open.
Some of these rooms are closed because they
have not been finished, others are not open
because the ventilation and air conditioning
could not be turned on.
There are some problems already.
"We don't have enough money, we need it
to buy such small items as cash registers and
a sound system for the outdoor plaza," said
Wait. "These were things which were overlooked."
Another problem arose about the proposed
pub-in scheduled for today.
Although there seemed to be no adverse
official reaction to the pub-in held on the SUB
plaza Monday, the SUB management committee met yesterday and passed a motion stating
that the committee wished to be on record as
discouraging the pub-in.
"Something like this might jeopardize our
chances for getting a liquor licence," said Wait.
Another member of the committee, John
Davies, called the meeting he d yesterday
"absolute hypocrisy".
"Only half of the committee * oted on the
motion," said Davies, "some of th* committee
have the view they can control otHer people's
lives.
"It's typical of the whole bure u-cratic attitude of the AMS."
Davies said it's time more studeits ignored
them.
When asked about Jill Cameroi .'s petition
to keep SUB open 24 hours a day Vv ;it said,
"She just isn't doing her job."
"The co-ordinator is an important person,
ask anyone who has tried to make a 'woking
how well things are co-ordinated," said Nait.
He said in the spring Jill "screamed" to the
SUB committee chairman, but counc 1 decided
the committee should pick its own char/man.
"In my opinion the council was correc in its
decision, because Miss Cameron could no have
done the job."
81 student
senators
group goal
A student group led by Michel Lalain, Arts 4, is planning
to nominate 81 students for senate.
"To say that four students in group of more than 80 members
can represent the entire student body is ridiculous," Lalain said
Wednesday.
He said his group feels senate's approval of four student
members is mere tokenism intended to quell student demands for
democratic representation in university government.
"We intend to show this election up for the farce that it is,"
said Lalain.
Lalain said his group will speak en masse to students in
class, with or without administration approval*. They also intend
to appoint themselves senators and attend senate meetings.
"We are going to do as much as possible to make this election
appear ridiculous so we have a number of stunts in mind, he said.
He said the group feels student representation is essential
in university governing bodies.
"But we think that the senate is trying to hide behind their
offer of four senate seats. We want some* proper concessions
to student demands for power."
Lalain said the group has over 40 people willing to run for
office.
Any student willing to run, including frosh, can contact
Lalain through the office of Alma Mater Society co-ordinator
Jill Cameron.
■#«■>'
XPfyfy, j1?;*
SUB architecture
(forgets  paraplegics
An architecture grad student Wednesday blasted designers of the new $5 million student union building for
not providing proper facilities for movement of wheelchairs in the building.
Gary Hansen said a paraplegic friend had asked him
to check wheelchair access to the auditorium of the new
SUB. The friend is a member of a paraplegic group that
regularly attends Cinema 16 productions.
"There is no way to get to the auditorium without
climbing at least two flights of stairs. It would be a simple
matter to provide proper access," Hansen said.
HELP!
At the beginning of the year
there were many future journalists in our office looking for
work.
Maybe we had too many
people wanting work because
many of the original staff no
longer show up in The Ubyssey's north Brock basement
office.
If we ignored or insulted
you, a thousand apologies.
Come back. Give us another
chance to make you one of the
best student journalists in
Canada.
— fred cawsey photo
THESE BABIES, the SUB bowling lanes, are among the
reasons for the delay in the opening of SUB. The building
opens regardless today at noon, even though most of it is
unfinished. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
Arts festival to stress
total student involvement
The campus will be an un-
believable scene of total involvement.
The Contemporary Arts
Festival, in a complete schism
from recent years, has decided
to set up a "pre-planned environment of the arts."
At a meeting Wednesday,
the committee debated plans
for what will be the most involved festival ever held. Dates
this year are Jan. 29 to Feb. 8.
"What we're aiming for is
an interaction, a cross-fertilization of ideas between New
York and the Northwest," said
Rick Sheppard, architecture 2.
"It will be a UBC extrava-
ganza," said Herb Gilbert,
assistant fine arts professor.
"We'll bring in outside people
who will involve themselves,
and through their involvement,
excite everybody, not just arts
students."
Although the planning is
still tentative, the idea of a
single media was rejected as
being of too limited appeal. All
major branches of the arts
will be represented.
Underground film groups
will be invited to present their
works and to initiate a workshop afterwards. There will be
no set schedule, but everyone
will just "let it happen", and
let their creativity come out.
Because of limited funds, it
was suggested the festival invite "pure and poor people"
who would be willing to share
their talent with the students.
The student union building
will be the focal point of the
festival because of its accessi
bility to all students and because of the size of its facilities.
"We'll turn it into one huge
experimental college with the
concrete plaza as the site of
guerilla    theatre,"    said    Mrs.
Class format
only change
for arts week
Arts students will not be
able to cut classes officially
during arts week.
Acting arts dean John Young
said Wednesday a complete
cancellation of classes during
the week of Feb. 10 -14 will
not be possible.
"We cannot cancel all
classes but we will be making
changes in class format during
arts week," Young said.
"Most classes will be oriented toward arts week rather
than the regular curriculum."
Young would not say how
the classes would be altered.
Arts undergraduate society
president Ralph Stanton has
been pressing for a stop to
classes in the arts faculty during the week.
"The only way to generate
complete student involvement
in arts week is to cancel all
regular classes so students can
freely discuss other issues,"
Stanton said.
Stanton said earlier he is not
sure what will happen during
arts week.
Helen Goodwill of the theatre
department.
To the complaint that undergraduates would miss a lot of
the festival due to classes, the
committee replied that workshops would be scheduled at
noon and after 3:30 p.m.
It also suggested that some
professors, at their own discretion, might let students attend the festival in lieu of
classes.
"With displays everywhere
and something happening all
the time, there is no excuse for
all students not "becoming involved with the festival," said
Gilbert.
Law faculty
general meet
for de Bracton
The UBC law faculty will
hold a general assembly at
noon today to mark the 700th
anniversay of the death of
Henry de Bracton.
Bracton, a noted scholar and
philosopher was one of the
main contributors to the English common law system.
The assembly, to be launched by a special lecture entitled Homage to Bracton will
coincide with special services
for Bracton at his tomb at Exeter Cathedral.
The assembly will be held at
12:30 today in the main reading room of the Law building.
'Females should work to remove
male-female differences'—Ruthie
Females should dedicate
themselves to refuting distinctions between masculine and
feminine values, Feminist
Action League organizer Ruth
Dworkin said Wednesday.
"We should be interested in
developing as human beings to
our  fullest  potential,   and  re
fute the whole idea of what is
masculine and feminine as being pre-defined," Miss Dworkin
told an FAL meeting.
She said the objective of the
FAL is education of people "to
change their deep-rooted and
archaic thoughts about the role
of females in society today."
Aven not a yes man,
favors participation
Alma Mater Society treasury Don Aven said Wednesday
he is not an administration 'yes man' and is in favor of more
student participation in university government.
The comment was in response to a Ubyssey question concerning a vote at Monday's council meeting.
Special events chairman John Mate had asked who was in
favor of more student power.
When no one responded, Mate asked who was not in favor.
Aven was the only one who voted.
"I'm no fascist. It's just that I refuse to support a meaningless statement," Aven said.
"That's like asking who is in favor of motherhood," said
Aven. "What does he mean by 'student power'? I'm sure his
definition is different from mine.
"I believe in student power based on rationality and a
reasonable approach. And that does not mean the use of violence
or mass  demonstration."
Aven said there seems to be a general feeling that he is
an "arch-administration" councillor.
"It's not true, but I don't really care what they think,"
he said.
About eight females attended the meeting in Mildred
Brock lounge.
No mert were there.
Miss Dworkin, also Alma
Mater Society internal affairs
officer, said improvement of
day care centres for offspring
of caxrtpus females is another
FAL aim.
A FAL meeting Thursday
will further discuss plans for
the improved centres.
Miss Dworkin, long an ardent feminist, says she detests
the thought of being barefoot,
pregnant and in the kitchen.
"For instance, females in
residences seem to accept the
female role more than other
females," she said. "They are
very willing to accept rules
such as not being able to have
men in their rooms after a
certain hour."
The next phase in Miss
Dworkin's revolution will be a
concerted effort to establish
acceptance of birth control on
campus.
"We will start working on
legal channels, and if nothing
is accomplished this way we
will have to go ahead on our
own," Miss Dworkin said.
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Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
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An astounding
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to the moon, the planets
and the still more
distant stars.
SUPER PANAVISI0N
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Fri.,   Sat.,   Sun.,   Holidays- $2.50 $3.00
MATINEES 2:00 p.m.
Wednesday $1.50 $2.00
Saturday, Sunday,   Holidays S2.00 S2.50
SPECIAL GROUP RATES AVAILABLE
w
6U-J434 Thursday, September 26,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
YES, IT DOES SOMETIMES SHINE at UBC. Old Sol was caught winking through trees near the Administration building.
— fred cawsey photo
Students have say
in Teacher award
Like your prof?
Show your appreciation for his enlightened attitude.
Nominate him to receive the newly-established $5,000
Master Teacher Award.
Students, alumni, and faculty members are invited to
make nominations for the award, established by timber
magnate Dr. Walter C. Koerner as a tribute to his brother,
Dr. Leon Koerner.
Nominations should be sent to academic planning
director Dr. Robert M. Clark before Oct. 15. Final choice
will be made by a committee made up of representatives
of the university community, including Alma Mater Society
president Dave Zirnhelt and co-ordinator Jill Cameron.
Any prof who has been at UBC for three years teaching undergrad courses in the winter sessions, is eligible.
Lecturers, instructors and teaching assistants are ineligible for the award.
The award winner's name will be announced before
January.
Rhodes Scholars win
$31,000 this year
Resident charges housing
shattered trust  UBC
Eleven Canadian students
will win a total of $31,702 this
year.
The award is the Rhodes
Scholarship. To qualify, applicants must be male Canadian
citizens, unmarried and between 18 and 24 years old.
Winners of the scholarship
are chosen on the basis of interest in sports, character, and
leadership as well as intellect.
Each winner  must  have   a
distinguishing characteristic in
some field.
Rhodes scholars will study
at Oxford for two or three
years where they will have a
unique opportunity for academic advancement and travel.
Established in 1904, the
Rhodes Scholarship has been
awarded to more than 600 Canadians.
For further information contact Michael J. Brown, 804-470
Granville.
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
An action by the UBC housing administration has shattered the remaining traces of trust
in UBC, a former Acadia Camp resident said
Wednesday.
In a letter addressed to housing director Les
Rohringer, dated Sept. 13, Sibyl Klein, ed. 3,
said she informed the housing office that she
could vacate her room in Acadia Camp immediately.
She said she had the "opportunity of sharing
a friend's flat, which would make living- and
studying for me easier and also less expensive."
But the housing office told her she could not
leave without paying an additional month's
rent and board as stated in her contract.
In the letter Miss Klein agreed "that a precaution like this has to be taken when there
is a possibility of a room staying empty for
some time . . .
FOUR GIRLS APPLIED
"But during the five minutes I spent in your
office four girls inquired after accommodation
on campus. And they were only four of a list
of 150 or so.
"At least one of them could be moved into
my room and be relieved of a lot of worry and
inconvenience."
Miss Klein asked at the end of the letter:
"Sir, is it really the case that rules and regulations are made to exist 'sui generis', that we
are made to serve them, when, as in this instance, they could so easily be made to facilitate our lives?
"An occurrence like this shatters the remaining traces of trust in this supposedly
humanitarian and intellectual institution."
Rohringer replied to Miss Klein in a letter
dated Sept. 16, 1968. The letter reads as follows:
CONDITIONS FIRM
"In reply to your letter asking us to waive
one month's notice, I regret but the conditions
are laid down firmly, not only because of financial conditions but also because student residences are intended for the academic year.
"You would have been welcome to have
stayed in residence until the end of your notice
period if you had wished., but the demand, or
lack of it, does not in any way change the conditions.
"I am sorry but I cannot agree to refund
your payment."
In an interview Wednesday, Rohringer said
Miss Klein's action is "unfair to students trying hard to get a room."
"She knew she had to give notice, and she
undertook an obligation," he said. "She has
taken another room, but if she can't afford to
pay both, she shouldn't have taken the other."
Rohringer said when she accepted the room
in Acadia Camp, she took away the chance of
other students to take the room.
ALWAYS REASONABLE
"The university is always reasonable when
there is a reason, but in this case there is no
reason.
"These things happen everywhere in life.
A student who wishes to leave an apartment
downtown, has to give a month's notice. There
is always a risk that you won't get a tenant."
Interviewed Wednesday, Miss Klein said,
"I wouldn't have cancelled my room if I hadn't
felt that it could have been filled right away."
The room was filled Wednesday morning.
THIS IS OUR FINEST H0UMD~Uf!!
BAVLESS, P&De OF the NORTH.!M Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
TMUBYSStY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242 editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, local 24; sports, local
23;  advertising,  local  26.  Telex  04-5224.
POLITICS
BY JOHN MATE
SEPTEMBER, 26,  1968
-.**t
Freedom
Tin-star sheriff and fascist prototype Tom Campbell
has again been denied in his campaign to destroy the
Georgia Straight, but only because the rest of city council
allowed fear of being in contempt of court to overcome
their basic feelings on the matter.
Whether or not the Straight manages to win its
libel and obscenity suits, let alone survive another
attempt by council to deny its licence, it appears the
Campbell mentality of our elected government will have
triumphed again in denying the rights of our so-called
free society.
How meaningful is the right of freedom of the press
when the minute a group tries to exercise it they are
harassed continually by police, courts, and government,
and forced to spend valuable time and money to keep
from going to jail.
When a government states publicly the rights of
society are one thing, yet by its actions shows that they
are in fact another, it can rightly said to be lying.
And when it uses its courts, against which there
can be no criticism, to uphold its autocratic decisions, the
whole fabric of these institutions can have little right to
exist in the eyes of those who they rule over.
As can be shown clearly by the example of our
neighbor to the south, when the government and courts
start acting in this manner, they are well on the road
to Chicago, Mexico City, and beyond.
Burp
Who needs a liquor licence ?
It is admitted by all that B.C.'s liquor laws are
highly farcical. The idea that students are traversing the
road to sin and damnation in resting their tired bodies
by quaffing a few beer in SUB is clearly beyond the
comprehension of any reasonable being.
Students set a very enlightened precedent on Monday by establishing SUB as the one bastion of enlightened lawlessness in the whole thirsty province.
It is very easy to get around some laws — just
pretend they don't exist, and they will go away.
The next step is for the SUB committee to start
selling the stuff (not at too great a profit, Peter) and
ergo we have B.C.'s largest and most lavish beer parlour,
despite having only two sleeping rooms.
The Ubyssey will be drinking with you at noon
today, and let's see the good work kept up.
Lets have a majority
It is hard for us to understand how the
student council, a group of seemingly well-
meaning individuals, can get bogged down in
bureaucracy and petty issues as effectively as
our council manages to do. We invite you all to
attend just one of the weekly meetings to see
for yourselves just how relevant council isn't.
There is an obvious state of alienation between
the students and council. This state of being
can be accredited to the council as well as to
the students. While on the one hand the council fails to offer proper direction on major
issues and continues to dwell in petty dealings,
on the other hand the students do not have the
understanding of the issues and consequently
fail in action and in demand for proper leadership from their elected representatives. Thus
council is allowed to continue in its present,
irrelevant bureaucratic ways.
The major issue confronting the student
movement all over the world is "student
power" for the sake of democratization of the
university, the liberation of the students' mind,
thus leading to the freeing of the individual
and subsequently the democratization of total
society. There is no democracy without participation. What the students are demanding is
not merely "representation" but rather "participation".
HEADACHES
Last year's senate elections at UBC were
important only so far as they showed acceptance — by the students and hypothetically by
the faculty — of the principle of "student participation". For the students it signified the
shedding of the nigger mentality through political action, and for the administration it marked the beginning of many a headache. Headaches may have many causes and one of them
is being struck over the head. Last year the
students began to raise up the bat but unfortunately the bat never landed. The administration very wisely ducked in time just as the
students were about to strike. The students
were given four token representatives and the
senate and the bat was left hanging high.
Nevertheless the principle of student power
was established. Now the time has come for its
implementation and the question becomes a
matter of tactics.
Obviously, as has been stated as early as
last year, the election of four student senators
is mere tokenism. The students must now show
the administration that it is not one big game
that we are playing, that we are determined
in achieving student power, and that we never
were nor are we at the present fooled by the
political game the administration is conducting. We must not accept the election of four
tokens on the senate as the future status quo
for the next twenty-five to fifty years. If the
senate floor is to be the testing ground for the
implementation of student representation and
participation in the university, for the beginning of "democratization",  then students can
not be satisfied with four tokens sitting in on
their behalf.  Four tokens merely get lost in
four  committees  and  they  can   achieve very
little  besides  appeasing  some  of the mislead
students.
VALIDITY TO TOKENISM
The council has ratified the upcoming senate elections and thus has given validity to the
tokensim of the administration. Who will be our
four tokens? Would you like to be a "token"?
The question is valid, for clearly we are not
electing senators, we are electing tokens. So
long as the administration decided authoritatively how many students will be on the senate,
what their term of office will be, what will be*
their function, etc., the election of students
to the senate will remain "tokenism". Once
these matters will become the decisions of the
students, based upon the advice of the faculty
and the administration, the "tokenism" will be
removed, and student power will have become
a reality. Unfortunately council has failed to
understand the real issues involved. Council is
therefore not capable of providing the proper
nucleus for the badly needed leadership. Had
council understood the true significance of senate election then it would not have voted in
favor of urging the students to ratify tokenism,
and to degrade themselves by becoming tokens.
WHAT IS TO BE DONE?
What is to be done? Obviously the students
have to reject tokenism and all would be tokens. One suggestion is that this can be done by
a boycott of the senate elections. That is essential but not enough. Besides boycotting the •
AMS elections the students must continue to
work positively towards student power. Factual student power will not be realized until
at least 51 per cent of the senate is made up of
students. That is simply achieved. The students
must simply choose, elect, appoint, whatever,
eighty-three student senators and thus they will
constitute a majority of the senate. Some students have suggested that they will simply appoint themselves as student senators. That is '
also feasible. The decisions would be that of the
students, not of the administration, and it
would no longer be "tokenism".
The crucial point lies within our attitude, *
our mentality. We must stop thinking only
within the framework provided to us by the
administration. That framework is not meant
to serve the ideological and political needs
and demands of the students. So long as we
limit our think to the guide lines drawn by the
administration we will never succeed in the
democratization of this campus.
Action is needed right now. Anyone interested in becoming a student senator — not
a token, not through the AMS elections — or if
you have appointed yourself already, please
let the others know by giving your name to
our co-ordinator Jill Cameron, so that a list
may be comprised for all practical purposes.
The time has come for the bat to fall.
■..*■•:     - •   -,\sr...,v
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■/ssft*-'- "_*■ **_•»■>    * ','
.-*■•.*■.
7-*';    ..x    »   • j   •
FALIacy
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I'd like to correct a number
of misconceptions which appeared in Tuesday's article
'Dworkin organizes females'.
The first misconception is in
the lead. I did not organize
the Feminine Action League,
but rather have been a charter member of a group that
grew out of a meeting at International House.
Secondly, integrated washrooms and quiet rooms are
hardly the main issues that
will face us. These are examples of dehumanizing effects
"*%'*■•*,' '?.",'      *• **" gs
EDITOR: Al Birnie
City Desk   Paul Knox, Mike Finlay
News   John Twigg
Managing   Mike Jessen
Photo .... Fred Cawsey, Powell Hargrave
Wire   Peter Ladner
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
in society and in that sense are
very important; however, I
don't appreciate the journalistic technique that plays up the
sensational and hence debases
the sincerity of the article.
Thirdly, men are more than
simply 'invited' to the meeting;
they are an integral part of it.
We cannot discuss liberation of
people without the participation of both sexes.
Fourthly, the opinions I expressed as to the aims of FAL
I thought I had made clear,
are subject to discussion by the
group.
RUTH  DWORKIN,
science 4.
These, thank God, worked: Ulf Ottho,
Irene Wasilewski, John Gibbs, James
Conchle, Karen Loder, Peggy Shewchuk,
Elaine Tarzwell, Dale Wik, Erik Bryn-
jolfsson, Murray McMillan, Frank
Scherubl, Rik Nyland, Dick Button, Lawrence Woodd, Bonnie Trott, Hanson
Lau. Than*-*.
-,'        ■■'■ "       #■*!, .
Organize
Editor, The .Ubyssey, Sir:
There was only one speech
I remember from the SDU debate last Thursday. A girl
Janice gave a speech in a sincere and simple style. It was
about how a group of poor and
shunned people, misfits of an
intolerant society, had fought
for what they believed to be
just—their freedom and their
rights as human beings. She
told of how these destitute
people by persistency, courage,
and action were finally beginning to gain what they were
fighting for. She told of how
others outside this group has
organized and helped these
people. She said SDU must organize right now in this way
and only in this way can anything be accomplished.
The intellectuals listened politely and then took up their
philosophical debate again,
happy to be heard and hear
themselves speak. They did
this two or three other times
too when someone suggested
something specific to do. I felt
like a polite listener at a compulsory seminar. The abstraction of the exchanges lost my
attention and interest after the
first few sentences. I had come
to the meeting hoping plans of
action would be discussed and
formulated, not to hear the
philosophical beliefs of a lot of
pseudo-intellectuals. To me a
true intellectual can express
his ideas in a short simple
manner and not have to try
and prove his intelligence for
two or three hours.
People began to leave one
by one with exasperated and
bored looks on their faces. Still
the intellectuals carried on
their debate, until the end I
guess; I left at 10:15.
Ever  hopeful  I'm   going   to
attend the next students' meeting for a democratic university.
CATHERINE SHEPPARD,
education 3.
Unrest
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Like most people, I've been
reading a great deal lately
about "student unrest" which,
in places which are getting
really hot, is sometimes called
"student rebellion".
In general I find myself on
the side of the students. Like
most traditional institutions
there is a great need to modify the rigid top-down command
structure, to democratize, to
allow student participation in
many matters in which some
aspects of their own lives are
concerned. Especially I am in
favor of letting in some fresh
air into that exclusive club of
See Page 6: MORE Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
MORI xUTTIRS TO THE EDITOR.
From Page 4
corporation lawyers and executives which is called the
board of governors.
But it seems to me that most
analyses of this matter do not
quite put their finger on what
seems to me the key point.
Every student is two quite different things — a recipient of
instruction, and a person. And
if he is to be treated wholly
he has to be treated by his
teachers in a way compatible
with this double nature. As a
recipient of instruction he can
quite legitimately be given
marks, grades etc. He is in this
respect entirely measurable.
But as a person he is a mysterious, indeterminate object
with an essential core from
which springs all creativity
and inventiveness. And this aspect is altogether immeasurable.
This poses peculiar difficulties for the university teacher,
who has spent half his life
with things which can be
measured, from his school
grades to his PhD. All his life
he has been acquiring information, which he often called
knowledge. Add to this the difficulty of establishing any per-
sonal relations between himself and the members of a
class of, say 100. I have been
told on good authority that a
professor in an eastern Canadian university had a class of
over 500. One day a student
knocked on his door, looked in
and said, "Excuse me, sir, I
just wanted to see what you
looked like. I've heard your
voice all winter but I've never
had a seat near enough to find
out what you really look like."
Thereupon the professor resigned and took a job in the
smallest college he could find.
Students   generally   include
this impersonality in their protest but they tend to relate it
to some outer factor such as.
size of classes etc. rather than
to the need for a very special
quality of heart and mind on
the part of the teacher to
people in general and students
in particular.
In short, what is supremely
missing in the present set-up
is   that   personal   recognition
and affirmation which every
student rightly and inevitably
yearns for. The immeasurable
has to be related to as well as
the measurable. For some university teachers this is difficult
and circumstances may make
it impossible. To get It right
you may have to badger Mr.
Bennett for a lot more money
to hire more teachers. And I
don't think it matters much
whether they all have PhD's
or not. Some of the best teachers I know have no such academic distinction.
In summary, immeasurability must express itself as
equality; function (and instruction is a function) quite prop
erly means inequality and hierarchy. I find this relevant to
the plight of the rebellious
students, as it is to the situation in which the white engineers is giving technical assistance with native helpers. In
both cases equality comes first.
WATSON THOMSON,
Assoc.  Prof.  Emeritus.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Why not feel contempt if
courts neglect justice?
By STAN PERSKY
In Jerry Farber's infamous bible, The Student as Nigger, he talks about how the system
builds your mind so you don't think about how
you really feel about things, but instead you
spend a lot of time thinking about the rules,
the technicalities and the fine print in the
contracts.
So if there's something you have an opinion
about, and then you discover a rule against it,
instead of seeing if the rule makes any sense,
you just invoke it, and try to scare people with
what will happen if you violate it.
On these grounds, Dave Zirnhelt is the
proud recipient of this week's Nigger of the
Week, which consists of 1 million S&H Green
Stamps with which he can purchase a watermelon. (For those of you who didn't live
through the S&H Green Stamp era, they were
something like Confederate money, worthless.)
The student council passed a motion supporting the Georgia Straight. Zirnhelt calls up
the lawyers. Lawyers say naughty-naughty.
Zirnhelt comes to council and does legal bullshit talk about contempt of court. Conjures up
paranoid visions of the student council being
held in contempt of court. Council chickens out.
Big deal.
It would be the best moment in the history
of the boring inglorious student council if it
sincerely felt itself contemptuous of the courts,
as they stand now.
But no one asks if we should feel contempt
for the courts. And of course the one institution
in the city, The Georgia Straight, that does ask
that question, is immediately faced with sanctions by the very body it's critical of.
Has anyone on the student council looked
into how our courts work? And I don't mean
courts, justice and law in some nice abstract
sense (i.e., away from your feelings), but I
mean the magistrate's courts here in Vancouver.
There are 14 magistrates. There are seven
courtrooms. The magistrates have no offices to
work in. I talked to one pitiful old geezer, Lawrence Eckhardt, who was sitting in judgment on
me. We sat in a tiny little cubbyhole designed
for rat experiments and we spent a few human
moments in the middle of a farce called justice
where everyone acted pompous and witty. And
in that conversation we didn't talk about the
case, which we both sensed was hopeless, but
he told me about his troubles. And his troubles
consisted of having no place to work, no place
to think, no place to do the work of the law
so that people benefitted.
Since cases can't really be heard in a decent
manner, this creates problems. Especially for
people without money, friends, or power. If
they're being tried for something and they
can't get out on* bail, the case could drag on for
weeks and weeks, all of which they spend in
jail, even though they may turn out to be
innocent men.
Since the courts don't really discuss justice
in an intelligent way, but are mostly hung up
with rules and procedures, I don't think they're
very good. Since defendants aren't really protected by a Bill of Rights, etc. Since the whole
court system is incredibly hooked to the prosecutor's office and the police department, etc.
So I feel contempt for our courts.
The whole point of a student council that
was really concerned with seeing the university
as a force for change in the society would be to
question these things instead of blindly submitting   to   unquestioned   rules.
Of course Zirnhelt had help. So to tubby old
Bermuda-shorted Petey Braund, even as he
piles up more offices and more powers, we
award the Uncle Tom of the Week citation.
A rocking chair from which to pontificate.
Peter is currently vacationing in Toronto on
student or administration funds, I hear.
NOTICE TO '69 GRADS
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NOTICE
To All Students
The Student Union Building Management Committee wishes to advise students
that the consumption of alcohol in the Student Union Building without a permit is illegal. The Committee believes that the proposed Clubs Day Pub-ln
would be detrimental to the obtaining of banquet licences, club licences and
liquor licences in the future for student events in the Student Union Building or
elsewhere on campus, as well as events off campus.
The Committee recommends that students do not participate in the Pub-ln.
On behalf of SUB Management Committee: Donn Aven, acting chairman.
Approved by David Zirnhelt, president, Alma Mater Society. Thursday, September 26,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
'ORIENT FROSH TO WHYS & HOWS OF UBC
By PAUL KNOX
First-year students on this
campus, having discovered
where, when and what their
classes are, will perhaps find
themsleves a little -uneasy now
about the why and how of
UBC.
Apart from the philosophy
of the university's educational
process, the nature and identity of the much-touted student
reform movement and its leaders present a baffling problem
to individuals whose contact
with UBC has been solely
through high school and the
own town press.
Similarly, while the process
of administration becomes
abundantly clear to frosh during registration week and immediately thereafter, the men
behind the process and the reasons for their actions remain
obscure for sometime.
Who are Peter Braund, Bill
Armstrong,     Kenneth     Hare,
LEGEND READING CENTER
SPEED READING COURSE begins first
week in Oct. Come to the FREE Demonstration, Thurs., 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.,
Sept. 26 at 134 Abbott St. Rms. 14
& 15, or phone Mike, home 254-4557
after 6 p.m.
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Arthur Fouks, and William
White, and what do they stand
for? Why do Martin Loney and
Carey Linde advocate a society-
changing revolution, and why
does Dave Zirnhelt cling faithfully to moderation?
These are the questions the
univiersity can expect to issue
from the mouths and minds of
students experiencing this campus for the first time. And with
this in mind, the Alma Mater
Society each year appoints a
committee to organize a program that will introduce first-
year students to the university.
This year, It didn't happen.
Frosh orientation was an utter
flop, and no one knows it better than committee chairman
Freddy Lowe, who admitted
the failure of this year's frosh
orientation to council Monday.
Miss Lowe was hampered
this year by the egregious
bungling of the bureaucrats
responsible for the delay in
opening the student union
building. She had planned
dances, meetings, coffee sessions and seminars, all to take
place in SUB.
She also complained of a
lack of co-operation from AMS
councillors, who she said were
able to meet with her only
once during the summer.
But councillors, and the
facts, tell a different story.
AMS co-ordinator Jill Cameron says she warned Miss
Lowe repeatedly that SUB
would not open on time, but
Miss Lowe refused to make
alternate bookings for Brock
Hall.
It also seems that Miss Lowe
cancelled a mass * meeting for
frosh on the steps of SUB because UBC president Hare, ill
with flu, was not able to attend.
Disregarding, of course, the
fact that important AMS coun
cillors and other administration and faculty members, plus
about 5,000 students, could
have made the date.
But the real problem lay in
Miss Lowe's attitude toward
orientation, which she expressed Monday night. "Frosh are
not interested in student power
when they first come here,"
she said: "They just want to
find their way around."
The point, however, is that
most of us found our way
around campus without the
help of an orientation committee. And the university pays
To Page 8
ROTP
REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN
IN THE
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
EDUCATION FOR LEADERSHIP:
The Department of National Defence, through the
Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP), sponsors a
programme of university education and leadership
training for selected numbers of young men who
have the potential to become officers in the Canadian Armed Forces.
Candidates with senior matriculation, junior matriculation, or who are university undergraduates
taking suitable courses, are eligible to apply for
enrolment as officer cadets in the Canadian Armed
Forces. The admission standards are high, but for
those who qualify, the way is open to a challenging
and rewarding career.
ROTP TRAINING AT
UNIVERSITIES:
Since the number of vacancies at the Canadian
Military Colleges is limited, a number of young men
are accepted each year as ROTP officer cadets and
receive  their  training  at  Canadian   universities.
They are either high school graduates or university
students in any undergraduate year. Undergraduates enrolled in the Armed Forces while they are
attending university continue at their university
until graduation.
Applications for general or honours courses in
Arts, Science, Engineering and several other courses
are considered. Applicants for university training,
and undergraduates, may obtain a complete list of
acceptable courses for ROTP subsidization from
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centres. You may apply
during the academic term but not later than 1 st April.
While attending university, cadets wear civilian
clothes and receive monthly pay at ROTP rates.
Uniforms are supplied by the Canadian Armed
Forces for summer training.
PAY AND ALLOWANCES—
REGULAR OFFICER CADETS:
Tuition and other essential fees are paid by the
Department of National Defence. Officer cadets
entering the Canadian Military Colleges are provided with necessary books and instruments; those
attending university receive an allowance each year
of $125.00 to purchase books and instruments.
Pay rates are as outlined in the attached Pay Rate
card. In addition, full medical and dental care, clothing and other benefits are provided without charge.
Annual leave (30 days plus travelling time) with pay,
may be granted each year, usually after the summer
training period. Christmas leave is also granted.
MEDICAL AND DENTAL STUDIES:
ROTP does not apply to students entering the medical and dental faculties for whom separate subsidization plans are available. Details may be obtained at
a Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre or through the
Director of Recruiting, Canadian Forces Headquarters, Ottawa 4, Ontario.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
An applicant must have the following qualifications:
CITIZENSHIP: be a Canadian citizen.
MARITAL STATUS: be single and remain so until
commissioned.
MEDICAL: be physically fit for enrolment.
AGE: have reached his 16th birthday, but not his 21st
birthday on the first of January of the year of entrance
if applying with senior matriculation, or his 20th
birthday if applying with junior matriculation. Consent of a parent or guardian is required if he is under
18 years of age.
The maximum age is increased by one year for
each academic year completed beyond senior matriculation.
HOW AND WHERE TO APPLY:
Applications and further information can be obtained  at
CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
RECRUITING CENTRE
547 SEYMOUR ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 684-7341 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
Central  campus closed  to cars
when  SUB entrance completed
UBC will soon be a walking
campus, traffic supervisor John
H. Kelly said Wednesday.
FROSH
From Page 7
faculty advisers to assist lost
and confused students.
Frosh orientation should and
can be an effort at redirection
of the high school student's
mind and values.
Not redirection with the aim
of indoctrinating the student,
but rather of helping him
escape the prison-like mentality with which high school
often leaves him.
Councillors who pretend in
the slightest to espouse the
cause of student participation
in university goverment would
do well to consider this. Registration and the following
weeks, when the first-year student has a minimum work load,
provide an ideal time for him
to think about the problems
of his education and his involvement in it.
A stronger AMS and more
confident, less confused students would be the result of a
more positive approach to
orientation.
These first few weeks* are
valuable time, but they have
been wasted this year by an indifferent attitude and a considerable amount of muddied
thinking. Council should act
now to make sure that the postmortem on next year's frosh
orientation creates an atmosphere of elation rather than
hand-wringing.
TAKE OUT--DELIVERY*-
LEGEND READING CENTER
SPEED READING COURSE begins first
week in Oct. Come to the FREE Demonstration, Thurs., 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.,
Sept. 26 at 134 Abbott St. Rms. 14
& 15, or phone Mike, home 254-4557
after 6  p.m.
Kelly said the process of
making UBC a walking campus
will be completed in two to
four weeks.
"The reason for this is to
cut conflicts between pedestrians and automobile traffic,"
he said.
Kelly said parts of the East
Mall and University Boulevard
have already been closed to
keep car traffic off the main
campus.
When the new entrance route
by the Student Union Building
is completed, the East Miall will
be closed permanently, he said.
University    Boulevard    has
been closed permanently on
weekdays and will be open to
traffic only on weekends.
"The SUB entrance route
will be completed an the East
Mall closed within two weeks,"
Kelly said.
The university plans to encircle the entire campus with
parking lots. A 3,000-car parking complex will be built along
with a new housing project just
off the new SUB entrance
route next year.
No new access routes other
than  the SUB  entrance route
will be built this year, Kelly
said.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Japanese students bugged
by  dehumanized' schools
Senator Donald Cameron (Ind.-
Lib.) warned the nation last week
that "neurotic anarchists" and
"hippie professors" are trying to
take over Canadian campuses.
Brace yourself, Senator, the
world is teeming with them.
Stories on this page are from
the Institute for International
Youth Affairs, New York.
The student power movement
convulsing campuses throughout the world is also rocking
the foundations of the Japanese educational establishment.
Out of 846 institutions of higher education, 54 are currently
experiencing student disturbances.
The demands of the Japanese
students are varied — total
student control of university
dining halls, recreation buildings and hostels; a voice in the
hiring of faculty and the drawing up of curriculums; the withdrawal by the university administrations of punitive measures against students. Or they
protest the rise of tuition fees
or the relocation of a campus.
The tactics tend to follow a
common pattern — the students
stage rallies, barricade buildings, lock up professors, boycott classes.  -
For example, at Tokyo University, the nation's most prestigious state university, students of the medical faculty
have been boycotting classes
since January. At various
points since then, as many as
five other faculties have joined
them.
The basic issue of the dispute is the students' demands
for an improved system of practical training for future doctors. No agreement has been
reached yet and the new fall
semester, scheduled to open on
September 2, has been postponed.
On the 14th, the medical faculty announced plans for an
outdoor "teach-in" in front of
the main medical faculty build
ing which has been occupied by
a group of the more militant
protesting students. This will be
the first opportunity for the
faculty and students to meet
since the start of the boycott.
In announcing the meeting, Ta-
kahi Kobayashi, dean of the
medical faculty, said he would
sincerely listen to the students'
opinions and was "determined
to help solve their problems."
At the massive private Nihon
University in Tokyo — enrollment in excess of 60,000 — students shut down three out of
11  faculties when  it was dis-
Iran students
get insurance,
other reforms
Iran's Minister of Higher Education, Madjid Rahmena, announced in mid-September that
"beginning with the new academic year all Iranian students
will be insured against illness
or accident."
Furthermore, he explained,
"no university will have the
right to refuse a student who
has passed the general entrance
examination but cannot pursue
his studies for lack of financial
means." Students will be given
loans "on their honor," repayable after they complete their
education.
These new measures are part
of a general program of university reform being instituted
in Iran this year in hopes of
avoiding the tension on campus that marred the 1967-68
school year. Two of the major
innovations will be the direct
participation of students in the
running of university affairs
and the right to organize student associations.
Other reforms are planned or
promised by the new and
younger university rectors recently designated by the Shah
to help carry out the modernization of Iranian higher edca-
tion.
covered that the University
authorities had evaded payment of more than two million
dollars in faculty income taxes.
Charges of favoritism in entrance examinations and too
rigid control of student activities fueled further disorders.
Some of the rallies at Nihon
—also planning to resume its
new semester this month —
turned into violent clashes with
ths riot police. On September
4, 132 students were arrested
for throwing stones and empty
bottles; 54 policemen had been
injured.
Although at Tokyo and Nihon — and at the 52 other institutions e x p e r i e ncing disorders this month — the actual
number of students involved
in militant action is a minority,
authorities now fear restlessness and rebellion is beginning
to grow even among conservative students.
Many of Japan's top educu
tors are starting to make a serious reappraisal of the country's entire educational structure which the Ministry of
Education has called a problem
of "bigness," "mass-produced
education" and "dehumaniza-
tion." Since World War II, Japanese youth has flocked
through primary and secondary
school and into the universities.
Before the War, only 5 per cent
of university-age students actually went on to a higher education. Today, that figure is 20
per cent — about 1.4 million.
As a result of this rapid
growth, it is widely admitted in
Japan that the quality of education has suffered. Ministry
figures are cited to show that
state universities average one
competent professor for every
11.4 students; in private institutions, the ratio is 1 to 37.3
and often as high as 80 or 90.
Seldom do students have personal, friendly contact with a
faculty member or an administrative official. As one Tokyo
professor commented to the
press recently, "they are lonely, lonely, lonely."
South African students clash
with pro-apartheid authorities
Strictly speaking, prime minister Balthazar
J. Vorster kept the promise he made on August
20 to meet in 10 days with students complaining of government interference in university
A  affairs.
On August 30, a delegation of students from
the students' representative council (SRC) of
Witwatersrand University in Johannesburg did,
in fact, meet with the prime minister. But he
flatly refused to discuss their grievances, according to SRC president Mark Orkin. During
the fruitless encounter, Vorster maintained a
completely uncompromising stand; "he told us
at least 25 times that certain things would not
be tolerated," Orkin said.
The original issue in this latest series of
confrontations between South Africa's liberal-
minded students and the pro-apartheid authorities concerned the government's veto of the
appointment of Archie Mafeje, a black African
anthropologist, to the staff of Cape Town University.
Students at Cape Town reacted with the
first sit-in ever staged in South Africa.
Sympathy   demonstrations   were   held   at
other    universities,    notably    Witwatersrand,
where a protest march was banned on orders
*from prime minister Vorster. Wits SRC presi
dent John Kane-Berman declared that, "The
students have ranged themselves fairly and
squarely on the side of a free society. It is now
up to the opposition parties and other bodies to
come and join us in the defense of these rights."
The basic issue, he said, was "whether we have
the right of dissent in South Africa."
The atmosphere of tension within the university community increased when students at
the non-white Fort Hare University College
demonstrated in protest against certain acts of
alleged "arbitrary conduct" on the part of the
rector, professor J. M. de Wet.
On September 6, police and dogs were
brought onto the campus to drive off the
demonstrators; 200 African students were suspended.
In solidarity with Fort Hare, students from
all over South Africa planned a "protest convoy" to the University College for September
14 if the suspended students were not immediately reinstated. South African minister
for police Muller warned in an interview in the
Johannesburg Afrikaans-language newspaper,
Die Vaderland, that the government "would not
tolerate" a protest campaign in support of the
suspended students.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
FREE SHOWS
TODAY
BURT LANCASTER
in
"ELMER GANTRY"
Shows at 12:30 and 8:00
IN THE OLD AUD.
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Election for office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her first year or equivalent and is a fully registered
student for the 1968-69 academic year. Candidates must
have attained in the previous sessional examinations an
average of no less than 60% for 15 units or more, and
65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wed., Sept. 25. 1968
and will close at 12 noon Thursday, Oct. 3, 1968. Voting
will take place Wed., Oct. 9, 1968.
Elections for the positions of
Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office of
Student Senator:
Three students from the student body at large (including
The Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected by the
student body at large. To be eligible for election to one
of these positions, a student in the academic year most
recently taken prior to the election shall have taken a
full winter session programme of studies at this University and attained at least a second class standing; he
shall also be registered as a full time student at this
University.
Terms of Office: Of the students elected by the student
body at large, the candidates receiving the highest and
second highest number of votes shall hold office for 2
years, the candidate receiving the third highest number
of votes shall hold office for one year.
Nominations are open immediately. Nominations will
close on Oct. 3, 1968. Voting will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1968.
Nomination forms are available at the AMS office in
Brock Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 55. For further information contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS mailbox number 55.
Elections Committee
Applications are now being accepted for the Elections
Committee. Four members-at-large will be appointed by
the Student Council. The Elections Committee helps
govern the running of the Alma Mater Society elections
including drawing up rules and checking eligibility.
Applications and questions should be sent to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS mailbox number 55.
Student Library Committee
Applications are now open for four positions on the
Library Committee. This committee is advisory to the
head of the service and may make suggestions or
recommendations concerning developments or changes
.in the library which may affect students. Anyone interested please contact Jennifer Johnston, Acting Secretary,
AMS box 55.
Wireless Site Residence Committee
Applications are being received for a position on the
above committee. For information, please contact office
of Housing Administration. Send application to Jennifer
Johnston, Acting Secretary, AMS box 55. Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
— U of A Gauntlet photo
RON  RITCHIE exhibited some  fine   running ability  as   he
ran this kickoff back a total of 107 yards for a touchdown.
Unfortunately the  Birds were nailed for clipping and the
touchdown   was   disallowed.
Grid Birds better
than score showed
By RIK NYLAND
Special from The Gateway
The UBC Thunderbird football team travelled to Edmonton
on Saturday and played the University of Alberta Golden Bears,
and as the saying goes, "they were only good for one egg and
that was the one on the end of the scoreboard".
As you may know by now, they lost the game 22-0.
In many instances though, the final score is not really an
indication of how the game was played. After viewing the game
films I will have to say the Birds played much better than the
score indicates.
Only about one touchdown should have separated the two
teams. Instrumental in the win was the running of Ludwig
Daubner and Bill Jenner along with the quarterbacking of Terry
Lampert and Dan McCaffery.
Jenner and Duabner sustained the attack with their running
and Daubner went over for the major.
Benbow converted and the Bears had a seven nothing lead.
ATTEMPTED FIELD  GOAL
The Birds came back quickly but had to settle for an attempted field goal from the 42 yard line, which was wide.
The second Bear major was set up by John McManus as he
partially blocked a UBC punt.
Lampert then was able to run around end for the score.
Convert was good and the score was Bears 14, UBC 0.
The following kickoff produced the most exciting run of
the game.
The ball was picked up by Ron Ritchie of the Birds on his
own three yard line, and was returned the whole length of the
field but the glory was shortlived as the Thunderbirds literally
had their wings clipped and the ball was called back by a UBC
clipping penalty to the 42 yard line.
The last point of the first half came on a UBC punt.
As the gun went Glim Mather received the ball and alertly
kicked it back through the UBC end zone to bring the score
to 15-0 at the half.
The Birds played a much stronger second half and the only
scoring in the final half was actually on an illegal play. Bill
Jenner went over for the major on a 32-yard pass and run play
but the Bears had an ineligible receiver downfield which should
have nullified the score.
The strongest effort by the Birds was by Dave Corcoran
who ran 18 times for 62 yards.
Halfback Bernie Fandrich re-injured his ribs on the third play
of the game and this hurt the Birds offensively.
But anyway you look at it the final score was 22-0, and as
usual, the Thunderbirds lost.
Field hockey
starts
this weekend
The UBC field hockey season opens this weekend with
all three teams in action at
Chris Owen Field S&turday
afternoon.
The first division Thunderbirds will play the Jokers
from the B.C. first division at
1:30 p.m. The Jokers are
basically ex-UBC athletes and
British imports, and are expected to provide extremely
rugged competition for the
Birds.
The Thunderbirds are In
great shape with eight players
returning from last year's
second place team. They have
also obtained several promising grad students from Britain
and are looking for an outstanding season.
The second division Braves
are expected to be the most improved team, however, fielding
an exceptionally well balanced
team with no apparent weak
spots.
The third division Tomahawks will be taking to the
field at 3 p.m. and are also expected to make a fine showing
for their season opener.
The grin bin
swft **. iw**-t
tlqawr few*
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGSI & CORSAGES A
SPECIALTY
• GREETING CARDS & GIFTS
TELEFUMA
. mu *mj7wi-*t
"Flowers By Wirt"
10%   STUDENT DISCOUNT ON
PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short   Blocks   From   UBC   Gates
4427 W. 1 Oth Ave.   224-1341
Under  New  Management
FIRST BIG BASH IN SUB
WITH 'HANK & THE HOBOS'
UNDERCUT   68
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11th
DRESS: HARD-TIMES
Weekends are Wild at . . .
The Palm*
Birch Bay, Wash. — 6 mi. So. of Blaine
featuring the soul music of
Chuck Stanford and Roger Laybourn
for your listening and dancing pleasure
Friday, Saturday and Sunday
Licensed premises . . . bring your I.D.
ATTENTION
MEDICAL and DENTAL STUDENTS
Surgeon Colonel Rogers and Lieutenant Commander
Robertson will present details of the Medical Officers'
Training Plans at 12:30 p.m. on the first and second of
October.
Tues. 1 Oct. —12:30 to 1:30 at UBC "B" Block
—Lecture Room "A".
Wed. 2 Oct.—12:30 to 1:00 at General Hospital
—"A" Amphitheatre.
Essentially the Plans offer tuition, plus good pay as
a commissioned officer, to completion of the internship year.
A career in the Forces is well worth considering, not
only because of the additional professional pay granted to all
medical and dental officers, but also because of the interesting and varied career opportunities.
Find out if you can qualify for, this assistance —
attend the talks or contact the
CANADIAN FORCES RECRUITING CENTRE
545 Seymour St.  - 684-7341
AUDITIONS
FOR
THE  FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE  PRODUCTION OF
MAN IS MAN
BERTOLT BRECHT'S FARCE-PARABLE ABOUT THE
REBUILDING OF A MAN INTO A FIGHTING AAACHINE
Directed by DONALD SOULE
TOMORROW — SEPT. 27 — 3-5.30
ROOM 112 — FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS Thursday, September 26,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
•    %    .    *: ,      x
•v-
*• •**>   * ~      .- • v> * ".i- .* .*■
..*.      ',V« •!»■..*       .       . ii lA >V*       T!
TOM WILLIAMS, a 6-4, 220 pound defensive corner, will
be playing this Saturday at 2 p.m. in Thunderbird Stadium
with the Willamette Bearcats. A 9.7 sprinter, he'll be
giving the football Thunderbirds plenty of close coverage.
Canoe club organizes,
first event on weekend
Canoeing has finally come to UBC in the form of an
organized club.
On Monday the constitution of the UBC canoe club was
accepted by the AMS clubs committee.
The idea started last spring, and over the summer months
members of the Electrical Engineering department have constructed a dozen fibreglass canoes at a cost of $50 each. These
canoes are comparable to commercially-available models costing
around $200.
In the past weeks these canoes have successfully navigated
the Squamish, Chilliwack, North Allouette, Skagit and Similka**
meen rivers as well as the Bowron lakes in northern British
Columbia.
River canoeing near Vancouver is reputed to be the best
in the world, and an entire provincial park is specifically set
aside for canoeists in B.C.
Because of the advantages of having deep, fast flowing rivers,
canoeists find the season begins in March and extends through
to November so trips are by no means restricted to the summer
months.
These facts are encouraging the formation of a UBC canoe
club. The aims of the club are as follows:
• To promote the sport of river canoe touring around
Vancouver.
• To encourage the building of inexpensive canoes by
members.
• To educate canoeists in river safety.
• To provide a medium for social activity within the
university.
To help in the instigation of the Club, a canoeing booth will
be organized for Clubs day. Anyone interested in the idea of
canoeing—whether experienced or not—is urged to take this
opportunity of joining this newest of UBC clubs.
Williamette
here Saturday
The football Thunderbirds
host Williamette University
"Bearcats" this Saturday, Sept.
28, at 2 p.m. in Thunderbird
Stadium in their first home
game of the season.
Williamette University had
a winning weekend of football,
downing the University of
Nevada 20-7. Last year Nevada
registered a 32-15 win over
the Bearcats. Coach Ted Og-
dahl will bring his co-championship team to UBC boasting a 7-2 record in the Pacific
Northwest Conference. He
credits his team with having
"the most class and character
of any I've coached at Williamette".
Ogdahl is in his 17th season and his teams have compiled a 78-48-10 record.
If you are interested in football at all and would like to
see a hard working group of
athletes just show up at Thunderbird stadium on Saturday
afternoon.
I believe that you won't be
disappointed in the calibre of
play that Gnup's team is capable of playing.
But don't expect miracles.
GRAND PRIX
MOTORS LTD.
"SPORTS CARS ARE OUR
BUSINESS"
TRIUMPH
SPITFIRE-TR250-1300
SALES  AND  SERVICE
Special  Consideration
to U.B.C. Students
Local   &  Overseas Deliveries
1162 SEYMOUR
682-7185
I
BUSY"B"
BOOKS
Used University Texts
Bought and Sold
146 W HASTINGS
Opposite Woodwards
681-4931
BLACK   PANTHERS
Aaron Dixon —   Captain of
Seattle Black Panther
w    EVENTS     „P„     Party
Hebb Theatre — Today 72:30
25c donation
FOOTBALL
Season Opener
UBC Thunderbirds
vs
Willamette University
Saturday, Sept. 28,2 p.m.       I
Thunderbird Stadium
Free Admission to U.B.C. Students
on Presentation of A.M.S. Card
J Page 12
TWEEN CLASSES .
SUB opening with
annual Clubs day
THEATRE DEPT.
Slide illustrated lecture by
Dr. D. Somerset "The most
perfect of all Greek theatres
—Epidauros." Lassere 104,
noon.
VOLUNTEER SWIM
PROGRAM
Red Cross-Royal Life Saving
instructor school starts Friday,  Sept.  27,  6:30 p.m.  at
Empire pool.
FORESTRY US
Oct. 11, annual hard times
dance with Hank and the
Hobos.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl  Burau on Ibsen: Peer
Gynt Friday noon, Bu. 100.
FLYING CLUB
Meeting Friday noon in Bu.
217.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Intercollegiate tryouts, next
practise today, 4:30 p.m.,
War Memorial gym. All welcome to tryout.
CIRCLE K
Men interested in direct participation in campus activities, see Circle K on Clubs
day.
EAST ASIA SOC
First informal meeting Friday 8 p.m., at 1032 Davie.
Bring your own refreshments.
PHRATERES
An All-phi will be held Friday noon, Bu. 104.
STUDENTS FOR
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
SDU meets tonight, 7:30
p.m., in Carey Linde's office,
Brock.
PHOTOSOC
Offices in Brock Extension
163 until SUB facilities are
open. Visit Clubs day booth.
BADMINTON
Student recreational badminton Tuesday (8:30-11:30 p.m.)
and Thursday (9:30-11:30
p.m.).
NEW DEMOCRATS
Meet NDP MLA's and make
your choice for federal and
provincial leaders at NDP
Clubs day booth.
SPECIAL EVENTS
SPEAKERS
"The American Revolution
'68" —• Aaron Dixon, captain
of Seattle Black Panther
party, today noon, Hebb
theatre.
SCM
Dr. Bob McClure, moderator,
United Church, noon Friday
in Angus 104.
VARSITY ROD AND GUN
Trap shoot Saturday 10 a.m.
Meet at Iona island.
SCIENCE US
Science jackets and sweaters
on sale daily noon in Math
annex 1119.
SCIENCE US
Science anti-calendar "The
Black and Blue review" on
sale in science common room,
Math annex 1119.
VCC
Annual Clubs day TODAY,
noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Hadley speaks on "what
should your role be ?", Friday noon in Ang. 110.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
See CVC's display in SIUB,
room 119. New members
welcome.
NEWMAN CLUB
Look for the orange closet
at Newman's Clubs day
booth.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
NVC mixer Friday, 8:30 p.m.-
12:30 a.m. in SUB 209. Frosh
25 cents, members 50 cents.
AQUA SOC
Aqua Soc dive Sunday, information at Clubs day booth.
PRE-LAW
First general meeting Friday
noon, Ang. 414. Guest speaker, queen candidate introductions.
OMBUDSMAN'S OFFICE
Students needed to help run
ombudsman's office. See Bob
Gilchrist or leave name in
AMS box 76, Brock.
NOTICE
THE PRICES IN  OUR  ADVERTISEMENT OF  SEPTEMBER   10
WERE ERRONEOUS. THE CORRECT PRICES
SHOULD  HAVE BEEN:
Dry haircut $3.50
Hairstyling   .   .   includes
Shampoo,  Razor Cut
and  Blow Wave $5.00
1KIH6S
534 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE FOR AN APPOINTMENT TODAY 6884632
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 26, 1968
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WHEN PLANNING YOUR NEXT
dance or party, book through our
agency. Exclusive agents for the
Boston Teaparty, Blue Crusade,
Witness, Exotics & many more, Dan
987-67B1.
GEOLOGY'S "BACK PROM THE
Bush Bash!" Sat., Sept. 28 — Hastings Auditorium. Tickets $3.00
couple. G. & G. HO.
'UNDERCUT '68" FIRST BIG BASH
in SUB, with 'Hank and the Hobos',
Oct.  11th.   Dress:   hard-times.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
GOLDEN RING, DARK-BROWN
stone. Family's keepsake. Reward.
Please  call   681-2073.
LOST PAIR OF GLASSES, ANG.
building. Brown horn-rimmed ladies.
Call Va]   733-8855.
LOST: FRI. MORN. BETWEEN B
lot & Ed. Bldg. One pair men's
glasses. Name on frame. Ph. 435-
4895.
FOUND: MAN'S GOLD WRIST
watch, Angus Men's washroom, main
floor. Owner identify.  Phone 733-9044.
LOST MON. SEPT. 24 ON CAMPUS.
Man's watch. Gold case. No strap.
Reward.   Call   Don   929-1705   after  6.
1?, 324,025.2 EMPTY BOTTLES OF
various descriptions at "Undercut
'67", owners may claim same at
"Undercut  '68".
Rides & Car Pools
14
GOT TO HAVE OTHER DRIVERS!
Richmond carpool. Vic. Blundell and
No. 3-4. Phone Ralph 273-3289.
WANTED ONE MORE DRIVER FOR
North Van. Carpool. Vicinity of Del-
brook Highland area. Phone Ron
988-6084.
WANTED: ALTERNATE DRIVER
Hollyburn Park Royal area. W.
Van. Ph. 922-4027.
Special Notices
15
UBC BARBER SHOP (IN THE VIL-
lage) now with 4 barbers to serve
you better. Open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.. 5736
University Boulevard.
"BACK FROM THE BUSH??" "GO
to the Bash!!" Sat., Sept. 28. Hastings   Auditorium.    Tickets   $3.00
couple — G  & G 110.
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
68 — INVITATION — 69
A students' directory to entertainment at student rates. At the Bookstore; at HE and She Clothing Shop
(the Village); at Fort Camp, Totem,
Acadia canteen shops. $2.50.
JOSE FELICIANO, OCT. 24, 8 P.M.
First big concert in SUB. Limited
tickets available. Ticket sales begin
soon. Keep watching! In concert
Jose Feliciano, SUB, Thurs., Oct.
24, 8 p.m.	
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott
299-9422.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
URGENT: CATHERINE McNAUGH-
ton of Montreal, please contact
Krysia Mercer—office hours: 522-
3911 or at IliO Cardero, Apt. 503.
Eves and weekends or call home.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
ONE    PAIR    185CM.,    GOOD   CONDI-
tion metal skis. Phone 522-4279.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 MONZA, 4 SPEED, RADIO,
maroon with black interior, buckets,
mechanically perfect. Call Rod, 733-
8285.
'61 MGA 1600CC REMOVABLE
hardtop, $750. Phone Doug Adams,
224-1204.
'63 RAMBLER STATION WAGON,
$795. Must sell! 224-0355 after 5:00
p.m. or before  9:00 a.m.
'51 FORD CUSTOM V8, USED BY
widow. Mech. very good. Radio,
tow   hitch,   $150.  733-3626.
1959 V.W. DELUXE. GOOD MECH.
cond. Radio, chains, seat covers.
Phone   261-2440.
PEUGEOT, 1961, MOD. 403. GOOD
tires. Best offer! 876-5077, after 6
p.m.
1965 PONTIAC WAGON, AM-FM
radio, power windows, 43,000 miles,
$1800.   Cash  or best offer.   736-5147,
'67 V.W. DELUXE; RADIO, GAS
heater, great shape. Must sell! Don,
Rm.  27, 224-9880.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21   Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
1964   V.W.    DELUXE,    PLUS    SNOW                    VARSITY  SPECIALS
tires and extra heater.  Good condi-   students'  desks  _ from 14.95
tion.  $800.  224-3052.
1965  DODGE  DART,  NEW  CLUTCH,
V-8,  radio,  maroon,  non-Canadians.
$1095 or best. 228-9166.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobile—Parts
23
Automobile—Repairs
24
Boats & Supplies
25
Motorcycles
26
1966 HONDA, MODEL 166, SPORTS.
Immaculate condition, cheap. Ken
Lee,  736-6631  or  874-3089.	
1967 SUZUKI 250X6, HELMET,   ROLL-
bar,     sprockets.     731-3480.     Offers!
Geoff.	
1965 YAMAHA MOTORCYCLE 250CC.
Hardly  used   since  last   September.
Good condition. Phone Don 876-1587.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  &   Copying
32
Miscelleous
33
NOW WITH APPOINTMENT SER-
vice. Upper Tenth Barber — Hair
Stylists, 4574 West 10th Avenue.
224-6623
Photography
34
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
Scandals
37
WHY SUFFER WITH TEXTS? TAKE
Legend Reading Centre's Speed
Reading Course. Mike, 254-4557 after
6:08 p.m.	
CLIMAX — THIS WEEK AT THE
"Bush Bash". Tickets $3.00 couple.
G. & G. 110.
MAYBE THE OTHER CAB COM-
panies are Number 1 downtown but
we're  Number 1 out  here.  224-5025.
DEVELOPING YOUR THINKING
ability is good for you and, maybe,
for the world. Read about a way of
doing it in "The Technique of
Thinking". Available in SUB and
Angus. 	
WHAT WENT ON AT "UNDERCUT
'67"? Come to "Undercut '68" and
find out. Friday, Oct. 11, SUB.
INSTRUCTION
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. 738-7881.
FAST   ,   ACCURATE     TYPING*     MY
home, 25c per page. Phone 325-6637.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
PHOTOGRAPHER REQUIRES GIRL
assistant one or two mornings per
week.  325-2433.
GIRLS REQUIRED BY VAN. FIRM.
Sales dept., part-time, free training.
Echelon   Enterprises,   736-6223.
Help Wanted—Male
52
ESTABLISHED GARDENING Business being surrendered by student
going east. Very lucrative, asking
only $20.00. 738-3252.
Male or Female
53
STUDENTS — EARN WHILE YOU
learn. Part-time contact work, management opportunity. Promise good
money and invaluable experience to
those who qualify. For interview,
call Ralph 929-2454,  6-8 p.m.
Work Wanted
54
Instruction
Wanted
61
Music
62
Special Classes
63
STUDENTS   AND    PARENTS   WHO
need  to   improve  their  French  have
very   good    opportunity   by    calling
Emmanuel Piarron at 683-6192.
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH,
Russian   le
B.A.,   M.A.
736-6923.
FRENCH,       HISTORY,
ssona   given  privately   by
B.L.S.   (McGill).   Phone
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
YOUR    STUDENT    TELEPHONE
directory.   Buy   pre-sale   tickets   for
75 cents from Bookstore or Publications Office, Brock Hall.
New bunk beds   pair 29.50
Book cases — from 8.95
New  252   coil  Hollywood  bed
complete    49.50
We carry a full line of precision-cut
unpainted furniture at lowest prices
ever.
KLASSEN'S
3207 West Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
THE WORLD'S LARGEST SELLING
35 S.L.R. $40. Others $34, $25. Factory  prices.  Ph.   SID  298-9110.
SKIS & BOOTS. UNIVERSAL, DYN-
namic VR, Kastle skis. Le Trappeur,
Hadever ski boots. 266-5859 and ask
for Bruce.	
ONE COMPLETE SCUBA OUTFIT
(6'1"), $150. Phone Brian 876-6980.
PHILIPS TABLE COMB. RADIO-
record player. Best offer. Silvertone
portable record-player $15. Call John
at 733-2469 after 5:00.
ANTIQUE DRESSER, FRIDGE,
double-bed, misc. furniture. No. 4
rear, 2141 Arbutus, at 6 p.m.	
TWO STEREO SPEAKERS IN WAL-
nut enclosures, value $50. Asking
$30 or best offer. Eve. 682-7966.
MUST SELL FULL- LENGTH RED
ladies' suede coat. Size 12. Leaving
for tropics.  733-1831 j^ter_6*00_p.m.
SMALL FRIDGE FOR SALE. GOOD
condition.  Phone  731-6894.  Only  $25.
1963, 1964 and; 1965
TOTEMS
(The UBC Yearbook)
25c - To Clear - 25c
Publications, Office Brock
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
FEMALE—BSMT., PRIVATE SHOW-
er, separate entrance, use of den,,
fridge. Quiet. 228-8948. $45. .	
NEW LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING
room, two blocks from UBC express.
Everything supplied. Private entrance, bath shared with one stu-
dent.  Male  preferred.  AM  3-4493.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS (M) 224-9662.
2250  Wesbrook,   kitchen privileges.
ACCOMMODATION AVAIL ABLE
close to UBC. 2 male students. Bed/
breakfast.  Phone 224-4294.
LARGE SINGLE ROOM. BREAKFAST
made when food supplied. Ironing.
Mrs. Roberts, 3215 W. 34th. Ph. 261-
2831.   $40 month.	
TWO FURN. ROOMS FOR MALE
student in 3000 block W. 3rd Ave.
Kite, priv. Phone 738-4655.	
LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS
for two students. Prefer friends
sharing.  Male or female. 224-9474.
FURNISHED   ROOM,   USE   OF   KIT-
chen.   Female   $55.   2391   West   10th, >
738-8989.	
GIRLS: CALL 228-9127. ROOMS, ONE
single, one double. Share own kitchen, bathroom. Any nationality.
Non-smokers.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AT UBC GATES — REDUCED
rent to nursing student in return
for  small amount of  help.  266-8642.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   ON   CAMPUS .
at Phi Delta Theta House. 2120 Wes-
brook. 224-9073.	
FOR 2 QUIET AND CLEAN MALE
students with Chinese family. Pleasant upstairs rm., 3 meals, $85 per
month. 876-3127 or 568 W. 19th Ave.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
BASEMENT SUITE, FURNISHED.
4100 Block W. 15th, private bathroom, entrance; phone available,
Oct.  1st. 224-0796.
STUDENTS, 2 TO SHARE HOUSE
with same, vicinity of Cambie &
20th for October 1st. Contact Glen
David or Normand at 2316 Dunbar
after  5:00 p.m.	
NON SMOKING GIRL TO SHARE
apart.,  reasonable.  879-3985	
GIRL OVER 22 TO SHARE 4 BDRM.
house with 3 students. Call 688-3155.
West End. For Nov. 1.	
GIRL PREF. OVER 21 TO SHARE
2 bedroom suite, $70 mo. Sharon
Hayworth, 2174 W. 14th.	
TWO ""FELLOWS WANT THIRD TO
share furnished, 2 bedroom apt., 21
or over. Your share $50, plus food.
Phone 738-1400.	
HAVE FURNISHED APARTMENT
to share. Prefer grad. student. Ph.
738-285C.	
WANTED ONE QUIET CHRISTIAN
girl to share new furnished house
with   three   others.   Phone  733-0584
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
WANTED    SENIOR    STUDENT    TO
share   unfurnished   apartment   with **
two  others.   Phone   263-6180  after  6
p.m.	
SUITE FOR RENT FOR TWO FIRE-
place, private bathroom and entrance, close. 4324 W. 11th. Call
228-9358.
Halls For Rent
85 SUBVERSION
but NOT
Finished
VrV-' I'
A special edition of 'the ubyssey' by 'THE POINT'.
SUB OPENS T
•it
AY
FREE COFFEE AND DONUTS
M^|?
--.:*- *-'.x4'«M
. . V    . *   * >■'
r;**?.-*;**5*;*;,-'.*, '.*••> '..,      .
^^V'iit'-i*"* *'- *  " ';.i"X.;-
Chance of a Lifetime!
To celebrate the opening of the Food Service's
Cafeteria and Shack Bar in the new Student Union
Building, Ruth Blair and her suppliers are offering FREE COFFEE ALL DAY AND 2000 FREE
DONUTS on a first come first-served basis.
The eating areas will be open during the hours
stated below but, due to a fire early in September
which destroyed most of the cafeteria chairs, you
will have to make do with B & G's stacking chairs
temporarily.
With the opening fo these facilities cafeteria
line-ups should shorten drastically.
So drop in and take advantage of this once-in-
a-lifetime opportunity!
BUILDING HOURS
Probably subject to change without rhyme, reason or notice.
Monday -
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Building
7:30 a.m. -
1:00 a.m.
7:30 a.m. -
1:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m. -
1:00 a.m.
12:00 noon-
12 midnight
A.M.S.   Business  Office
10:00 a.m.-
4:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m. -
4:00 p.m.
CLOSED
CLOSED
Barbershop
8:30 a.m.-
6:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.-
6:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.-
6:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Booking Clerk
9:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-
5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
CLOSED
Cafeteria
11:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.-
6:30 p.m.
11:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.-
6:30 p.m.
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
Games Are&s
8:00 a.m.-
11:30 p.m.
8:00 a.m. -
11:30 p.m.
10:30 a.m.-
10:30 p.m.
12:00 noon-
11:00 p.m.
Information Desk
8:00 a.m. -
10:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m.-
10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m. -
10:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-
10:00 p.m.
Mamooks - Poster Room
8:00 a.m.-
12:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m.-
12:00 p.m.
12:00 noon
6:00 p.m.
12:00 noon -
6:00 p.m.
Music Listening Lounges
9:30 a.m.-
12 midnight
9:30 a.m. -
12 midnight
10:00 a.m. -
10:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-
10:00 p.m.
Reading Lounge
9:30 a.m. -
12 midnight
9:30 a.m.-
12 midnight
10:00 a.m. -
10:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-
10:00 p.m.
Snack Bar
7:45 a.m. -
11:00 p.m.
7:45 a.m. -
8:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m. -
4:30 p.m.
12:00 noon-
10:00 p.m.
Problems
Everywhere
The S.U.B. has been held up by a vast number
of problems, both construction and supply, but the
main set-back was probably the 9 week delay in
the signing of final documents and long term financial agreement between the University and the
AMS, so that construction could start.
Probably the most noticeable thing will be the
lack of ventilation in the northern half of the
second floor and the entire ground floor.
Other things which are not yet ready are as
follows (starting from the ground floor up):
• The bank still requires a* start on its interior,
and when it will be ready no one knows (somewhere between November and February).
• The College Shop lease was just passed
through the AMS last week and the Shop will open
by November 1.
• The lockers have been delayed until mid-
October due to a 7 week strike back east.
The games areas are progressing towards completion although due to water leaks on the bowling
lanes they will not be ready for a while. The billiard tables will be today or tomorrow.
• Auditorium is slowly progressing but will
not be ready until probably around October 15.
• The music lounges and reading lounge
should be ready by September 30,
Believe it or not, the Clubs' general workroom,
bookable offices, conference room and lounge are
all complete. Also, all the 16 meeting rooms on the
main and second floors are finished and fully
useable.
• The following clubs will not be moving in
until their areas are finished: Mamooks, Film Soc,
Photo Soc, The Ubyssey, and Radsoc. The Publications' office will probably movte with The Ubyssey.
• The general darkroom still needs considerable mill work done.
• The Ballroom and Party room can be used
only to half capacity due to ventilation problems
until October 15, when it can be used to full
capacity.
Groups wondering about furniture in their offices, when they can move in and other major
things pretaining to the building drop into the
Building Manager's office (224) or 246, or 242 for
help. Otherwise stop in at the information desk on
the main floor.
Congratulations to the Barber Shop; it opens
today with the building.
Guided tours of the building will be taking
place throughout the week, starting from the information desk in the main corridor. Page 2
SUB-VERSION
Subday, September, 1968
Meeting Room F
L_
r
Cafeteria Expansion Area
Meeting Room A
"^
Cafeteria
Snack Bar
Meeting Room G
Cafeteria Servery
L_J
Snack Bar
Expansion Area
Meeting Room H
Men's
Washroom
Women's
Washroom
ll
Snack Bar Servery
"\
Meeting Room
 1 '
I Janitor
1      I	
Storage
 I	
Lost and,
Found
:ound    I
lJ
Coat
Check
Room
«.    J
Ri
Board
\       1
Music
Lounge B
Music
Lounge A
1        '                 '
CM
TV Lounge
Storage
MAIN  FLOOR
Reading Lounge
OUR GIRL WITH ALL THE ANSWERS
Kathy Bigsby
Kathy Bigsby is a graduate of the
university of Victoria. She is married,
has one child and is presently supporting her husband through grad school
by heading our staff at the information
desk and the reading lounge.
INFORMATION DESK
Kathy or one of her staff will be
manning the information desk in the
centre of the main hall on the east side.
At this central location you can find out
what is happening not only in S.U.B.
but also on campus and downtown.
SOUND SYSTEM
The three channel sound system that
runs throughout the building is controlled by the person at the information
desk, although there are individual
volume controls in each room.
One of the channels will broadcast
Radsoc, and another will be available
for playing records, tapes, or a radio
program if they are brought to the desk
or requested of the attendant. The third
channel will be used for EMERGENCY
paging only and this will over ride all
other channels and volumes in the
building.
There are 50 areas that can be individually programmed and these can be
done in any combination. The easiest
thing to do is ask the attendant at the
information desk.
LOST & FOUND
The building lost and found will be
located here as well. But it is for things
lost or found in the building only.
BUILDING AND
CAMPUS DIRECTORY
Also in the alcove by the information
desk you will find a set of building floor
plans and a campus map to save you
asking for many simple directions at
the desk. Subday, September, 1968
SUB-VERSION
Page 3
Floor plans in alcove by the information desk should save many questions.
Tickets
For Sale
Tickets will usually be on sale through the
registration desk which is between the Art Gallery
and the main hall. Behind this great long counter
there are a number of chairs than can be booked
by various groups to sell tickets or anything else
they can think of.
Adjoining this desk is office 100B which is most
conventient for groups wishing to use: both the desk
and the office when running a conference or
seminar.
OMBUNDSMAN
The Ombudsman's office is 100A in the main
lobby of S-U.B. — directly across from the information desk.
The ombudsman, Bob Gilchrist, is elected by the
* students   to   receive   and   investigate   complaints
against unjust administration action.
For instance, if the traffic office sends you 34
parking tickets and you don't even own a car —
or you are in residence and you get liver for supper
seven times a week then the ombudsman is the
man to see. If he isn't any help you can always
vent your frustrations by tanking him.
Meeting Rooms
There are 10 meeting rooms, A to J. on the
main floor which are available for multi-purpose
use — meetings, catering, group discussions, lectures, seminars, panel discussions etc.
Meeting Rooms B, C, D, E, G and H will be
generally, open only during food services Snack
Bar hours. Meeting Rooms A, F, I and J will be
- open during regular building hours; furthermore,
Meeting Rooms A, F, I and J may be used for
studying during regular building hours when not
in use by groups who have booked these rooms or,
are being set up before, or cleaned up after, such
functions.
All meeting rooms (A-J) may be blacked out
for any projection purposes.
Seating capacities are as follows:
Meeting Room A (Room 111): 48 meeting, 30
dining.
Meeting Room B (Room 113): 18 meeting, 16
dining.
Meeting Room C (Room 115): 20 meeting, 18
dining.
Meeting Room D (Room 117): 20 meeting, 18
dining.
Meeting Room E (Room 119): 34 meeting, 32
dining.
Meeting Room F (Room 125): 105 meeting.
Meeting Room G (Room 105 B): 30 meeting,
29 dining.
Meeting Room H (Room 105 A): 25 meeting,
22 dining.
Meeting Room I (Room 130): 20 meeting.
Meeting Room J (Room 101): 22 meeting
Individuals or groups wishing to book these
meeting rooms should do so through the A.M.S.
Receptionist-Booking Clerk's Office in S.U.B. on
the second floor.  Same thing with food services
# when catering  is required  — book   through the
A.M.S. Booking Clerk.
Advertising
Galore!
BULLETIN BOARDS
There are lots of these throughout S.U.B. on
all three floors — for students and student groups.
All posters must indicate a date on which they
can be removed. You can use a rubber stamp for
this purpose which is available at the booking
clerk's desk if you wish.
Use these boards Dammit. Groups may be held
responsible for damage to your building walls or
equipment where posters aren't to be hung.
PORTABLE KIOSKS
We have 10 new portable publicity kiosks,
which are 7 foot high corkboard cylinders 3 feet
in diameter. They are built on furniture glides
and may be moved throughout the building. But
they are to stay inside the building!
They may be booked through the booking clerk.
BANNER POLES
A number of metal banner poles are being
erected on the north-west and south-west parts of
the S.U.B. site for the express purpose of stringing
many banners between them. Banner spaces can
be booked through the booking clerk.
At the base of some of these poles tackboards
have been placed for general campus use. No bookings are necessary.
WE  HAVE  GOT
CULTURE
The Student Union Building will function as a
cultural centre for the entire U.B.C. campus. Many
facilities are available for all groups and persons
both within and outside the university community.
The 425 seat auditorium may be programmed
for films, lectures, panel discussions, concerts and
other live entertainment.
Adjacent to the auditorium is a large two-level
art gallery-display area, which is an excellent
centre for presenting works by students, faculty
and local artists; travelling exhibitions from- the
art museums; annual exhibitions of student art;
photography exhibits; prints from the art department; educational or poster displays of interest
to students; and special engineering and hobby
exhibits designed and assembled by students. The
possibilities are endless.
For further information have a talk with Fred
Flores our cultural and social areas supervisor,
Room 246.
In the south-west corner are two music listening lounges; one with 18 headphones for individual
listening on a 12 channel sound system and the
other is designed for group listening.
A record and tape collection will be built
up at the desk where an attendant will play your
choice upon request. Students are also encouraged
to bring their own records and tapes which they
can have the attendant play over one of the sound
channels.
Adjacent to these rooms is a reading lounge
which will subscribe to a large selection of newspapers, magazines and periodicals from around
the world. The Leon Ladner private collection
which contains many books on B.C. history will
form part of the library.
The general lounge, the centre of the cultural
areas, is blessed with a carpeted "conversation pit".
A semi-enclosed TV lounge adjoins the "pit" on
the south side.
RIDES OR RIDERS WANTED
Professional car poolers, in-and-out-of town
commuters, ski trippers, car riders — all play the
ride board game. Located in the main corridor just
north of the information desk, it will serve you no
matter what you want — to get or to give a ride —
you only have to take two simple steps:—
Step 1: Check the slot with cards showing the
names of people who want to provide what you
are looking for. If there are none proceed to step
2.
Step 2: Fill out a card stating what you want
and put it in the appropriate slot on the board. If
the cards run out of supply, ask for more from the
information desk.
FOOD SERVICES
Most of the main floor is devoted to eating. The
food services area is paid for and administered
by the University. The Cafeteria will serve full
meals only during meal hours, Monday through
Thursday, 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to
6:30 p.m. and Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The
Snack Bar facilities will be open during the following: Monday to Thursday — 7:45 a.m. to 11:00 p.m.,
Friday — 7:45 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Saturday — 9:00
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Sunday — 12:00 noon to
10:00 p.m.
The Cafeteria and Snack Bar eating areas will
seat 962 persons.
The six meeting rooms adjacent to the Cafeteria
and Snack Bar will be available for catering and
informal meals if required.
The full-meal cafeteria menu will include soup,
juice, hot dishes, salads, sandwich plates and beverages. The snack bar menu will include soups,
hamburgers, sandwiches, chips, chili and beverages.
The new cafeteria will utilize the idea of separate pick-up areas for different types of food rather
than the traditional cafeteria system where everyone joins a single line-up, so don't stand in line.
A conveyor belt system has also been installed
for fast handling of soiled dishes. You simply put
the dishes on to a tray and then on to the belt
which removes the tray to the dishwashing area.
To arrange food services banquets, catering etc.
for S.U.B. functions, see Miss Olga Rumen, second
floor in S.U.B., in the A.M.S. Executive Offices area..
FULL
MEAL
CAF.
I
I
I
I
COlDS
*    I
I
COFFEE
I
.0
\
CASH
OINING
ROOM
□
"fl
M"*v
T    C    M    E     N
SNACK
BAR
HAMBURGERS
CHIPS
^^^CONDIMCNT
I    i      i
DINING
ROOM Page 4
SUB-VERSION
Subday, September, 1968
—
—
Radsoc
	
|
Radsoc
1
	
	
1
	
' •
.        1
1
Meeting Room P
Storage
Kitchenette
l   r
1    VT
Ballroom
Ballroom
Extension
j!
Servery
Z M
Elevator
Men's
Washroom
Lobby
Party Room
Mimeo Room
If
J
AMS
Business Office
Reception
Area
Cashier
Office
Manager
Vice-
President
Treasurer
Courtyard
Master
£^   Calendar
Booking
and
Reception
Co-ordtnator
i
Executive
Conference
Room
Internal
Affairs
Food
Catering
I General
Building I Manager
Manager I
i r
Office    I      I    Office
-I      I
J L
Office
Committee
Conference
Room
Committee Headquarters
General Workroom
Offic
Janitor
Office
Office
Office
I    Office
Clubs General
Work Room
Council Chamber
Offic.
Office
n-
Offic
Club Lounge
Clubs
Conference
Room
SECOND  FLOOR
Building Manager
Dave Cooper
ANY A.M.S. club or student who requires assistance, please feel free to
call on Dave Cooper , the Building
Manager in office 244. After all we are
paying him to help you with your use
of S.U.B.
Dave is responsible for the operation
of and services for the various facilities
in the new S.U.B. (except the Bank and
Food Services). If you have problems
with room set-ups, food services, equipment for a booking, etc., go up and
see Dave.
Dave, married and the father of four,
is also enrolled on campus in political
science.
Cultural  Supervisor
Fred Flores
This face belongs to Fred Flores, our
Cultural and Social Areas Supervisor.
Fred is from Calif., has a B.A. in English and wants to know when it's going
to stop raining.
He's the one who makes sure you
get the records you want to hear, the
periodicals you want to read and the
art exhibits to stimulate your mind.
Also, see him if you want to make
sure everything goes right with special
set-ups, etc., at your next big meeting
in S.U.B.
Look for him in Room 246 or if not
there ask the booking clerk. Subday, September, 1968
SUB-VERSION
Page 5
EHS3EE_r_£_ia3V
New A.M.S. Council Chamber with its luxurious McAfee chairs to make the agony of meetings more
bearable.
AMS Bureaucracy
Business
Office
The A.M.S. Business Office,
for club and committee finances, accounts, postage and,
mimeograph facilities room,
will be open from 10:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
There are 177 mail boxes,
each with a key for individual
or student groups who so wish.
Mail box keys will be issued
by the S.U.B. Building Manager, Dave Cooper.
Advance
Publicity
The Master Calendar on the
wall outside the booking
clerk's office is to allow student groups to advertise and
co-ordinate future events —
either in S.U.B. or out up to
12 months in advance.
This board will be kept up
daily by the A.M.S. booking
clerk. So if you got anything
you want publicized in the
Master Calendar see the booking clerk and she'll type up a
card and put it in for you.
Executive
The A.M.S. Receptionist-booking clerk will be on duty from
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday to handle bookings, requests for publicity to
be put on the Master Calendar
and to co-ordinate catering
events with bookings.
Other persons with offices
in this area are Food Services
Catering office (Room 290, Miss
Olga Rumen), S.U.B. committee and cultural and social
areas supervisor's office (Room
246, Fred Flores), A.M.S. coordinator's office (Room 238,
Jill Cameron), S.U.B. Building
manager's office (Room 244,
Dave Cooper), A.M.S. general
manager's office (Room 242,
Ron Pearson), and the executive secretary's office <Room
252, Evie Popoff).
Also find the rest of the
A.M.S. executive here — Pres.
Dave Zirnhelt (Room 256), V.P.
Carey Linde (Room 258, External Affairs Officer Tobin
Robbins (Room 250), Internal
Affairs Officer Ruth Dworkin
(Room 254), Secretary (Room
248), Treasurer Donn "Tiger"
Aven (Room .262), Ombudsman
Bob Gilchrist's office (Room
100A) is on the main floor,
right across from the Information Desk.
Committees
The A.M.S. Committee Area
includes 6 offices, a general
workroom and conference
room. The committees themselves are to work out space
and booking arrangements in
these areas amongst themselves, with appeals to be
decided by the A.M.S. Coordinator.
So far the Committee offices
have been allocated as follows:
Academic Activities 234
•B.C.A.S. and I.F.C.    232
_ 226
_ 220
230A
Symposia Committee
C.U.S.O. & W.U.S.  ..
Performing Arts &
Speakers Committees
Mardi Gras, Home-coming,
& High School Conference 228
Frosh Orientation
(Meeting Room)   101
Clubs
The Clubs area includes 9
offices, a large general workroom with 40 storage bins, a
conference room, and a general
lounge. Allocation of storage
bins and the 9 offices is to be
done by the University Clubs
committee with appeals to be
decided by the A.M.S. Coordinator.
SUB-VERSION
The SUB-VERSION is published by the Alma
Mater Society of the University of B.C. as a guide
acquaint the student body with their new Student
Union Building.
The facts and trivia herein were collected by
various members of the S.U.B. Management Committee and are presented in what is hoped to be a
useful form.
We would like to thank The Ubyssey for allowing us to use their name.
This issue was made possible only through the
diligent work of members of 'The Poinf staff, and
to them a special thanks.
STAFF
Editor Al Wait
Managing Editor Dave Gibson
Building Editor Peter Braund
*    Layout John Reche
Contributors Hanson Lau & John Davies
General Banner
and Poster Room
Room 251 right next to the Mamooks has been
designed as a general banner and poster making
room for any campus group which feels so inclined.
It is hoped that we will have a full time attendant working with Mamooks so that groups can
rent or buy materials to make their own posters
or pay the Mamooks to do it.
A storage area for silk screens, banners, and
their makings is provided in the room. These lockers can be booked through the Mamooks desk.
Ubyssey Ads
The Publications office is where you place your
ads in the Ubyssey and is located right next to
the Ubyssey offices in the north-east corner of the
second floor.
You will still place your notices in 'TWEEN
CLASSES through the regular Ubyssey office. But
don't expect to find them in SUB for a few weeks
yet until the ventilation is working.
Ballrooms
£■ Banquets
On the second floor, the Ballroom has an adjacent servery and may accommodate over 500 at a
banquet. The large permanent stage enables the
area to be used for large meetings of over 1,000
people. By combining the Ballroom, Ballroom extension and adjacent Party Room, a dance could
accommodate 1,500 people.
The Ballroom Extension may be separated from
the Ballroom by a folding door and will be available for smaller meetings, banquets and dances of
150-200 persons.
The Party Room, with its excellent sound system, is ideal for smaller events as well. It has a
specially sprung wooden floor and may be used for
dances, meetings and banquets for 200-300 people,
or may be used as a lounge.
One side of the Party Room faces the large
open air courtyard. The courtyard will be a
pleasant lounging and viewing area, complete with
sound and lighting around the perimeter.
Coat checking and/or reception facilities are
available in any of the many adjacent meeting
rooms on the second floor or, at the coat checking
and receptionist areas in the main lobby on the
main  floor.
Meeting Rooms
There are six meeting rooms K-P, on the second
floor which are available for multi-purpose use —
meetings, catering, group discussions, seminars,
coat-checking, lectures, etc.
All meeting rooms on this floor will be available
during regular building hours and may be used
for studying when not in use by groups who have
booked these rooms or, are being set up before,
or cleaned up after, such functions.
Meeting Rooms K, L, M and P have their own
areas for chair and table storage within the room.
Meeting Rooms L and M are separated by a
folding door and may be booked together (total
seating:   175).
There are two kitchenettes which may be booked by individuals or groups for use along with
meeting rooms K-P. One is adjacent to Meeting
Room M, the other is adjacent to Meeting Room P.
Each contains a fridge, range, double sink and
shelves. No utensils are provided.
All meeting rooms (K-P) may be blacked out
for projection  purposes.
Meeting Room K is immediately adjacent to a
women's powder and washroom.
The Student Council Chambers is carpeted with
a circular meeting table. It will be open only
when booked.
Seating capacities are as follows:
Meeting   Room   K   (Room   205):
60 dining.
Meeting   Room
40 dining.
Meeting   Room
60 dining.
Meeting   Room
32 dining.
Meeting   Room
20 dining.
Meeting   Room
40 dining.
Council  Chamber  Room  206):  29  meeting.
Individuals or groups wishing to book these
meeting rooms should do so through the A.M.S.
ReceptionistJBooking Clerk's Office in S.U.B. on
the second floor. Same thing with food services
when catering is required — book through the
A.M.S. Booking Clerk.
75 meeting,
L   (Room   207):   50 meeting,
M  (Room   209):   125 meeting,
N   (Room   211):   40 meeting,
O   (Room   213):   25 meeting,
P   (Room   215):   50 meeting,
Plush conference rooms like this, the club's
conference room are few. There is one other
for the committees. Book early if you want
them. Page 6
SUB-VERSION
Subday, September, 1968
Commercial
Enterprises
Nearby — if you're the type
— you can split hairs in the
eight chair Barber Shop. Barber in charge is George Pon-
amarenko; hours are from 8:30
a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday to
Saturday.
Next door the College Shop
will soon be in business to supply all your sentimental and
other necessities.
And the 7,400 square foot,
20-25 teller Bank of Montreal
tentatively scheduled to open
in November will allow you to
replenish your spending power
much easier than at present.
Games Area Manager
Dermot "Dave" Boyd, a referee in the North American
Soccer League, is our man in
charge of the Bowling, Billiard
and Table Tennis operations,
the locker room and small
games area. He is a graduate of
Queen's University, Belfast, N.
Ireland, and an Accountant by
profession.
He is the man to see about
other special uses of the games
area facilities that strike your
fancy.
Dermot "Dave" Boyd
Recreation
Food Services
Main Kitchen
Hiding under food services, on the ground floor,
are the recreation and games facilities. There is a
bowling area with eight lanes, a billiard room with
14 tables and a table tennis room with three tables.
A small games area, in the games area foyer, includes five card tables.* Two shuffleboard tables in
the billiard room is a future possibility.
The nearby washrooms include men's and
women's showers, changing rooms (bring your own
towels) and quiet rooms with cots for those who
find that even a game of ping-pong is exhausting.
The bowling rates will be 250 per game for
students, 350 for others, shoe rental 100 per pair,
and league rates by negotiation. Charge for the
billiard tables is $1.00 per hour. For table tennis
bats will rent for 250 each and you must buy or
bring your own ball.
When lockers arrive in about a month they can
be rented at the games area desk for a deposit of
$3.00, $2.00 of which will be refunded when the
lock is returned.   You cannot use your own locks!
G-rba**« Room
General Storage
Billiard Room
Bowling Alleys
Unfinished Area
GROUND  FLOOR
Food Facilities Better than Ever!
These   pies   will   soon   be   rolling   out  of  Sub's
ultra mtjdern kitchen.
CENTRAL KITCHEN:
All meal items for the S.U.B. Snack Bar and
Cafeteria together with some items for the Ponderosa, six other Campus Snack Bars and two small
Hospital units are to be turned out here. Last year
our Campus units (Not including the Residence
kitchens) used 50,000 lbs. of flour, 7,500 lbs. of
coffee, 114,000 lbs. of chips, 15,000 doz. donuts and
35,000 gals, of milk, to mention only a few products.
Centralized production is to help save money in
labour costs thus freeing more money for raw food
costs.
New equipment installed costing nearly $300,-
000.00 consists of many labour saving pieces, including a mixer-steam jacketed kettle for making
pie filling. We have Convection ovens that circulate
the heated air by fan so that food may be cooked
upon multiple racks, thus utilizing the full capacity
of the oven chamber. We hope to have enough oven
space to make double the number of cinnamon buns
in this kitchen.
There is a large griddle skillet which can be
used as a range, fry-pan, griddle, defroster, saute
pan or a stew kettle. You will see many other
pieces of equipment on wheels so that they can
be moved easily from place to place and for ease
in cleaning underneath.
DISHWASHING:
Fast dish removal is based on students taking
their soiled dishes to the conveyor belts. They are
located at the centre of the dining areas and the_
belts will whisk dishes to the central dishroom
where an employee removes them. Liquid is emptied with one motion by placing dish directly in
racks located on the self-draining racking shelf.
Racks are pushed forward by live rollers to the^
flight type dish machine. Subday, September, 1968
SUB-VERSION
Page 7
A BUILDING PHILOSOPHY
The University needs facilities which allow it
to function as a community of scholars if the process of education is to continue into out-of-lecture
hours. Human interests and activities need to be
related to the series of class room discussion and
~ the Student Union Building will provide the needed
facilities. Cultural, recreational and social interests
must be provided for; a broad range of facilities
must reflect the divergent tastes and interests of
• - the cross section of campus faculties, schools, departments and groups if interaction of people on a
broad general basis is to occur. The Student Union
Building, in other words, has been planned as far
as possible to humanize and make personal the
education process.
A COMMUNITY CENTRE
The Student Union Building is intended to serve
*■ as the community centre of the University for all
members of the University community—students,
faculty, administration, alumni and guests. Because
of inadequate facilities, the present Brock Hall has
* been unable to fulfill that function. Therefore, the
new building with its wide range of facilities and
services will fill a great need that has existed on
- this campus for several years.
THE S.U.B.  IDEA DEVELOPS:  1958-61
In 1958, a committee consisting of students,
administrators and faculty was established to assess
the problems regarding student facilities. The committee recommended that a new Student Union be
built apart from the present Brock Hall. The suggested site was the northwest corner of University
Boulevard and the Main Mall. The financing would
be done by student levy and an administration
contribution. The design would be subject to an
architectural competition.
INITIAL STUDENT  BODY APPROVAL
During the academic year 1959-60, the committee   continued   directing   its   attentions   towards
- acquisition of the suggested site. However, the then
preferred site was lost to buildings for academic
purposes thus forcing the committee to look for an
alternate location.
During the year 1960-61, the committee reviewed the methods of financing and negotiated with
the University Administration as to possible financial assistance for the buidling. A referendum was
held to seek student approval for a Student Activity
Centre containing a combination of Union and
Winter Sports Centre facilities costing the students
an estimated $550,000. This approval was given in
March, 1961 with an 85% vote.
PLANNING CONSULTANT HIRED
The following year the Sports Centre was severed from the project and built elsewhere. Then a
consultant was hired to plan the Union Building
as a separate project. He was Mr. Porter Butts of
the Wisconsin Union. As the committee continued
its analysis it became apparent that the original
$800,000 ($550,000 from the students and $250,000)
from the University) was completely inadequate,
the cost of the proposed building being estimated
in the area of $4 million. Once the planning consultant was hired the project developed rapidly.
The first steps undertaken were the evolution
of a controlling purpose or philosophy and an overall planning approach so that facilities could be
chosen with a full awareness of the total goal in
view, and even more important, so that basic functions of the building could be understood by everyone. Essentially, the basic purpose was to provide
the best facilities for the most students.
PLANNING COMMITTEE FINALIZED
On January 26, 1962, Porter Butts submitted
Part I of his Preliminary Report to the student committee, making procedural suggestions and presenting a proposed three-part questionnaire intended to
determine student needs. Copies of this questionnaire were printed and mailed to the students on a
random sample basis.
In November 1962, upon request from the Alma
Mater Society, Dr. John B. Macdonald authorized
the A.M.S. to strike a joint Student-Administration
Union Building Planning Committee, consisting of
ten students, a student chairman, and eight Administration and faculty members. Some of the members
were Dean Walter Gage, Dean McPhee, Miss Ruth
Blair, Mr. William White, Mr. John Porter and the
student chairman, Dean Feltham. This committee
worked with the consultant in the preparation of a
building programme for the consideration of the
University and for the guidance of the architect.
STUDENT NEEDS SURVEY TAKEN
In addition to the needs survey circulated to
individual students, surveys were also sent to the
more than 150 various clubs, Council committees,
and informal groups in an effort to establish the
number of functions each held during the year, the
number of people attending and the type of programme. After analyzing the results of the questionnaires and considering the funds available, the committee decided a three-stage project to be necessary.
The core building would contain meeting and seminar rooms, lounges, business offices, a bank, a
barber shop, a games room containing bowling
alleys, billiard and table tennis tables, a ballroom,
and a very large cafeteria and snack bar, with the
University paying for and operating the latter two
items.
The second stage would be a 1,200 seat Theatre-
Auditorium while the third stage would be a Conference Centre. The committee, Students' Council
and the University Board of Governors decided that
all stages should be designed as an integrated unit
but with only stage one being developed initially.
It was then estimated that stage one of the project
would cost approximately $3.5 million, the Theatre-
Old Stadium on May 1st, 1967
Auditorium $1.2 million and the Conference Centre
$250,000. The committee also decided that the project should be put out to a two-stage architectural
competition and this decision was ratified by students' Council and the Board of Governors.
ARCHITECTURAL COMPETITION HELD
At the end of the first stage, the judges of the
architectural competition picked four finalists. Each
finalist was awarded a prize of $2,500 and was required to do further development for stage two. At
the end of stage two the judges selected Kenneth
R. Snider from Winnipeg as the winner and he was
awarded a cash prize of $3,000 and was retained to
carry out the work.
SITE ESTABLISHED
(Meanwhile the committee continued to search
for a suitable site. The committee's first site choice
had been ruled out as the University planned to
construct an academic building on it. The second
choice was the one finally selected and located
in the old football stadium area. It is the general
feeling that the second choice site has turned out
to be the best in view of more recent campus
developments.
STUDENT BODY APPROVES PER CAPITA LEVY
At that time, the financing of the building was
considered in many ways. It was agreed to finance
the project through a student levy. In November,
1963, a referendum was passed approving the
S.U.B. project. At that time, $10 of the then $24
A.M.S. fee was being allocated to a Building Fund.
A further referendum, passed in March 1964,
raised the A.M.S. fee by $5.00 to $29.00 with the
additional $5.00 to be used in the financing of the
Student Union Building. This was anticipated to
repay completely (over a fifteen year period) the
loans required to construct stage one of the building. At that time, the best possible interest rate
obtainable   from   local   mortgage -companies   was
63/4 % .
FURTHER FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SOUGHT
On March 19, 1965, Roger McAfee was appointed Chairman of the Student Union Building Committee and the committee continued to seek financing for construction. It was difficult to get proper
cost estimates because of the problems in the local
construction picture but preliminary financial estimates were undertaken.
In January 1966, it was estimated that the cost
of the building would be approximately $4.5 million, of which the A.M.S. could contribute $3.3
million with the University making up the difference for food services. The previous estimate for
the building was between $3.8 and $4.2 million,
depending on the floor area ultimately drawn. It
was expected that construction of the building
would begin in the summer or the fall of 1966,
construction time to be eighteen months, thereby
opening the building in the 1967-68 academic term.
On February 7, 1966, final preliminary drawings were to be completed.
In July 19*66, Peter Braund, A.M.S. President
went to Ottawa to meet with officials of the Federal
Government, Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, the Department of Public Works and the
Canada Council. The possibility of financial assistance from the Federal Government or its agencies
seemed very limited and remote. Therefore, it was
suggested that approaches be made immediately
to the Board of Governors for further financial
assistance.
FINAL AGREEMENT WITH UNIVERSITY REACHED
On July 5, 1966 an agreement was signed between the Alma Mater Society and the University
of British Columbia with respect to the construction
of the Student Union Building. This provided the
Alma Mater Society with a forty-five year lease
plus option to renew for fifteen years on the building. The University would provide all maintenance
and services for the building, and all site work,
landscaping and maintenance around the building.
By August 1966, the architect was well into
final working drawings and the various consultants
were dealing with the technical aspects of the
building. In September of that year, the total cost
was estimated at $4.7 million for 176,000 square
feet.
Mr. David Cooper was hired as Building Manager in October of 1966. He had previously been
employed by the Students Union at the University
of Alberta (Edmonton) as Building Manager of their
new Student Union Building. Before that he had
Continued on Page 8 Page 8
SUB-VERSION
Subday, September, 1968
FROM UNIVERSITY        TO UWVERSITt
AND CHANCELLOR      ANO CHANCELLOR
BOUIEVAROS BOULEVARDS
WAR
MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM
D C
D    C
EAST MALL
D C
D   O
HOME
| ECONOMICS
BUILDING
BOS
LOOP
Site plan showing the road network around SUB. This doesn't mean that you will be able to drive on
any of them though. B & G's traffic experts are full of funny ideas.
BOOKABL
.E  FACILITIES
Facility
Room
Number
Dimensions
Sq. Ft.
Capacity
Meeting
Capacity
Dining
Capacity
Dancing
Art Gallery — Display Area
(Upper Level)
120
23' x 66'
1,518
	
	
	
Art Gallery — Display Area
(Lower Level)
120A
22' x 18'
396
—
—
	
Auditorium
10
48' x 67'
3,216
428
—
—
Auditorium Stage
—
20' x 45'
920
—
—
—
Ballroom
201
76' x 64'
4,864
800
450
1,000
Ballroom Extension
201A
64' x 25'
1,600
175
135
250
Ballroom Stage
—
16' x 41'
656
—
—
—
Coat Check Room
100P
17' x 30'
510
720 coats; 40 meeting
Council Chambers
206
44' x 35'
1,540
29      |     —
—
Games Area — Bowling
11A
—
—
8 lanes, 5 pin automatic
for tournaments,  leagues
Games Area — Billiards
13
—
—
14 tables — for tournaments
Games Area — Table Tennis
15
—
—
3 tables — for tournaments
Interview Room
100B
8' x 12'
96
—
—
—
Kitchenette
209B
13' x    7'
91
—
—
—
Kitchenette
215B
13' x    7'
91
—
—
—
Meeting Room A
111
23' x 26'
598
48
30
—
Meeting Room B
113
14' x 24*
336
18
16
—
Meeting Room C
115
16' x 24'
384
20
18
—
Meeting Room D
117
16' x 24'
385
20
18
—
Meeting Room E
119
24' x 24'
576
34
32
—
Meeting Room F
125
37' x 30'
1,110
105
—
—
Meeting Room G
105B
16' x 28'
448
30
29
—
Meeting Room H
105A
14' x 28'
392
25
22
—
Meeting Room I
130
22' x 18'
396
20
—
—
Meeting Room J
101
30' x 14'
420
22
—
—
Meeting Room K
205
28' x 32'
896
75
60
—
Meeting Room L
207
24' x 28'
672
50
40
190
Meeting Room M
209
37' x 28'
1,036
125
60
Meeting Room N
211
24' x 28'
672
40
32
—
Meeting Room O
213
13' x 20*
260
25
20
—
Meeting Room P
215
30' x 20'
600
50
40
—
Party Room
200
88' x 32*
2,816
260
225
350
Registration Desk
102
8' x 24'
192
8-10  chairs behind table
—  may  be   booked  individually for tickets sales, etc.
Traffic Flow
and Parking
Please take note of the new traffic flows and
parking patterns. A new S.U.B. access road, running esat-west along the north side of the Student Union Building links car traffic from Chancellor and University Boulevards to in front of the
main entrance to S.U.B. on the north side.
A new Bus loop congregates at the corner of
University Boulevard and East Mall.
Parking for S.U.B. events after 6:00 p.m., 7 days
a week, will be free, only to cars bearing student traffic office stickers ("A" Lot, "B" Lot, "C"
Lot etc.) in the S.U.B. Parking Lot (old Brock Lot)
and the Empire Pool Parking Lot, in a first come,
first served basis. So get a car sticker and come
early for evening S.U.B. parking.
Booking
Charges
The following rental charges have been set out
by the S.U.B. Committee:
(a) There will be no rental charges for space
(except in the Auditorium) for any official A.M.S.
organization (club, undergraduate society, committee).
(b) There may be no rental charge or a small
rental charge not to exceed %0 per square foot per
day for other U.B.C. student organizations.
(c) Rental charges for university community
groups will not exceed 10 per square foot per day
except in the case of the Ballroom, Ballroom Extension, the Party Room and the Art Gallery, where
the rent shall not exceed 20 per square foot per day.
Rental charges for the non-university community will be the same or greater than (c).
(e) A charge may be levied on all revenue-
producing events sponsored by any organization
other than a student  group.
(f) There may be additional charges for special
setups and maintenance, apart from rental charges.
These special charges will be paid to the A.M.S.
(g) All groups booking facilities where rental
or special charges are involved, should see the
Building Manager, Dave Cooper, or the Co-ordinator of Activities.
Continued from Page 7
served for many years as Comptroller of the Canadian Union of Students.
In November 1966, the Board of Governors gave
their approval for the new Student Union Building
to go out for tender. Following that the many drawings and specifications for the building were completed by the architect. The Department of Physical
Plant had made an extensive study of the drawings
and specifications and had given their approval.
As a result, tenders on the new building were
called on Monday, January 16, 1967.
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION BEGINS
The opening of tenders ceremony took place on
February 24, 1967 with representatives of the Alma
Mater Society, the University Administration, the
architects and the contracting firms all taking part.
The various tenders were opened by Peter Braund,
the A.M.S. President, and Dr. Phyliss Ross, Chancellor-Emeritus of the University. The low tender
of $4,237,000 was submitted by Grimwood Construction Ltd. compared to a previously estimated
cost of $4.7 million.
From February 24, 1967 to May, 1967, negotiations continued between the A.M.S. and University
Administration to arrange the financing of the
building. A supplementary agreement between the
Alma Mater Society and the University was signed
on April 28, 1967. After the agreement was signed,
construction began on May 1, 1967. Since that time
the contractor has been moving ahead towards
opening day.

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