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The Ubyssey Mar 21, 1969

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Array STUDENTS BACK UBYSSEY INDEPENDENCE
The Ubyssey will remain an independent newspaper free of the dictates
of student council.
That was the outcome Thursday of
more than an hour of debate between
Ubyssey staffers and student council
executive members at the Alma Mater
Society general meeting.
In a close vote a majority of the
3,000 people at the meeting in the SUB
plaza supported the independence of
The Ubyssey against a motion by outgoing AMS president Dave Zirnhelt to
limit the paper's freedom.
And when a vote was called on the
appointment of Ubyssey editor-elect
Mike Finlay, students overwhelmingly
urged his appointment at the council
meeting March 31.
Finlay's appointment became a
major  point  of  contention  when   the
combined executive Monday advised
council to reject him as editor.
Rejection was urged because Finlay
— the unanimous choice of the editorial board—refused to guarantee he
would print whatever material council
directed him to print.
He maintained that as editor he
must ultimately control both the content and policy of the paper and the
guarantee demanded by the executive
would turn The Ubyssey into a council-controlled and directed house
organ.
At the general meeting the executive intended to present a resolution
asking that The Ubyssey become "as
well as a newspaper with editorial
freedom, a medium of official AMS
policy."
But the resolution was never offici
ally presented. Instead, Zirnhelt asked
if students wanted the paper to be a
newspaper with complete autonomy or
"something different".
The students voted for the former.
The vote followed a lengthy debate
during which both sides presented their
views.
Said Ubyssey editor Al Birnie: "Under this resolution council could force
us to print as much material as they
dictate, at any time. There are no limits
set.
"It would destroy all effective editorial policy. It would be de facto censorship because the space consumed by
AMS policy would necessitate the elimination of other material."
Birnie also suggested that the resolution was an attempt to blame The
Ubyssey for the ineptitude and failure
of this year's council.
AMS president Fraser Hodge maintained the paper should print AMS
policy—which it could criticize on the
editorial page.
"As publishers of the paper the
AMS should have certain rights," he
said.
Treasurer Chuck Campbell said the
paper had failed to communicate to the
students and had presented a one-sided
editorial policy.
But Campbell was countered by
Ubyssey staffer Frank Flynn, who said
the paper operates on the principles of
a participatory democracy in which all
staff have their say.
"I find myself well to the right of
most of the present staff but my views
have been well accepted," he said.
To page 16 — See: FINLAY
Vol. L, No. 52
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 21, 1969
228-2305
—dirk WsMr photo
General meeting passes revisions
By PETER  LADNER
It might have been the sun,
Papa Bear's band, or end-of-
term restlessness, but for the
first time in two years, a general meeting got a quorum.
Well over the necessary
2,000 students gaped, gabbled
and groaned Thursday at noon
outside SUB at incoming
speeches, outgoing reports, and
the ubiquitous engineers.
The latter entered chanting,
toting the inevitable cage filled with council bigshots, and
finished off the meeting with
a tank full of same.
In between, business started
with passage of former AMS
vice-president Carey Linde's
constitutional revisions, a year
after the first drafts started.
The revisions were presented
in two parts, the first giving
undergraduate societies the
right to levy their own fees.
Outgoing AMS president Dave
Zirnhelt, who chaired the
meeting, said some faculties
might object to the first part
because it said a 25% turnout
would be necessary for an undergraduate society to pass a
money referendum.
Engineering president Duane
Zilm said there has never been
a 25% turnout in the arts faculty. "If engineers vote for
this they would be supporting
other faculties," he said from
his private microphone.
Outgoing arts undergraduate
society president Ralph Stanton assured the red-clad gang
they would not pay any more
to arts in the future than the
$600 they paid this year.
After a short speech in
Chinese by Hanson Lau, arts 3,
opposing the revision, it
passed.
Zilm also protested the
second part of the revisions to
make the AMS council representative by population. "I
don't feel the number of representatives* that science and
arts will get will be a fair representation of the student
body because most of the positions will go by acclamation."
Carey Linde countered: "The
only  reason   for  equal  repre
sentation is that we're all taxed
$24 equally."
(Present council procedure
is to use a weighted vote on
important matters. The weight
of the vote is determined by
the   number   of  people   who
have voted in the most recent
undergrad elections.)
Donn Aven's treasurer's report was passed by a tense 4-3
decision, which was, according
to chairman Zirnhelt, a mere
exercise in democracy since a
vote wasn't needed anyway.
Total expenditure came to
more than $700,000, with an
expected surplus of about
$2,000.
To page 6
See: MORE MEET
SFU admin  building  invaded
The Simon Fraser University administration
building was occupied by students Thursday in
protest against sentences handed out to 101 participants of the November occupation.
Three hundred students entered the administration building following a noon mall meeting of 1,500 students called to discuss the fines
levied Wednesday against the November occupiers. (See story page 3.)
A spokesman for Thursday's occupiers said
the fines were levied to "deter rather than
punish". "We will not be intimidated by the
judges," he said.
The occupiers met SFU administration president Kenneth Strand outside his fourth-floor
office in the building.
Strand was asked to make a public statement
on the remarks made by the judges concerning
the fines they levied.
He   would   say   only,   "I  will   not   give  a
substantive answer to a substantive question."
The students then left the building to report
to other students in their classrooms what
happened in the building.
The building was re-occupied later in the
afternoon for twenty minutes.
SFU student leaders have planned for a
"mill-in" today at the university. Students will
attempt to engage faculty in discussions and
devote class time to discuss the sentences and
the four demands that brought about the
November occupation of the SFU administration building.
The four demands, call for: freedom of
transfer within the B.C. educational system;
opening of administration files to students;
establishment of an elected parity student-
faculty appeals board; and an end to the school
construction freeze and repeal of education
Bill 83. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March 21,  1969
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A Flower in a Concrete Plain
By MAURICE BRIDGE
Ubyssey Flower Child
Do you have any kind of a
problem concerning UBC? If
you do, put it in writing and
send it to Flower in a Concrete Plant, Ubyssey office,
SUB or leave it in the ombudsman's office in the main foyer.
Q. I feel that the balcony
around SUB should be open
for the use of students in the
daytime. Is there any reason
why this cannot be arranged?
A. At the present time, the
air-conditioning    and    heating
systems for the building are
not totally finished, and therefore, it is better not to have
students out there messing it
up. Once the warm weather
comes, it can be finished and
the building management will
look into using it as a general
facility.
At present, anyone who
needs it for a particular reason
can get to it with a key.
Q. Is there any way that I
can by my parking sticker for
next year now? I would like to
get a spot that is reasonably
close in, like "A" lot. Also,
what is "preferred student"
parking. I mean, does somebody really like them better?
A. At the present time, students in fourth year, or higher,
can reserve their stickers now
for whatever lot they wish.
The "preferred student" lots
are reserved for them.
The rest of the campus must
wait until August 1, when all
the space that is left goes on
sale to anyone who wants it.
FLASH: What lies on the
bottom of the ocean?
A. An untruthful fish.
Grads to  revise constitution
The graduate students association will propose constitutional revisions at a general
meeting March 27 in order to
"give students greater power
in decision making."
The GSA executive will present the proposed revisions to
a general meeting at 1 p.m.,
March 27 in SUB ballroom.
Under the proposed revisions
the GSA executive will be reduced from 13 to seven members and have its policies approved by a grad student assembly.
The assembly will consist of
one member from each department in graduate studies. Members of the assembly will carry
a weighted vote according to
the  size  of  their  department.
John Dickensen, president
of the economies grad student
union said Thursday, "We hope
to make the structure of the
executive relevant to the tasks
before it and to make the tasks
themselves relevant to the
general membership of the organization."
Dickensen said the assembly
will also provide greater
"cross-fertilization" of ideas.
"At the moment, grad students
are notorious for their insular-
17 SIB applications
Seventeen students have applied for the five positions on
the SUB management committee.
Alma Mater Society vice-
president Tony Hodge said
Thursday, "At close of applications Wednesday all commit-
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Dicksensen said under the
new structure the GSA will
work for greater student representation in departmental
decision making.
"This is a partial fulfillment
of the general trend within the
university towards achieving
greater democracy within the
departments."
tee   chairman   positions   had
been applied for."
The committees applied for
were frosh orientation, academic activities, speakers, performing arts, CUSO, intramurals, WUS, homecoming and
open house, Winter Sports
centre, discipline, and student
court.
Junior added that decisions
on appointments will be announced "in the immediate
future".
Soldier boys awarded
Seventeen UBC students and
one SFU student will receive
Queen's Commission scrolls
from Lieutenant - Governor
John Nicholson.
The students are members of
the armed forces who have
completed three summers of
military training.
The scrolls will be presented
during a graduation ball at
the Hotel Vancouver tonight at
8 p.m.
First computer head
Dr. J. E. L. Peck, a mathematics professor from the University of Calgary, has been
appointed as the first full-time
head of the department of
computer science at UBC.
He will be taking over from
Dr. J. M. Kennedy, the present
acting head of the department.
Peck will be responsible for
expanding the computer science program, with possible
introduction of an honors or
major program in the near
future.
The appointment is effective
July 1, 1969.
THE  VANGUARD  PLAYERS
Present
BERTOLT
BRECHT
A dramatic  reading of  Life and
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8 P.M. - 1208 Granville
Adm. $1.00 688-5924 Friday, March 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students nix jocks, AMS
—dirk visser photo
LEAVING OFFICE as AMS president,  Dave Zirnhelt arrives
at general  meeting.
New English course
A new course has been formed so that students may enter
the honors English program in second year, rather than waiting
until third year, as has been customary.
Students may enter thisj course only if they are recommended by their English 100 or Arts I professor, and if they
attain a first class or a high second class standing in English 100
or Arts  I.
The course, English 210, a survey of English literature
from Chaucer to 1900, will combine lectures and seminars.
English 210 students will also take English 300, a seminar
course in practical criticism, in their second year.
G. H. Durrant, English head, said Wednesday it is not intended to create an elite group of English students. "The purpose of
studying literature is to illuminate one's own and other people's
lives."
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
UBC students resisted witty classified ads
and gymnastic displays and held on to their
wallets Wednesday as both the AMS and athletic fee increases were defeated.
With some 5,900 students voting, the AMS
$4 increase was rejected 3,699—2,196, while the
jock $5 raise hit the gym floor 2,950—2,948.
Both needed 65 per cent to be binding.
Disappointment, bitter in the case of the
athletic organizers, was the reaction of officials.
Fraser Hodge, AMS president, said it is the
students who will suffer from the results as
priorities have to be shifted.
"The political education program is the first
priority," he said, "and this defeat means much
of the funds for that will have to be drawn
from other sources. Everybody will feel the
pinch."
Nancy Wells, president of the women's athletic association, was very bitter and replied
to Ubyssey questions tersely and emotionally.
"This campus disgusts me," she said, "It's
time people started considering the general
welfare of the campus instead of their own
little selves."
She said passing the referendum would
have meant the first step in a program to put
UBC "on a par with other campuses."
Outgoing AMS president Dave Zirnhelt, although lamenting the loss of the AMS increase,
said he was pleased at the jock defeat. <He had
been involved over the past weeks in a running debate with Miss Wells in council on the
relevance of athletics.)
The athletic associations had waged an extensive promotional campaign including banners, speakers in the residences, a four page
ad in The Ubyssey, and gymnastic displays on
the SUB plaza. The lack of promotion for the
AMS ballot was considered by most involved
as a major factor.
Dave Gibson, AMS public relations officer,
criticized The Ubyssey's "anti-promotion campaign" in Tuesday's three front page editorials
against the increase.
"They acted in a juvenile, piqued, and personally biased way to the rejection of their
editor," he said.
(He was referring to council's attempted rejection of editor-elect Mike Finlay at Monday's
meeting.)
Ubyssey editor, Al Birnie later refuted
Gibson's statement. "The editorials were printed on the basis of principle and were 'in reaction' to nothing," said Birnie.
He added that the decision to print them
was made Monday noon, "long before we knew
how council would react to Finlay."
Linde captures Law in comeback
By   DORIO   LUCICH
Former Alma Mater Society
vice-president, Carey Linde,
was elected president of the
law s t u d e n t-s Association
Thursday.
Linde polled 183 votes while
his nearest opponent, Don Mun
roe, polled 110. Other candidates were: Ean Maxwell, with
59 votes, Mike Hutchison, with
32 and Chris Pocock with 30
votes.
Linde called the result, "incredible".
He then added a few more
words concerning his plans for
the coming year in office, say*
ing "changes must come and
now we have gotten rid of the
inertia which held us back for
so long, they will come."
He termed his election "not
so much an endorsement of
my own ideas, but a general
admission by law students that
a   great  change  is  needed.
"They agree with my ideas
that things must move, and
there is also general agreement
that the time has come to do
somehing about some of the
ridiculous laws of our society",
he said.
"It is always fallacious to
say that only Arts students
get upset." He added, "in many
cases the ills of society are
even more clearly denned in
the professional faculties and
the students in these faculties
are becoming more and more
aware of this.
"Up until recently there has
been a kind of inertia holding
back progress but the restrictions will start falling away
and progress will start to
come."
Outgoing LSA President
Web Macdonald said with the
election of Linde "the students
had shown a desire for
change."
He stressed the importance
of maintaining firm but reasonable change and pointed out
that in the end it is up to the
students themselves to assure
that these changes come about.
Other officials elected were:
Brian McAsey, internal vice-
president; Dell Valair, external vice-president; John Parks,
treasurer and Angela White,
secretary.
Silenced students soaked $25,000
By AL BIRNIE
BURNABY — Despite previous promises that
accused students would have a chance to make
statements in their own defence, 101 of the Simon
Fraser 114 were denied the right to speak and
were fined a total of $24,900 in magistrate's court
Wednesday.
One other occupier was jailed for three months,
again with no chance to plead his case.
UBC student David Carrell, 20, had two days
left on a $100 peace bond, demanded following
his arrest for objecting to the way a policeman
was treating a suspect, when he was arrested at
SFU Nov. 24.
Carrell forfeits his $100 bond, is fined $250
along with all but three of the 101, and spends
three months in jail.
"Apparently you have to learn things the hard
way," Magistrate Harvey Jessop told Carrell.
Each of the 102 was given three months to pay
the fine (until June 19), or two months in jail in
lieu of fine. All had pleaded guilty to causing a
disturbance.
The group will meet at SFU Monday to decide
whether to appeal and methods to be used to
raise money for the fines. (Any appeal must be
made as a group, not individually.)
Magistrates Jessop and F. G. Giles both silenced
students who attempted to make statements, while
Magistrate Lawrence Goulet allowed certain defendants to make short statements.
Both Dawn Carrell, 18, who attempted to read
the statement on the occupation by SFU Students
for   a   Democratic   Society   (reprinted   in   The
Ubyssey March 11) and Susan Claus, 20, who
attempted to argue that she has been denied
entrance to SFU while others with a lower average had been admitted, were both silenced by
Giles.
"I will hear no further dissertations—I am
not interested," he said. Several times during preliminary hearing Giles had said accused students
would be allowed personal pleas following lawyer's presentations.
Giles said he imposed the fines (maximum
sentence for causing a disturbance is $500 fine
and six months in jail) to:
(1) Make clear that the law cannot be broken
with impunity;
(2) Deter others from similar acts;  and
(3) Riassure the general public that genuine
attempts are being made by authorities to deter
disturbances at universities.
He said prison terms, or suspended sentences,
would be inappropriate.
Giles began his summary of the case by a long
dissertation in defense of the RCMP against "unfounded and irresponsible" charges of harassment
and brutality.
"The RCMP must maintain law and order,"
he said.
"SFU is not a sanctuary for those who break
the law.
"The clearing of the administration building
of those who for three days denied its use to
others was carried out in an exemplary manner."
Giles said the students had been portrayed by
the prosecution as "Marxist extremists who shout
down opponents at meetings" and by the defence
as "dedicated social reformers".
"It is not for me to rule on the merits of
either group. There may well be a need in society
for both groups, providing that they act strictly
within the law," he said.
He said the students stood before him as "unrepentant lawbreakers, who knew what they were
doing and had no apology".
He said that under the circumstances he did
not impose a stiffer penalty because "Youth are
inclined to act en masse rather than as individuals,
and usually have more reforming fervor than
their elders."
One student who did repent was fined $100,
while two others who said1 they were in the building by mistake received $25 fines.
One more student who pleaded guilty will be
sentenced April 30; eight who pleaded not guilty
will appear for trial April 17; and three juveniles
arrested will be sentenced in juvenile court.
At a meeting of the 101 following sentencing,
the group voted after heated debate to pay $500
to each of defence lawyers John Stanton, John
Motiuk and John Macey.
Some students felt the lawyers had grossly
miscalculated in their opinion earlier that if the
students pleaded guilty they would received only
$25 fines.
SFU student Brian Slocock, appearing before
Goulet, summed up the feelings of many:
"These fines are likely to have a reverse effect to what is intended — deterrants on social
movements only serve to strengthen them." Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March  21,   1969
:<>:v:w:::-K-*-:>;.£:y,£^^ «™*'  i*«j*«h™«
MF WWW
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH 21,  1969
EDITORIALS:
Decentralization at last
"Who needs more universities? We've got more now than
we can find guys to run."
LETTERS
Blind Faith
Editor. The Ubssey, Sir:
It serves the buggers right!
How can they expect 20,000
people to vote yes to their request for an increase of $4 in
the AMS fees? I am glad that
there were not enough people
who would vote yes out of
blind faith alone. I voted yes
to both referenda but I don't
blame those who did not. If the
executive felt that the increase
was so necessary they should
have gotten off their asses and
told the people so instead of
just hoping there would be
enough blind faith in them to
pass the referenda. I am sorry
the jocks referendum failed because they worked hard to get
it through.
SEAN McHUGH.
Ombudsman.
(Ed.   note:   Simply   because
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating       Al   Birnie
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Associate    Paul  Knox
Wire    Irene  Wasllewski
Pag* Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin
Photo       Fred   Cawsey
Ass't  News     John  Gibbs
Managing     Bruce   Curtis
"We beeped 'em," said Hanson
Pockets as the truculent staff of the
squalid   campus   rag   successfully   took
the jocks worked hard lo get it
through does not mean the
referendum was justified. Such
hard work is sometimes referred to as railroading.)
Spring Time
Editor, The Ubyssey,  Sir:
If you are graduating this
spring, you probably received
a personalized letter from
Time, Inc. advertising their
magazine as "one of the best
investments you could possibly
make in your future". For all
non-aspirants to the plastic
society, I urge everyone as
honored as myself to receive
such unsolicited junk mail to
send back the enclosed envelope empty, leaving the postage to be paid by the sender.
It may not cut down much on
their profit, but it's worth it
as a symbolic gesture.
GRAHAM FARSTAD
arts 4
on the AMS gollath with journalistic
slingshots. Erik Brynjolfsson (since he
was city ed. today we'll spell out his
last name) was exultant in victory.
Maurci bridge the gap between Frank
Flynn and John Andersen. Elaine Tarz-
well did her thing, sending Keith Rout-
ley into shock. Nate Smith jumped for
joy and landed on his pointed little
head.
Dorio Lucich hearing about staff participatory democracy but wondered
about the participatory when he saw
Bruce Stout, Gordie Tong, Dirk Visser
and John Frizell sauntering out of the
darkroom.
Maddin wanted his name at the bottom oi the masthead.
In the words of former AMS president
Shaun Sullivan, Papa Bear's Medicine Show
was a pretty cheap ad that did the trick and a
quorum finally turned out to a general meeting.
The result was the passage in a matter of
minutes of two major constitutional revisions
that have been kicking around for about a
year and have caused long and heated debate
in council over the last year.
OK, so what does this mean? The revisions
— in brief — enable undergraduate societies
to levy their own fees and institute a form of
representation by population on student council. In other words, the AMS — meaning students — took the first wobbly steps Thursday
toward decentralization of the unwieldly AMS
machine and towards democracy in a truer
sense of the word.
But the battle has just begun, to quote the
cliche. The fee levy is a powerful instrument.
For the sake of argument, consider the faculty
of arts.
With about 6,000 students, a $2 fee levy
would mean the arts undergraduate society
would have $12,000 to play around with. With
such money it could sponsor free concerts,
dances, discussions, symposia and the like. By
charging a nominal amount — say 50 cents —
for a good show, it could bring some of the
finest entertainment on the continent.
It sounds pretty good. But who is going to
accomplish these undertakings? Only a good,
strong imaginative executive is capable. And
do such things exist in many undergrad societies? Hardly.
Past experience has shown that not much
can be accomplished in undergrad societies.
So, in many cases the best people don't run
for the positions. You find places being filled
by acclamation or by incompetents. If a faculty
is given anywhere from $1,000 to $12,000, a
good executive is imperative.
And chances are good executives will arise,
for the time will have come that undergrad
societies will no longer be impotent collections
of meatheads or ineffectual idealists. With the
power — and that means money — to accomplish something, the most capable people will
be induced to run and good things could
happen.
As a result, these capable people attracted
to undergrad society positions by the chance
to make things happen will provide better
representation on council. And that will justify
the passing of the rep by pop revision. Neat,
eh?
The onus is on both the mass of students
to elect good people and on the capable people
to  run  in  the  first  place.
— MIKE FINLAY
Students reaffirm free press
In the face of student council's determined
bid to take over The Ubyssey, their failure at
the general meeting Thursday must be seen as
a firm vote of confidence in the principle of an
independent student press.
The overwhelming vote of confidence given
Mike Finlay as incoming editor suggests clearly
that, despite the relatively even split between
those who feel The Ubyssey should be closer
to present council policy, and those who feel
it should maintain an independent course, they
uphold the principle of an independent editor
to make the choice.
Whatever political course The Ubyssey has
taken over the past decade, we have firmly upheld the principle of a politically-independent
newspaper acting as the official, public critic of
student government.
We do not say, however, that this proves we
are any closer to reflecting the outlook of
the majority of students on campus than is
student council.
The overwhelming defeat of the fee referendum clearly shows the student body is not
interested in paying more for the kind of
lacklustre undemocratic organization presided
over by council.
We on The Ubyssey feel as well that we
have not been providing the necessary news
coverage and information that correspond with
and supplement the aspirations of the general
student body.
But The Ubyssey is a participatory democracy, and like any other such organization only
reflects the views and amount of work that
the individuals working for it put in.
And the only way any organization and
the people in it are going to grow and develop
is in such a structure where each individual is
free to exert his influence toward whatever
goals he sees as being best.
The Ubyssey is glad that it will remain, at
least for the time being, this kind of organization.
—AL BIRNIE
Need changes before increase
Students' councillors should have learned
something from Wednesday's defeat of the proposed student fee increase.
They should have learned that whatever
their mandate, they do not have the right to
arrogantly demand support for the operation
of the AMS from students without presenting
proposals for the structural changes which the
majority of students recognize must be made.
The 63 per cent of students who voted
against the proposed fee increase expressed a
total rejection of the attitude of this year's student councillors.
Students do not like to be told in a cavalier
fashion that $1 of their money will be used for
some vague motherhood issue like "higher
education  promotion.''
And they clearly didn't buy the argument of
councillors that administration costs the AMS
as little as possible.
After all, no student will be reassured by
the frightening revelation that $74,000 in salaries is paid to administrative personnel whom
he never sees. What further evidence is needed
of   the   irrelevance   of  the  AMS ?
Whether they like it or not, next year's
councillors will have to get the money they
claim is needed from somei place other than
students' pockets.
They won't be able to do it overnight. But
it won't be impossible. What is required is a
complete overhauling of the entire bureaucracy
— the AMS business office, the executive
office, the SUB operation.
In the words of treasurer-elect Chuck Camp
bell: "The bureaucracy is the best on the
continent for running social events — dances
and shows. But students have changed a lot
since it was set up, and their desires have
changed."
Damn right they have, Chuck, and it's time
we changed the bureaucracy, too.
For starters: employ more students, who
can work for a little less money and, because
they feel a sense of commitment, will do a lot
more work than nine-to-five professionals. Call
it participatory democracy if you like.
Then, you could move on to decentralization
— giving subsidiary organizations more freedom to spend money so they can provide better
programs.
And then you could start looking at ways
to increase revenue — such as charging advertisers for putting up posters on campus, and
taking over the operation of the Thunderbird
Shop.
In short, no less than total reorganization
is mandatory Students made that clear to
councillors  Wednesday.
Probably, students other than councillors
should be called in to discuss how the AMS
can be structurally reformed. Perhaps a special
committee can examine this over the summer.
In any case, it's going to take a lot of work.
But that's what councillors are elected — and
in some cases paid — to do.
And   that's   what  we'll   be   looking  for
evidence of when we come back in September.
—PAUL KNOX Friday, March 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
general
meeting
photos by
d. bowerman, John fvizzel,
gordie tong, and dirk visser
Papa Bears do the musical thing . . .
and passersby stop to see what all the noise is about.
AMS biggies arrive and announce there is
a meeting . . .
whereupon Ubyssey biggies Al Birnie (centre) and Mike Finlay (left) address
the crowd on the evils of press censorship with such impeccable logic that. ..
hitherto   water-tight   arguments   of   AMS
would-be press censors get all wet and . . .
go right down .
the drain, as it were. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March  21,  1969
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS
FREE CONCERT
SUB  BALLROOM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 at 12:30
Sponsored by Performing Arts Committee
«MM«mUI.U*
in a bridal ensemble of utter simplicity - maximum
effectiveness. In tune with the trend towards width,
the diamond in the solitaire is placed so that it
is part of the weddjng ring for a harmonious whole.
The rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie
designs and must be handcrafted
Special Discount Available to Students and Faculty
&*3*4£&<*»
566 Seymour
685-2271
Victoria Store — 1209 Douglas, Tel. 385-4431
2322ESISE&
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS & FACULTY
THE
BOOK STORE
will be
CLOSED
ALL DAY
TUESDAY, APRIL  1st and
WEDNESDAY,  APRIL 2nd
FOR ANNUAL STOCK TAKING
The store will be open Thursday, April 3rd
before the Easter holidays
More on general meet
from page 1
Aven was questioned about
administrative costs of the
AMess bureaucracy. "Exactly
$41,000 has been spent on administrative salaries, that's
all," he said.
Later Aven released the
breakdown of administrative
salaries. They range from
$3,120-$3,500 for cashiers and
typists, to $8,400-$ll,400 for
the AMS general manager. The
three full-time SUB employees
are cultural areas supervisor
($5,000-$7,000), game,s area
supervisors ($6,000-$8,000) and
building manager ($8,000-$10,-
000).
Aven commented, "It may
be possible in the future to
charge all or a part of AMS
office salaries against the
operations of SUB."
$74,000 SALARIES
At the general meeting, AMS
treasurer Chuck Campbell said
total salaries for AMS employees cost $74,000.
He criticized The Ubyssey's
allegations that the University
of Toronto provided the same
services as the AMS for $30,-
000 less. "The University of
Toronto doesn't get the same
services for its money," he
said.
Outgoing president Dave
Zirnhelt started into a year-
end speech but gave up when
the hooting and jeering amid
pleas for a strong, viable AMS,
comments on unloved people,
and talk of obligation to mankind, gave him bad nerves. In
the speech, Zirnhelt reviewed
the  year's  activities, and  sug
gested changes for the future.
The speech said that in spite
of the 'Zirnhelt Report', "the
university has not changed a
great deal."
In an apparent call for parity
of students and faculty on governing bodies, it says, "the real
change in the university will
come when its governing
bodies, senate and board, with
full participation by university
students—'equal but different'
members of the university
— debate the goals of the university in society and come to
some rational allocation of resources on the basis of those
goals and priorities."
"The occupation of the faculty club was a misdirected
aberation," the text says.
"However, we learned."
The speech suggests better
spending of the AMS money
that's available, and urges additional spending on a 1,500-
seat theatre for SUB, and a
$300-a-month full time salary
for the AMS president.
SUB A 'CONCRETE
MONUMENT*
Zirnhelt praised SUB as "a
concrete monument to students' time and dollars."
The speech recommends a
province-wide high school union, and establishment of a
bureaucracy for the B.C. Union of Students.
Zirnhelt points out that students have an obligation to
mankind, and "such obligation
to mankind must not be taken
lightly." (See full text on page
15.)
After reading the conclusion
of the speech, Zirnhelt was
attacked by a student for ram-
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rodding all the business
through the meeting. A fiery
word battle ended with Zirnhelt suggesting that the speaker join the Chilcotin liberation
army if he didn't like parliament and suchlike.
Attacks on the bigwigs continued. Another student wanted to know why the AMS paid
for the faculty club gaffuful.
Said president Hodge, "We
paid $2,000 after long discussions on the matter, because
we felt it was our moral duty
to assume a share of the damages."
Zirnhelt figured, "If we're
going to keep the campus clear
of police, we're going to have
to pay our housecleaning
bills."
ZIRNHELT 'A RAT'
At this point a persistent
questioner burst forth in a valley of red-faced blasts at Zirnhelt. "You rat, you bootlicker,"
he screamed after his microphone had been turned off.
Then Hodge cooled off everyone by jumping into the
speech-making act. He soared
onto an academic plane to comment on the last 50,000 years
of life.
In what he called an unconventional move for the incoming president, he talked for
about ten minutes about progress and change.
"A good index of man's progress is speed — the speed at
which man can travel," he said,
launching into a summary of
man's speed, starting with the
speed of race horses at Exhibition and Patterson Parks.
At this point those breathing around the engineers'
microphone sprang into song:
"Hooray for Fraser, he's got
class; Hooray for Fraser, he's
a horse's ass." After a whole
meeting of practice, the engineers' glee club was in harmoniously tuneful tonsil.
Hodge warned the students
that his student government
was not going to end the war
in Vietnam or stop the starvation in India or provide solution to inflation in Canada.
UBYSSEY 'SLANDERS
AND DISTORTS'
He said unity and togetherness were the only answer to
a problem the AMS could
solve — 600 students herded
into a single classroom. "The
first prerequisite for a successful attack on this problem is a
united effort."
He then attacked The Ubyssey for "slander" and "distortion of facts". He did not
elaborate.
In reply to a question from
the concrete floor, Hodge said
his anti-CUS policies were not
meant to split the so-called
student movement.
"I don't think there's room
for a second student union in
Canada." He said he was going
to organize a seminar at UBC
around the third week of May
to work out a new union.
"Letters have been sent to all
council at the universities that
have dropped out of CUS."
"You have to have a creditable lobby to approach the
federal government and you
can't do it with a students'
union that comprises only a
third of the students in Canada." ■I *
Page Friday
goes geographic
Bruce Dolsen, whose
work appears to the right,
struggled in the lower
depths of Vancouver's picturesque warehouse district in order to get away
from UBC for six months.
Strange. Not even Europe can boast of red fascists who practice baptism by immersion.
On pf 3hree, Stephen
Scobie reaches back into
his Scottish past for four
poems from plaid period.
On the same page, music
critic Michael Quigley
reviews the greatest
sound ever heard, not the
explosion of an atoll, but
the cracking of a toa.
Valerie H e n n e 11 finds
girls still warm from
making love, in that city
of sin and iniquity, New
York. In the process, she
adds her voice to past
generations of poets who
have made pleasant song
by hating New York.
Page 4our and 5ive becomes our annual opus
magnum, a personal report from Rick Luxton
on poverty in Peru and
the attempts by Peruvians to come to terms
with their problems.
The unacademic approach
to Japan, on pf 2wo was
written in a cherry mood.
Pf 8ight is pfisscelania.
A.H.
An Algerian interlude
between Tangier and Tunis
Friday, March 21, 1969
By BRUCE DOLSEN
So you've been to Tangier and blown your mind Right There In
the Street for several days or weeks in a row and your vision
of Marat-Sade keeps circling the block; blind beggars reciting
the Roran, the mad boy's stare; dogs fornicating ini the side
show; gnarled and twisted humanity alj day and all night circling,
circling inside the walls of the medina, even today . . . and the
stench of piss and charcoal fumes and sea fog and keif and rot
and disinfectant and another sunny morning at a table outside
the Cafe Central, is divining its presence in a glass of mint tea
very sweet while the first shoe-shine sales pitch begins: transaction, transition, transformation and — heymeester youwanda-
sell yrwatch yrshoes youwandabuyh keif hesh onlythbestand
veryblek acidspeed H meth whatyawantyermyfrend?iget foryew
change money ? a woman ? yering mabey ? aboy . . . ? Then
shuffle down the wide white-sanded coast to Rabat and go to the
Algerian Embassy and — 'A'Algerie Vous Attend!' say the
posters and much green paint with red trimmings . . . pay your
$3.50 for a visa — then get on the road again, early, when it's
cool,  and try Algeria.
• • •
By eight o'clock it was hot. Algerian border scene in the middle
of a field, and very quiet! The fat man with the hairline moustache was perspiring and stamping passports, and the thin man
with the gold braid and the hairline moustache counted our
money. Outside, the man with the gun and the hairline moustache
waved us across, and we waited, and ate oranges and the last
morsels from our tin of greasy, fibrous halva.
We waited. There wasn't any traffic, just country buses coming
up to the border from either side, then turning around after
depositing dark little men, and women swathed in white from
head to foot. The people crossed the frontier on foot, and crowded
into another bus, or into beat-up taxis. It is difficult for Algerians to obtain visas and permits to leave their country, and there
is such strict money control inside the country that it is next
to impossible for them to obtain foreign currency. Algerian
money is generally considered worthless outside of Algeria. In
the capital city, Algiers, we spent a good hour trying to locate
the one and only bank that could cash our travellers' cheques.
There is a whole street of banks, the old business section all
gilding and plate glass and marble and crystal, all Very Busy, and
THE      UBYSSEY
each of them the wrong bank for accepting a cheque. The right
one, new, and very Godard, was in another section of town. Ah,
bureaucracy   .   .   .
Once inside the country, once past the first or second little town,
the hitch-hiking was suprisingly easy. We were headed east,
toward Tunisia following the northern rim of Algeria, along the
Mediterranian, from Oran to Algiers, to Bougie, dipping inland
to the ancient city of Constantine before our last night, spent
in some nameless village in the mountains near Tunisia.
The people were immediately friendly, and very curious about
our presence. Our first encounter with the people of the land
Continued on pf 5ive
—art by Roltwn
pfage lne As an occasional editor of this paper, I
feel rather awkward about introducing my
own article. There are, however, several
rationalizations for the appearance of the
following piece of non-news. Despite the
number of times reports appear in the
downtown press about Japan (or could
it be because?) Japan is still not considered as being ~ anywhere nearly as
familiar a place to Canadians, as countries, such as Britain and Australia, which
are much farther away. The purpose of
the article is not to spread knowledge
about Japan, but rather to try to stem
the flow of misinformation of the kind
perpetrated on the unaware by the mass
media. Recently, courtesy of a certain
downtown newspaper, I experienced for
the first time the nightmare of being quoted out of context. The matter concerned
Japan, so I hope that this article might,
in its own monotonous way, help to undermine the profession of those who peddle
controversy.
Cherry
Blossoms
a tale from
the feudal mists
By ANDREW HORVAT
Cherry blossoms, and Mt. Fuji, and
geisha, did not disappear with the arrival of Commodore Perry to Japan in
1853. The Japan Travel Bureau will
gladly show any foreigner any of the
above, for a few thousand dollars. The
Bureau will also gladly point out at no
extra cost, that Japan is now an industrialized state, or the fact that the
country is made up of four main
islands. But what the Bureau is not
going to make clear is just how Japan
began to produce 200,000-ton tankers,
and 120 mph trains from cherry blossoms. The answer is that Japan did not
use cherry blossoms in this way, but
then again she did.
Cherry blossoms, or "sakura", in Japanese, has a double meaning. In poetic
language, the word stands for "samurai", the sworded heroes whose lives
are as short as the days the petals remain on the cherry tree. These flowers
are traditional symbols of the ideal of
self-sacrifice among the Japanese.
Self-sacrifice is the key-word in modern Japanese history. It explains the
reason why the Japanese have been
able to put group ends ahead of individual aggrandizement. One need only
point to the kamikaze pilots of the last
war for an example of total selflessness, the kind not usually understood
by westerners. Incidentally, during the
second world war, the Japanese referred to these pilots, as "present day
cherry blossoms". But of course all
that is past.
Japan was defeated and democracy was
established. Well, not quite. The driving
force behind those huge industrial
giants, Mitsubishi, Sumitomo, and Mitsui, and many others, is still a self-
sacrificing group spirit. The Japanese
businessmen down on Hastings and
Granville will not compare themselves to the kamikaze except in their
driving habits. They were extreme examples of group mindedness. But that
is not to say that the pilots and the
businessmen have nothing in common.
Unlike the American businessman, who
will unashamedly admit that he is
working for such selfish goals as
money, personal gain, or the assured
comfort of his own immediate family,
the Japanese businessman, while hoping that he will also have a car, and
his wife will have nice clothes, and his
son will go to university, also works
for the good of Japan, through the con-
pfage 2wo
tinued prosperity of his company, which
is led by a number of higher-ups to
whom he owes personal allegiance, very
much the same way that a samurai
owed undying loyalty to his feudal
lord.
A concrete example of this fact is that
Japanese workers do not change companies. They enter a company upon
graduation from school, and work for
the same organization for life, not at
all in the manner of American junior
executives, who jump from one firm
to the next, seeking greater authority
and personal gain.
Another example is the way in which
Japanese introduce themselves: "I am
Tanaka of Mitsui", or "I am Sato from
Mitsubishi"; the individual self is never
isolated from the group. Japanese gain
their identity from the groups they
belong to, more so than North Americans.
But it is not enough simply to say that
the Japanese have a spirit of self-sacrifice. In order to understand the manner
in which Japan developed from an
isolated agrarian economy to an industrialized state of world importance, we
need some background material. With
that in mind, I would like to quote from
a recent edition of the CBC Times. So
here is the way it is:
Talk about the up-tight society —
could you imagine five times Canada's population stuffed into an area
the size of Newfoundland? That's
Japan, an affluent, glossy, technological giant bursting at the seams.
In the free world she's first in shipbuilding and second only to the
United States in electronics and automobile production. Yet just a century
ago Japan was still living in almost
unbelievably feudal isolation. Then,
Admiral - Perry and his American
ships broke the little country's long
medieval slumber, waving the flag
of trade, and young Emperor Meiji,
realizing his people must face the
challenge of the new world to survive, began the chain of modernization that has helped Japan leap three
or four centuries to become a slick,
efficient competitive commercial
success — but without losing her
unique flavor, without allowing technology to smother her tradition of
politeness, formality and paternalism.
To mark the centennial of her
first step out of the feudal mists and
to show the expanse of her progress
since the Meiji Reformation (sic), a
film crew from CBC's Man al the
Center series . . . spent five weeks in
Japan, gathering color material for
four fascinating programs on the two
worlds of Japan.
The myth this article is trying to perpetuate, is that Japan is two worlds;
the world of the Eastern past and the
Western present. What it is trying to
say is that Eastern traditions are dying,
and Western technology is gaining the
upper hand, ostensibly because more
cars are being built than temples, or
as the writer says in a later passage:
". . . You have to make quite an
effort to find the quiet, delicate, elegant Japan you read about. The larger
cities are vast grey and sprawling
like ours. . . ."
Well, I hate to make prejudgments, but
I don't think the CBC made the effort
to find traditional Japan, if it was looking at quiet delicate places. Traditional
Japan lives in the grey sprawling cities
which only look like ours, but which,
in the behaviour of their citizens, are
quite different.
I have already mentioned that Japanese are very group conscious and self-
sacrificing. This fact shows up very
well in the modern Japanese language,
which despite many social changes,
still contains innumerable so-called
politenesses to refer to outsiders, or
superiors, and equally innumerable expressions for conversations between insiders, in social groups.
During my stay at a university in
Tokyo two years ago, two girls tried to
teach me the Japanese version of the
Communist Internationale. Their efforts, which ended in total failure,
were interspersed with deferential expressions, (and giggling) so characteristic of the feminine Japanese language.
This kind of feminine language traces
its origins to the inferior position
which women fell into at the beginning
of the feudal age, some eight centuries
ago. The Japanese, like the members
of any society are the prisioners of
their traditions.
Now I would like to return to the
short history of Japan, courtesy of the
CBC. The point the copy writer has
missed altogether, is that Japan modernized for traditional goals and by
traditional means. The main reason
why Japan is an independent state
with no colonial history is the intense
feeling of group-preservation felt by
her 19th century leaders. It was due
to the self-sacrificing efforts of a handful of young samurai that the Meiji
^C/Xx>)
^|x
"*   *   ^l<*x^--- ■ *—
>\\tf>* olive *v
.stolon from Shukan Asahl
THE     UBYSSEY
—stolen from Shukan Asahl
Restoration took place. Incidentally,
the event was not called the Meiji Reformation, but the Meiji Restoration.
The difference in nuance is very big.
Though major reforms did take place
after 1868, the Restoration represented
in fact a kind of progressive conservatism. (It's not unique to Canada.) The
emperor was only a symbol; he, himself took no active part whatsoever in
the modernization movement. Even the
spiritual momentum stemmed from a
revival in the study of Japanese culture in Japan in the 18th century;
prior to that time, the Japanese almost
exclusively studied the Chinese classics. The movement known as National
Learning, was responsible in part for
the feeling among the samurai that
despite the overwhelming technical
superiority of the westerners, Japan
must be preserved as a nation.
The motto of 19th centruy Japan
became "Eastern ends through Western
means." The new government composed
mostly of young samurai, well schooled in a classical education, embarked
on a program which could easily
be called state capitalism. The plan
was for the government to establish
shipping companies, steel mils, munitions factories, railroads, and then to
hand most of them over to private interests; not for the benefit of the
people, but in order to gain recognition
for Japan among westerners by making
Japan self-sufficient. .
Internal competition in business could
only hinder the success of this venture.
It was avoided at all costs, and it is
still being avoided despite the postwar
American efforts to split up the huge
Japanese companies. Recently automobile firms and shipping lines have
been merging, and they are still doing
so in order to prepare themselves for
international competition.
The Japanese rulers had another asset
which must have been the envy of
every nation state: an obedient population, loyal to a traditional national
symbol, the emperor. Countless battlefields in the Pacific, and on the Asian
mainland are proof enough of that
loyalty.
I will be the first to admit that what
I have written so far is pretty superficial. What I have tried to say is that
modern Japan did not inscrutibly rise
out of a feudal mist, that in fact the
answers to her rapid modernization
lie in her pre-modern ethics, transformations of which can be seen in modern Japan.
In summary I would like to compare
mythologies: the old myth, so disliked
by modern Japanese, that Japan is a
land of cherry blossoms, versus the
new one that it is a country of transistor radios. I, personally find the latter
shallow, without historical depth. But
the former, with a bit of updating is
much more accurate in describing the
group mindedness of the people whe
make the cars which some of us ride
to school every day.
Friday, March 21,  1969 GLASGOW
ECCLESIA SANCTAE ANDREANAE
Gorbals Cross; predominant grey. My
memories of shoogly tramcars, the front seat
upstairs boxed off. Men in jackets
and cloth caps, shipbuilding hands,
blue scarves or green (wars not
too long forgotten) Saturday at Ibrox
or Parkhead, call "Pitimaffref I"
"Digaholefuriml" and other
admonitions. Crossing the Kelvin once,
top of a tramcar, a child to his mother:
"See the dirty water!" Glottal stop,
harsh vowel. Craigendoran, Greenock,
the river opening into the Firth.
The narrow waters of the Kyles;
the craggy line of Arran's mountains.
THE MAN WHO FLUNG THE
ROPE ASHORE
"Doon the wa'er." Yellow funnels. Names:
Dunoon, Inellan, Rothesay (at each
wooden pier a squeaky loudspeaker
grinds out Kenneth MacKellar.) Boats:
the Jeanie Deans, great orange paddles
churning; down in the engine room
we watch the pistons thumping round.
Above, the seagulls, tireless scavengers,
gliding the currents of lazy air
on the easy stretch of their wings.
Up at the bow (the sharp end) stands
the central figure of this mythology:
a sailor with a quiet rope.
Scotland could be
verse
"EDINA. SCOTIA'S DARLING SEAT'
(Burns)
George Street, regal, its spacious extent
handy for parking cars  now; restraint
of terraces, railings, severe windows.
Princes Street, one side a jumble of shops,
the other the world-famous Gardens
dipping to Waverley, the railway lines,
and rising in thrusts of rock to Castle ramparts.
O Edinburgh ! dignified, serene !
(But in between them, Rose Street-
narrow, shambling, filled with poets.
And every second house a pub.)
A city, I call it, remembering the ruins.
The wind-long line of sands, then
sandstone, stones.  Cathedral nave
so narrow, long; collapsing
slowly: only the gravestones stand.
Stones marking deaths: PH, GW,
cobblestone initials where the martyrs died.
And Patrick Hamilton's face, appearing in the stone,
above the bonfire where his body sizzled.
My city, I call it, remembering my ruins.
IRA VELOGARHYTHMS
by Stephen Scobie
give us this day
our daily damn
new york
in October
such a big city
for a man alone
narrow streets
paved  with  people
'got  a  dime,   mister?'
no
for the hundredth time
today
i haven't even got
a wife
a  hungry city
where only the lean
survive
grovelling  in the wake
of fat, well-fed
businessmen choking
on their own spittle
'don't spit'
that's the subway
conveyor belt  uptown
and
down
often  down
a girl
still warm
from making love
kisses at the turnstyle
turns and goes
down into the darkness
still warm and soft
from  making   love
behind a roar
apart down
into the darkness
'got a match, lady?'
i haven't even  got
a   light
and so it's dark
he's dark
calls you 'brother'
lifts his black
face from the latest
OD and  he's black
but he's your brother
'give a damn'
thafs tough love
baby
give us this day our daily . .
what, God?
what God
be you white
or black
or tough
or still warm
from   making   love?
God of subways
dirty streets and
garbage cannibals
corroding  each
other's flesh
God of loneliness
and give a damn
goddammit
give us this day
our daily damn
dirt   age    and    degradation
claustrophobia
of the  spirit
in dark alleyways
overflowing  with
the crowded  refuse
of tenements
punctured windows
oozing  musty windows
and  the   odor of  flesh
Judas
with  my paper gold
clutched in white hands
wiping   pink-sticked   lips
that  frame  syllables
in  silver-studded  teeth
how do you feel
lovely slim but well-fed
lady on a street
where others sleep
drunk  with age
and rot-gut wine
'pathetic'
says the taxi-driver
through a stogie
what do you say
slim  but well-cut
lady sitting
in  the back seat
smiling?
i don't come from  here
you  say"
come
-VALERIE HENNELL
KRAKATOA
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
I picked up the soundtrack album to the coming Cinerama
release Krakatoa - East of Java
(ABC Records ABCS-OC-8)
mainly out of curiosity, having had an interest for some
time in the famous volcano
which blew up in 1883, causing a mammoth amount of destruction and making the loudest noise ever heard on earth.
(The sound was heard in Ceylon, over two thousand miles
away.)
My interest in Krakatoa stems
from a Mighty Mouse cartoon
of the same name which I encountered in my pre-pubescent
years. (You probably saw it
too. Remember the theme song
— Krakatoa Katy — and the
grand finale when Mighty
Mouse tied a knot around the
volcano and choked it with his
vapor trail?) I even envisioned
myself making a movie about
Krakatoa someday, and
wrote an overture to the movie
completed with Rule Britannia
leitmotifs. And recently I
acquired a book called Krakatoa by Rupert Furneaux, a good
account of the disaster. So,
being an amateur Krakatolo-
gist, I got the movie soundtrack to add to my collection
of volcanic memorabilia.
I was a bit put off when I saw
the music was done by Frank
DeVol, whose previous scores
include The Dirty Dozen, Cat
Ballou, Guess Who's Coming
to Dinner? as well as the TV
series My Three Sons. I wondered, "Is this the man who
will score a film about one of
the greatest disasters of mankind?"
After listening to the album,
I thought the music was quite
pleasant, in fact, almost too
pleasant. DeVol is quite competent with his writing and
orchestration. (I guess). There's
some nice piccolo riffs thrown
in to symbolize the nautical
aspects of the story, and a few
Debussyan chords to break the
monotony of the selections,
most of which are as innocuous as popular songs.
However, when one considers
what Bronislau Kaper did with
his scores for Mutiny on the
Bounty and Lord Jim, DeVol's
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achievement blanches in comparison. Kaper at least went
to the trouble of consulting a
UCLA professor in Oriental
music while researching his
Lord Jim score. DeVol's Javanese musical efforts sound
like the pseudo-Oriental passages from The King and I.
As well, there's not much music on the record —* original
music. There's only four melodies — East of Java, Just Before Sunrise, Kee Kana Lu,
and An Old Fashioned Girl.
These are each orchestrated
several times, each time slightly differently, or else thrown
into medleys. All of them also
receive vocal treatment, with
words by Mack David which
reached a new low in movie
music lyrics, the old standards
being Que Sera Sera, which
Doris Day sang in The Man
Who Knew Too Much, and
Somewhere My Love, which
wasn't sung in Doctor Zhivago.
What do I consider a good
movie song? Try Days of Wine
and Roses, which is a minor
masterpiece.
Why the music for Krakatoa is
given its particular pop-music
treatment is probably for
strictly commercial reasons.
Consider other soundtrack albums along the same lines,
like   those   from   Bonnie   and
Clyde   and   The   Odd   Couple,
both of which had a minimum
of music. In these two cases,
there are also snippets of dialogue on the record to make
up for the musical vacuum.
You might ask why I'm so uptight about this commerialistic
type of sound track record.
Well, I used to really like
soundtrack records, like those
by Miklos Rozsa — Ben Hur,
King of Kings, El Cid —
where each piece managed to
sound distinctly different, and
brought back memories of the
film. (Why the hell else would
anyone buy such an album?)
Some of the albums were really beautiful, like Maurice
Jarre's Lawrence of Arabia,
Leonard Bernstein's On the
Waterfront, the two mentioned
by Kaper, and Alex North's
score for Spartacus, which is
one of my favorite records.
With Krakatoa, I'm not only
suspicious of the sound track,
but also the film as descibed
in the brief synopsis on the
record cover. History gets hysterically distorted everywhere.
Read Furneaux's book if you
can get a copy somewhere, and
then go and see the movie
when it hits (explodes?) in
town. Maybe you'll be booing
just as much as I probably will.
Friday, March 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
pfage 3hree There are some men
an account of the condition of the poor in Peru
Rick Luxton was born in Peru and went to school in England.
Last October he visited Vancouver and UBC on his way to Peru
where he is currently involved in a literacy programme in the
Barriadas, poor towns outside Lima. Next fall he will return to
England, to Essex University, where he will engage in Latin
American studies. The following report is special to Page Friday.
By RICK LUXTON
Literacy Worker In Peru
THERE were some men in Peru in the Belaunde Terry
government of 1963, who started a policy of intense
industrial growth in order to cut down the flow of imports. They built factories to process the nation's raw materials and national highways to bring those raw materials
from the interior.
For the campesino, the Andean small farmer, the sight of
these new roads meant the beginning of a drive for freedom
from a seventeenth century system. From the times of colonial
development in the Andes the ordinary campesino has laboured under a semi-feudal system of land allotment whereby
he leased land from an hacendado who perhaps owned all the
fertile land in the valley. In return he was bound to work
120 days a year for the absentee landlord (hacendado). The
sight of a highway meant that a campesino could sell the
few belongings he had and head for Lima with its promise
of a twentieth century way of life.
Today these would-be Dick Whittington's stream down into
Lima at the rate of 65-75 thousand a year. On arrival they
discover that almost a million campesinos had the same
idea before them and that all the available amenities have
long been chocked-up by the demand. Unable to find work
or a decent place to live the campesino is soon disillusioned.
He quickly discovers that his city brothers have no time for
him and often laugh at his broken attempts to speak Spanish
rather than his native quechua.
Rejected by the city, the campesino and his family join their
own kind and form a squatter community. Talking with the
people he encounters in these makeshift communities, he discovers that he is not alone in his feelings and his spirit reawakens. Plagued by insecurity he yearns for a piece of land.
Together, the heads of family plan an invasion of a suitable
desert hill near Lima.
Shortly after midnight on the day scheduled for the invasion,
the families move out from the city carrying four large woven
cane mats to build a temporary house with, and all their
other possessions. By morning the once barren hillside has
become a small city and each of the mat huts proudly flies
a Peruvian flag from its roof.
Normally the families take over unused government land
that is of little immediate value. Sometimes there is a battle
in which the police attempt to bulldoze the huts flat and
move the people. Occasionally someone is killed. Usually,
however, the government puts up only nominal resistance to
calm the rich hacendados, and then leaves well alone.
The initial uproar over, the campesinos begin to dig in. The
mat huts give way to solid brick houses and the community
begins the long drive towards respectability. The open sewers
are replaced by underground ones and petitions are sent to the
local council asking for the garbage to be collected. Later,
running water and electricity are put in, and medical centers
opened.
Unfortunately the success of the campesinos in conquering
their hostile environment has only aggrevated an already
existing Peruvian wound. It has encouraged more campesinos
to give up farming and come to Lima. Today there are over
200 such cities or "barriadas" surrounding the capital and
more around other major industrial centers. However, although for the moment the campesino has contributed to the
suffering of his brothers in the sierra by reducing agricultural
manpower, he has probably helped him in the long run by
making the development of education and medicine in the
sierra the only solution to the problem of the barriadas.
7 de Octubre
ON the southeastern edge of Lima lies 7 de Octubre, a
barriada cut into the side of a steep, sandy, rock-strewn
slope. It is little known to the inhabitants of the central
city beyond the fact that it was named after the date of invasion — the 7 of October, 1963. The government considers
it so poor and badly laid out that it has been written off as
an area with a development potential of zero.
But the people who live there seem to think differently.
Slowly they have cleared the rocks, laid provisional roads
and permanent sewers and are in the process of order to
transforming the initial chaotic individualism that created a
nightmare of labyrinth paths, gloomy surroundings and
cramped conditions.
Families work day and night, month after month, digging
the sites for their homes out of the hill. When pick and shovel
fail to break the stubborn rock, they set fire to old tires
beside the rocks. The rock« cracks with the heat and they
begin to scratch out a few more feet of space. The dirt from
the site has to be.carried down the hill in sacks because the
houses are so closely packed tha'
it. Similarly materials, water ai
up daily.
The foundations of their home s«
to develop a way of earning a '
men follow the general pattern
coming self-employed. Falling bs
they find old abandoned shells (
means they obtain parts to restor
into life and starts a new caree
men become cobblers, fruit oi* v-
layers. Usually the wife stays at
keeps a stand in the local marke
to beg or to work as shoeshine t
The influx of more campesinos i
job going, regardless of what th(
love for mechanical things and a
ing the workings of any machine,
they tend to become repairmen
to cars.
Having found a new life, the cai
ambitions of his city brother unt
except for a noticeable lack of
attitudes of the latter. The camp
for education in an industrial cit;
for him to benefit to any great <
gain by being able to read and v
And yet again there is no easy
Peruvian education has been bad]
this century. It is only in recent j
done to mould it into a produc
thirty per cent of the national inc
Unfortunately, ninety per cent of '*
and in the cost of administratior
struction of new schools and te*=
all efforts, there are still 25 th<
provisional environments and o
did not attend school last year
no school to attend.
If these are t^ie conditions preya
worse in the barriadas. In 7 de O
three small schools to serve 12 t
of whom are under the age of fift
up a total of fourteen classrooms t
of packing cases and even these ?
The schools were built by the peo
in the process of building another
does not end there. Few teachers
selves to such schools, especially
the Ministry of Education and thu
A barriada school
ONE of the schools in 7 de
man — Fermin Salazar.
should apply in any enviror
a school and every school a hor
in a bakery and without any for
teacher. After two failures he en<2
ing hard at building a house wh
home at the same time. Using br
classrooms and made desks out ol
whitewashed the walls with the i
away by welders in a nearby ca
doors to all the children willing
For two years Fermin worked o;
covered by a Peace Corps worke;
tional teachers, improved the clas
ials and the methods of teaching,
gram of self-enlightenment by t
meeting lecturers and professors
came into contact with prograrr
suitable method of teaching peopli
with a Canadian Professor of psy<
ers he helped develop a prograai
wanted to teach.
Today, five years after he first arr
is well on the way to fulfilling b
school is like going into a marlr.
selling everything from deter-jen)
to put up a wall and an iron gatt
Even that proved a failure, for oi
the people broke down part of the
are given in two of the classroom
sick are attended to by volunteers
packed to capacity and all atterft
were given up long ago. Instead
veloped from teacher to pupil an*
effect is to leave the teacher won;
than he has learned.
Not satisfied with merely teaching
on to trying to get their mother
fulfill the second part of his mott
by offering powdered milk and os.
came over a two week period,
of their own incentive and once •
problem of how to cope with ov«
three afternoons a week. Betwee
pfage 4our
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 21,  1969 there is nowhere to throw
d food have to be  carried
ttled, the campesinos begin
iving. In 7 de Octubre the
of other barriadas by beck on an Indian ingenuity,
f cars and through various
i it. Finally, the car coughs
r* as a taxi. Otherwise, the
.-getable vendors and brick-
home but occasionally she
;. The children are sent out
oys.
orees everyone to take any
y want to do. They have a
near genius for understand-
If they are given the chance
)f everything from watches
apesino begins to adopt the
il he becomes just like him
the, smug and comfortable
jsirio soon realizes the need
rand although it is too late
•xtent, his children stand to
trite adequately.
road to fulfilling this wish,
y planned or ignored during
■ears that anything has been
live institution. Today over
ome is devoted to education.
;his goes in teachers' salaries
t, leaving little for the con-
ching materials. In spite of
rasand children studying in
ver 800 thousand children
because  there was  simply
iling in Peru, it tends to be
rtubre for example there are
o 15 thousand people many
ieen. The three schools make
a which most desks are made
re not enough to go around,
pie living there and they are
. Unfortunately, the problem
are willing to devote them-
if they are independent of
s lack official recognition.
women are given lessons in reading and writing, knitting and
living on an adequate diet. Although some of them have been
in the barriada for over four years they still tend to retain
the diet they had in the sierra. Meat is still seen as a form of
money and the food eaten is mostly potato, rice and fruit spiced
into a palateable form. While the women are busy learning,
their children are examined by medical students outside, and
their mothers advised on how they should be treated when
they are sick.
Algerian interlude continued
What can be done
rORKING in a barriada can be a very satisfying experience; and yet it remains a disheartening one. For
every person helped, there are three waiting and for
every school and medical center started, there are many more
needed. And every year the need intensifies as more people
come down from the sierra.
And yet the new arrivals show themselves as willing and as
capable as their predecessors to start a new and better life
given the chance. Perhaps the new military government has
seen one way of doing this by taking the amenities and benefits of Lima into the sierra, and in this way giving the campesinos a reason to stay in their birthplace. A start has been made
in this direction by instituting programs to reform and open
up the sierra to new methods of farming and communication.
Unfortunately, the government's efforts are far from organized
and programs tend to overlap and minimize their own potential. An example of this is the much hailed Agrarian Reform
which in many ways has laid the foundations for modernizing
agriculture and thus improving the lot of the campesino who
still suffers under the yoke of seventeenth century customs.
But the campesinos who are coming down to Lima today see
it as an attempt to keep them from organizing, since it forbids
them to live in communities aimed at developing into communes with self supporting schools and medical centers.
Instead the campesino has to live on the land he receives as
his own under the terms of the Reform.
Nevertheless, things are beginning to move. At least the government is taking an active interest and some of its work is
bound to have a positive effect. Should a way be found to give
the people living in the sierra a chance to educate themselves,
to treat themselves medically and to share in the amenities
city peaple take for granted, it will no longer be a matter
of what can be done but one of what can't be done.
PFEND
came as we attempted to hitch-hike to Oran. It was a disaster.
We couldn't shake off a gladsome welcoming party of a dozen
little boys and their brothers. They bought us ice cream bars and
brought us water and departed much good advise in exchange for
postcards and stamps and; matchbooks — 'Know Canada Better'
— and travel folders, anything, in fact, that they could lay their
eyes on. What we take so much for granted, the slick magazines
sulking on the coffee tables all over North America, would be
a bonus for these kids. We had a long ride into Algiers with a
young soldier and a student who are part of a new class of
Algerians, the young, educated people. Both the soldier and the
student had studied in the USSR — political economy and engineering — and they were proud of their revolution, of their
prospects for the future and very aware of all the problems that
their country faces. For although education is given a priority in
Algeria, they have not yet been able to overcome the gap that
the French interests left when they were nationalized, or thrown
out of the country. Technological and financial assistance are
still relied upon as Algeria builds its nationhood. They are
living in a land that still bears the scars of war and revolution;
the rusty frame of a burnt-out truck, the shell-scarred ruins and
bunkers and pill-boxes, the fading anti-French slogans painted
on walls, and nests of barbed wire. The last night we spent in
Algiers, we became the guests of a shepherd who allowed us to
sleep in his little hut, high in the mountains. Even in that remote
place, which served as a sort of cafe for the men of the village,
we noticed a familiar poster on the wall calling for the suppression of counter-revolutionaries. Down in the village there was a
stucco house, much better than any of the other dwelling places
in the community. It was empty, abandoned. It was the mayor's
old house, we were told. And what happened to the mayor?
One of our hosts drew his fingers across his throat in reply to our
question.
Octubre is the effort of one
Folowing a motto he feels
unent, 'every home should be
ae', Fermin gave up his job
mal training set out to be a
led up in 7 de Octubre work-
ich could be a school and a
icks and mud he built three
Fard packing crates. Having
residue from carbide thrown
r dump, Fermin opened his
to come.
a his own until he was dis-
r. Together they found addi-
ssrooms and teaching mater-
Fermin embarked on a pro-
enrolling at university and
from abroad. Eventually he
-learning in a search for a
} to read and write. Working
:hology and two other teach-
i suitable for the people he
ived in 7 de Octubre, Fermin
is ambition. Going up to his
■>t. Outside there are people
to bananas and he has had
> to stem the flow of people,
l the first day of enrolment
wall to get in. Inside classes
s and in the yard, while the
; in the third. The rooms are
pts to keep the pupils quiet
a moving dialogue has de-
1 pupil to pupil. The overall
lering if he has taught more
children, Fermin has moved
s to come in an attempt to
o. Initially he tempted them
tmeal to all the women who
Today, however, they come
again we are faced with the
•r a hundred women coming
•n two o'clock and five, the
Friday, March 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
pfage 5ive Graduate Student Association
SPRING GENERAL
MEETING
Thursday, March 27 —1.00 p.m
SUB BALLROOM
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS
m^
w^
Here's your brand new Constitution with seven on the floor and bucket
seats.
Should a constitution be promoted by hard-sell or soft-sell techniques?
Hurry to your closest General Meeting and see this beauty! It was written for
a small liberal arts college which referred to it only on election days. Or how
about . . . 'Volksconstitutions' does NOT do il again; if you are tired of trading
your constitution in every year, you will be glad to hear that this one has the
same bugs in it as the last one.
Neither of these techniques is likely to appeal but, because of the importance
which the G.S.A. Executive places in the new constitution, it is trying to make
the selling of it as attractive as possible. If you are a member of the G.S.A.
please come to the General Meeting-Party on Thursday, March 27 at 1:00 p.m.
and mix pleasure with business.
The new constitution proposed for the G.S.A. is not a revision. It is a complete change. Its three main features are a compact, stripped-down, seven-member
executive equipped for "political" action and freed from the weight of housekeeping duties; an assembly of departmental representatives; and a fail-safe provision in case the representative assembly never goes into action.
Two pressures for change in the constitution have become especially important this year. It is necessary, first,, to make the structure of the executive relevant to the tasks which are before it. The second pressure has been to make
I.     Name
The name of the organization shall be the
Graduate Student Association hereinafter referred to as the G.S.A.
II.    Objective
The objective of the G.S.A. is to promote the
welfare of graduate students and of the University and to promote and serve the social,
intellectual, cultural and recreational activities
of graduate students.
III. Membership
A. All students at the University of British Columbia who are registered in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and who are in attendance at the
campus of the University.
B: Associate membership, which shall not confer
the right to vote in the assemblies of the Association, may be granted by by-law.
C. Honorary membership, whieh shall not confer
the right to vote in the assemblies of the Association, may be granted by by-law.
IV. Administrative Structure
The G.S.A. shall be administered by two bodies,
an assembly and an executive: the Graduate
Representative Assembly hereinafter referred
to as the G.R.A. and the Graduate Executive
Council hereinafter referred to as the G.E.C.
General meetings of the G.S.A. will be held
according to Article XI and will have the
authority specified in Article XI. From the
time at which the first officers, who assume
positions under this constitution, do . assume
those positions, until such time as the G.R.A.
has met once in formal session, the G.S.A. shall
pfage 6ix
*■*•«? j***f   -**.$
the tasks themselves or, at least, the task-selection process, relevant to the general
membership of the association.
The old constitution apparently never has provided a properly structured
executive. Custom and expediency, not the written constitution, have legitimized
the existence of three extra persons on the executive and redistribution of the
work-load. Now that the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre is about
lo receive special status under the B.C. Societies Act some officers' duties will
decline considerably or completely to the extent that full-time staff in the Centre
take them over.
Another short-coming of the old "system" has been the division which exists
between the executive and the membership. For reasons which are not all related
lo the constitution, the executive has often been at a loss in assessing the wishes
and needs of the meir-bership. And the members have often expressed that they
do not know whal their executive is doing if they were aware of its existence in
the first place.
The proposed constitution tackles all these problems ai once. By restricting
the core of the executive to a very smajl size and by providing, through the
device of easily changed by-laws, for a commission structure of government, it
facilitates the setting-up and preservation of an executive in which everybody has
a set of tasks — tasks which can be rationally re-defined and re-distributed as
the years pass. By allowing for an assembly—an assembly which may control
policy through its veto-power over the budget—il provides for strong links of
communication between the members in their departments and their executive.
be administered by the G.E.C. which under
these extraordinary conditions shall not be
bound by the resolutions of any assembly other
than a general meeting of the G.S.A. except as
provided under the Constitution and By-laws
of the Alma Mater Society of the University of
British Columbia.
V.    Officers
A. The President. The President of the G.S.A.
shall act as its Chief Executive Officer and will
call all meetings of the G.E.C. and be its Chairman. He will appoint the Vice-President of the
G.S.A. He will be an ex-officio member of all
committees appointed by the G.E.C, supervise
all expenditure of funds and uphold the constitution. He shall represent the G.S.A. in dealings
with the Alma Mater Society and may nominate
representatives and alternates to AMS Council.
He shall nominate representatives of the G.S.A.
to the Board of Directors of the Thea Koerner
House Graduate Student Centre.
B. The Vice-President. The Vice-President of the
G.S.A. shall be the Vice-Chairman of the G.E.C.
and of the G.R.A. He shall, in the absence of
the President, perform the functions of the
President. He shall be the Public Relations
Officer of the G.S.A. and in this regard he shall
be responsible to the President.
C. The Assembly Co-ordinator. The Assembly Coordinator shall be the Chairman of the G.R.A.
He shall call the meetings of the G.R.A. He
shall represent the G.R.A. on the G.E.C. and
ensure that the policy of the G.R.A. is effected
in the program of the G.E.C. He shall preside
at joint meetings of the G.R.A. and G.E.C. and
general meetings of the G.S.A.
D. The Secretary. The Secretary of the G.S.A.
shall be custodian of the records and shall keep
or cause to be kept the minutes of the G.E.C,
Advertisement
the G.R.A., their joint meetings and the general
meetings of the G.S.A. He shall announce to
the membership any proposed amendments to
the constitution.
E. The Treasurer. The Treasurer of the G.S.A.
shall cause to be kept its book of account; shall
arrange for the custody and disbursement of
the funds pursuant to appropriate direction by
the G.E.C and shall submit statements at least
annually to the G.R.A.
F. Subordinate Officers. The G.E.C. may appoint
other subordinate officers who may be given
the right to vote at the time of appointment.
VI.    Graduate Executive Council
A. Membership. The G.E.C. shall consist of the
officers of the G.S.A. and the commissioners
(Article IX). Any vacancy, excepting that of the
Assembly Co-ordinator, shall be filled by the
G.E.C. within 14 days using any means of selection at the discretion of the G.E.C. A vacancy
in the position of Assembly Co-ordinator shall
be filled within 30 days by a nominee of the
G.E.C. who receives the approval of the G.R.A.
as indicated by a simple main motion in that
assembly.
B. Duties.
(1) To prepare a comprehensive programme and
budget for submission to the joint meetings
of the G.R.A. and the G.E.C.
(2) To make such decisions as are necessary to
administer efficiently all business within the
policy of the G.R.A.
(3) To hire employees at its discretion and define their duties.
(4) To appoint such special committees as it
deems necessary.
(5) To act as  an official liaison between the
Friday, March 21,  1969 PROPOSED NEW CONSTITUTION (Cont'd)
G.S.A. and the Alma Mater Society, the
University and other organizations.
(6) To adopt such rules and regulations governing the work of the commissions and its
committees as it deems necessary.
<7) To  appoint  annually the Treasurer.
C. Voting. The Chairman shall have no vote at
G.E.C meetings. A tied vote on a resolution
shall cause the resolution to fail.
,D. Quorum. Four members of the G.E.C, one of
whom shall be the President, or Vice-President,
will constitute a quorum.
E. Meetings.
(1) Any member of the G.E.C. may call a meeting giving 3 days notice.
(2) Meetings will normally be open to all members of the University community but may
be closed to any or all persons on resolution
of the  G.E.C
VII.    Graduate Representative
Assembly
A. Membership.
(1) The G.R.A. shall consist of not less than
twenty-five ordinary members of the G.S.A.
representing not less than fifteen departments participating in the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The representatives shall be
elected by members of the G.S.A. in their
respective departments. The G.R.A. may
set by bylaw, on approval of the by-law by
G.E.C., what procedures will constitute
proper conduct of an election.
(2) A member of members of the G.S.A. from a
particular department, may on the grounds of
improper conduct of an election, but on no
other grounds, dispute the authority of a
representative to act for their department
by presenting the nature of their dispute in
writing to the Assembly Co-ordinator. The
Assembly Co-ordinator shall then investigate
the dispute and present his findings to the
G.R.A. The G.R.A. may then suspend the
representation of that department until such
time as another election has been conducted
by the members of the department according
to procedures approved by the G.R.A.
(3) Every department, participating in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, for which any
member of the G.S.A. has provided to the
Assembly Co-ordinator a written statement
of election procedure used in that department, is entitled to at least one voting representative on the G.R.A. Additional representation for departments which include
more than 50 members of the G.S.A. may
be provided according to the terms of the
representation by-law. The subdivisions
which exist in some faculties, but which
are not termed "department" by the University, may be termed "departments" for
the purpose of representation on the G.R.A.
B. Duties.
(1) To determine G.S.A. policy limited only by
the constitution and resolutions of general
meetings of the G.S.A. Executive authority
shall be delegated to the G.E.C. by the
G.R.A. upon acceptance by the G.E.C. of
the policy recommendations.
(2) To appoint such special committees as it
deems necessary.
(3) To affirm or reject the appointee for Vice-
president and the appointees for the Board
of Directors of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre as named by the
President.
(4) To affirm or reject the appointee for Treasurer as named by the G.E.C.
C. Voting. The Chairman, the Treasurer, and the
Secretary shall have no vote at G.R.A. meetings. A tied vote on a resolution shall cause the
resolution to fail.
D. Quorum. 60% of the voting members of the
G.R.A. will constitute a quorum, provided that
at least 40% of the departments registered with
the Assembly Co-ordinator for the purpose of
sending representatives   are   represented.
E. Meetings.
(1) The G.R.A. shall meet within  10 days:
days:
(a) at the call of the Assembly Co-ordinator
(b) on resolution of the G.E.C.
(c) on petition by not less than 1 % of the
G.S.A.   membership
(d) on petition by not less than 1*0 members of the G.R.A.
(2) Meetings will normally be open to all mem-
Graduate Student Association
SPRING
GENERAL MEETING
Thursday, March 27th, 7969
1:00 P.M.
SUB. BALLROOM
AGENDA
1. MINUTES
2. PRESENTATION  OF PROPOSED  NEW
CONSTITUTION
3. EXECUTIVE REPORTS
To be followed by a free Punch Party
bers of the University community but may
be closed to any or all persons on a resolu--
tion of the G.R.A. which receives a 2/3
majority.
VIM.    Joint Meetings of the
G.R.A. and the G.E.C.
A. Voting. The Chairman, the Treasurer and the
Secretary shall have no vote. A tied vote on a
resolution shall cause the resolution to fail.
B. Quorum. 60% of the voting members of the
G.R.A., provided that at least 40% of the departments registered with the Assembly Coordinator for the purpose of sending representatives are represented, and four voting members of the G.E.C, one of whom shall be the
President or Vice-President, will constitute a
quorum.
C. Meetings.
<1) At least one joint meeting shall be held
between March 31st and October  15th.
(2) The G.R.A. or the G.E.C. may, by resolution, call for a joint meeting within 10 days.
(3) A joint meeting will normally be open to
all members of the University community
but may be closed to any or all persons on
resolution of the joint meeting.
IX.    Commissions
The G.E.C. and the G.R.A. shall establish commissions by by-law. Each commission shall be
chaired by a commissioner who shall be elected
according   to   the   elections   by-law.
X. Annual Elections
The President, the Assembly Co-ordinator, the
Secretary, and the commissioners shall be
elected between January 15 and March 31st
according to the by-laws, and shall hold office
from March 31st for twelve months. Members
of the G.R.A. will normally be elected during
this same period and will normally hold office
from March 31st for twelve months. The bylaws may allow departments considerable flexibility in this regard.
XI. General Meetings
A. A general meeting of the G.S.A. shall be called
by the Secretary within 30 days on receipt of
a resolution or petition:
(1) on resolution of the G.R.A.
(2) on resolution of the G.E.C.
(3) on petition of  2%   of the  G.S.A.  membership.
B. All resolutions passed at general meetings are
binding on the G.R.A. and the G.E.C.
C. 10% of the membership of the G.S.A. will constitute  a   quorum.
D. At least one general meeting of the G.S.A. shall
be called in the Spring term.
E. Notice of a general meeting shall be posted in
the Graduate Student Centre and placed in
The Ubyssey continuously seven days prior to
the meeting.
XII.    By-laws
By-laws may be adopted or amended by two-
thirds affirmative vote of the voting members
of the G.R.A. and a majority vote of the G.E.C.
XIII.    Amendments to the
Constitution
A. Initiation. A proposed amendment, supported
by a petition of 2% of the G.S.A., or by resolution of the G.E.C. or the G.R.A. shall be delivered to the Vice-President.
B. Notice. The Vice-President and the Secretary
shall give notice of a proposed amendment at
least 7 days prior to a G.R.A. meeting by posting it in the Graduate Student Centre and
placing it in The Ubyssey continuously until
the day of the meeting.
C. Voting. The G.R.A. shall debate the proposed
amendment and present it with a recommendation to a general meeting. Any amendment may
be decided by a referendum, and shall be considered adopted if it receives a two-thirds affirmative vote. The minimum number of ballots
must be equal to a quorum for a general meeting.
D. Adoption. The amendment is adopted if it receives a two-thirds affirmative vote of those
present at a general meeting, or of the ballots
cast in a referendum.
XIV.    Authority of the
Constitution and its
Amendments
No portion of this Constitution shall in any
way be interpreted as repugnant to the Alma
Mater Society Constitution and Code.
MEETING FOLLOWED BY
FREE PUNCH PARTY
Friday, March 21, 1969
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—art by Dolsen
Next week will be a big week for poetry at UBC.
The best comes last, with the opening on Friday of the Fine
Arts Gallery's major exhibition of Concrete Poetry. This
exhibition, which features recent work by Vancouver's Michael
Morris and New York's Ray Johnson, will be the most comprehensive coverage yet in Vancouver of the international concrete poetry movement. In next week's Page Friday, there
will be a long essay and introduction to the exhibition by
PF's ace critic Stephen Scobie, himself a concrete poet and
one of the exhibition's organizers.
In association with the exhibition, there will be a reading
next Friday at noon in Buchanan 106 by Canada's leading
concrete poet, b.p. nichol, whose sound poems should make
fascinating listening. This reading will be one of the major
events of the exhibition, and (apart from Ginsberg) the biggest
poetry event of the term.
Earlier in the week, another Toronto poet, Mike Handelman,
will be reading his poetry. Handelman hitched from Toronto
to see a girl, and ended up seeing the English Department
instead. His readings have been very popular in several classes
and seminars. Performing Arts, who put on that groovy film
of Finnegan's Wake last week, will be presenting Handelman
on Tuesday at noon in the Party Room of SUB.
re. Joyce
The Editor, Page Friday, Sir:
Once again the Massed Advenger mistake pun in hand to
write the wrongs committed by ignollectuals. Ontheday
March 19, 1969, Performing Aughts sponsored ashowing
offa flim bassed onna James Joyce novel. The novelle
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ising for the fline is a glawering terror on Prefabricating
Carts' parts. The originall title was a typickle Joycian
funpun and was extremisteryly realevent to the theme
ofthe novel. Joyce was funning the world "wake" whirge
can mien a funereal or to awaken. The dubble meaning
of wake in the title is essendalential to the novel, whitch
is basemented upon the bicyclic nascure of ourstories andof
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Friday, March 21, 1969 Friday, March 21, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 15
The year end report of
your AMS president:
By DAVE ZIRNHELT
The students' council of the AMS is a small group
of people who have undertaken tasks in the AMS.
Far too few do: they are to be commended for the
time they spend. With a few exceptions, however,
council does not really try to be innovative in the
struggle for reform. A solid executive is necessary.
The real problem is for the council to consider itself
collectively responsible for leading. Leading means
drawing people out of one understanding, or attitude
or confusion, that they have and offering solutions
or at least the way to get solutions. The individual
member of the AMS (which is you, baby) must not
look only to the hardworking people in instituted
positions. Surely to hell you can do something on
your own. We try to mobilize as many people doing
something constructive as we can. Still there are not
enough coming forth.
Students' Council
Councillors that were in town over last summer
are to be commended for the hours they put in on
matters relating to the Student Union Building.
Throughout this year, however, many councillors
never did attend any meetings. They failed you as
your representatives. Those who did not come because council is not dealing with important matters
did not try to bring those matters that they considered important to the executive. If people do not try
0 to lead themselves then they are not justified in
screaming irrelevancy and condemning the leadership in the form of the executive. That is too easy!
I caution you to elect those people who are willing
to devote much time to their job as a member of a
body that is supposed to give leadership.
It is vital that you the students remember that
your council representatives and the executive are
responsible to you. That means that you can recall
any one of them if they are not responding to your
needs. If they are not remaining accountable to the
students then the students must demand that they
are accountable.
You can invite your councillors to your meetings
and you can come to their metings. The president's
door is usually open.
The method of operation of council is such that
there is not adequate input for policy and action
programs to council to make important decisions that
affect the students at UBC. The executive are relied
on too much for policy input. One solution is to
institute a commission structure into the AMS code
of operations that will place each and every councillor into a policy innovation position. These revisions to the code of operations will enable students
who are not elected by the student body in a general
election to participate in policy decision-making
procedures. It is the desirable end to enable everyone who wants and is able to participate to do so.
Only then can we create a viable, strong Alma Mater
Society. An active society member is the only socially
useful one!
Administration
In relations with the administration, we have
had a year that began with the issuance of the document The Future of the University, more commonly
known as the Zirnhelt Report and that had ended
with no continuing strained relations. However, as
I have said elsewhere the university has not changed
a great deal — not that any realist would have expected it to.
The real change in the university will come
when its governing bodies, Senate and Board, with
full participation by university — 'equal but different' members of the university community —
debate the goals of the university and society and
come to some rational allocation of resources on the
basis of those goals and priorities. Only then will
we be able to restructure the university. Everyone
doing one's own thing in the university—(for some
studying anything, for others certain kinds of research, others a meal ticket, others the trairiing to
screw dollars out of somebody else)—is not going
to build a better society. A 'crise de conscience' is
entirely necessary for change. That 'awareness' will
bring about a revolution by consent. The other possible revolution is by destruction and violence . .. .
the kind that is threatening so many campuses today.
Those in leadership positions in institutions must
learn to act in a positive direction for change, instead
of waiting to let things get so bad that they just
happen, causing a defensive reaction. "Uptight
people" have no excuse for not having acted. Unloved people have no justification for not loving.
Faculty Club
The occupation of the faculty club was a misdirected aberration; there were no demands, no goals
of the occupation until a few people sat down a few
hours later and came up with some. However, we
learned. We must accept some responsibility as
leaders for not having channeled dissent into programs of constructive change. The teach-in that followed did have some highly desirable effects. However, with the exception of one major post-teach-in
group the activity of that day was not meaningfully
sustained. We should ask ourselves why it takes a
crisis to make us want to move. The next teach-in
should be an examination of our collective conscience
here at UBC and it should happen early in the fall
and be the kick-off for the discussion that will end
in action for change.
If the destruction of the university would bring
the millenium, I too, would be for it. If dissenters
are not wittingly aiming at the destruction of. the
university then by their actions they may destroy
it spiritually instead of radically reforming its nature,
purpose and direction. Any activity that will do
nothing but incur a reaction by the government or
the public such that the university is either strangled
by the lack of funds or so totally destroyed humanly
that it cannot function is to be condemned.
There is no substitute for hard work for that
revolutionary change. Arts I was an example of hard
work. Other manifestations of hard work are not
readily discernable. That is the real revolution.
The greatest single change in the university has
got to be a revolution in interpersonal relations between people with roles in institutions and those
outside the institutions. Attitudes must be changed.
People must be shaken emotionally, but shake ups
must not be destructive to people as feeling human
beings.
Education Reform
We did not have the executive manpower to
work continually on academic reform and on general
interdisciplinary and interfaculty work. One of the
revisions that is brought forward to the next students'
council meeting will be to establish an "Education
Commission" that will deal with all matters of university reform.
Very early in September, I commissioned some
people to do some research for council.. About twenty
to thirty students met on a regular basis to discuss
the matters they were researching. The areas of
investigation were university government, university
finance, curriculum, the philosophy of education at
the university. They also undertook an extensive
attitude survey to determine accurately the attitudes
of students towards various aspects of university life,
so that the new council will be able to build a political education program on the basis of some empirical
data. Since university reform is really a matter of
changing attitudes toward the university, then it
would seem very useful to know thoroughly what
those attitudes are that need to be changed to build
a better university. It is preposterous to begin bargaining until we know what we are talking about.
ZIRNHELT
Most of us do not know, but there is an increasing
resolve to learn.
Student Union Building
One of the major problems that the AMS faced
this year was not relating its undeclared priorities
to its budget and financial priorities. It seems that
we can more effectively spend the money we do have.
That is not to say more efficiently.
The Student Union Building has done its share
to dispell restiveness among students at UBC this
year. It gave room for many meetings and activities
that were sadly needed. Unfortunately, there is not
a room in SUB large enough to hold a quorum at a
general meeting, but then I am not sure that I want
SUB to be a huge barn. However, since there is a
need for a large gathering place at the university,
I recommend that we immediately begin initial preparation for stage two of SUB which is a 1,500 plus
seat theatre. SUB has taken the time of many people
during last summer. It opened three weeks late,
which is not bad as far as the opening of a building
goes. SUB stands as a concrete monument to students'
time and dollars. Remember $15 of the $24 student
fee goes toward paying of the capital cost.
Winter Sports Centre
Students' council in co-operation with the board
of governors have got the expansion of the Winter
Sports Centre under construction. The date of completion is October of this year. It will provide the
badly needed additional two ice surfaces for student
athletic activity. Weekly participation in that centre
by students will be in the neighborhood of 8,000 to
9,000 people. The joint venture for physical recreation between the administration and the students is
a model of other co-operation on vital matters. The
$1 million expansion can be converted into a speed
skating rink by the removal of a few centre boards.
This will give UBC the second largest ice surface in
the world. No student money will be used to pay for
that facility. The AMS borrowed the money necessary—that is all.
Bureaucracy
The AMS bureaucracy has served well the auditing and accounting functions of council and all the
nearly two hundred subsidiary organizations. It is
not without need for review. A review that we have
not been abje to conduct this year but which the
incoming executive must review for it has people
with experience in the AMS operations that last
year's executive did not have.
Canadian Union ot Students
UBC is now out of CUS after a disappointing
year. It remains for UBC to do the necessary positive
work to bring the national union back to a viable
operation. If students in Canada want a voluntary
union, then let those very few form their own and
let the majorities of students on each campus form
their kind of union. The national union must perform the service function of being a communication
between students in Canada. It must also serve the
research need of the majority of students in Canada.
It must seek to develop those programs that will
result in action. This main function will be to concentrate on just a few areas of national concern
that can realistically be expected to be acted on.
For example, a national program educating students
to the societal problems that the universities are not
facing let alone tackling. The university is, as I have
said elsewhere, failing society.
B.C. Union ot Students
Council has taken an active part in the formative
stages of the B.C. Union of Students which is to
supercede the B.C. Assembly of Students that was
defunct for many reasons such as the lack of permanence and continuity from year to year.. BCUS
does not have the high schools as members as BCAS
did. We should help to create a high school union of
students on a provincial basis. In the meantime we
have enough problems at the post secondary level
to occupy our time. BCUS is planning to have an
executive secretary that will do all the administrative detail needed to hold regular and frequent
meetings. It has been criticized for not having a
policy. It is true it has not much policy. Policy takes
time to evolve. BCUS is still in the formative stages.
The third formation meeting is this weekend at
Selkirk College. BCUS is essentially a collection of
students representing various student bodies. Once it
To page 18
See: ZIRNHELT Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 21,  1969
U.B.C. Liberals present . . .
Burnaby Central
HOMECOMING
ALL FORMER
STUDENTS
MAY 14
at the School
8:00 p.m.
Paul Gerln-Lajoie
(Former Quebec Education Minister)
Friday, March 28th - Noon
SUB. L & M ROOM 207
Canadian Poet and Wanderer
MIKE HANDELMAN
reads from his unpublished  book .  . .
"BAUBLES FOR A GIANT BALANCE"
Tuesday, March 25 at 12:30
in SUB PARTY ROOM
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Ttuman Capotes
IN
COLD
BLOOD
Written for the Screen and Directed by
Richard Brooks
FRIDAY -12:30 -
6:30 - 9:00
ADMISSION 50c
SATURDAY -
7:00 - 9:00
SUB THEATRE
Finlay, Hodge agree
from page  1
Outgoing treasurer Donn
Aven complained that The
Ubyssey has failed as a valid
communications function on
the campus.
"They do not present both
sides of issues and their attitude is not one of co-operation," he said.
Finlay countered that at no
time during the past year has
a member of the executive discussed policy with the paper's
staff and at no time has council requested an article be
printed.
Finlay said there is no way
a newspaper can operate with
freedom of editorial policy
under the resolution proposed
by the executive.
"It's a black or white issue.
There is no grey. Either a paper has freedom or it is under
autocratic control."
He also asked what alternatives council offered if the staff
of The Ubyssey walked out as
it voted to in the event of Fin-
lay's  rejection.
"And I question the right
of this executive — of which
half the members are in office
by acclamation — to dictate
the content of the paper," he
said.
Near the end of debate
Hodge asked Finlay if he
would favor a gentleman's
agreement on co-operation
rather than enforced guarantee.
Replied Finlay: "It has always been my stand that the
paper and the AMS can cooperate but it must be the editor's final choice what is printed in the paper."
Following the meeting and
the support voiced for The
Ubyssey and editor-elect Finlay, Hodge; met Finlay for discussion.
It was agreed that the paper
shall print such material submitted by council that is
worthy but the final decision
shall rest with the editor and
the editorial board.
PANEL DISCUSSION ON
The Sino-Soviet Border Conf liet
Headed by Dr. C. BRYNER
with Mr. O'hanganian and Mr. Solecki
*
Today    12:30    Bu 104
FINANCE COMMITTEE
4 Members at Large
Applications for A.M.S. Finance Committee
will be accepted until Wednesday, March 26.
Apply in writing, stating experience and  reasons for
application to:
Chuck Campbell, AMS Treasurer, SUB
INTERVIEWS WILL FOLLOW
LOOK TO KITIMAT
This growing community with expanding school facilities
offers opportunities at all grade levels and in almost every
subject area both in the elementary and secondary fields
for September, 1969.
Modern, well-equipped schools; progressive educational programme; active support for profesisonal
in-service programme; summer school assistance of
$60.00 per unit after probationary year; internship
programme for May and June; full credit for equivalent teaching experience outside B.C., moving and
travel allowance; housing purchase assistance;
group life insurance and medical plan—cost shared
by Board.
EB                $5315-   7659
SC/PC
$6608-10173
EA                 5963-   8979
SB/PB
7254-11636
PE(B.Ed.EI) 6739-10384
SA/PA
7900-12865
Persons interested in teaching positions in School District
No. 80 (Kitimat) are invited to contact district representatives through the Office of Student Services (Placement),
U.B.C.
Interviews on Campus will be held—9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Monday, March 24 - Tuesday, March 25 Friday, March 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
UBC alumini  fund   passes  goal
The UBC Alumni Fund has collected $250,289 during its 1968-
1969   campaign.
This is $25,000 over the target figure and more than $40,-
000 over the amount collected
Finance
positions
now open
Applications are now being
accepted for positions on the
finance committee for 1969-70
by Chuck Campbell, AMS treasurer, SUB.
Applications should state experience and reasons for applying and reach the AMS by
Wednesday, March 26.
The committee meets weekly to allocate funds for conferences, symposia, subsidiary
publications, etc. and approves
all contracts in excess of $100.
Applications close Wednesday, March 26.
Anti-war
movement
debate
Members of two anti-war
groups will debate the direction of the anti-war movement
in Vancouver at noon today in
Bu. 100.
Brian Slocock will debate
the position of an ad hoc committee which is organizing a
march April 5 in support of
the Vietnam Liberation Front.
Bob McKee, of the Vietnam
Mobilization Committee will
debate in support of an end-
the-war march on April 6.
Varsitu    D^
43^°0,f 7!3°'':3«
"A DELICATE MASTERPIECE..
IT OFFERS BEAUTY,
SENSUALITY, AND
PERFECT TASTE!"
-GZNnjH£NWfORK£R
MICHELE MORGAN
MICHEL PICCOLI
PIERRE CLEMENTI ,„„
CATHERINE DENEUVE.-.
Benjamin
THE DIARY OF M
IHHOCMYOUHGBOr
in 1967-1968.
Money for the fund is donated by former UBC graduates. It
is used to provide scholarships,
cutural events, symposiums and
other benefits for students.
Murray McKenzie, fund
chairman for 1969-1970 said the
donations had not been adverse
ly affected by student unrest.
"We like to think that this
is because the graduates and
friends of the university recognize that the fund is oriented
toward providing the extras
that can make the university
experience more rewarding to
students."
£   iMmi&m
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
Plesciibtiott Optical
Student Discount  Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
DUTHIE BOOKS
Now 4 Locations to Serve You
OUR  U.B.C.  BRANCH
4560 W. 1 Oth AVE.   -   224-7012
and  at
9T9 ROBSON   -   684-4496
1032 W. HAST! NGS        -        688-7434
670 SEYMOUR ST.   -   685-3627
DUTHIE BOOKS
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 86
(CRESTON-KASLO)
District Representatives will be available tor
interviews with prospective teachers on MONDAY, MARCH 24th.
Please   check   interview  sheets   at   the   Office   of
Student Services, West Mall, to arrange interview time.
Students may also contact our representative
during School District Orientation Day programs
on Friday, March 21st at the Armoury.
GRADUATE
STUDENT ASSN
Grad.   Students
i
The New Constitution
Otters You:
Participation at the Departmental
level
2. A more viable Executive structure
3. A redefinition of the aims and
purposes of the G.S.A.
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
FINANCE COMMITTEE
Applications are now being received for individuals
interested in serving on the finance committee of student
council. Please state reasons for interest and qualifications in a written letter and submit to Chuck Campbell,
A.M.S. Treasurer, Room 228 SUB or Box 97 before 4:30
Wednesday, March 26th.
£n„r *49 *>
Any Color-ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us... AND REALLY SAVE !
f
OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES
Complete from $9.95    Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
At These Locations Only
VANCOUVER
677 Granville        —        Opp. The Bay       —        681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale 987-2264 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  21,  1969
HIGH IS A PRCBING AWESOME FUM.
"ABOUT THIS SKIN THING, YOU'VE GOT
TO MAKE UP YOUR MIND, DON'T SHOW IT
ALL, OR SHOW IT RIGHT."
-Larry Kent
"... AN OUTCRY AGAINST THE
CANADIAN    ESTABLISHMENT.'
SHOWN AT TME
-    BERLIN FESTIVAL
1968
SUB. Aud.
Wednesday, March 26
HrJt, -feM, 7-00. I MO
ADMISSION $1
Show your AltB or 11_ Af-tRY KE1
FMralty Qu-d
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUEXDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
224-0034 __ 4397 W. 10th
VARSITY
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LTD.
(*sso)
A Complete
Automotive Service
All  Mod.li - AH  Malm
"32 Years at fhh Locatta-**-*
10 Ave W* Bianca 224-7424
Zirnhelt reports on year
from page 15
has some idea of what policy
should be it will go to the students with its policy. This
should happen at UBC in early
fall. A political action program in B.C. is essential. No
one who looks at the situation
of higher education in this
province will deny that something must be done. It will
take time to get to the people
of the province. It will be
hard work and we must work
together with the faculty and
the board of governors. This is
a time for unity. We must
know what it is we want
though. Students must not renege on the responsibility they
have to society to help institute a proper education of the
citizenry. It is to 15 years from
now that we must look. That
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Truman Capote's P***^
IN
COLD
BLOOD
Written for the Screen and Directed by
Richard Brooks
■*<np ^r
FRIDAY-12:30-
6:30 - 9:00
ADMISSION 50c
SATURDAY -
7:00 - 9:00
SUB THEATRE
is 1984. That is an ominous
year for many reasons. It is
for our children and for all
those that follow us into higher
education for higher purposes
that we have an obligation.
Such obligation to mankind
must not be taken lightly.
Hight School and
Community Visitation
I rate the high school and
community visitation program
as highly successful because
much media coverage was obtained and we got a message
across to thousands of parents
and students about the nature
of the reforms that were pending in he university. I believe
the program did much to dispel the fear that the general
public has about University
unrest. That ought to be continued next year but it should
be very disciplined in its approach. That means that two
or three items of information
must be communicated in order to be effective. If it is
province wide, then we will
begin getting to the people.
Unfortunately we will not be
able to have the size of program that Students' Council
would have liked simply because the fee raise did not pass.
In the absence of an expensive
campaign, each one of you can
take it upon yourself to do
your share when you are working throughout the province
this summer.
Your AMS president will be
working full time for you.
Therefore, I recommend that
the president be paid a salary
of about $300 per month as he
is in most of the other big
universities like the University of Toronto. The sixty to
seventy hour per week that is
consistently put by the senior
executive warrants this. He
should not be required to enroll as taking nine units as at
present either, for that is unrealistic. However, a president
aat
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HURRY WHILE SELECTION IS GOOD
\\
LEXANDER &
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XELSON
PPLIANCES LID.
Phone: 228-9088
ought to take at least one
course just to keep in touch
wih the reality of the classroom.
The executives, especially
the president should have an
executive assistant to aid him
in some of the administrative
tasks that he has to perform
and to go to some of the meetings that he ought to go to
and write some of the policy
papers that he has not time
to write. A president's flexibility as to the allocation of his
time is essential to his exercise of leadership. His time is
best spent talking and trying
to mobilize people for creation of a very active student
government. There seems no
way to get rid of the heavy
responsibilities to anyone else.
The other employees of the
AMS are working hard as it
is. By a reshuffling of staff and
the reallocation of some of the
administrative costs to the
SUB operation, the AMS
should at no cost to the student be able to hire the assistant. Volunteer student assistance cannot be relied on since
there are studies and exams
still are with us as are essays.
Hare's   Resignation
The resignation of Dr. F.
Kenneth Hare was a sad loss
for the university and for the
student body. We made him
an honorary member of the
student body as a tribute to his
sincere efforts to put our case
to the faculty and the public.
The odds we know are disturbing. I have no doubts that
Dean Gage will carry on as
he has for many years putting
in very long hours for this
university and for the students.
Student participation at vari-
ious levels of university government and in the academic
operation of the university has
been the subject of weekly
meetings of a student-senate
committee that was appointed
by senate and by council to
discuss the reform brief that
was presented to the University in the summer and make
recommendations. It should
report by early May. The
recommendations will be taken
to the students for wide discussion in the fall term. It was
a major task, but those who
were working, worked hard
and they are doing you a service.
Due to space problems, Ihe
remainder of Zirnhelt's report
(approximately two columns)
will appear in next Friday's
paper.
Hysteria
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Man,  you think you've got
problems!
The Socreds make me hysterical, Tom Berger makes me
puke, the Liberals give me a
belly-ache and The Ubyssey
gives me a pain in the ass.
Yours sincerely,
ROGER CLAPHAM
arts 2 Friday, March 21, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
UCLA Bruins here
for rugb y week
Did you know that next
week is rugby week on campus? Well it is, and next
Thursday and Saturday UBC
will be playing UCLA for the
World Cup.
The World Cup was donated
many years ago by a now defunct Vancouver newspaper
of that name.
It was to be emblematic of
the best university rugby teams
on the west coast. In its early
days UBC won easily and eventually retained the cup under
a stipulation that said if the
same team won the competi-
ion for a certain number of
years then they got to keep
it.  UBC won enough.
The competition has for the
last few years been the Berkley campus of the University
of California, but this year
they stood down and UBC invited the UCLA Bruins.
The Birds played against
and lost to the U of C team
last year by a total of eight
points in two games played in
front of the obviously partisan
fans  in  California.
This year UCLA played
Berkeley and beat them twice.
They have also been undefeated throughout their whole
season.
Rugby fans always talk de-
precatingly about American
teams,   saying   that   they   are
Big Block Club ....
The monthly Big Block Club
meeting will be in the upper
gym foyer. Come and meet the
new executive.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
3000   GARMENTS
TO CHOOSE  FROM
e    Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coats
• White a* Colored Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe 688-2481
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS  -  DINNER  JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
latest Styles
10% UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W 41st 263-3610
composed  of football players.
This team has five footballers, five converts who play
only rugby and five foreign
rugby chaps.
UBC coach Don Spence said
that if the Birds play as well
as they did in Oregon, then
they should have no trouble
beating the Bears.
Don Crompton, the team
captain, in remembering the
games last year, recalled that
the Bear backs were not great,
but liked moving the ball fast.
"The pack was well drilled,
and played well together," he
said.
The Californians will be the
centre of some of the social
functions of rugby week, all
ending in the dance which is
to be held in SUB on Saturday night after the last game.
It will feature the Self Portrait and contributions will go
towards the Birds' tour of the
East this summer.
UBC tracksters
sponsor mixer
Saturday, March 22, UBC will host the third annual Spring
Mixer Track and Field meet at John Owen Pavilion.
Competing this year are teams from UBC, Vancouver Olympic Club, Richmond, Vancouver Island, Norwesters (North Vancouver) and Seattle.
This meet is unique in that teams comprised of both men
and women compete in each event. In track events each team
must consist of two men and two women. In field events, the
aggregate distances of two men and two women will decide the
winning   team.
A special feature this year is the addition of a High School
Relay competition. Schools may enter teams of boys and girls.
Last year, Vancouver Olympic Club won! the meet. This
year UBC coach Lionel Pugh expects better results.
Team members, Ray Stevenson, Ken Witzke, Dave Aune,
Tom Howard, Anne Corell, Betsy George, Eva Adamovich will
attempt to block the efforts of last year's winners, VOC, and the
the team from below the border, Seattle.
According to coach Pugh, UBC should be holding the Robert
F. Osborne Trophy at the end of the day.
The meet starts at 12 o'clock with the high jump and javelin
meets.
TVinten Sfiotfo @e*ttne
SKATING SCHEDULE
TUESDAY
12:45-2:45
WEDNESDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
2:00-3:30
3:00-5:00
3:00-5:00
7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
7:30-9:30
SUNDAY
12:45-2:45
7:30-9:30
Fri., Sat.
Wed.      & Sun. ■■■—»»—™—™—»—■■—»—~—«
Aft.        Aft. Even.  ipOI information phone
25c      35c 50c
Tues.
Aft.
STUDENTS   15c
ADULTS       15c
25c  60c  75c
224-3205 —. 228-3197
FREE — Public Skating Admission. Present this advertisement to the cashier
at the Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre prior to March 31, 1969. It will
be honored for one free public skating admission at one of the above times.
SKATE RENTAL OR SHARPENING — 3Sc
FREE — The Arena & Curling  Rtnks are available  FREE through the  P.E.
programme 4 hours per day, Monday-Friday  inclusive   (U.B.C. students).
For Personal Service See:
DEAN
CARLSEN
AT
WETMORE MOTORS LTD.
The full range of
VOLKSWAGEN CARS, BUSSES, TRUCKS & CAMPERS
— New and Used —
2203 Marine Drive West Vancouver
OFFICE PHONE
922-0168 ANYTIME
HOME
922-6481
SP0R TS
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB member Al Gentles is shown warming up for the fantastic final Championship Gymkhana this
Sunday, March 23 in "D" lot at 9:30 a.m.
VOLVO OWNERS . . . NEED A TUNE-UP?
*%   jr      -w-***--**.-,
Come to the experts . . . (also Volkswagens and Mercedes)
AUTO-HENNEKEN
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine)   Phone 263-8121
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& V
Graduating
This Year?
Then why not
keep in touch
with the
Campus Action
by subscribing to
THE UBYSSEY
ONLY $8.00
per year
Apply at the
Publication Office
SUB
}>'*
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i  ,
,"rf^**"*^C"',?-**S* Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 21,  1969
DANCE CLUB
Competition Ball, Saturday, March 22,
SUB ballroom, 7-1 a.m. $l/person,
semi-formal.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Meeting noon, today, I.H. upper
lounge.
PERFORMING  ARTS
Vancouver  Symphony   Chamber Players appear in free concert noon, Wednesday,   SUB   ballroom.
SPRING   FEVER
Be-in  first   day   of spring  rites  noon
today.   Kites,   songs,   computer   card
burnings, etc. Freddy Wood—Lasserre
Mall.
ARCHAEOLOGY   CLUB
Meeting noon Tuesday, Bu.  201.
VCF
A    student    viewpoint    noon    today,
Brock   garden   in   sun   or   SUB   N  In
rain.
CHINESE OVERSEAS  STUDENTS
General    meeting    —     constitutional
amendments.   I.H.,   Sunday   7:30  p.m.
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Elections     Wednesday     noon,     SUB
209L.
EL   CIRCULO
Meeting  Monday, Remember student-
faculty fiesta March 29.
AQUA SOC
General meeting, exec, elections noon,
March 27, SUB 125 F.
JUDO
Spring elections noon today, SUB
111A.
PERFORMING   ARTS
Canadian poet Mike Handelman reads
from  his   unpublished   book   "Baubles
for a Giant Balance".  Noon Tuesday,
Party room.
VARSITY SHOE
SERVICE
Specialist in
• REPAIRS
• DYEING
Opposite Safeway at
4530 West 10th
— Service while you wait —
ubc sec
1968   Shell  4000  rally   film,  noon   today,  Chem.  250.
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Rabbi   Solomon   and   Karl   Brua   on
genocide,   Monday   noon,   Bu.   100.
UBC   NDP
General meeting for 69 exec, noon today, SUB 211N.
FILMSOC
Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" in
SUB  aud.   today  12:30, 6:30. 9:30 and
Saturday 7:00. 9:00.
SLAVONIC   STUDIES   DEPT.
Dr. C. Bryner discusses Sussian-Chin-
ese border clashes with Mr. O'Hang-
anian and Mr. Y. Solecki, Bu. 106,
noon  today.
'tween
classes
KARATE   CLUB
General meeting March 25, SUB ballroom 7:30 p.m.
COMMERCE   SCHOLARSHIP
Larry Kunt's "high"—SUB aud. Wednesday,   March   26,    12:30,   3:30,    7:00,
9:30—Admission  $1.   Show  your AMS
or Faculty card.
VIET-NAM   MOB.   COMM.
Bob McKee and Brian Slocock (SFU)
debate future of anti-war movement,
noon today, Bu. 100.
UBC  SCC
Final    championship   gymkhana.    For
all club members. Sunday, March 23,
9:30 a.m., "D" lot.
LEGAL   AID   COMM.
Free legal advice every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday noon in AMS
ombudsman's office.
PIZZA wktft
\ street from ]
263-44401
U.B.C. LIBERAL CLUB
Notice of Election
Selection of Next Year's Executive
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Buch. 106
Noon
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS
FREE CONCERT
SUB  BALLROOM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 at 12:30
Sponsored   by  Performing  Arts  Committee
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville ot 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
m >5
X'RENT
>    A-CAR
ECTOPLASMIC ASSAULT
LIGHTSHOWS
MAX M. ANDERSON
Telephone (604) 736-0944
2281  West 5th Ave.
Vancouver 9,  B.C.
i* fe^r -^s*** ** w,\v
•EAT IN «TAKE OUT* DELIVERY-
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 750, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
SPRING SWING - POLKA PARTY,
Hat., March 22, 9 p.m.-l a.m. in
International House. Admission $1.0$
person. Germand band, bar, prizes.
Sponsor German Club.
COME AND HAVE THE FINAL
din** to ihe sound of tiie Icabod
Crane. Place Vanier. Friday, March
21,   5   to  1.  $1.35  per  person.
BALLROOM DANCING COMPETI-
tion. Featuring: Open Latin and
International events, Formation
teams, and lots of General Dancing.
March 22, SUB Ballroom, 7-1 a.m.
$1.00  person.   Semi-formal.
LAST DANCE AT TOTEM PARK
Fri. 21 9-1 with the Self Portrait.
Girls  75c, Boys  $1.00,  Couples $1.50.
DANCE—NO! BUT YOU CAN HEAR
a Free Concert by the Vancouver
Symphony Chamber Players Wednesday, March 26, 12:30 in Ballroom.
Greetings
12
BE-IN FIRST DAY SPRING RITES
noon today. Kites, songs, computer
card burnings, etc. Freddy Wood,
Lasserre   Mall   today.
Lost  &  Found
13
PLEASE   NOTE
The Information Desk in SUB Is the
Lost and Found Department
LOST: MAN'S SILVER LEROY
watch, March 8 In Woodward
Library. Much sent, value. Reward.
731-2808.
FOUND THURS. MARCH 13. LOSE
a 35 mm camera? Phone Al 922-
5858   or   224-4682.
LOST:    ENGLISH    310    NOTEBOOK.
Valuable.   Call Jane  738-5788.
LOST: MAN'S SILVER AUTO,
watch, in Brock, Mon. 17th. Reward.
266-4449,  Paul.  No  questions asked.
LOST: A GOLD CHAIN BRACELET
on Tues., Mar. 18. Contact Joanne,
738-6062   after   5:00  p.m.	
LOST: SMALL GOLD RING ON
Wed. between SUB and Buchanan.
Important value.  733-0649.	
STOLEN: ALL MY YEAR'S NOTES
in a blue bag in front of Alpha
Delta house. Please call me or hand
in at STTB Info. desk. I'm desperate.    Rob   Best. 	
FOUND: THE IMITATION OF
Christ in Reserve Library. Phone
684-0929.
Rides  Sc  Car Pools
14
2 GIRLS DESPERATELY NEED
ride to or near Banff at Easter.
Share  driving,   expenses.  224-0741.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
Premiums? If you are s?e 20 or
over you mav qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott   299-9422.
NATURE LOVERS—BREAK AWAY
from the rat race. A new and
different world awaits you in this
million acre alpine wonderland. An
all-inclusive ten day wilderness
stay can be yours for just a very
small monthly payment. Further
information from A. W. Gibbons,
P.O.   Box   75,   Sechelt,   B.C.
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS. COM-
plete theses and publications. High
calibre typing, graphs, illustrations,
formulations. Special student rates.
Phone   733-4506   (evenings).
BE-IN FIRST DAY SPRING RITES
noon today. Kites, songs, computer
card burnings, etc. Freddy Wood,
Lasserre   Mall   today.	
MIKE HANDELMAN READS HIS
poetry Tuesday noon in Party Room.
Sponsored by Performing Arts Committee.
Travel Opportunities (Conl.)     16   Typing (Cont.)
WHO   THE   HELL   IS   AZAK?   ASK
Harvey   Kirk.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERESTED IN A FREE HOLI-
day cruising the B.C. Coast, including lower and upper coast, Queen
Charlotte Islands, plus numerous
coastal towns and Indian villages?
Senior student-captain has room for
1 or 2 persons, male or female on
a modern 40' troller combination
boat. Board and room supplied free
in exchange for sharing the housekeeping chores. Some remuneration
could be arranged. You may stay
on for all or part of the summer
from May to September. Only those
who will enjoy the serenity and
solitude of the open water and wild,
uninhabited coastline should consider this voyage. If interested
write Brook, 3200 Indian River
Road, North Vancouver for more
information. All queries will be
answered.
BE-IN FIRST DAY SPRING RITES
noon today. Kites, songs, computer
card burnings, etc. Freddy Wood,
Lasserre  Mall today.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'67 EPIC TAKE OVER PAYMENTS
$73/mo. 11,000 mi. Excellent shape.
'57 Chev., std. shift, great shape.
$250.00.  929-1635.
'61 MGA  MK1
Rebuilt    engine.    New    tires,    British
Racing   Green  with   Maroon   Upholstery.    Excellent   cond.    261-0569    or
733-4121.
1961 VOLKSWAGEN CAMPER, 1964
engine, snow tires, heater, tent.
Good. Utility trailer, good condition.   224-1494.
Automobile—Parts
23
2    W/W    8:25-14    FIRST    LINE    OK
tires,  4000  miles,  $20  each.   733-0062.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA CENTRE
No Down Payment
Specials  far Students
BANK   FINANCING
Low Priced Helmets & Parts
Best   Honda   Repair   Mechanic
in   B.C.   —   Paul   Emmons
Before You  Buy  Hurry To
NORTH-WEST MOTORS
CORP.  LTD.
145   Robson  at  Cambie
Phone 688-1284
58 YAMAHA. 900 MI. 2 SNELL
helmets included; accessories. $500
full  price.  Phone  224
1965" YAMAHA 250 cc. GOOD CONDI-
tion; hardly used since 1967. Helmet,
1969  plates.   733-1697 evenings.
BONNEVILLE 1968 650 cc TRIUMPH.
Excellent   condition.   Call  733-4992.
Miscellaneous
33
MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS
will be performed by Vancouver
Symphony Chamber Players Wednesday, March 26, 12:30 in Ballroom.
Scandals
37
POT YOURSELF INTO A SEAT IN
SUB Aud. and get high Wednesday
12:30, 3:30, 7:00, 9:30. Admission to
the  joint  $1.00.
KEEP INFORMED ON CAMPUS
news after you graduate. Subscribe
to The Ubyssey for the 1969-70
term. Only $8.00 at the Publications
Office,   SUB.
JACK:   I'M   SORRY.   JOYCE.
AQUA SOC. GENERAL MEETING,
Thurs., Mar. 27. Very important as
elections for next year's executive
are being held. Everybody turn out.
SUB   125F at   12:30.
40
FAST,   ACCURATE   TYPING,
tact   Doreen   at   688-8972.
CON-
CLIP THIS AD. ACCURATE TYP-
ing by experienced secretary at my
home in Dunbar. Essays, theses,
technical matter. Manual or electric
by  arrangement.   263-6256.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
HANDICAPPED LADY REQUIRES
help May 1st for about 3 weeks for
moving, leaving city, live in by the
day.   433-7358.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help Wanled-
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
QUALIFIED TUTOR AVAILABLE,
most subjects. Exams are upon
you; phone 872-5397 after 5 p.m.,
Ill   help.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
ELECTRA 210 PORT. l-YR.-OLD,
changeable types for sale. $150 or
near offer. Call J. Bak, 2161 or
home.  738-4655.
HEAVY BASS WITH 2-JBL140's IN
solid enclosure. Good response. Will
sell   cheap.   684-0929  to  midnight.
SPRING    COAT,    SIZE    10,    EXCEL-
lent  condition.   Must  sell.   688-9050.
I HAVE SEAT ON MAY 18 '69 C.U.S.
flight, want to switch with someone
on June 4 '69. Phone 228-2980; after
6   p.m.   874-3296.	
EXCELLENT FISCHER STARLET
skis. Sentimental value. 175 cm, no
toe pieces. Only $20. Call Nancy,
RE 1-6284.
BIRDCALLS
UBC   STUDENT
TELEPHONE   DIRECTORY
Publications
Office
241—SUB
75c
AND  BOOKSTORE
RENTALS
&
REAL
ESTATE
Rooms
81
CANADIAN POET MIKE HANDEL-
man reads from his unpublished
book, 'Baubles For A Giant Balance'
Tuesday noon  in  SUB Party Room.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM   SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable  Rates —  TR  4-9253
TYPING DONE,  MY HOME.   PHONE
255-9483.
I HAVE SEAT ON MAY 18 '69 C.U.S.
flight, want to switch with someone
on June 4 '69. Phone 228-2980; after
6  p.m.   874-3296.
TYPIST AVAILABLE FOR EFFICI-
ent essays, reports etc., in my
home,    North   Vancouver.   988-7228.
EXPERIENCED ELECTRIC HOME
typing. Essays, correspondence, etc.
321-2102.
EXP. TYPING, REASONABLE
rates, quick service from legible
drafts. Call 738-6829 after 10:00 a.m.
to  9:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY TYPING SERVICES.
Offering a convenient on-campus
location for all your typing needs.
In the village at 2158 Western
Parkway. Upstairs in the new University Square Building (facing the
Chevron Station). Open Monday to
Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. All work
done on  I.B.M. Electric typewriters.
ESSAYS & SEMINAR PAPERS EX-
pertly typed, 25c per page, 5c copy.
Fast efficient service. Phone 325-
0545.
TYPING.   PHONE   731-7511   9:00-5:00;
after 6:00,  266-6662.
EXPERIENCED I.B.M. ELECTRIC
typing. Standard rates. Phone 298-
5395.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, EXCEL-
lent speed and accuracy. Will do
any form of typing at home, Richmond.  728-8640 after 5:00 p.m.
10 MINUTES FROM CAMPUS,
newly decorated/furnished, large
rooms. Available end April, 10th-
Highbury. Kitchen privs., auto,
washer, separate entrance, view.
Day 291-3141,   evening 228-9597.
IF YOU LOVE DOGS AND WOULD
like a free place to live until September in return for sitting with
my dogs & husband phone 738-9566.
Couple preferred; references please!!
Room & Board
82
PRIVATE ROOM, BATH & BOARD
in exchange for babysitting, light
housework. Available May 1st. Kerrisdale.  263-7952.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
$85.00 a month at D.U. Fraternity
House. Good food, short walk to
classes, quiet hours for study.
Phone  228-9389,   224-9841.	
SUMMER ACCOMMODATION? ROOM
and board at D.U. Fraternity House.
Good food; close to campus. Phone
228-9389  or 224-9841.
Furn.  Houses  &  Apts.
83
KITS. RESP. PERSON REQ. TO
share house, semi-furn. private
room.  $50.  Call John 732-7918.
WANTED IMMED. ONE GIRL TO
share large three bdrm. suite. $33.
Phone  after 10:00  p.m.,  733-3827.
WANTED APRIL 1st OR MAY 1st,
1 guy to share 2 bdrm. apt. in
Kits, area, semi furn., $70. 733-9260
after  6:00   p.m.	
GRAD. STUDENT TO SHAKE
house with 3 of same, Dunbar. 263-
9603 or 228-3089, Bob, Ken.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
ON CAMPUS: 1 BDRM. APTMNT.
to sublet May lst-Aug. 31st. Adults
only.   Phone   224-5401.	
WANTED: MAY 1, APTMT. OR
self-cont. ste., unfurn., near W. 4,
Broadway, W. 16 or S.W. Mar. Peter
224-3121, 5:30-6:30 leave ph. number.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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