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The Ubyssey Sep 16, 1983

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Vol. LXVI, No.
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 16,1983
228-2301
Wasted youth
Living off breadlines
without hope
WAITING...for a decent meal
photo neil lucente
By DEB WILSON
FROM THE KITCHEN door at the
Franciscan Sisters of the Atonement convent, the bread line grows one by one until
by noon it stretches down East Cordova
Street, around the corner, down Dunlevy
Street and up the alley. Almost 1,000 of
them. They huddle by the convent railing
against a grey and damp Vancouver day,
waiting for the biggest meal of the month
on the city's skid road soup circuit.
Some of them stagger here for meals year
in and year out. They're the ones with the
empty eyes, sticky hair, flaccid skin, the
bloated features of alcoholics or the gaunt
faces of addicts.
Some of them remember the 1930s —
when the lines first grew long — but more
and more of them these days are 17-year-
olds, 18-year-olds, who have never had a
real job. Many are recent arrivals from
clear across the country, here because they
looked for work along the road and found
none. Because Calgary just gives them a few
hostel and meal tickets and sends them on,
and because there aren't any missions at the
end of the ferry ride to Vancouver Island.
Because the Vancouver skids are where they
land, the last station. As far as they can get.
This is the end of the line.
At one o'clock, the first hundred turn in
their tickets. A volunteer waves them into
the basement hall. Another ushers them
briskly to four long tables with a hundred
place settings. Coffee, dinner and dessert
are all cooling there, with paper plates and
plastic forks. They are small meals, but
clean, and the food doesn't taste bad. The
coffee flows strong into bottomless cups.
One pale and silent man barfs — on
himself, on the floor, in a box Brother Tim
passes under him. A couple of guys try to
get rough but it's no use; Brother Tim's a
big bruiser who worked Rykers Island
prison in New York city until his superiors
began to worry when he started to walk,
talk and look like the cons. He's playing
bouncer for this event.
When the door opens and they file in, the
air collects the smell of boozy sweat.
Sometimes, leaning over a thin man to take
a plate or fill a cup, there's that odd, acrid
smell of the rooming houses, of piss-stained
linoleum and empty wine bottles in musty
hallways. The afternoon wears on and
hands begin to shake. It's a Sunday with
two weeks to go until the next welfare cheque. No money, no booze. Those few
who've managed to procure something to
dull the day teeter to chairs. Later, outside
again, they walk on the backs of their heels
as though the ground might suddenly shift
and send them reeling.
A small army of parishioners from the
suburbs are assembled to serve. They sweep
the debris into green bags as each diner
leaves, wipe the table and reset another
hundred places. The men and women file in
again, eat and leave. The whole act takes
about a half hour. Reset file in eat and
leave. The teenagers and matrons and
clean-faced men are dressed and powdered
and pressed against the contagion of poverty like they might bundle against the cold.
Among the brown and grey of the diners
locked in feeding frenzy and the suburbanites and trays and ladles in the aisles and
the scullery, the seven Sisters of the Atonement move, grey hair tucked under brown
habits, dispensing instructions, coffee and
assistance. But no prayers. That's their
policy. It's the first meal in a long time for
many of the diners, and they eat as if they
would swallow the plate whole. For the
sisters, it's another day. Tomorrow there
will be sandwiches at four and another line
at the door.
The line doesn't shrink with the evening
business pages' announcements of renewed
investor confidence. It grows as steadily as
the numbers of declarations by government
leaders and corporate analysts that
economic recovery is just around the corner.
And then there are these kids. In each
hundred-seat setting there are about fifteen
of them, 18 to 25 years old. They don't stagger, and they don't puke under the tables.
Few of their hands shake when they hold
out their cups for a refill. And they look
away from the sisters and the volunteers,
unaccustomed to their charity.
The kids are different than the others.
They might find a warm spot to sleep in a
cheap hotel or near a heating duct outside,
and they might find food in soup lines and
industrial trash bins. But they just don't fit
in.
ED MAKSYLEWICZ .AND Dwayne
Rockwell peer from under their umbrella
against the hedge, looking like a couple of
heavy metal fans in a concert ticket lineup.
They've got no use for the kind of people
who settle into a life on welfare. They've
got plans and they hang on to them with the
determined grip of a couple of Ozzy Oz-
borne animal victims. They're not asking
for much: a grade twelve diploma, steady
work, maybe even a trade and a union card.
They know times are hard — who
wouldn't, standing in a sandwich line 600
long in the February rain. "The way things
are now it's probably gonna take five years
before it's better," says Ed. But somehow
they feel that doesn't have very much to do
with them personally.
Ed is 18. Dwayne is 19. They blew into
Vancouver from Edmonton last October.
Life was going nowhere there. Stagnation
and winter were creeping up fast. "I
thought maybe Vancouver would show me
something," says Dwayne.
Within a couple of days their money ran
out. "So I decided to try my hand at
shoplifting. I went to the Safeway and they
caught me with about nine dollars worth of
steaks. They gave me four months."
Vancouver showed Dwayne the inside of
Pine Ridge prison camp. ("It was boring.
Everybody hypes it up so much and says it's
violent but it's not that so much. It's just
boring.") He was paroled after two and a
half months of work at three dollars a day
in the prison sawmill.
Meanwhile Ed did another kind of time
in the rooming houses and on the streets of
the grubby east side of downtown Vancouver. "I was in bad shape, on skid road,
for two months," he says now. "But I pulled myself out of it.
"And I came here with a shirt, pants and
a jacket. Now I have a stereo. A T.V. I'm
clean all the time."
MARCEL PATRIN, 20, is also clean, so
clean he would take the award, if there were
any in a life in missions and under bridges,
for best-disguised down-and -outer. In a
fuzzy grey sweatshirt and a jacket with the
designer's name stamped on the arm, he
looks like he got lost on the way to a university lecture, and in a soft Quebecois accent
he explains: "I try to look like to show that
I'm not a bum. I used $130 of my first
welfare cheque here to buy myself a winter
jacket and a shirt.
"I didn't know that I didn't get any more
for rent."
His appearance hides a street-smart
steadiness he's learned in two years on the
road. When a stranger approaches him in
the line, he keeps his eyes straight ahead
and returns a cautious "hello" only after a
considered pause. Later, in a greasy spoon
by the convent, he talks wearily about hitting the road after finishing three months
military training and hitching around
Canada and the states.
"I'm used to sleeping under a bridge or
something like that. There's missions
everywhere but a lot of the missions are
full. I try the most to keep away from people who take drugs and drink."
He almost settled down in one Oregon
town, where he worked for nine months as
a cook in a mission, but despite more than
ISO sponsors he couldn't get his working
papers from the government. There just
aren't enough jobs for Americans, as it is,
he was told. So he was off again.
And now he waits; for work, for welfare-
sponsored job training, for the next cheque
(they last about two weeks into the month,
he complains), for word from the army on
the application to re-enlist he made two
weeks earlier. "I should never have left the
army," he says. "It's a career, you know."
Sure. No life like it.
And no life like the downtown east side,
where Marcel pays $240 a month from a
welfare cheque that provides a $200 rent
allowance (leaving him $135 a month for
food and clothes), in a rooming house
where the girl next door regularly flips out,
screams and chucks furniture out the window.
"When I get up in the morning I go to
Manpower. Then I go back to my room.
There's nothing else to do. I don't want to
hang around in the streets or anything. I
don't know anybody at the hotel — don't
want to know anybody.
When I called his hotel a few weeks later,
Marcel was gone. The local recuiting office
can't find him either. Maybe he's become
another working stiff at last. More likely,
he's moved on to another filthy rooming
house or another heartless town. The kids
reel off the names and descriptions of their
seedy hotels like they're a colossal joke: the
Pender Hotel ("the Pender Hole"), the
new Brazil ("$170, cockroaches, lice and
all"), the Lone Star ("you get a room as big
as a finger"). And it would be a joke, if
they weren't the butt of it all. Most of the
85-odd cheap hotels and lodging houses in
the city, where drifters and pensioners and
people without money, contacts or family
turn up, are cramped, dirty and often
dangerous.
Many of the rents are set to squeeze at
least a few dollars more than the rent
allowance from a tenant's welfare cheque if
See page 4: SKID
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THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, September 16,1983
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UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Featuring:
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Entertainment by:
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Refreshments Available
Followed by UBC
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UBC vs U of Calgary
Contest for
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monday SEPTEMBER 26™
8:00PM • S.U.B. Ballroom • U.B.C. Campus
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«*. Friday, September 16, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Prince Bennett
introduces
brave new
order
By BILL TIELEMAN
There is nothing more difficult to take in
hand, more perilous to conduct, or more
uncertain in its success, than to take the
lead in the introduction of a new order of
things.
— Machiavelli
We're not doing something off the back
of an old envelope. What we're doing is
trying to get some management plan.... 1
think that's what the people want. They
expect reasoned, planned leadership and
that's what we're giving them.
— Bennett
Outside the legislature in Victoria they
came together from all corners of the city, an
angry crowd of civil servants, unionists, the
disabled in wheelchairs, women's groups,
human rights activists, ethnic groups,
tenants, seniors, just ordinary citizens, to
confront a government gone mad.
Inside the high walls of the legislature,
behind locked, heavily guarded doors,
government officials peered out the windows
at the gathering below while in the legislative
chambers Social Credit members continued
creating their Frankenstein monster — an
awesome collection of ghoulish bills that put
fundamental democratic rights into a shallow
grave.
The demonstrators, among them many
fired government workers, gathered to create
the largest protest ever seen in Victoria, bringing in more people than had shown up for the
Queen's visit earlier this year. Even the
organizers were shocked by the more than
25,000 people who filled the legislature
grounds and spilled into adjoining streets.
• Attacks on the provicial labour, human
rights and medicare legislation by federal
Liberal cabinet ministers, raising the
possibility of federal disallowance of Socred
bills.
e An open letter from leading Canadian
church leaders condemning the Bennett plan
and calling his government "dishonest" for
not campaigning in the recent election with a
clear indication of government actions to
come.
• Civil servant picketing of a number of
government offices as workers are dismissed
immediately from their jobs.
• Calls from several national and international human rights bodies to rescind the
planned elimination of the Human Rights
Commission and radical changes to human
rights legislation.
• A request from the powerful Employer's
Council of B.C. to "review" the bills affecting labour relations.
The Bennett attack on workers, tenants,
minorities, civil servants, the disabled,
seniors, students, teachers, women, regional
governments, school boards, and others
represents the most fundamental shift in
policy ever attempted in the province, even
during the days of W.A.C. "Wacky" Bennett, and his 20 year rule from 1952 to 1972.
Bennett the younger is attempting to roll
back the odometer in the sleaziest fashion of
B.C.'s notorious used car dealers, many of
whom populate the Socred ranks.
In response the legislative coup has
brought together the most impressive array
of groups ever joined in one fight in the province. Under the banner of Operation
Solidarity are every conceivable union,
church, women's, community, minority,
special interest, student, and other groups in
It was a fitting end to possibly the most
tumultuous month ever seen in B.C. politics,
sparked by the July 7 provincial budget and
its 26 companion bills introduced at the same
time. Among the more significant events as a
mass protest movement spang up were:
e A huge march and rally in Vancouver July
23 that drew more than 25,000 people out to
the streets bearing T-shirts and placards
equating the Socred policies to those of Nazi
Germany and military-run Poland,
e The lengthy occupation by government
workers of a centre for the mentally handicapped in Kamloops that the Socreds intend to eliminate completely by next year.
The workers were demanding the centre's
operations be continued.
• A public information meeting on the
Socred legislation that drew more than 6,000
people, startling its organizers and turning
the meeting into an angry protest.
• A rally of 40,000 Aug. 10 in Empire
Stadium.
the province affected by legislation that is being openly called "totalitarian" and "neo-
fascistic" daily in the media.
Within the labour movement Bennett has
managed to bring together some of the bitterest of enemies. Canadian nationalist
unions of the Confederation of Canadian
Unions are sitting down with international
unions, the B.C. Federation of Labour and
the B.C. and Yukon Building and Construction Trades Council are working together, as
are other significant non-affiliates of the Fed
such as the Hospital Employees Union. Even
the politically aloof Teamsters were
represented at protest marches.
The legislation has also revitalized a badly
demoralized New Democratic Party, with
outgoing leader Dave Barrett showing that
his third consecutive electorial defeat has not
stemmed his ability to verbally destroy the
Socreds inside and outside the House. Even
the most mild-mannered of NDP MLAs have
SOCRED GOVERNMENT
- sarah albany photo
drawing all kinds of comparisons
denounced the pending bills as reminescent
of Hitler's Germany, Pinochet's Chile and
Jaruzelski's Poland. And Barrett warned
that the Socreds' moves could bring people to
take violent direct action against the government.
"When you put human beings in a corner,
when you force them to have no recourse to
law that they've been used to in our
democratic society, when you put people up
agains the wall...it is inviting and asking for
that kind of violence and they know it," Barrett warned.
Although no violence has occurred in the
province, many people have begun taking
their own forms of personal protest against
the government. One unemployed man
rented a full Nazi uniform and paraded in
front of the constituency office of Human
Resources Minister Grace McCarthy with a
sign reading "This is the B.C. Spirit." Vancouver's renowned graffiti artists are making
heavy investments in spray paint and
numerous groups and individuals are running
the poster presses overtime, cranking out
anti-government literature. Even small scale
free enterprise has been given a boost, with
leftists producing a wide variety of buttons,
bumper stickers and T-shirts calling for a
general strike and caricaturing Bennett in
Hitler garb.
What effect the enormous protest activity
will have on the Bennett government remains
unclear. Although Bennett is putting up a
solid front, playing tennis in his Kelowna
stronghold while protestors mass, it is certain
that the Socreds underestimated both the size
and the ferocity of protests against their
legislation. So far, cabinet ministers have attempted to blame the protests on self-
interested unionists and B.C.'s left wing but
such lame excuses hardly counter the images
nightly on television of wheelchair protestors, mentally handicapped people losing
their work in shelters, tearful workers leaving
their jobs forever, national church leaders attacking the government and seniors thrown
out of their recreation centres.
Increasingly, people talk about the amazing depth of the coalition forming and
predict it will only end with the defeat of
Social Credit. The sickly provincial Liberal
party sees new life ahead as "10 second
Socreds," those who become Socreds for the
10   seconds   necessary   to   vote,   become
disgusted and look for a non-NDP alternative, potentially creating a split right wing
vote in the next election.
The other important development is the
realization that it will take serious non-
electoral politics to stop the Socred legislative
juggernaut. There is no illusion about waiting
four years or giving up because no electoral
avenues are open. The struggle to come will
focus on labour action — strikes, work to
rule, occupations, secondary picketing and
possibly general strikes — and on direct action, including civil disobedience and various
forms of public protest.
Inherent in the battle is the inevitable
politicalization of large numbers of people
previously uninterested and uninvolved in
B.C. politics. Already veteran protesters are
aware of the huge numbers of neophyte
demonstrators attending rallies and joining in
action groups in their workplace and community.
The potential for mass action against the
only viable free enterprise party in the province, as well as the likelihood of disruptive
labour relations across B.C., clearly
motivated the Employers' Council to become
involved. Council president Bill Hamilton
gave the Socreds a carefully worded but un-
mistakeably clear warning even before the
two huge rallies, when he addressed an
employers' dinner at which Bennett was a
guest.
See page 6: CONCERN Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16, 1983
From page 1
they need the place badly enough. Nearly
everyone does down here.
It's hard to escape the desperate, derelict,
sometimes deadly elements of skid road
society. Morning and night, intoxicated
men and women stumble and sprawl on the
streets, overserved by area bars, then
thrown out to risk robbery or beatings —
especially on welfare payday. Patrons are
robbed right inside some bars. A lot of people are armed, with knives mostly, and
argument often breaks out when someone
cuts ahead in the food line.
A couple of years ago, in from the
prairies and down on luck at 21, I found a
room in the dingy Fraser Hotel after someone noticed that the old man who used
Skid row desperate
to look out his second floor window above
Gastown's Carrall Street all day wasn't
looking anymore. By then the body had
smelled up the place quite a bit and left a
good-sized reddish brown stain at the head
end of the bed. In the meantime another
room came vacant and I took it, relieved of
a nightmare or two.
The place always stank. The drafty windows faced more drafty windows facing an
alley where a police paddy wagon always
parked and pestered pedestrians. The walls
were thin, the plumbing unreliable and a
red streak ran up the staircase along the
velvet-textured bordello-style wallpaper.
Night and day a huge orange W, a garish
neon sun, hovers in Vancouver's skid road
sky, a thousand festive lights shimmying on
and off up and down the standard that
hoists it above the Woodward's store. It
spins and spins stupidly outside the windows of a thousand one room hell holes,
while late into the night the bars and the
nightclubs churn a clash of pub schlock and
jazz into the streets and the lonely rooms
above. There are no visitors after 11 p.m.
IT'S A KIND of hopeless marathon 19
year old George Smith has run, all the way
from home on the east side of Newfoundland — The Rock — to rock bottom
on the seamy end of Granville Street. There
he rooms, with the friend he hitched here
with six weeks ago, in the Yale Hotel down
near where you can buy dope from a
stranger if you don't look too straight and
where women work the sidewalk by the
parking lots, the dirty bookstores and the
strip joints. Three hundred and twenty
bucks for two beds and a shower and a T.V.
("and even that doesn't work") and a
chance to get mugged when he goes out at
night.
Forty five hundred miles and no work.
But still George puts on his boots when he
gets out of bed each day, to be ready for the
work he hopes to find.
See page 13: PEOPLE
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Vancouver
North Shore
2912 West Broadway
736-3461
1615 Lonsdale
986-3471
Burnaby/Coq. - 9600 Cameron Street
(Lougheed Plaza)
421-4434 Friday, September 16,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC shortfall pegged at $4 million
By SARAH COX
The provincal freeze in university
funding which now leaves UBC
with a shortfall of about $4 million
is a "panic response" to the province's economic problems, says
administration president George
Pedersen.
Taking funds away from educations will hurt the province in the
long run because' fewer people will
have access to a university education, said Pedersen.
"From my perspective, education
is not receiving the sort of priority it
should from the provincial government, he said.
Universities minister Patrick
McGeer said the freeze in funding
did not indicate a lack of concern
for education. "It's always been a
very high priority and will continue
to be," he said.
Once people understand that the
government has to deal with a $1.6
billion deficit, they will support the
freeze in university funding, said
McGeer.
"All people have to see is the
overall good of the province as the
first responsibility," he said.
B.C. is the only province to impose a freeze in university funding
despite an eight per cent increase in
federal funding for post-secondary
education this year.
Pedersen said the government has
indicated it will freeze university
funding for the next three to five
years. It is even considering a five
per cent decrease in funding for
next year, he added.
"The magnitude of that is so
great it hasn't even started to sink
in."
In a Sept. 9 memo to all department heads, the administration announced a one-month freeze on all
new faculty appointments. The new
freeze will affect teaching
assistants, non-academic staff and
student service appointments as
well as potential replacements for
departing professors. Retiring professors have not bee replaced since
last February, when UBC faced a
$700,000 budget shortfall.
The freeze could easily be extended beyond October, said Pedersen.
"It can and it may well have to," he
said. "We sort of have to limp
through the next seven months."
UBC departments are already being crippled by the cuts.
Chemical engineering head R.G.
Campanella said the hiring freeze is
a serious problem for his department. The recent death of one professor and the impending retirement
of another leave the department
short-staffed, he said. "The faculty
loads are larger and professors have
less time to talk to students."
Political science head Kal Holsti
said the department would normally have asked for at least two more
teaching assistants this year to cope
with an enrolment increase of 17
per cent.
"Now we're in the position of
having to cut our discussion
groups," he said.
The retirement of two international scholars from the department
later this year will have "disasterous
effects" if the freeze has not been
lifted, said Holsti.
Limiting enrolment in faculties
such as arts, science and education
are measures UBC will also have to
take, said Pedersen.
"We will undoubtedly have a
reduction in the overall size (of the
university)," he said. "We cannot
continue to provide a quality service
with a shrinking budget."
The possibility of UBC running a
deficit, which would require the
permission of McGeer and finance
minister Hugh Curtis, is not a solution Pedersen favors.
"Running a deficit would only
make the situation worse," he said.
Work programs
slashed to bits
BY CHRIS WONG
& CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Student employment received yet
another setback as the provincial
contribution for the work study
programs at several B.C. institutions was cut back severely this
year.
According to a survey of major
B.C. institutions, colleges are
hardest hit.
Rick Inrig, BCIT work study coordinator, said BCIT was cut
$40,950 from last year's total of
$110,700. The new allocation levels
eliminate about twenty positions,
he said.
"It's   ridiculous,"   Inrig   said.
Julie Steele, Douglas College
awards officer, said her program
was reduced to $6,750 this year
from $18,000 last year. "It's just
been decimated."
Steele said the ministry's rationale was across the board cuts
were taking place, equalling two-
thirds of the work study budgets.
But Kwantlen awards officer Jim
Anderson said the funding for his
college's program went up $2,000
from last year's amount of $16,000.
Rick McCandless, education
ministry director of institutional
support services, said some institutions are receiving less funding this
year as a measure to equalize the
overall funding levels between colleges and universities.
He said equity will be put back
into the system over a two year
period. "There was a disproportionate amount of money sitting in
the colleges versus the universities."
McCandless added the institutions who had surpluses remaining
from last year's work study budget
were cut back this year.
All three university's work study
budgets have increased this year, he
said.
But Lisa Hebert, UBC Alma
Mater Society external affairs coordinator, said UBC's allocation is
cut $21,000 from last year's total of
$181,000. UBC awards officer
Byron Hender said it is not actually
cut because $21,000 was added to
the allocation last year from surplus
funds.
Sheila Summers said 1,200 applications have been sent to eligible
students. Only 300 have been
returned, she added. "We will continue to hand out applications till
the budgeted positions are filled."
- n.J.d. photo
DANCING FAERIES CELEBRATE season of fall harvest and time of plenty coming before thin shivery winter.
Faeries romp through enchanted forest (use your imagination — what are you at university for anyway?) and spin
magic spells and webs of recycled nuclear waste to fuddle new students. Magic dust will soon settle and grim
reality shortly wipe the Stardust out of dewey eyes.
Student referendum overlooked
By CHRIS WONG
The capital projects acquisition
committee is acting "undemo-
cratically" by ignoring the priorities
students voted for last November's
$20 fee referendum, a committee
member charged Wednesday.
CPAC recommended to council
at its Sept. 6 meeting that the land
under the Whistler ski cabin be purchased immediately, a project
students gave seventh priority to on
a list of eight.
Sheila Howick, student council
rehabilitation medicine representative and a CPAC member, said
council should be following the
priorities students set last year.
But Dave Frank, another committee member, said the priorities
do not have to be strictly adhered
to. "They weren't written in stone
— that was made very clear at the
time of the referendum."
Just before the November
referendum, Frank, the mastermind
of the $20 student fee hike, said it
would be "politically unwise" for
.council to ignore the priorities.
When reminded of his statement, he
said "maybe it's politically unwise,
but that's the recommendation that
came up."
The land must be purchased now
or it will be lost, said Frank.
Whistler is the cheapest project
because only two per cent of CPAC
UBC enrolment unbalanced
The overall UBC enrolment increase of 6 per cent may be deceiving because some departments such
as computer science and political
science have seen incredible increases.
Enrolment in political science
and international relations courses
has increased 17 per cent over last
year but only two additional sections are offered.
AMS pre* moonlighted
One member of the Alma Mater Society had two jobs this summer, both funded by students' money.
Mitch Hetman, while working 40 hours a week as AMS president,
also worked on several construction jobs in SUB, including the
games room expansion and the copy centre improvements.
"You have to hire the president," said AMS vice-president Renee
Comessotti, who was also hired this summer. "There's no question
about it."
Hetman, who was paid about $8 and hour for the work, said he
saw no conflict between his position working on AMS initiated projects.
"I worked evenings and weekends," said Hetman. One of Het-
man's co-workers, who wished to remain unidentified, said "Mitch
spent half of the summer in the Pit."
Hetman said he was "meeting with people" when he was not in his
office, where he had a free video game installed during the summer.
In computer science, one-third of
all applicants were rejected. At least
one-third and possibly one-half of
fourth year students were turned
away, said computer science head
P. Gilmore.
"If we had accepted everybody
who was eligible we would have
been swamped," Gilmore said, "if
anybody quit we'd be absolutely
sunk."
Students applying from other
departments were denied admission. "A lot of students were
upset," said Gilmore.
In the next few months, UBC will
be examining ways to limit enrolment, particularly in the arts,
sciences, and education facilities.
English department head Ian
Ross said restricting enrolment was
one possible solution to UBC's
shortfall of $4 million.
"We can't cope with this year
after year," he said, "We'll have to
put some controls on entry."
Other faculties with restricted
enrolment noted increases in applicants. Applied sciences applications have increased but fewer
students are being admitted.
The medicine faculty did not suffer a significant increase in applica-
tions but there were 20 more B.C.
applicants this year, an increase of
five per cent, said medicine
associate dean Alexander Boggie.
Medicine currently accepts 130
applicants a year, but has accredited 30 additional students yet
to be accepted this year. But with
no funding increases, the future of
the 30 applicants is uncertain.
Enrolment at other Lower
Mainland institutions has also increased. At SFU, course enrolment
is up about 4 per cent and the total
number of course sections has
decreased, said Analytical Studies
professor Walter Wattemanikik.
"Had there been no constraints
on the size of classes, I think the
(enrolment   increase)   percentage
would have been much higher," he
said.
Enrolment increased 26 per cent
in computer science and 11 per cent
in sciences at SFU.
At Douglas College, enrolment
has increased between 17 and 19 per
cent. At Capilano College, the increase is at least 4 per cent.
funds are needed to finance the purchase, he added.
"It's such a small chunk of
what's going on. It's quite an insignificant amount, really."
Howick said she is also against
the Whistler land purchase because
few students will benefit from the
project.
"Obviously students didn't want
to put their money into the land
because the cabin's not ever used by
a large number of students," she
said.
The Whistler Cabin management
committee will pay back the money
to CPAC funds over a ten year
period, said Howick. But a previous
loan from council funds of about
$85,000 still has not been paid back,
she added.
"If they don't pay it back this
time there's no precedent for them
to pay it back."
Ski club membership fees will be
raised and the cabin will be rented
out in the summer to generate
money, said Howick.
Howick is responsible for the
daycare project, which was second
on the priority list. Information on
daycare operations will be obtained
from a survey sent to other universities, she said. A presidential advisory committee on daycare may
also be set up, she added.
Frank said an expansion of on-
campus housing, student's first
priority is underlay. A new Gage
low-rise will go before the board of
governors in October for approval
and construction could begin by
February, he said.
Proposals for athletic facilties
and SUB renovations will be
presented to students for their input, he said.
CPAC was set up in council soon
after students voted overwhelmingly in favour of increasing Alma
Mater Society fees by $20 last
November. The committee is
responsible for overseeing allocation of funds and ensuring plans are
going ahead for each project. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16, 1983
Concern everyone's
From page 3
"Every one of us in this room
must be aware of the concern initiated by the recent legislative
measures which accompany the
budget. The very extent of those
concerns must affect us all," he
said. "Labour-management relations are not conducted in neat little
black boxes which are unrelated to
one another."
Both employers and their private
sector unionized workers are anxiously awaiting promised "reform"
of the provincial labour code,
which the Socreds are expected to
deliver soon. During the May election campaign Bennett stated that
the provisions regarding the decertification of unions would be made
more "democratic" and other
Socred candidates claimed that a
decertification vote could be held if
as few as 20 per cent of the workers
in a bargaining unit petitioned for
it. Other changes discussed included
provisions that would force a vote
of employees on employers' "last"
contract offer before allowing any
form of job action. Many labour
observers believe that even more
radical surgery will be performed,
including the introduction of "right
to work" legislation banning closed
union shops.
The fear of pending legislation is
in no small measure prompting
private sector unions and workers
to fight hard on behalf of public
sector workers now, in order to
frighten the Socreds away from
their most radical proposals.
Although Bennett has attempted to
claim he is only putting public sector employees into a position
similar to their private sector
counterparts, where they are subject to layoff due to economic difficulties, people are clearly seeing
that the arbitrary and unfair provi
sions   of   the   legislation   go   far
beyond any economic restraint plan.
The battle for B.C. is being seen
more and more as a major test for
the introduction of new right
Reaganism into Canada. The Bennett government, a gang of
legislative bumblers that once
eliminated the business charter of a
major insurance firm by mistake,
has come under the influence of the
extreme right wing Fraser Institute,
a think tank headed by economist
Michael Walker. An avid follower
of Reagan and Milton Friedman,
Walker's heavy hand is evident
throughout the legislative program,
which he was involved in as an official advisor.
The message contained in the
budget and bills is unmistakeably
clear: big business is to have a free
hand to do as it pleases in British
Columbia and those who dissent
will no longer have any avenues of
complaint. In many ways it's an attempt to return the province to the
good old days of Kelowna in the
1950s, when white business men ruled the roost and everyone else —
tenants, women, workers, students,
minorities, etc. — kept in their
place.
Those fighting the Socred coup
are well aware of the importance of
the battle as an indicator for
Canada and of the consequences of
losing. Pierre Samson, president of
the Public Service Alliance of
Canada, summed up the feelings —
and the determination — of many as
he addressed the Victoria crowd:
"This fight is just beginning. It's
going to get a lot more serious, its
going to get a lot more vicious...it's
going to be rough."
(This article was written for
Canadian Dimension and The
Ubyssey. Bill Tieleman is a UBC
political science student.)
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THE    U BYSS EY
Page 7
Nazi
Ml
retires year early
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
For 20 years, convicted war criminal Jacob
Luitjens taught botany at UBC. On Sept. 1,
the 64 year old professor quietly retired.
Luitjens was convicted in absentia by the
Dutch government in 1948 for collaborating
with the Nazi's during the German occupation
of the Netherlands in the Second World War.
He allegedly killed a German army deserter
and a member of the Dutch resistance movement.
UBC administration president George
Pedersen claims the administration did not
pressure the botany professor to retire early.
Luitjens elected to do so himself and enquired in the spring about receiving his pension benefits, Pedersen said.
Botany department head Robert Scagel
refused to answer any questions about Luitjens' decision to retire one year early. "I have
no comment to make at all. Everything that
needs to be said has been said," he said.
But Scagel's administrative assistant
Winston Hunter was less tight-lipped about
his former colleague. "I think Luitjens has
been thinking about retiring for a while," he
said.
"Sure, (his past) is shocking, but the Jacob
Luitjens we know is the man who worked in
the department for 20 years," Hunter added.
In 1981 the Dutch government requested
Luitjens' extradition from Canada to serve a
20 year sentence on charges of using a
firearm and assisting German occupation
forces in rounding up Dutch resistance
fighters.
But the Canadian government refused the
request because his offence is not covered
under the extradition treaty between the
Netherlands and Canada signed in 1899.
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of
the Simon Wiesenthal Centre in Los Angeles,
said in a telephone interview Thursday that
UBC has evaded its moral and ethical responsibilities by not encouraging Luitjens to face
up to his "crimes against humanity."
The administration has "stonewalled" any
attempts to remove Luitjens from UBC, he
said. In July, the Centre sent UBC a telegram
urging Luitjens' dismissal but the administr-
tion refused, citing "serious legal obstacles."
One obstacle was the binding agreement
between the university and the faculty
association on conditions of appointment,
Pedersen wrote in his reply to the telegram.
And the other was B.C.'s human rights
code, which says a reasonable cause must exist for dismissal. It states conviction of a
criminal charge is not a reasonable cause
unless the charge relates directly to the person's employment.
Pedersen also suggested that in the eyes of
the Canadian courts the Dutch government's
conviction of Luitjens is absentia might not
constitute a reasonable cause, considering it
took place 35 years ago and that Luitjens was
a "satisfactory employee" of UBC for 20
years.
But Pedersen admitted at the time he was
"concerned" a convicted war criminal was
teaching at the university.
"The university did a good job of standing
up for Luitjens' legal rights, but it did a
dismal job of taking into account the rights
of his victims," said Cooper.
"It's a sad commentary that no attempt
was made by UBC to deal with the moral and
ethical issues surrounding Luitjens," he added.
PANGALACTIC TIME WARP exposes startling evidence that former Ubyssey staffer Erica Leiren, centre, is immortal being found everywhere in fabric of space-time. Entropy duct from 1952 revealed holograph of dance band
called The Debutantes projected outside SUB Thursday, leading to speculation that radiation leakage from
TRIUMF accelerator will cause past to return and have disastrous effect on women's fashions.
Loan appeals expected to rise
A drastic increase is expected in
the number of students making loan
appeals this year because the provincial government has completely
transformed the student aid program, said Lisa Hebert, Alma
Mater Society External Affairs Coordinator of UBC.
To cope with the increase, Victoria's Student Services Branch has
decided to set up a new appeals
committee.
However, students who currently
wish to appeal their loans should
first approach their local financial
awards office, said Hebert.
"If the local office turns the appeal down, then appeal to the provincial committee. There's a very
good chance of getting the appeal
through if you appeal provincially,
because there are three students as
well as three awards officers who sit
on the provincial committee."
About one thousand loan applications are still waiting to be processed, according to UBC Financial
Aid Officer Byron Hender. He attributes the delay to the increase in
the number of applications this
year, and to the large number of
forms that have been sent back
because they weren't filled out correctly.
Hender estimated that about 30
per cent of the applications his office received were filled out wrong.
"We need to hire more people (to
clean up the backlog)," said
Hender, "but there's a freeze on
hiring, so that doesn't help.
However, the majority of students
have been very understanding."
At Simon Fraser University, the
loan application backlog is slowly
being taken care of, said David
Crawford, Assistant Financial Aid
Director.
"Normally we're three weeks
behind, but we're now working on
applications from July 20 or so.
We're about a month behind."
Crawford said reasons for the
delay include an upsurge in applications received during the early part
of the summer. In July, the number
of applications increased by 60 per
cent over July of 1983. In August,
the increase leveled to about 30 per
cent.
Crawford said the provincial
government's delay in announcing
loan policies also added to the delay
in processing the forms.
"We're trying to cope with the
situation, and we do have an
emergency fund which we're using
quite heavily."
Kwantlen College is trying to
cope with about a 54 per cent increase in applications over last year,
according to Student Council President Tami Roberts. The college's
backlog extends to the beginning of
July.
Roberts is waiting for word on
her own application. A single
parent, Roberts was only able to
find part-time work this summer
and the money is sorely needed.
UBC hospital audited
UBC Hospital's president denied Wednesday that the provincial
government's audit of his hospital is due to "mismanagement."
"This partial audit was a health ministry decision we agreed to,"
Robert McDermit said. "I don't think there is a question of
mismanagement.''
McDermit said the provincial government wants to determine if
the hospital's two closed wards should be re-opened.
He added that the audit "is really a review of the management
systems and resource requirements of the hospital."
The continued closure of two acute care wards denied health
sciences students the experience required to complete their courses,
McDermit said.
McDermit also said he believes the auditing firm of Extended Care
Canada Ltd. will recommend an increase in the hospital's funding.
Similar audits at the Royal Columbian and Royal Jubilee hospitals
resulted in increased funding for those institutions, he added.
Hospital administrators have requested a 24 per cent increase for
the hospital McDermit said. He refused to say what the budget is.
Extra funding is needed because the hospital has encountered a
300 per cent increase in demand for emergency care, McDermh said.
Julius bocomos
citizen Kane
UBC finally dropped the other
shoe in May and fired Julius Kane.
The tenured animal resource
ecology and zoology professor is
the first to be dismissed in UBC's
73-year history. His firing May 12
was attributed to his making
"defamatory" statement about the
university, according to the board
of governors.
The board unanimously agreed
with then administration president
Doug Kenny that Kane had committed gross misconduct.
The firing followed a.second attempt by Kenny to dislodge Kane
from his tenured position. The first
came in 1980 after Kane was convicted of diverting National
Research Council research funds
for his own purposes.
Kane has used part of a $9,000
research grant to hire student
assistants in the summer of 1976,
assigning them to secretarial tasks
which had nothing to do with the
research.
Among their jobs was editing and
typing material for a novel Kane
was writing.
After Kane was fined $5,000 for
two counts of theft, Kenny initiated
proceedings to have him dismissed
but a faculty committee ruled that
penalty to be too severe and recommended an 18-month suspension
without pay.
The suspension came in March
1982. By that time Kane had been
drawing his $75,000 a year for three
years while conducting no classes
and submitting no papers.
In September 1982 Kenny tried to
fire Kane, again, this time basing
the dismissal proceedings on a press
release Kane distributed in 1981
while the faculty committee was
reviewing his case.
The release attacked the university, and eventually the board of
governors decided it contained
statements "defamatory and
beyond the limits of academic
freedom."
The firing came almost seven
years after initial allegations led to
seven separate charges against Kane
of fraud and theft. One charge was
dismissed and he was found not
guilty on four others.
College strike ends
By Canadian University Press —
An 11 day strike by support staff at
Kwantlen college that cancelled the
first four days of classes and
delayed registration ended Sept. 8.
Administration president Tony
Wilkinson agreed to sign a letter
stating the college would not use the
B.C. government's controversial
Public Sector Restraint Act — Bill 3
— to break the collective agreement.
The new contract, ratified by the
college's 90 support staff, who are
members of the B.C. Government
Employees Union, also gives
workers a five percent wage increase effective October 1982, and
an additional three per cent this
year.
"We were willing to compromise
on the wages," said union
negotiator Mary Knotts. "We were
not willing to compromise on the
letter."
The strike at Kwantlen was the
first union challenge to Bill 3 which
the Social Credit government introduced with its fiscal restraint
budget July 7.
The Bill has yet to be passed
through the legislature but if
enacted, would allow any government employer to fire staff for
fiscal or managerial reasons.
Wilkinson said the agreement is
consistent with the mandate set by
the college board before negotiations started.
But even though classes are under
way at the college's three campuses,
the situation is not back to normal.
Kwantlen's 4,100 students face
i overcrowded classrooms and textbook shortages.
The administration charge the
college deliberately overfilled
classes by using the strike as a cover
to "increase productivity."
Jeff Dean, Kwantlen faculty
association vice president said some
classes are booked by as much as 30
per cent over the official limit.
The college only ordered
materials and text books for the
maximum allowed, he said.
The college administration said
overcrowding from college attempts
to enroll students who were
registered unofficially off campus
by union and faculty during the
strike.
"The onus is on the administration to clean up the mess," said student association president Tami
Roberts. She warned the association will consider ways to pressure
administrators to alleviate the problems.
Throughout the strike, most of
the college's 200 faculty respected
union picket lines. Only about 20
professors, mostly from the
criminology department, and college administrators held classes.
Faculty resumed talks on their
contract with the college Sept. 8.
The faculty also wants guarantees
the college will respect their agreement.
The faculty had been without a
contract since October, 1982. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16,1983
Stylized murder and brutal cold sex
By PETER BERLIN
At first glance 'The
Draughtsman's Contract' seems to
be a very straighforward and traditional film. But the message of
Peter Greenaway's film is that appearances can be deceptive.
At The Ridge
The Draughtsman's Contract
Directed by Peter Greenway
Sept. 23 - Oct. 6	
The film is set in late seventeenth
century England. It tells the tale of
a draughtsman, played by Anthony
Higgins, who makes a living producing drawings of country houses
for the gentry.
While at a party he is asked by a
Mrs. Herbert (Janet Suzman) to
make a dozen drawings of her
house for her husband. At first he
refuses, but Mrs. Herbert and her
daughter, Mrs. Talmann (Anne
Louise Lambert) persist and in the
end he gives in after extracting a
very high price. The contract
stipulates that as part of his fee he
will be able to have the use of Mrs.
Herbert's body on each of the
twelve days on which he works.
The rest of the film is set in the
lush green surroundings of the
Neville's large house. The
draughtsman is seen drawing the
house and indulging in brutally cold
sex with Mrs. Herbert and later, her
daughter.
Gradually the audience realizes
two things. First the drawings begin
to reveal behind the scenes oc-
curances. Secondly, although Mrs.
Herbert appears to be exploited in
the contract, she is in some way the
manipulator.
Articles of clothing begin to appear in the garden and the field of
the drawings, the origin of which
the draughtsman cannot explain. It
becomes increasingly clear that they
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are clues to a murder and that he
has become a witness.
The film suggests it is an error to
imagine we have seen all there is to
see. The viewers, both the audience
and the draughtsman, never see the
key event in the film — the murder.
We can only speculate. Likewise,
we never see what goes on between
the   ears   of   protaganists,   par
ser d«nnar • •
ticularly Mrs. Herbert and her
daughter, who each enter into a sexual contract with apparently clear
motives, only to reveal several levels
of thinking later.
Greenway, the director, uses his
camera to draw our attention to the
disparity between what we see and
what actually is. The camera never
moves during a shot. It doesn't pan,
or zoom — we see only what is
framed, similar to a slowly moving
painting. This impression is enhanced by the opening sequence at the
party in which we see a series of
conversations, the heads illuminated only by the yellow glow
of candles against a deep brown
background, each shot a self-
conscious evocation of Rembrandt
paintings.
The rest of the movie luxuriates
in the fertile English countryside —
not only visually but verbally as
well. The characters constantly
discuss the techniques of gardening
which allow trees to be trained into
certain shapes and certain natural
types of countryside to be created
by skillfull landscape gardening.
The interior shots are always filled with the fussy detail so favoured
by artists of that era.
The dialogue too is very reminiscent of the time's theatre. The era
was, so it is said, the golden age of
the art of converstation and the
script has the sort of polished air of
a Congeve play. It is full of
ferocious cut and thrust and sexual
and classical allusions.
The film is slow, a little stately
and deliberately static. All the same
it is a rich delight. The camera work
is always as satisfying as the script.
The acting is highly stylised, as is
appropriate, and of the highest
order. For those with a little patience this is a fine film. Friday, September 16,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 9
Block long lines visit
inn
kstore
Students are standing in record
line-ups at the new UBC bookstore
and rushing to scan bulletin boards
as they scramble to get hold of required texts.
Bookstore director John
Hedgecock dealt with the crowds by
allowing between fifty and a hundred students to enter at a time.
He said people only waited for
ten to fifteen minutes. Line-ups will
always occur as long as the university enrolls all 25,000 students
simultaneously," said Hedgecock.
But answers from a random
Ubyssey survey reveal that students
have had to wait up to one and a
half hours inside and one hour outside the boodstore.
One  bookstore  clerk  estimated
students have had to wait an
average of half an hour outside and
45 minutes inside.
Hedgecock said business is much
smoother this year because shopping is more centralized and books
can be found more easily.
He said crowds will get thinner
from now on and for the time beiog
advises people to shop between five
and six p.m.
The survey indicated that most
people like the new store and are
able to find things more quickly.
The bookstore served a record
number of 5,500 customers during
the twelve hours it was open on
Tuesday.
Judging from sales to date,
Hedgecock expects last year's total
PREPARATIONS FOR NEW school year at UBC always incomplete
without mandatory acid rain gear. Students new to Vancouver area learn
quickly that unprotected heads easily subject to deterioration, especially
- nail lucanta photo
in university atmosphere. Possible victims explode after waiting in line to
load up on supplies for monsoon season ahead at shiny new nicknack
store.
Collective surviving despite funding cuts
Vancouver's self-help collective
for women is still in operation
despite the government's
withdrawal of funds.
The seven staff members at the
Vancouver Women's Health Collective have received their last pay
cheques but continue to volunteer
their services at the West Broadway
clinic, a health collective spokes
person said.
The government cancelled funding in its July 7 budget because
health ministry officials claim the
service   offered   at   the   clinic   is
available   through   family   physicians.
Last year the collective received
$119,000 to provide counselling,
self-help workshops, fitting of cervical caps and diaphragms, and
pregnancy tests.
Although these services are
available from doctors, the
women's health collective say they
provide faster and more personalized help.
The collective is determined to
continue the clinic, said collective
member Lorna Zabeck.
"The important work that we do
and have done for years will not appear and disappear with government funding," she said.
The collective is investigating
alternative forms of funding and
operation, said Zabeck.
Health ministry information officer Terry Moran said the government's  priority  is  to  give  direct
treatment through conventional
health delivery systems instead of
self-help counselling.
Many physicians refer women to
the collective because of specialized
treatment available, the collective
said.
The collective also has a self-help
resource library on issues related to
women's physical and emotional
health.
Desperate need homes
Chilean fasts for rights
HALIFAX (CUP) — Human
rights violations in Chile were the
target of an eight-day hunger strike
mid-August, led by a Chilean exile
who attends Dalhousie University.
Elias Letelier-Ruz and two compatriots, Serge Gomez and Ulises
Nitor, started the strike just days
before peaceful demonstrations in
Chile led to reprisals by the military
regime.
The strikers, joined by Mount
Saint Vincent student, Mike
Emerick, called on the Chilean
government to cut off all aid to
Chile, denounce human rights
violations there and demand the
reinstatement of democracy
through free elections.
The strike, located in St.
Patrick's Roman Catholic Church,
created controversy within the congregation. Some said the Church
should not be involved in affairs of
state while others, including the Archbishop of Halifax, stood behind
the symbolic action.
Ruz ended the strike on August
25, fatigued but pleased with the
amount of media attention that his
concerns received.
Female students are having no
difficulty finding on-campus housing.
Totem Park and Vanier have
openings for women and the
waiting list for Gage Tower has
decreased to 158 from the 600
reported Tuesday.
However, the news is not as good
for male students. While the male
waiting list for Totem and Vanier
has significantly decreased 495 men
were still waiting for accomodation
as of Wednesday, and there are still
489 men waiting for rooms at Gage
Towers.
"There's still quite a few men
who are desparate for housing,"
said student housing director Mary
Flores.
According to Flores, the off-
campus housing situation is better
than last year. There is a 3 per cent
vacancy rate and a small increasejn
the average rents. The average
bachelor suite costs $356 this year,
compared with $349 last year.
Married students with children
have the most problems .finding off-
campus housing, Flores said.
number of 35,000 books sold to increase this year.
The new bookstore is a "bigger,
more comprehensive store covering,
a much wider range of buyers,"
said Hedgecock. It attracts off-
campus clients seeking non-
textbooks and academic books, including Health Sciences reference
material which is difficult to obtain.
B.C. prison
program
reinstated
VICTORIA (CUP) — Post-
secondary education courses will
continue to be offered at four B.C.—
prisons, at least until December, a
correctional services official confirmed recently.
Solicitor-General Robert Kaplan
reinstated the programs, cut in
January as a result of government
restraint, because "of the numbers
involved," CSC education chief
Doug Griffin said.
Of 254 prisoners enrolled in
B.C., Quebec, Manitoba, and Ontario programs, 157 took University
of Victoria courses.
A report this fall by a CSC committee to the solicitor-general will
determine the program's fate, Griffin said.
But if the 10-year-old program is
continued, inmates may have to pay
fees which would "kill any education system," UVic program director, Douglas Ayers said.
A management consultant's
report ordered by the CSC, showed
70 per cent of inmates are willing to
pay fees, Ayers said.
Ayers charged however, the consultant's survey did not ask how
much inmates would be willing to
pay or if they would have entered
the program if user fees were required.
"If a fee structure had been in
place when I started, I probably
wouldn't have taken courses," said
Alan Sauve, a former William Head
prison student.
"If an inmate were put in solitary
confinement for disciplinary
reasons, he may fail due to a no-
show, but still have to pay for the
course, and be indebted without
benefit," Sauve said.
Ayers estimated the program
costs B.C. taxpayers $450,000 annually.
The program has two purposes
said Ayers — to rehabilitate and to
upgrade skills.
About 55 per cent of those released from prison eventually return
but the rate is only 14 per cent for
those who take university courses.
This fall 156 have enrolled across
B.C. compared to 53 last year.
Feet against cruising
SOMEWHERE IN ONTARIO (CUP) — Patrick Chamberlain is a peace
crusader who puts his feet where his mouth is.
The 27-year-old philosophy student from the University of Victoria has
spent the last four months walking to Ottawa to protest the testing of the
cruise missile.
He left Victoria in early May and has walked about 40 kilometres a day.
He has met with peace groups along the way, and plans to take their concerns to the Canadian government and the Soviet Embassy when he reaches
Ottawa around September 20.
"There's a long tradition in liberal democracies of people walking to
their capital cities to talk to leaders about what they believe," says
Chamberlain.
Although complaining of a sore hip and hellish black flies, Chamberlain
is committed to finishing his almost cross country walk for peace.
"Disarmament groups I met told me my action is a boost to their morale.
If a personal statement acts to increase the committment of others, then it
is worthwhile," he said.
Chamberlain left Sudbury September 6 and plans to continue his routine
of walking and meeting peace groups by day, and sleeping beside the road
at night.
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
WAITING FOR GODOT
by Samuel Beckett
SEPTEMBER 23 - October 3
(Previews Sept. 21 & 22)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Matinee/September 29 — 12:30 p.m.
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - 4 Plays for $12]
1983/84 Season
3       WAITING FOR GODOT (Beckett)
LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST (Shakespeare)
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST (Wilde)
THE SUICIDE (Erdman)
*    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *    ROOM 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Sept. 21-Oct
Nov. 9-19
Jan. 11-21
March 7-17
BOX OFFICE Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16, 1983
Asbestos still in SUB walls
"Warning! Area containing
asbestos. For clean up of loose or
damaged asbestos insulation contact... " on a door in SUB.
Posters instead of action is
physical plant's short term answer to
potentially harmful asbestos insulation in several areas of SUB.
A year ago the Worker's Com
pensation Board pressed the university to remove the insulation from
its buildings. But physical plant
director Neville Smith says UBC
must weigh inconvenience against
WCB demands to complete the job
quickly.
Smith says the asbestos is not a
health hazard as long as the fibres
remain in the insulation.
Carleton student in jai
OTTAWA (CUP) — Students
and faculty at Carleton University
are working to free a Phd student
who is being held prisoner in
Pakistan.
Tariq Ahsan, a doctoral student
in political science, returned to his
native Pakistan for health reasons
in 1979, and was arrested in 1981, in
connection with "seditious"
—material traced to his home. The
material included a pamphlet calling for return to democracy in
Pakistan.
He was not charged until
February, 1983 and was not tried
until April. He is still awaiting a
verdict, which under Pakistan's
martial law, could mean execution.
The Carleton University
Students' Association recently
voted unanimously to send a petition to Pakistan's president Zia-ul-
Haq expressing the Association's
"collective concern" over Tariq's
case. CUSA also plans to raise part
of the money for Ahsan's airfare to
Canada should he be released.
The Political Science department
has made a teaching assistantship
available to Ahsan and a scholarship to cover his tuition fees. Glen
Williams, a Carleton professor who
hopes to get people across Canada
involved with the case, said he
hopes such concrete moves will
show Pakistani officials that people
here want Ahsan to return.
H.lEO|
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INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1983
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit your resume to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus (Forms are available from
the Centre) by October 5, 1983.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 14th regarding campus interviews which take place during the weeks of October 17 and 24th. Additional information is
available at the U.B.C. Canada Employment Centre
and the Accounting Club.
1st
N x     Meeting
IM Referee Club
Thurs., Sept. 22 - 12:30
W.M. Gym, Rm. 211-213
Compulsory Clinics:
Monday, Sept. 26 — Soccer
Tuesday, Sept. 27 — Hockey
Wednesday, Sept. 28 - Volleyball
Thursday, Sept. 29 — Basketball
Room 211-213 — 7:00 p.m. W.M. Gym
For  information   contact  referee ^Ut
directors W.M. Gym, 203A. To be ^
certified,   you   MUST   attend
meeting and clinics!
BIG BUCK$$$
Inhaled asbestos is recognized by
scientists as a potential carcenogen
said energy consultant Jay Lewis of
the Society to Promote Environmental Conservation.
"There is no cause for alarm, but
good cause for action," Lewis said.
"Whoever removes the insulation
should leave no trace of asbestos
behind. It takes only one fibre to
lodge itself in someone's lungs
before it can prove harmful."
Smith said a $400,000 project to
remove the insulation has started
and will continue over the year.
But he said work will be left for
next summer if it is disruptive to the
university community.
No decision has been made on
when SUB will be closed for
asbestos removal, said Smith.
SUBFILMS
PRESENTS
AN
OFFICER
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SEPT. 15-18
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Rental Policy
Single
Members $1.25
Non-Members    $2.50
Memberships
Double LP        Monthly   $10.00
$2.00 Yearly       $25.00
$4.00 Lifetime   $50.00
Rent 4 or less (Keep them for 1 Day)
Rent 5 or More (Keep them for 3 Days)
Select from Rock to Classical!
IN COOPERATION WITH PARAMOUNT PICTURES AND FAMOUS PLAYERS,
The Ubyssey welcomes
voi to UBC with
a free, by-iivitatioi-oily
screeiiif of oie of
tie year's lost
coitroversial fills.
Oi Ties. Sept. 21 at
the Vaicoiver Ceatre
ciiema.
From the director
of Dog Day Afteriooi,
Network aid He Verdict.
SIDNEY LUMET
FILM OF A NOVEL BY
E. L. DOCTOROW
The power of a blind faith, a passion for dissent.
Get jib* free doille pass fir the special Ties. Sept. 21 screeiiig at Rum
2411, SMnt UiiM Baling, today. Passes aiailaMe nly while they last. Friday, September 16,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
University sports ride Edmonton wave
By PETER BERLIN and
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
International sporting attention
was focussed on Edmonton this
summer for the World University
Games.
But what will happen now the
athletes have gone home, the television crews have moved on and the
arenas have been shut down? Will
universities in Canada be able to
maintain some measure of the
public's interest, or will they slip
back into semi-obscurity?
Members of the Canadian International Athletic Union are betting
that the Universiade will have a
spill-over effect. They feel they can
ride the game's coat-tails and retain
the interest of the public and the
news media.
At stake is the potential for
much-needed revenue to fund
athletic programs, and the opportunity to provide Canadian athletes
with a chance to achieve excellence
at Canadian schools.
"The Universiade will do for
Canadian university sports what the
1976 Olympics in Montreal did for
sports in general in this country,"
says Ernie Miller, publicity director
for the games. "It will certainly
help the profile of intercollegiate
sports."
Ironically, universities in Canada
once occupied the top of the Canadian athletics heap.
Paul Carson, sports information
officer at the University of Toronto, says as late as 1965, a
Queen's-Toronto football game at
Varsity Stadium drew a larger
crowd than that of the Toronto
Argonauts on the same day.
But later in the decade, faced
with more competition for the
entertainment dollar, a lack of campus spirit induced by the radicalism
of the 1960s, and of course, television, which ate into live gates,
university teams were suddenly
playing to near-empty houses.
Aside from the excitement
generated by a full house, the
universities want large crowds for
one reason: money.
At Toronto, for example, Carson
says the university could generate
close to $250,000 — enough to
more than pay for their football,
hockey and basketball programs —
if they could attract full houses of
21,000 for every football game.
And if revenue from sellouts at
basketball and hockey games, not
to mention money made off concessions, were added to the ideal football totals, the money would almost
make the athletic department self-
sufficient.
Bob Hindmarch, UBC athletics
department director, said since
UBC students are admitted to
Thunderbird events free, an increase in attendance would not
necessarily lead to an increase in
revenue. But any periferral income
from   non-students   is   useful
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Universiade '83
t        *• World University Games
UNIVERSIADE . . . good for university sports
especially in financial crunch times,
he said.
If this happened, the money currently budgeted to the major sports
could go to funding programs such
as fencing or gymnastics, sports
which tend to be ignored at budget
time.
The universities feel if they could
pump more money into so-called
minor sports, and provide better
coaching and facilities for the major sports, they could help keep
Canadian athletes in Canada, and
in turn, help the country improve its
profile in world sports.
CIAU president John Mc-
Conachie said Canadian schools
can still capture some of the old
glory, but "it's up to us now to use
the momentum of the games to our
advantage."
Hindmarch said University sports
in Canada have not had such a high
profile in a long time. This is partly
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a result of the Universiade and partly as a result of the change in the
role athletics plays in peoples'
lifestyles, he said.
The Universiade encouraged a
growing awareness of the number
of high class athletes produced by
universities Hindmarch said. In
field hockey, ice hockey, track and
field and football practically all our
top performers are university products. Hindmarch said the governments realizes this now and UBC
has been made the regional
coaching centre for soccer and national tennis.
In general, said Hindmarch, people view sports as far more important and a far higher number of
people, expecially students, now
participate. The increasingly
positive image sports has means
that excellence in any part of the
community is greeted more enthusiastically.
'About 75 per cent of Canadian
teams come from Canadian universities; the remainder attend schools
out of the country, so I think the
public will recognize that we do offer high-calibre sports in this country," said McConachie.
"It should help us follow through
with the promotional programs
we've been trying the past few
years."
There has been a modest increase
in attendance at university sports in
the last few years. The Vanier Cup
national football title game attracted crowds of close to 15,000
the last two years, up from about
5,000 for previous games. The
men's hockey final in Moncton,
N.B. attracted capacity crowds of
7,0013 in each of the last two years.
But the universities still have a
long way to go.
Toronto athletics director, Gib
Chapman, feels the games can
elevate the profile of university
sports.
"The television coverage has
been extensive and the newspapers
have been giving it a lot of play, so I
think that the public will see the
high level of competition that this
country's schools have to offer,"
Chapman said.
"With the entertainment dollar
getting tighter every year, people
will realize that university sports are
good value."
Both Chapman and McConachie
said they feel the games will help at-
"At stake is the potential much-needed
revenue..."
tract fans to the larger sports.
Chapman expects the gold medal of
Canada's basketball team to bring
about dramatic increases in basketball crowds.
But they also predict some of the
sports featured at the games, such
as track and field and volleyball
which have not traditionally drawn
large crowds, will benefit from the
exposure.
With the Universiade over, Canadian universities will have to hurry
if they hope to use its publicity to
their advantage.
One university administrator puts
it, "This may be our last chance."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16, 1983
Bonkers
The newly elected government of B.C. has yet to satisfactorily answer
charges that many of the programs introduced in the name of restraint are
only petty revenge on those who oppose them.
It could be their vengeance isn't petty at all.
Labor minister Bob McLelland has added fresh evidence of their
revenge attitude by criticizing the federal government for supposedly funding Operation Solidarity by granting aid to unemployed workers' centres.
Also known as unemployed action centres, these community self-help
groups are focal points of support and hope for tens of thousands of
unemployed citizens.
They operate job exchanges, provide volunteer help for food banks,
assist people who have difficulties with the UIC and human resources
bureaucracies, and often coordinate further support from churches,
unions and community organizations.
The centres, by existing and by organizing the unemployed, battle the
emotional enemy of people without jobs: a sense of uselessness.
That such valuable resources have been assembled with so little direct
help from government is testimony to the resilience and determination of
humanity. The Socreds should be applauding.
But the provincial government has done nothing for the unemployed.
They have cut away at minimal financial assistance, undermined health and
housing, security and refused to stimulate job creation.
Because the unemployed rightly see the Socreds as their foe, they opposed them and joined with their working counterparts in Operation
Solidarity.
The Socreds consider that a crime, and they have cut off funding for
groups or even fired individuals who were so naive they believed they could
question: their government.
McLelland is so steeped in hatred of the great unwashed that he cannot understand why the government of Canada would give a few small
coins to people hard at work helping themselves and others in the second
worst depression of the century.
The only explanation is the Social Credit party does not support the
principle of pluralistic democracy. They have made themselves the sworn
enemies of everyone but themselves.
Musical chairs
Our legislators seem to believe there is fat to trim from the body of
post-secondary education.
That might have been true six years ago when they first began putting
the squeeze on colleges and universities for funding. A lot of instructors
and support staff have been lost and quite a few students added since
then.
The engineers, who a few years back removed the speaker's chair
from the legislature in Victoria, might have had the right idea.
Let's remove a few more chairs, so MLA's can scramble to avoid sitting on the floor. Let's have them line up for up to an hour to receive their
legislative packages or have lunch.
In the meantime, drop a line to your own MLA, and to universities
minister Pat McGeer. There is something happening here they ought to
find out about.
Letters
Shell necklaces not wanted
On Sept. 13 you published a letter
from Ms. Lerae Britain, on
Honolulu, Hawaii (Necklace
refusal perplexes Hawaiian visitor),
in which she expressed her distress
at our refusal to accept her donation of shell necklaces. I share her
distress, in that one of the more difficult aspects of my job is the need
occasionally to refuse gifts from
generous donors.
As a museum of anthropology we
could collect, with justification,
anything made by human hands
from any time and place; all artifacts are potentially of interest.
Realistically, we have to set limits to
determine which of all the available
material is most relevant to our interests.
After long deliberation, we have
established collections guidelines
which determine what our priorities
should be. Unfortunately, contemporary shell necklaces are outside
our present collecting guidelines.
The note which I received from
our receptionist stated only that the
shell necklaces were a potential
donation to the museum, not that
Ms. Britain's intention was that
they might be passed on to someone
else if we were not able to accept
them. Museum ethics prohibit their
being accepted by a member of our
staff, as this could create a conflict
of interest.
r
THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian. University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Hello," said Lisa Morry, lamenting the Whitecaps loss. Sarah Cox, from Toronto, was
not too consolling. "Yayy Toronto," she was heard to shout, above the heckles of Arnold
Hedstrom and Robert Handfield, who, both being from Calgary, were raised to hate Toronto
with a passion. Brian Jones, a Ubyssey draft pick from Calgary, where he was taught the art
of capitalist ad selling by sheik Peter, pointed out the Whitecaps don't advertise in the paper,
so why should anybod ^are. Muriel Draaisma, who until age 18 thought Eastern Canada
meant everything east of Main street sat working away while fellow three stooge members
Chris Wong was boasting about his Shaughnessy mansion, Vern McDonald and Craig
Brooks meanwhile ripped the first edition to shreds, secretly knowing it was better than in
their years, but they weren't telling. Shaffin Shariff went back to the Sun, where he now feete
at home, while Bill Tieleman and Deb Wilson looked for Francis' last name. Robby Robertson
and Peter Berlin went back home, being homesick, Maria Kredensten, Sarbara Walden and
Charlie meanwhile worked on the flats, while Victor Wong rounded out The staff list for
Ubyssey 1983-84 number 2. Sorry if I missed anyone.
Had I known that Ms. Britain
wished them to be passed on to
some local person as a goodwill gift,
-I would have been delighted to do
so, as I was very sorry to have to
return a gift which was obviously
offered in a spirit of generosity.
Elizabeth L. Johnson
curator: collections
Red tape
race won
At 2 p.m. today, I decided to
begin my registration circuit for this
year. I went to get my course cards
from the education grad office. I
went to get my course cards from
the education grad office. Then I
headed over to the faculty of
graduate studies in the main administration building to register. I
next payed my fees upstairs in
Finance and finally got my library
card renewed at Sedgewick library.
By 2:50 p.m. the entire affair was
wrapped up.
I never thought it could be done
in under an hour. My thanks and
congratulations to the registrar and
his many agents.
David Klrshner
mathematics
Letters.
We like them because we don't
have to write them.
Get out your typewriter and start
working. Please don't address it to
Sir. Thank you.
P.S. Please deliver them to SUB
241k. Thanks.
Welcome distorted
It is regretable that the Lutheran
campus chaplain, Ray Schultz, was
insulted by the welcome to the
students given by the new campus
paper, The Campus Herald put out
by the AMS Christian Publications
Club. I am grateful that Chaplain
Schultz pointed out that the Christian clubs which participated are
just a part of the religious community on campus.
As he pointed out, unity among
the Christians is an extremely important goal. It was for this very
reason that the AMS Christian
Publications Club and The Campus
Herald began. It is to provide a
forum where the Christians on cam
pus could voice their opinions
without having it distorted.
It also is to provide another way
of unifying the Christians on campus. It has been exciting to the
Christians working together in
many different ways: praying
together bi-weekly, the new paper,
and the sharing of offices.
Most of the Christian community
on campus would really like to
welcome the students, especially
those first year students to our campus and we wish you the very best at
UBC.
Keith Coleman
advisor
Maranatha Christian Club
Polish prof performed
All of Chris Wong's articles in
The Ubyssey on Jerzy Wiatr, the
most recent article appearing
September 13, have failed or
neglected to address the cause for
which Professor Wiatr was appointed — that being to teach. Mr
Wong has consistently failed to
report on the content and quality of
Professor Wiatr's courses, and for
this reason, I believe that Mr Wong
must be strongly criticized.
Professor Wiatr was hired to
teach, and, as a student in both of
his courses, I am pleased to advise
you, and 1 am confident that my
fellow students would agree, that
Professor Wiatr accomplished his
task admirably.
Professor  Waitr's lectures  were
uniformly superb, his knowledge of
the material was well demonstrated,
students' examinations and papers
were consistently and equitably
marked, and Professor Wiatr was
most generous in the amount of
time he made available for private
consultations.
At no time could any of his comments in class be construed as
anything less than objective, in the
most academic sense. I have no
doubts that if Professor Wiatr was
a full-time instructor at UBC, he
would be deserving of a Master
Teacher Award.
K.M. Murphy
arts 4 Friday, September 16, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
From page 4
"I mostly walk around. I try the
docks and all the ships and every
restaurant. I been back east of here
and checked out all the ranches and
farms and all that. Mostly I thumb
my way around; I'm very good at it,
eh? I spend most of my day looking
for work. Night time, I'm usually
hanging around some friends,
around shopping malls, checking
out some young women and just
passin' away the day."
He shows me the ring his girl gave
him before he left home. She also
gave him a choker necklace, some
pictures and a watch but he left the
choker and the watch in Newfoundland and someone stole them.
Someone stole the pictures he
brought with him, too. "She was
decent," he remembers.
He left The Rock with seven
dollars in his pocket and had six
when he got to Edmonton. Sympathetic drivers along the way
would help him out with a meal and
a few bucks before setting him on
the highway again. He recalls one.
He was hitching through Ontario —
"I forget the names of all these
towns" — and this big guy, a Pen-
tacostalist, he learned, picked him
up. George knew some Pen-
tacostalists from back home in
Westport and he wasn't immediately impressed. They never seemed
too charitable if you weren't one of
their own. But the guy asked if they
'People had dreams'
had a place to stay and no, they
didn't, so he took them home to the
wife and kids for the night.
A little later George made his way
into the kitchen for something to
drink and nearly stumbled on the
guy, sitting at the table with his
head in his hands and crying. Crying. "Oh, God, please help these
kids," he was pleading. George
could hardly believe it. "I felt like
laughing because this guy was crying." But he couldn't forget it
either. "This guy comes into my
head all the time now."
The interview warms after a half
hour of economical question and
answer when George leans closer
and lowers his voice confidentially:
"I think this place'd be real bad if
there wasn't places like the sisters'
and all that. I think there'd be a lot-
ta violence." Proletarian justice?
Massive redistribution of wealth? A
new political order? "Not a lady'd
be able to walk with a purse, and
there wouldn't be a store with
anything in it. I know that."
THE MAN WITH the purplish
web of broken blood vessels running a fine pattern over his cheeks
and nose chews out the insides of
his baloney sandwich and chucks
the crust on the grass of Op-
penheimer Park, across the street
from the Sandwich Sisters. A
mushy bit of white bread is pasted
to his right cheek. Slowly he turns
to the woman sharing the bench and
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starts small talk. Yeah, he mumbles
into the wind, he fled the farm in
Salmon Arm, B.C. for the big city
in forty two. No money to be made
on thrity five acres. Became a
seaman. Sailed to Australia and
back. Married there.
Nineteen forty two. That's forty
one years. Musta been just a kid.
He looks like a geezer but the booze
does that. I want to know if it was
the same for him then as it is for the
kids now joining the line up across
the street. Did his generation run on
the same thin mix of hopes and guts
and charity?
"Yeah, but there were jobs then.
People had dreams but they forgot
about them when they had
something to do. Me, I never
thought about anything but my
work in the shipyards ..."
A mess of pigeons on a sandwich
safari wiggle in a rough line towards
today's paydirt. A big white seagull
swoops down and scarfs the whole
thing. I head over to the convent
kitchen.
The old man with a torn upper lip
is cleaning up around the scullery
and the convent daycare. He's been
around, off and on, for fifty years.
He's seen the old buildings come
down and these already shabby
ones go up. Seen the line grow long
in the Depression, longer when men
started to ride the rails after the Second World War and longer still as
they began to be replaced by
machines in their jobs. He looks at
something far away. Yes, it was different then. He always had a job
too.
The line starts to wind around the
corner, growing by ones and twos.
Old men and a few women, young
men and women who have never
even had a job and can't find one.
No experience, little hope. And
unless there are some big changes,
says the scullery man, a lot of them
will be standing there 40 years from
now. "But I'll be long gone by
then," he snorts, and he goes back
to his chores.
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We believe that you will find The Video More to be a
very special, and unique video rental storefront. Ours is
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Planning your future requires a
lot of thought - and as much input
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sources. As a college or university
student thinking about a career
in professional accounting, Associate
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as details about professional development seminars and chapter meetings.
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Learn more about CG.A. Become
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Association office for an application
form and details about membership.
The Director of Admissions,
The Certified General Accountants
Association of B.C.,
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Telephone: (604) 732-1211
Certified General
Accountants
CGA
^y Association
of British Columbia Page 14
Wfi£.
Rubber Biscuit: the band following the long
and honoured tradition of having a silly name,
started by the Beatles, Sept. 16, Soft Rock
Cafe, 1925 W. 4th, 734-2822.
Sundance: ah, sing praises to his mightiness,
Haile Selaisse rumoured to be making yet
another guest appearance at this reggae gig,
Sept. 17-18, Soft Rock.
Phoenix Jazzers: dixieland, Sept. 13 and 16,
Hot Jazz Club, 33 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
Visible Targets:  quasi-pseudo  new-wave-
modern-esoteric-punk,  now beat that Neal
Hall for an esoteric description, Sept. 15-17,
Town Pump, 68 Water, 683-6695.
Bob Hanson Band/Melchlzadek: a live Coop radio broadcast, Sept. 16, The Wsterfront,
686 Powell, 684-8494.
Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson: a blues legend
who has played with Count Basie, Charlie
Parker and others, a must, Sept. 16-17, The
Ankor, 99 Powell, 669-4022.
Roy Reynolds Quartet: jazz in an art gallery,
what more could you ask for besides a lifetime subscription to the Ubyssey, Sept. 18, 2
p.m., Surrey Art Gallery, 13750 88th Ave.,
596-7461.
Ernestine Anderson: she's rumoured to be
singing with Betty Carter, if thaf s true, don't
miss this show, even if ifs not, go anyways
she's dynamite as evidenced by her appearance at the Whister Jazz Festival, Sept.
19-Oct. 1, Plazazz Showroom, International
Plaza Hotel, Showcase Weekend: a showcase
for new bands, Sept. 16-18, SUB Ballroom,
228-5336.
Bob Brozman: master of the national steel
guitar, mandolin and ukelele, Sept. 18, 8
p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 1895
variables, 254-9578.
Vancouver Chamber Choir/Vancouver
Chorale: a capella magic, Sept. 18, 2:30
p.m., Westminster Abbey, 738-6822, via
British Airways, just kidding, it's the abbey
somewhere in the Fraser Valley.
\tf\p\j\J6
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6119) Sept. 16: L'age D'or/Simon of
the Desert, 7:30 p.m.; Los OMdados. 9:30
p.m. Sept. 21: Anthology of the Italian
Clnema-The Silent Film From 1896-1926.
7:30 p.m. Sept. 22: Toute Une Vie, 7:30
p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
A Right of Rainbirds, Sept. 16-22, 7:30 and
9:30.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) From Here to Eternity. 7:30
p.m.; Suddenly Last Summer, 9:40 p.m.
Sept. 19-20: Poetry In Motion. 7:30 p.m.;
Judy Chicago-The Making of the Dinner
Party. 9:15 p.m. Sept. 21-22: Wiaeblood,
7:30 p.m.; The Big Red One, 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Sept. 16-18: The Hunger. 7:30
p.m.; Just a Gigolo, 9:20 p.m.; The Man
Who Fell To Earth. 11:15 p.m.; Sept. 19-20:
Barbaraila, 7:30 p.m.; Star Crash, 9:30 p.m.
Sept. 21-22: Jeilbert, 7:30 p.m.; Attack of
,the Killer Tomatoes. 9 p.m. Women In
Focus (465 W. Broadway, 872-2250) Two
days of continuous films and videos. Films
with women, their role, the oppression
against them, and their culture, Sept. 16, 2-8
p.m.; Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Presentation Houee (333 Chesterfield,
986-1351) Sept. 16: If You Love This Planet,
12:10 p. m.; Our Health is Not For Sale, 1:10
p.m.
SUB Films (SUB Auditorium, 228-3897)
Sept. 15-18: An Officer and a Gentleman.
Thurs.-Sun., 7 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 7 and 9:30
p.m. Sept. 22-25: My Favorite Year, same
times.
Cinema 16. Sept. 19: What On Earth,
Neighbours, Toys, If you Love This
Planet, For The Next 60 Seconds, 6:30 and
8:30 p.m.
The Diary of Adam and Eve: a musical and
comic look into the lives of those two great
hipsters whose favourite dish was barbecued
spare ribs, City Stage, 751 Thurlow,
Mon.-Fri., 12 noon, 688-1436.
California Suite: a comedy by Neil Simon,
Metro Theatre, 1370 S. W. Marine Dr.,
Weds.-Sat., 8:30 p.m., 266-7191, till Oct. 1.
Tighten The Traces-Haul In The Rains and
The Boat: a play with three names has to be
good, check it out, Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, 8:30 p.m., til Sept. 17, 254-9578.
Waiting For Godot: ah yes, the old English
100 standby is receiving a treatment by those
loveable people over in the theatre department, ifs been a long wait, don't miss it now,
beware for Beynon's scorching review,
Frederic Wood Theatre, Sept. 21-Oct. 3, 8
p.m., 228-2678.
«
£yJUl>'fc
What Could Be Mora Boring Than Art:
that's sure easy, this God forsaken column
called VISTA which I'm typing out at 12:30 at
night instead of something rarely done by
Ubyssey staffoids, sleeping, hurry up, let's
get this over with, oh year, this is a great
show of digital paintings, with sarcasm, by
Jim Carrico, Unit/Pitt Gallery, 163 West
Pender, 681-6740, till Sept. 24.
Victor Cicansky: clay sculpture from a
Regina sculptor, he comes from the same
home time as a certain VISTA writer, the
home of many esoteric culturally minded people, UBC Fine Arts Gallery, 228-2759, till Oct,
1. Vancouver Illustrators: features
Vancouver's best illustrators, aren't you glad
I'm providing you this info, Artists Gallery,
555 Hamilton 687-1345, till Oct. 1.
Contemporary Czechoslovakian
Photographers:   sure   beats   ancient   Czech
photogs, Presentation House, 986-1351, ti
Oct. 2.
FREE EXERCISE CLASS
M
I
V.
I
r
s
s
- Ml AM
III {)() AM
..'.*"
11  M) PM
. .' * "
. .' * '
\  M> PM
•* HI PM
. .'.* "
. -V "
. .'.* "
COST: $40 00 —  Choose any of the classes listed above as
many times a week as you like, any time,
any location, any intensity
$  2 00 —   Drop-in per class
Session:   First Term - Sept   I 9 Dec  9 83
Second Term - Jan    I 6-April 4.   I 984
Registration: First Term - Sept   6-16; Second Term - )an   3-1 3 at
Intramural Recreational Sports (Rm. 203 I. War
Memorial Gym or late registration during first week
of exercise class
Sponsored by Recreation U.B.C.   For Fitness Information - 738-4 I 69
• VALID UNTIL SEPT. 24/83 WTTH THIS AD.
Friday, September 16, 1983
Tacky-Tourist Tailgate Party: Yup, this is
what you've been waiting for, a roast pig dinner, President George Pedersen roasted
(that's funny, he resembers Kermit the frog
more than Porky Pig), and the Outriggers
Polynesian Dancers, all before the T-Birds
game against U of C, Sept. 16, 4 p.m.,
Thunderbird Stadium Plaza, tickets $3.50,
AMS Box office.
Buy-a-bargain-book-bonanza: alliteration, I
love it, get books from 99 cents to $10, Waterfront Theatre, Sept. 17-18.
TODAY
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Meeting with George & Joelle Emery, directors
of   the   Foundation   of   Universal   Unity,   noon,
Buch A202.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
T-Birds   vs.    Calgary    Dinosaurs,    7:30   p.m.,
Thursdays Stadium.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Pre-footbali game barbeque, 4 p.m , Thunder
bird Stadium plaza.
MONDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Organizational meeting for Clubs Day, anyone
interested in cycling welcome, noon, "Cages"
(SUB) basement).
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: "If You Love This Planet" and discussion
of this year's activities. All welcome, noon, SUB
205.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Meet George and Joelle Emery, founding directors of the Foundation of Universal Unity, noon,
Buch. A202. This is a serious announcement.
CITR
Live play-by-play coverage of football T-Birds
against Calgary, 7:15 p.m., FM 101.9, cable
100.1.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Partyroom. Come out and
brush up on your dancing.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: The Hiding Place, 7:30 p.m., Angus 104.
SATURDAY
UBC COMMUNITY SPORTS SERVICES
Tennis tournament, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., courts
behind ice rinks. Prizes, hoorayl
FORESTRY
Dr. T. G. Northcote, Forestry/Westwater/IARE
UBC, speaks on "The Lake Titicaca Project: Exporting Canadian Fisheries expertise to the Peruvian Andes," noon, MacMillan 166.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: The Cross and the Switchblade, 7:30 p.m.,
Angus 104.
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice and beginners' clinic, 10 p.m., aquatic
centre. All welcome.
MONDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB foyer.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Evangelist Bob Martin of the University of
California (Bericley) speaks. 7:30 p.m., Angus
104.
TUESDAY
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS C'ETTE
Organizing Oct. 6th General Meeting on provincial budget and legislation. All interested
students welcome. SUB 224, 12:X.
GEOLOGY
UBC Prof. J. J. Nagel speaks on computer data
bases and museum cases, noon, GeoSci 330A.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
FREE legal advice, noon to 2 p.m., SUB 111.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
General meeting, noon, Buch. A202. Anyone interested may join in.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Introductory meeting, noon, SUB 212. Ne.v
members welcome; planning for clubs day.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Evangelist Bob Martin, UC Berkley, speaks, 7:30
p.m., Angus 104.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre conference room.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS & LESBIANS OF UBC
Continuation of third annual beer gathering, 4:30
p.m., Gallery Lounge. Come to SUB 239 for
details.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
UBC MEN'S SQUASH TEAM
Team tryouts, 6:30 to 8:45 p.m., Winter Sports
Centre,
THURSDAY
GAYS Er LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, Brock 304. Important, all
interested people please attend.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registratin, noon, SUB party room. Continues
until 3:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Immigration officers meeting students re visas,
9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., International House board
room.
FRIDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB party room. Continues
until 3:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Sixties Revival dance, 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., tH
Upper Lounge. Taped music, $1 admission.
Dead.
That's what your inhibitions and
insecurities will be after you take
part in The Ubyssey's newswriting
seminar today at 4 p.m. in SUB
241k.
Bill Tieleman, hardened news
writer for the better part of a
decade, will go through the basics
of ledes, inverted pyramids, attributions and how to avoid being sued.
Much good, you bet. Be there.
y~          c/eltinis
■^i
T*»2
from
3 to4
i
C-W.'K COFR.7
(per per^imi
M[,77/\rV('OH7/
(per person)
fi lea   >/ ,.».!%,'
$2.50
$1.25
i
r---^             ,„ulwhaik.   ,l!he,Y:a
,
BOB MARTIN
SPEAKING NIGHTLY.
SEPT. 19-24
ANGUS 104. 7:30 P.M.
-MARANATHA-
HEALING, MIRACLES HAPPEN TODAY
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 66c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977,
5 - COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
THE FORGOTTEN PARTY:
THE VICTIM OF CRIME
The Honorable Mr. Justice
Brian Dickson, Supreme
Court of Canada
SATURDAY, SEPT. 17
at 8:15 P.M.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
10 -
- FOR SALE -
Commercial
11 -
- FOR SALE -
Private
TIRED OF COMMUTING
ALREADY? Come and live on
campus. Vacancies available now
in the student residences. Room
and board for Ladies. Come to
the Ponderosa Housing Office or
call 228-2811.
FREE ROOM
AND BOARD
in exchange for 15 to 20 hrs.  housesitting.
25th & Arbutus, 738-8685.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander.
Graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
731-8323 or 261-8514.
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Women to play rugby. No experience necessary. Practices Tuesday and
Thursday, 5:30 p.m. at Balaclava Park
(West 30th & Balaclava). Everyone
welcome.
65 - SCANDALS
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 West Broadway. 874-0633.
AFRICAN BASKETS. Perfect for carrying
books, groceries, etc. Retail cost, $60-$80.
My cost - $20-$35. Sandy, 222-0176 between 4-9 p.m.
FOR SALE: Shelving unit. Solid
wood, white, 1 piece 3 level pedestal. 3'x
6'9" x V4". $65 obo. Tel. 266-4289.
'79 HONDA HAWK. 15,000 mi., very good
cond., Helmut & Fairing incl., $780.
321-1675, Harel.
'63 MGB. With '67 Datsun engine & 5
speed. 228-8333 or 888-0879 after 6 p.m.
Suitable for restoration.
15 - FOUND (no charge)
FOUND: Young female cat at
UBC. It has short gray hair and
needs a good home. Contact
224-3752.
THE KEG PRIME RIB
and BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:00 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
85 - TYPING
ESSAYS, term papers, theses and
manuscripts professionally prepared on a
word processor. Your work can be stored,
revised and reprinted at any time. Special
rates for students. For information, phone
Maggie Edwards at 683-4613 (8:30-3:30! or
732-0948 (other times).
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects. $1.00 per page min. Contact
Louise. 731 0594.
40 - MESSAGES
90 - WANTED
20 - HOUSING
4-DR. EXEC. HOME. Richmond. Washer'
Dryer. $350/mo. Utilities incl., non-smoker.
Avail, immed. 271-7813.
POTTERY CLUB
All ciay and pots must be claimed, and lockers emptied by
Sept. 18 or the club will confiscate. New lockers available
starting the 19th.
MUSICIANIS) to join ex-pro bass player to
play iunk for MONEY and fun. Competence
a must   Mike 270-8355.
DRUMMER and keyboardist for rock band
of students. We have bookings in Oct. Paul
266-8392 or Zack 689-0482. Friday, September 16,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Four women fast for life
Page 15
Four Vancouver women fasted
for three days last weekend in
solidarity with eleven other people
conducting a "fast for life".
The women camped on the Old
Courthouse steps at Robson Square
from Friday until Saturday, setting
up a literature table and hanging a
banner proclaiming "We Hunger
for Disarmament." The four
women slept on the courthouse
steps Friday and Saturday night accompanied by a few friends and
supporters.
The three day fast at Robson
Square was in support of eleven
people fasting in Paris, Bonn, and
Oakland, California. They intended
to draw government attention to the
need for immediate action to halt
the momentum of the arms race.
The fasters, including Andre
Lariviere of Quebec, began their
fast to the death Aug. 6 as an
analogy to the short time left for
life on earth. They ended their fast
Wednesday after forty days. The
eleven issued a statement explaining
they were ending their fast in
response to people the world over
who had taken up their appeal.
"We live in a world that is out of
balance," said Vancouver faster
and music teacher Susan Elik.
"Every day 40,000 children under
the age of five die of malnutrition
and nearly $2 billion is spent
worldwide on arms."
During the day the Robson
Square fasters handed out leaflets
to passersby, wrote letters to world
leaders, made peace bracelets for
the eleven fasters, and talked to
downtown pedestrians about their
committment to world peace and
justice.
"When I hear about these people and what they were doing I
knew that I had to do something to
support them," SFU sociology student Sue Cox said of the 11 fasters.
"The media coverage of their fast
has been very poor in B.C. and we
wanted to bring it to the attention
of as many people as possible,"
added Cox, one of the Robson
Square fasters. "We hope that people will write letters to Trudeau or
Reagan or their MPs encouraging
them to make a positive offer
toward disarmament."
The International Conference of
the Fast for Life issued an appeal
calling on people, institutions and
governments to take significant actions to end the nuclear arms race.
The appeal did not make demands,
but instead gave examples of
responses the 11 fasters would consider significant.
Canada's refusal to test the
American Cruise missile is a
response the international fasters
wish for, the Robson Square fasters
said.
War in peace land
MONTREAL (CUP) —
Disagreement over the extent of the
Soviet Union's role in the nuclear
arms race could jeopardize turnout
at two independent rallies scheduled
for Oct. 22.
One coalition La Grande Marche
Pour la Paix (LGM), has declared a
call for an end to arms in the East
and West. With the support of
unions and the municipal party
Montreal Citizen's Movement,
LGM is organizing a march and rally.
Another group, the Oct. 22nd
Committee consists mostly of
women's groups, health professionals, and church groups. They
plan to form a human chain spanning the 14 blocks separating the
U.S. and Soviet consulates. This
coalition protests not only the East
and West arms build-up, but throws
support   behind  the  independent
peace movements in Warsaw Pact
countries.
This emphasis on Soviet responsibility led LGM to turn down an
offer to join forces. They refused to
accept the Oct. 22nd Committee's
declaration at a meeting last spring.
MARY J. DON LEVY M.D.
FAMILY PHYSICIAN
is pleased to announce the
opening of her practice at
201-2732 W. Broadway
731-0324
Mon. -Thurt. 8:00 am-fcQQ pm
Friday B:00 am-6:00 pm
Saturday      9:00 am-4:00 pm
Sunday       11:00am-4:00pni
9900
£ <£      XEROX COPIES    £ <f
«* nm QUOTE9 UN LAftOt omens
Copies better than your original
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd., Vancouver
CLUB DAYS:
Sept. 22 & 23
THURS. AND FRIDAY
9:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m.
in SUB
Come out and get involved.
Join your favorite club.
E.D. SOUND & SOFTWARE
Rent a Record
Entire Selection
SPECIAL
OFFER
2 FOR 1
261-6316
Compter
Software
Apple • Commodore 64
• IBM • ATARI
FECIAL OFFER 10% on all Software
Expires Sept. 22, 1983
3526 W. 41st St.
(Across from Safeway)
Bring in this ad.
for your discount
FRENCH LANGUAGE
TRAINING
Fall Program All Levels
Registration from now on
Alliance Francaise
Information — Registration
6161 CambieSt.
327-0201
SLEAP
CHEAP!
Complete Unfinished Pine
Waterbeds From
$169.95
A UBC Special from United Waterbedsl This "Super Single"
(48" by 84") includes: Mattress, Heater, Liner, Pedestal,
Frame & Deckl
STUDENT BODY SPECIALS:
PERCALE SHEET SETS TWO FOR $59.96
BOOKCASE WATERBEDS NOW FROM $229
PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED.'
ASK ABOUT FREE DELIVERY!
OPEN SEVEN DA YS A WEEK!
UNITED WATERBED
12626 BRIDGEPORT ROAD, RICHMOND
273-7600
MASTERCARD
VISA
Next Week in Intramurals
Terry Fox Run
Sunday, Sept. 18
2:00 at Osborne
j>Mk,
League Soccer,
Oct. 3-Nov. 28. $20
Register Sept. 19-23
Buchanan Badminton, Saturday/Sunday
Grand Prix Round 1. Oct. 1 & 2
Register Sept. 19-23
Great Trek^^^—!
Cycle Tour, Sat. Sept. 24. $10
Mayne Island
Ride the Rapids,
Sun., Sept. 25. $55
Thompson River
Register by Sept. 21
HUGE SAVINGS ON
FASHIONS
TOP QUALITY
& EXCITING VARIETY
OF NAME BRAND FASHIONS
SAVE up to 70% of regular retail
PLUM CLOTHING
forwomen
conveniently located at
FOURTH and ALMA
open
SUNDAYS & FRIDAY NIGHTS Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 16, 1983
Vancouver
MWL
Dine Out
This Weekend
New Er popular on the Kits-Pt. Grey
scene, the Eatery is considered by a
discriminating many to be the only
place to eat.
The Eatery has an astonishing menu
containing great meals, phenomenal
snacks, dessert that Grandma would
be envious of, an espresso machine,
and is fully licenced on top of all
that.
A highly recommended restaurant.
Treat yourself!
(P.S.   Not at all to  imply  that our
customers are hawgs. Just liked the
cartoon.) 343, w   Broadway
(not far east of Alma) 738-5298
<E*TIE^!>i
Sun. only til 10
m
SET A FREE TACO
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF A TACO
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 7 days a week
2028 W. 41st Street, Kerrisdale
Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(Closed Sundays)
This coupon is good for a FREE TACO
with the purchase of a Taco.
Coupon must be presented. One offer per person.
Expires Sept. 25/83
i
I
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after Classes ...
(JhstxLtfLuh
Pasta Shoppe & Delicatessen
OUR SPECIALITIES ARE:
• Fresh Pasta and Assorted Sauces
(Made Daily — Herb Cream Sauce, White Clam with White Wine & Garlic,
Pesto, Tomato, Meat Sauce with Red Wine, Red Clam Sauce).
• Ready Made Pasta Dishes to Go.
(Lasagna & Daily Specials)
• Sandwiches, Quiches, Cold Meats,
Salads & Cheeses
• Assorted Home Made Desserts
OPEN: Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat. 9:00 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Thurs., Fri. until 7:00 p.m., Sun. Noon - 5.00 p.m.
3625 W. 4th Ave. 738-0122
UBC Students/Faculty/Staff
10% off on pasta
FULL MEAL
DEAL
$3
It's the best meal deal going. Our 100% pure
beef single burger with "More Burger Than
Bun™". A small order of crispy, golden fries.
Your favorite small drink. And, to top it all off
a cool and creamy 5 02. DAiRY QUEEN*
Sundae. All for only $3.39. Get a good deal
on a full meal. Head for the corner of
Broadway and Trafalgar.
AM D Q. Corp., 1981
Dairy
Queen
brazier
2601 W. Broadway
at Trafalgar
for Itue \,<\zz cmd blues
Specia1
until SfLlfit. 21±t
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3-50
1540 u>esf
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near
6rwi\/i||e JsU*<d
734-OS?4
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
UBG Ganepas
Pizza
Steak & Pizza       Lasagna
Spare Ribs       Ravioli
Chicken       Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224 4218 - 224-0529
Hours Mon   Thurs   11:30 ant   -  2:00 a.m.
Fn   11.30a.m.   - 300 a.m
Sal   4:00 p.m    -   3:00 a.m.
Sun. 4:00 p m   -   1 00 a.m
2136 Western Parkway
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS      <
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri   11 30 9 00 p m
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3788 W. 10th Avenue
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Cakes whole and by
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Snacks, pastries.
Espresso Bar.
10% off with UBC I.D. card
for purchases over $2.50
Hours: 8:00 a.m.-1:00 a.m.
Monday - Saturday
ph. 228-9816
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Akc at HCOambrtiQe *by, Rictimcnd.

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