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The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1970

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Array Page 2: An in-depth look at Vancouver
left groups
Page pf4: Page Friday raps with the Gallimaufry group
Page 23: Canada's hockey future: where
it's at
Vol. LI, No. 27 VANCOUVER, B.C.,  FRIDAY, JANUARY  23,   1970
228-2305
Student societies face dissolution
The Alma Mater Society could cease to exist as a
functional organization.
The future of the AMS is dependent on the outcome
of a referendum being forced by John Cherrington, arts 2.
The petition urging the referendum asks if students
are in favor of "being given the choice of joining or not
joining the AMS or contribute (sic) funds, thus removing
the present compulsory requirement."
500 signatures must be collected on the petition
before the referendum can be held.
"As far as I'm concerned, Cherrington is just a right
wing shit-disturber," said AMS president Fraser Hodge.
"The AMS would be nothing more than a tea party if
that referendum were passed," he said.
Hodge went on to say that students would still be
responsible for a $15 levy to pay the mortgage on SUB.
However, he said that holding the referendum would
be good for the AMS because "every organization needs
to re-evaluate its position and objectives".
"A referendum of this sort would do the AMS a
bloody lot of good," said AMS vice-president Tony
Hodge. "It will get people thinking where their money is
going. It will make the people aware fo the AMS."
He said if AMS resources were not available, students
would be unable to take part in operations such as the
Blaine border crossing demonstration.
He felt confident that students would support the
AMS if the referendum were held.
At Carlton, after facing a similar petition, the
remnants of the student council decided to remain in
business Wednesday despite the student mandate to
dissolve itself.
During a two-day referendum Jan. 19 and 20,
students voted 744 to 457 to abolish the council and
replace it with two new bodies: one controlling services,
and one taking charge of "political" functions of student
government.
But the referendum turn-out only amounted to 19
per cent of the full-time student population of Carleton —
less than the one-third of Carleton's 6,200 students
necessary to make the decision binding.
The proposal to split the duties of the council —
consigning service functions to a five-man board of
directors, and political functions to a "grand council"
composed of student representatives to the university's
decision-making bodies — was originally forwarded by
members of the student council executive Jan. 6
At the same time they made the proposal, seven
members of the eight-man executive resigned.
Wednesday, the remains of the council rejected a
proposal by former student council president Lorenz
Schmidt asking that the council dissolve itself anyway,
even though members were not bound by the referendum
results.
"A valid political comment to draw out of the
referendum is that a majority of the people who bothered
to vote think changes are necessary," Schmidt said. "I
think this council should recognize that fact - and act
accordingly."
The councillors voted 7-1 to defeat the motion.
"You want us to dissolve ourselves so your
dreamchild will come through," i arts representative Dave
Egan told Schmidt. "But right now we don't have enough
participation. Let's wait until we get people at Carleton
who will make this sort of change possible."
The council appointed Brian Hamilton, former
finance commissioner, as interim president of the group:
five other executive positions left vacant by the Jan. 6
resignations will not be filled until new council elections
take place Feb. 16.
New research centre to
fight student isolation
-roger kozma. photo
FRED FERDMAN, a member of the Vancouver Student
Movement gets dragged off by RCMP after disrupting mealtime at
Totem Park. Ferdman and a fellow VSM member were trying to
sell newspapers to the residents during their dinner. As a result of
a scuffle downstairs in the Common Block, he was arrested and
charged with assaulting an officer.
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
A research centre will open Friday in
Vancouver to fight the elitism and isolation
propagated by the present university
structure.
Mordecai Briemberg, deposed head of the
Simon Fraser University political science,,
anthropology and sociology department,,
spoke Wednesday on the new research centre.
"The centre is going to try and fight
isolating functions performed by most
universities today," said Briemberg.
The university isolates the student from
the community for four years or more.
According to Briemberg yhis isolation takes
place in several different ways and serves a
very definite purpose.
"The university student is as a rule a
member of a social elite, the upper middle
classes, therefore he is automatically isolated
from a large portion of the society.
"Course content isolates him or her even
further since it is designed to legitimize and
rationalize the present system with its
distribution of resources.
"On top of that the student is taken out
of the main stream of activity while attending
university.
"And finally almost all universities are
located far from the city centres."
Briemberg than went on to show that this
isolation was very consciously done in order
to control the students' thinking for a
determined length of time and to provide
research material for those in power.
"There are ways of remedying this
situation and that is what the centre will
attempt to do by taking education to the
'oppressed' classes, workers, tenants,
unemployed and minority groups," he said.
The student can try to remedy this
isolation by "engaging in struggles in the class
for more relevant courses, attempting to
equalize power relations between faculty and
students and by establishing relationships
between elites and others," said Briemberg
Although the centre will have a definite
political perspective it is not a political party.
Nor is it a free university.
In describing the centre Briemberg said,
"It is more like a library than a university. It
will encourage continual interaction between
work and study.
"The centre will try and facilitate the
struggle of the "oppressed" but it will take no
further political position," he said.
The center will also try and fight the
traditional notion of expertese which "is
another form of oppression" said Briemberg
Students and faculty will offer themselves as
resource personell for those in the centre.
There are some immediate benefits for
the students who will work for the centre as a
resource person.
"If you are willing to join yourself with
other oppressed groups then you can make
your period at the university meaningful since
you will be doing meaningful work," said
Briemberg.
Students could also use the centre as a
source of guidance in their struggles in the
class. In the centre they would come in touch
with people who have either been engaged in
similar struggles or are conducting them
presently.
Dick Betts, arts undergraduate president,
thought that the centre would be very good
for students.
"If I have any interest at all in the centre
it is to combat the myths going around now,"
he said.
Betts also pointed out ways in which
students could incorporate work for the
centre with their courses. "Instead of writing
a term paper on some irrelevant topic as the
oppression of Paraguayan Indians write on the
oppression of the Canadian Indian.
"That way you are profiting yourself by
making the course relevant to your
surroundings and others can use the
information in a constructive way."
Another way in which the centre hopes
to cater to young people is by organizing
workshops (discussion groups) about
"repressions" in and out of the educational
system and how to fight them.
"It is very important to initiate discussion
among young people that will insure that they
remain in contact with the oppression of their
parents, fight it and succeed — not only get
out of it," said Briemberg.
The centre will officially open tonight
with a dance starting at 8:30 p.m. at
Fisherman's Hall on East Cordova. Everyone is
welcome to attend. Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
THE CANADIAN LEFT:
On The
Move Again
MARX: started it all
The Ubyssey's John Andersen dissects the Canadian radical lett and finds the outlook bright.
After decades of stagnation, the Canadian
revolutionary left appears to be on the move again.
The present revolutionary left is comprised of a
number of splinter groups, some of which are branches
of international revolutionary organizgMBMflgtatmare
based entirely in Vancouver. *f«r
Each group adheres to a distinct line, *#ell to the left
of the Communist party, ranging from the Various
interpretations of Maoism and Trotskyiigrt to anarchism.
The members of these groups arf*'usually young
workers or students, each sharpened in political theoiv
by intensive readings and debate between and within ihe
groups. ''it$ "
To the outsider, the ideologies of these gi'MJpS
would be nearly incomprehensible at first glance. For
example, how many people can explain clear]
concisely the major differences between Tro
Maoism? Or realize that anarchism is an ideo
not a ghetto revolt?
The number is miniscule.
As a result, these groups are often dism
comprised of members of the lunatic fringi
under the vague definition of "communi
fact many have fairly sophisticated political
analyses of events. What follows is intended
some of the confusion surrounding these grou
Most ot the Maoist and Trotskyist parties
under the assumption that a highly trained, di
party is needed in a revolution to lead the people. This
concept and its development was V. I. Lenin's major
contribution to revolutionary theory.
The Trotskyist movement in Vancouver is
represented by the Young Socialists/Ligue des Jeunes
Socialistes and the League for Socialist Action.
The LSA operates primarily within the labor
movement while the YS operates mainly in the high
schools and universities. Their activities are co-o[dinatcd
to an extent that the YS is often considered to be the
youth wing of the LSA. They share a headquarters in a
hall behind the Vanguard bookstore at 120| Granville
where they sponsor public forums on Friday *lightllj|
Their political views are almost precisely the same
and they will be treated here as belonging to the^ame
group. There are no formal connections between them,
however.
The first of the two major concepts of their
ideology is internationalism: (i.e.) "Working class unity
should be international and not limited by nationalist
feelings." In practical terms, this means that if a
workers' revolution succeeds in a country, it shoul
"exported" to the workers of the surrounding c
After the expulsion of Leon Trotsky^
this was revised by Stalin to a policy of j
country". That is, the revolutionary
countries   should   have   has   their  maj
preservation of the revolution in Russia.1
To preserve this policy of internatf
wide organization of revolutionary socialist parties,
including the LSA, was formed by the exiled Trotsky in
1938.
Called the Fourth International, it is described by
an LSA spokesman as "a unified international party
operating   under   the   same   concept   as   the   Third
International did under Lenin."
"Capitalism is world-wide, therefore to fight it you
have to organize effectively around the world," he
said.
*-..eT^;«^^*^^^*^ptt^*f^tart^iw» »* .,
anti-bureaucratic nature. Trotskyism point to the rapid
growth of the Stalinist-controlled bureaucracy in Russia
as a prime cause for the decay of that revolution.
Both the YS and the LSA are democratic centralist
* parties. There is complete democracy within the party.
M]_.guestions are discussed freely and are decided by
. lfai$8r\t% voter-Factions are allowed to organize within
•.-** the par gftje oppose the line of the majority and are
allowed ^percentage representation on all committees
with thi/parly.
However, once a decision on any matter has been
feached,   party   members  are   required  to carry   the
■ •; mainly line when operating outside the organization.
The  highest  body  in  the LSA is the l^piyal
cuiiveniion  which outlines the  major policies,<#*the
party. Again, complete internal democracy i$4|pipiftx
The convention elects a central commtt^^^^S
people which is in chaiplgfi
ntral coi
•a pol
'rfperat
instan
membership.
The YS* ope
fThe
an intern
&creta
Can*
and, the •#
people
•    Tb
capitalisMBeoncum.
basis.
Th$; feel   ih.n   SjQj; the '<&t\
ultimately no diflcrrtioc hC^""~*-'
capita,
ecor
bu
tnenting
.elects a T<
4s resp
League. All LSA offic
iy majority vote of t]
C.-1K ihe sdme • tincture"
has i Minilur -.liuiiure on
lunimitict-u*-* a three man
Qui-, -ol'* and.Romc.-.)
or f^tp-ffcidu-ition
,niH.Ha»'biJwr'{eoisie
ween-ific Canadian
dfi\'-loped
(■ii  t class
"Socialism in the NDP has gone to the doghouse
under the social democratic leadership. The NDP should
be a mass movement rather than just a parliamentary
party," he said.
He cited support given to the left-wing Watkings
Manifesto at the recent NDP convention in Winnipeg as a
prime reason for continued support of the party.
The radicalization of people is seen by the YS/LSA
as being accomplished by building actions around
concrete  demands rather than  the  broader issues of
iajism and anti-capitalism. "We build around   "
singJKTfssues which anyone can understand," said the
spokesman. "The anti-war movement is a good example
of radicalization of people on a single issue," he said.
Other major points of the LSA/YS program include
support for unilingualism in Quebec and support of the
Cuban revolution.
(Although the following groups are labelled Maoist,
most do not chant Maoist slogans or wave little red „
books at every opportunity. The term Maoist is used to
mean the group sees foreign imperialism as the primary
threat to an independent country. This means that to a
country like Canada, the major threat at present comes
from American control of the economy, rather then
control by the Canadian ruling class.)
The Progressive Workers Movement is the leading
exponent of Maoism in Vancouver.
It was formed in 1964 in the aftermath of a series of
purges in the Communist Party. The persons expelled   '
re unhappy with the direction the CP was taking, in
rms of its Canadian and international programs. They
sagreed with the support given by the CP to the Soviet
in the  Sino-Soviet  dispute  and felt the party
rograrh    was    becoming    too    reformist    and
commodating to imperialism.
The  people   expelled  from   the   CP joined  with
t-wing ex-members of the NDP, forming the PWM.
The PWM had a fairly rapid growth during its first
•ear of existence.  However, it was not a disciplined
group an^Wacked a clear program.
As one member put it: "Anyone who wasn't in
anything joined the PWM. It was a catch-all."
Several militant strikes took place in 1964 and 1965
\which were actively supported by the PWM.
"At one time, nearly every PWM member had been
jailed for union activity," a spokesman said. The
militancy won widespread worker support until at one
time it had 70 active members as well as 12 seats on the
Vancouver Labor Council.
When the striki situation tapered off, however, the
ternal   contradictions   of   the   group  became  more
t.    Opposing   views   on    questions   such   as
|pd to a series of splits and resignations that
he group out of existence.
969, the few remaining members decided
the PWM into a disciplined group with a
iprogram.
aded that Canada's relationship to the U.S.
ony and as such, is almost totally under its
As   a   result,    a   policy    of   Canadian
rmed the major part of their program,
feels  a  united   front   much  like   the
Iteration Front of Vietnam   is needed to
fight American imperialism.
"This front would include not just socialists, but
anyone willing to work for national independence," the
spokesman said. This could possibly include members of
the national bourgeoisie as well as the working class, he
said. Friday, January 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
The national struggle would not necessarily lead to
socialism, he said.
"In many colonies, the nationalist struggle has been
led by the bourgeoisie. The new ruling class often sells
out to an imperialist country and the former colony
emerges as a neo-colony. It is the purpose of socialist
groups within the united front to work for socialist
programs. We feel that socialism is the only defence
against imperialism and that the common people are
going to see socialism as the only practical way of
achieving a better life."
He stressed that socialization of the Canadian sector
of the economy would be a slow process. "It's not going
to hurt the socialist economy to agree to allow the
people who joined us in the struggle to keep their
property for the remainder of their lives," he said. "The
vast majority of property in Canada is American-owned
and nationalization of it would mean most of the
economy would be publicly owned anyhow," he said.
The PWM supports the concept of Canadian
unionism.
"At present, Canadian labor is mostly organized in
international unions," the spokesman said. "These
international unions support American imperialism and
are arms of the imperialist structure reaching into
Canada," he said.
"Organized labor should fight not just for economic
goals but for political goals as well. This includes
Canadian independence from the U.S.," he said.
Members of the group describe the present PWM as
"a communist collective operating in Vanouver". Within
the PWM, members are allowed full democratic rights in
discussing and deciding any policy questions. Decisions
are made by a majority vote of the membership to
ensure unity. However, all members must carry the
majority decision when working outside the group.
The PWM headquarters is at 5H Carrall and
publications include a theoretical quarterly The
Progressive Worker and the monthly B.C. Newsletter.
The Canadian Party of Labor is another variant of
Maoism,   :
Paradoxically, the distinguishing .feature of their
program is m extreme aversion to nationalism, being
opposed to it in any foTm. They fee! that nationalism is
a bourgeois class outlook which ties workers closer to
their own ruling class rather than workers of another
country. As a result, they have serious (fisagreement with
the policies of groups such as, the NUF and the Black
Panthers, although they continue to support these
organizations.
They support the policies of Stalin,, saying they
were necessary for the rapid industrialization of the
Soviet Union. They feel any mistakes made by Stalin
were a result ofhis having no precedent to follow.
"Stalin didn't take into account the fact that the
working class who seized power grew up in a bourgeois
state,"  a party member said.  "Stalin felt that class
TROTSKY: led Russian revolution
struggle ended with the revolution while Mao now feels
it is a long, continuing process," he said.
The Chinese Cultural Revolution shows that Mao
learning from the mistakes of Stalin, he said.
They disagree with participation in the NDP. They
feel it is not a working class party and shows no sign of
moving toward a working class position.
The CPL program is aimed mainly at the working
class.
"However, we work on campus in terms of bringing
working class politics and ideology to students," their
spokesman said.
"Students should define their role in society with
reference to the working class," he said.
The CPL, despite its name, is still in the movement
stage but is expected to become a formaly constituted
party at a congress to be held this year.
The highest body in the CPL at present is the
All-Canada council, consisting of six members elected
from the ranks. No factions are allowed to form
internally but each individual is allowed complete
freedom of speech within the party.
"Policies are generated by the mass of the party and
are arrived at by common consensus," a spokesman said.
"However, in any controversial decisions, the all-Canada
council has the final say," he said.
The CPL presently has branches in Toronto,
Montreal, Winnipeg and Hamilton as well as in Vancouver. Local headquarters is at 4206 East Georgia and
the major publication is* the Canadian Worker.
The Campus Left Action Movement was founded at
UBC during the spring and summer ol 1969. The
formation of the group was in large part due to the
failure ot" the Students for a Democratic University to
mobilize students oil radical issues during the fall of
1968. Many students full a group with a cleaih stated
basis of unity and some degree of discipline was needed,
both of which the SDU lacked.
CLAM policy has suice emerged as a mild version of
Maoism, advocating, a broad front movement against
American imperialism. Like the PWM, CLAM is willing
to unite with anyone to oppose American imperialism.
Being primarily a campu*- group, they attempt to
relate to students by supporting democratization of the
university structure. They feel the university is run by
corporate inteiest, reorescnted by the hoard of
governors. Instead of supporting this one class, they feel
the university should serve the entire community.
Unlike the other Maoist and Trotskyist groups,
CLAM is not organized on the Leninist concept of party
LENIN: revolutionary theorist
structure. Instead, it is run on a committee structure,
with each member of the group belonging to at least one
committee. The emphasis is on self-discipline rather than
discipline imposed by regulations.
(The following information had to be obtained from
a former member of the Internationalists, the parent
group of the Canadian Communist Movement. CCM
members did not wish to speak with a representative of
the "gutter press" so no analysis of their ideology can be
attempted.)
The Canadian Communist Movement and its
affiliates, which include the Canadian Student
Movement and the Vancouver Student Movement,
defines itself as a revolutionary communist movement
following the teachings of Marxism-Leninism, Mao
Tse-tung's Thought.
It had its beginnings in 1964 as a liberal
student-faculty group at UBC called the
Internationalists. A grad student in microbiology, Hardial
Bains, was the dominant figure in the group. At that
time, the group was attracting up to 100 members to its
discussion sessions. Bains left UBC to study at Trinity
College in Ireland while the Internationalists were still a
loosely organized discussion group. While in Ireland, he
made his first attempt at organization, founding the
Trinity Student Movement.
When Bains returned to UBC, the Internationalists
were begining to consolidate around a basis of unity.
Through his personal magnetism, he was able to
consolidate the group around himself on the basis of a
select few. The remainder of the group was unable to
remain together and disintegrated. In 1967, he again left
for Ireland, returning to Canada in the summer of 1968.
He settled in Montreal and started to develop a cohesive
Canadian organization.
From the original Internationalists, he formed the
Canadian Student Movement and its various subsidiary
groups as well as the Canadian Revolutionary Youth (the
non-student equivalent of the CSM) and les
Intellectuelles et Ouvriers Patriotiques de Quebec and
others. The latest group to be formed is the Canadian
Communist Movement which now is the senior group in
the complex.
The former member described the organization as
being "very heavy on indoctrination techniques".
Included in this are "struggle sessions" in which a
prospective member is isolated with other members of
the party. He is then asked questions by the CCM
members. If he gives the "wrong answer" or does not
answer immediately, rehearsed answers are shot back at
him by the CCM members.
These sessions are reported to have continued for 72
hours.
Their method with other groups is to show extreme
sectarianism, attacking any position not their own.
'They have a complete disability to work with other
groups," the ex-member said. "This includes workers,
the unemployed and native Indians," he said.
The phraeseology of their publications resembles
that of the Peking Review. As a result they are unable to
communicate with the average Canadian, he said.
Bains himself has no official position within the
CCM complex. His only position is chairman of the
Necessity for Change Institute of Ideological Studies in
Montreal. However, as the ex-member put it, "In actual
fact its Bains' organization, he runs the whole show."
The anarchists, more' properly called
anarcho-syndicalists, differ from the other groups
mentioned in that they feel no need for a vanguard party
to lead revolutionary workers.
Their revolutionary theory consists of "forming the
structure of the new society within the shell of the old."
The basic idea is to unite all workers in "One Big
Union". The overthrow of the state is accomplished by
calling a general strike and seizing control of industry on
the shop level.
The union would then replace the state as the
national organization and all industry would be
controlled by workers at the local level.
However, they do not feel the army and police will
simply lay down their arms and surrender. They foresee
a system of Red Guards being necessary to preserve the
revolution.
The anarcho-syndicalists are represented in
Vancouver by the Industrial Workers of the World. The
IWW, or the Wobblies as they are commonly called, is
the only group in Vancouver with a long radical
tradition.
(The name Wobbly comes from the pronounciation
of a Chinese laundryman who was a member of the
Vancouver local. He couldn't pronounce the "W" in
IWW, saying i-wobble-you-wobble-you instead, This was
shortened to Wobbly and the name stuck.)
Organized in Chicago in 1905, the union spread
rapidly across North America and reached a peak
strength of 100,000 members in 1912. It was
particularly active in the U.S. Pacific northwest and the
Canadian southwest, especially in the mining and logging
industries.
During this period, is produced several martyrs,
including the famous labor poet Joe Hill, framed on a
murder charge by the Utah authorities and shot in 1915.
Due to government suppression with the help of the
American Federation of Labor, its strength diminished
rapidly after 1925 and for several decades, only a
skeleton organization remained with a few Wobblies left
to keep the faith. Until 1968, only one Wobbly
represented the Vancouver local.
In that year, the IWW convention decided students
would be allowed into the organization. This was done
on the theory that most students today are destined for
the working class.
The union has since rejuvenated across North
America. At present (he-re are about 80 members in
Vancouver (about onc-fhird of whom aris riora-students)
divided among three locals. Largest is the students'local
but the construction workers' and printers' locals are
also gaining strength. Work is also being done in
organizing secretaries.
At the community service level they are working in
support of the grape boycott, the Unemployed Citizens'
Welfare Improvement Council and the Black Cross food
service at UBC.
In the libertarian tradition, the IWW is almost
entirely without structure and hierarchy. The highest
body in the union, the Chicago based General Executive
Board has strictly a co-ordinating function. Maximun
terms of two years on the executive are permitted in
order to prevent the development of personality cults.
A separate GEB will soon be formed in Canada. Said
a spokesman: "Although we recognize that the cause of
the working class js international, we feel every national
BIG BILL HAYWOOD: IWW founder
region has district problems which can best be solved by
having an executive from that area."
In addition to the national GEB, the Vancouver
Industrial District Council of the IWW will be formed
next month with headquarters near the corner of
Broadway and Granville.
A coffeehouse at the same location is also planned.
Each local of the IWW is completely autonomous
within its district and is free to carry out any project the
membership wishes. All union members have, as near as
possible, equal work and responsibilities. There is great
emphasis on self-discipline rather than discipline
imposed through union rules. Although a member could
theoretically be expelled from the union, this has yet to
be done in the Vancouver area.
Ideology in its classical sense is excluded from the
program of the Vancouver local. Instead, the emphasis is
put, as one member said, on "solidarity with anyone
being screwed".
The groups described in this article are just part ol the revolutionary left movement that is now building strength
around the world. They are growing up outside the influence ot the established parties and parliamentary methods. In
terms of revolutionary theory, they have left the Communist party far behind.
In France, they were responsible for detonating the near revolution ol 1968. In Italy today, they are joining with
striking workers and taking over the factories.
It will be a few years before Canada reaches comparable situations but in the meantime, the left will be further
developing its revolutionary theory, waiting for the day  when they will put it into practice.
J Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
TM UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press* services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports, 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
JANUARY 23, 1970
Upheaving
People say that the English department is
coming apart at the seams.
The latest problems involves the "firing" of
six junior members of the department. Two
instructors have been refused promotion to
assistant professor and four assistant professors
have been refused tenure — permanency of
appointment.
Five have since been given two-year terminal
contracts and the sixth has had the decision on his
tenure deferred one year. Two of the five have
rejected the two-year contract, believing they
should be granted tenure.
Officials reasons given for the action are said
to include such things as lack of serious
scholarship, poor teaching ability and failure to
publish in scholarly journals.
Unofficial reasons are said to hinge around
efforts by department head Dr. Robert Jordan and
others to make the department into a professional
academic research centre, at the expense of good
and creative teaching.
It is also said that the action is part of an
effort to bring the department up to some kind of
academic level, where professors will be
continually learning and not feeding students the
same hackneyed lectures for years at a time.
We cannot say at this point who is right, if
indeed anyone is. We can only say what we would
like to see.
It will be readily accepted that we do not
want to see the department become a research mill,
where the only valuable activity is seen as that
which gets the department's name in a scholarly
journal or produces new facts about the moles on
Sam Johnson's left buttock.
Nor do we want to see creative, innovative
teaching and research stifled in favor of standard
academic rhetoric and pomposity.
Nor do we want to see professors spending so
much time experimenting with body poetry that
they lose touch with some of the relevancies of the
course they are teaching.
Nor do we want to see grad students
short-changed by profs out of step, our of touch or
out to lunch.
What will be the result of this conflict, which
is now before the dean of arts review committee,
will not be known for some time. But the natural
result is not necessarily the one which will come
about.
This issue has all the makings of a problem
the magnitude of the SFU PSA hassle. There
classes stopped, debates flared and the university
was disrupted for months.
We suggest people keep an eye on this paper
for the facts before taking action or forming
opinions. The education you save may be your
own, or something like that.
Editor: Michael  Finlay
News   Paul  Knox
City    Nate Smith
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire   Irene   Wasilewski
Sports  Jim Maddin
Senior    John Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Ass't City  John Andersen
Managing       Bruce  Curtis
Page Friday    Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
Jim "Falryprint" Maddin, fellow
jock Dick Button, and Jim Davies and
his one man animal show toiled all
through the night in the newsroom
with only the with of Brian McWatters
and visions of Ginny Gait in the wee
hours of the morn to keep them going.
Lottie the Bottie Krawczyk almost got
bit after Shane McCune returned from
the leg show. Fortunately she swerved
just as Tony Gallagher, Dave Keillor,
David Schimdt, and feature writer
Smith drew abreast of things.
Linda Hossie screamed, Robin
-Burgess fainted, as Bev Gelfond and
Sandy Kass arm-wrestled Lesley Mlnot
to the floor. Dave Enns shouted "hold
It"  and  Maureen  Gans  did.
Jam up and jelly tight
and all that neat stuff
Anyway, so there I was,
strolling along, minding my own
business, and all-in-all expanding
my conciousness by marvelling at
the beauty of nature while
thinking romantic thoughts.
"Marvel", I thought to myself,
"Truth is beauty, beauty is
truth." "Marvel, marvel."
Suddenly, a long-haired youth
stepped directly in my path,
constituting an unwarranted
attack upon my personage.
"I say, boy, what is the
meaning of this unwarranted
attack upon my personage," I
enquired politely.
The young lad then began
gyrating his pelvic area, all the
while emitting orgasmic moans.
"My boy, my boy, is there
something the matter?" I intoned
quietly, thinking that perhaps the
youthful gentlemen had contacted
the dread St. Vitas Dance.
"Jamupandjellytight," the
young fellow blurted.
"What is the matter young
man? Could it be that you have
contacted the rare but fatal
Potato Famine?" I queried. (I
remember that a friend of mine
always used to miss school
because of the Potato Famine.)
"Mamamababy now you're
outa sight," he writhed.
"Oh please youthful
long-haired gentleman," I pleaded.
By JIM DAVIES
"In truth I am well within your
field of vision."
The poor lad obviously needed
a more potent set of bifocals.
DAVIES
"Jamupandjellytight . . . you
look a little naughty, but you're
polite," he squealed.
"Why thank you, my fine
young fellow," I chortled.
After several minutes of
prolonged chortling, I pondered
about what the dear young man
had meant by calling me
naughty-looking. After all, my
innocent, somewhat cherubic
countenance certainly seemed
rather harmless to most.
"You've got a sweet
disposition," he crooned.
"Why thank you young man,"
I chuckled.
"So come on and give me
permission."
"What for? I queried.
"One kiss and maybe another,
we'll see if we're meant for each
other," he gasped.
"What the bloody hell!" I
roared.
"Jamupandjellytight. You
won't say you will but there's a
chance that you might," he
groaned.
"Now just hold your
furshlunger horses!"
I suddenly reached an
epiphany of thought that perhaps
this young fellow was
non-compos-mentis, so to speak,
as it were.
"I said the first day I met you,
some day I'm going to pet you,
now you're here and baby I love
it. Come on and give me some of
it!" he ejaculated.
"Ya lousy no good pervert!" I
yelled as I disappeared over a
hedge, having set a new record for
the standing broad jump.
I knew right away what kind
of creep he was.
I can always tell.
1 then returned to my marvels
of nature, truth, beauty, and
wonderfulness. Thank god for my
precious body fluids.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Q.C. Replies
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
A copy of your Jan. 20, 1970
issue has just been placed on my
desk.
I was somewhat surprised to
find myself so prominently
displayed on page one and, as a
UBC graduate, who still has the
warmest regard for the institution
and who likes to think these
feelings are reciprocated, I would
like to make a few comments.
Apparently, the purpose of your
arrow diagram is to infer (sic), a
series of sinister or improper
relationships. It is true that I have
been retained by Mr. Fouks as his
Counsel but, in view of the fact
that that proceeding is before the
Courts, I am not at liberty to
discuss it. However, a perusal of
the charges of criminal libel that
have been laid will clearly indicate
to you that Mr. Fouks is
defending his reputation and
endeavouring to maintain the law
by protesting against statements
that he regards as improper. The
script that accompanies your
arrow diagram is plainly intended
to indicate that the author speaks
from a high moral plane and
deprecates some foibles which he
perceives with flashes of intuition
denied to ordinary mortals.
I personally do not take
objection to this type of thing if it
is done either with accuracy or
humour. Unfortunately, I am
unable to find either of these
attributes on your front page and
I would like to list tor you a
number of facts.
1. I am not the lawyer for
the Insurance Bureau of Canada.
2. Your vertical arrow
indicates that I act for the
Insurance Agents of B.C.
(incorrectly described), when
this is untrue.
3. I am a lessee of an
apartment. I became a lessee as a
result of my wife having seen an
advertisement in the classified
advertisements in or about
December, 1968.
4. The landlord is a limited
company   and   at   the   time   I Friday, January 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  5
MORE   LETTERS
became the lessee 1 was unaware
who the shareholders were.
5. My only relationship with
Messrs. Fouks and Bonner consists
ofthe following:
(a) in 1966, long before I
became a cliff dweller, I acted as
Counsel for a client of Mr. Fouks;
(b) I acted as Counsel against
the Attorney-General of British
Columbia in connection with the
expropriation of the shares of
B.C. Electric Company Limited
under circumstances that could
hardly be said to have endeared
me to the then Attorney-General
and I add parenthetically that I
am now and always have been an
active Liberal both Provincially
and Federally.
6. Your diagram would
indicate that Mr. Fouks was acting
as lawyer for the Insurance Agents
of B.C. at the same time that Mr.
Bonner was the Administrator of
B.C. Insurance Laws. I understand
that this is untrue.
7. If you have any law
students on your editorial board, I
suggest they look up the Supreme
Court of Canada decision in the
case of Guay v. Sun Publishing
Company Limited to see who
acted for you know who.
Now let us take a look at your
objectivity. The whole page
spread has a minimal, not to say
forced, relevance to any matter
that The Ubyssey would normally
be discussing. May I suggest that
your writer take a simple
objectivity test. He simply goes to
the Chem. Lab. and gets some
litmus paper which he puts under
his left armpit. It is then easy to
tell whether he is acid or on the
other hand simply base.
DOUGLAS McK. BROWN
It is our understanding that
McK. Brown acted as counsel for
the Bureau during the commission
on auto insurance, which was the
crucial period. The arrows only
indicate associations that might be
made; actual connections are
indicated by the solid lines.
As for you, Mr. McK. Brown,
the snotty tone of your letter
certainly does not help to put you
point across, it only reveals your
character. — Ed.
Old Ideas
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to the letter by
Gerry Cannon in The Ubyssey of
Jan. 20 on 'Libraries', I would like
to draw attention to an article
written in 1949 by Dr. Ernest C.
Colwell, who was then president
of the University of Chicago. The
article, entitled "Cooperation or
Suffocation" appeared in 'College
and Research Libraries,' 1949,
Volume 10, pages 195-198, 207. I
quote from it:
". . . . libraries resemble
cemeteries the fact that much of
what they • contain is good for
nothing except to enrich the soil.
If fifty per cent of what college
and university libraries contain
was spread on the fields, it would
enrich education as well as the
soil."
Obviously no one listened to
*aI ttt
EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
the gentleman in 1949, which is
one of the reasons for the 'million
plus' libraries today. Mr. Cannon's
voice is yet another crying in the
wilderness of unused and useless
books. Perhaps the only solution
is to hope that Marshall
McLuhan's prediction that the
book will soon be extinct, may
soon come true.
Because of the hoarding
instincts of librarians the volume
containing the full article can still
be found in the University
Library, Call No. Z671 C6 V. 10,
if anyone is interested in further
reading.
"R"
Narrow view
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With regard to the birth
control questionnaire included in
Tuesday's Ubyssey, it appears that
the "Women's Liberation Group"
does not really want the opinion
of the students, but rather it is
asking solely for backing for the
selfish demand of a contraceptive
clinic on campus. The wording of
the questionnaire presumes that
such a service is not readily
available off-campus; that if the
students would not use such a
service either they are already
using contraceptives or they do
not want contraceptives. The true
purpose of the questionnaire is
evident from its narrowness.
The attitude of this group is an
example of the general feeling
that we university students are an
elitist group, wanting special
privileges and concessions, and
not making a practical effort to be
a part of the community.
Secretaries and teachers in the
city have not set up a "special
clinci" for the distribution of
birth control pills but use the
facilities available — either their
doctor or the Family Planning
Association. Why are university
girls so different?
No mention was made of the
proposed financing of the clinic
should it be acceptable. If this
project was to utilize student
contributions, I'd rather have my
money go towards improving the
heating conditions in the library
stacks. JUDITH WALKER
arts 2
Order, order
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In all due respect to the
listening ability of your senate
reporter, John Andersen, either he
fell asleep for a few vital seconds
during the Jan. 14 meeting ofthe
senate or else he is merely making
use of his reporting position to
cause senationalism. If the latter is
the case, then he is most certainly
using his power of the pen to
express his prejudice against our
somewhat antiquated senate.
Surely he could not help but
realize that the reason the words
had to be deleted from Stan
Persky's pollution was not
because the senate refused to
acknowledge that the university
has an obligation to serve the
community, but the fact was that
such a motion was out of order,
and as such would have had to be
brought forward as a motion at a
later date (if any senator feels that
such a motion is necessary). The
senate, at that meeting, neither
acknowledged nor denied the
question of whether it has an
obligation to the community.
I VICTOR MARK
comm 1
Please read paragraph 11 of
UBC Reports' story on the same
motion. Those views were
supported by the majority of
senators at the meeting.      —J. A.
Biafran boy
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Obviously you are pulling
another hoax on your readers. I
refer to the picture of the Biafran
baby, Friday, Jan. 16 issue. The
picture show a child suffering
from gross deficiencies. Babies
simply don't look like that! Our
modern technology has given rout
to disease and bountiful crops so
everyone now has an abundance
of food. Today's babies are
laughing, chubby things dressed in
soft woolen outfits — just look at
any food and see for yourself.
Next, I suppose, you will try to
tell us that overpopulation is a'
problem.
GREG COOK
Thumbing
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Just a few sad words on
together, rain, screaming orange
'vettes, reeperbahn, slick fat cats,
anger and fear accumulates while
hitchiking here and back
everyday. Like how can you do it
— drive by so easy (or maybe that
intent look of concentration
means it's hard). Is it fear or hate
or what? If you're scared now,
you'll succumb when you leave
our common womb here. Your
capacity for hate couldn't cover
us all (we're all just as different as
we are the same), so relax man,
woman, child-like-me, open up
and maybe we can begin to break
down this hostility we wallow in
each day out here. And girls in the
auction — do you feel real good —
knowing you've been chosen
number 1 by that sexually
deprived guy with his cock and
hopes rising as he picks you up,
("Not that one Chuck, look at
those tits on the blonde up the
road.") while we who still hope
grow a little colder (inside) in our
group, waiting. And you're not so
together when you find yourself
heating the cold with anger. So
for our mutual sanity, let's try to
get a little closer — start simple
things. Let's take each other
home. HARRY     arts 4
VARSITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
JACK REID - JIM SMITH
-Esso]
A Complete Automotive Service
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33 Years at This Location
10th AVE. AT BLANC A - 224-7424
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ic INTERNATIONALLY TRAINED HAIRSTYLISTS
it UP-TO-DATE TECHNIQUES WITH CRAFTSMANSHIP
ie ARNOLD EPP-CORRECTIONAL HAIR CUTTING
if ZAIDA MERIO-LADY BARBER AND STYLISTS
Special Prices for Students and Faculty
4605 West 10th Avenue 228-9354
CONTEMPLATION, MEDITATION,
RELAXATION
WORRY BEADS
For details - See Page 8
SKI SALE
Commences Jan. 23rd
Ski  Boots — Sweaters
Ski   Slacks  —  After-Ski   Boots
Skis (Wood - Metal)
Ski Poles — Ski Parkas
«P^if*7?
Car - Top
Carriers
and   all   Skiing
Accessories
North Western Sporting Goods
10th & Alma (Open till 9 Fridays)
LTD.
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Warning: The very
coarse language could
offend you.  B.C. Censor
SUNDAY 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 	 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W.  10th Ave. 224-4144
—dave enns photo
GEARS OF A FEATHER tarred together. In the pokey for hoax resignations are EUS executive
members Vic Hardy, Bill Chyplyk and Bill Spilchen.
Hunter and Forbes argue
over bookstore problems
By LESLEY MINOT
"Hunter is incompetent."
This charge was leveled
Thursday at UBC bookstore
manager John Hunter by
commerce prof J. D. Forbes.
Forbes is presently preparing a
report on bookstore inefficiency.
"Hunter doesn't perceive that
he has a problem in the
bookstore. This is what bothers
me most," said Forbes. "There is
a lack of management in the
bookstore. There's not even any
management there to
mismanage."
"At the annual meeting of the
Canadian body with the
publishers the complaint every
year is the lack of stock," he said.
"Most of the bookstore's
problems are caused by Canadian
agencies who do not carry large
enough stocks of the books
required for courses or who are
slow in replenishing their stock,"
said Hunter.
Hunter felt there was little the
bookstore could do to alleviate
these problems.
"There is no procedure to keep
track of problems. Hunter can
never tell how many are caused by
publishers, how many by
copyright problems, and how
many are caused by the
bookstore," said Forbes.
In response to a similar report
compiled by Dr. Kubicek of the
history department Hunter said,
"All this is not the bookstore's
fault."
Hunter described the Kubicek
survey which reported that of *3ne
hundred and sixty-seven books
ordered by the history
department only fifty had not yet
arrived, as "a fair report." He
emphasized that the bookstore is
not to blame for the lack of
books.
"Kubicek did a good job," said
Forbes. "The first page of the
report shows that the problems
are not the fault of the bookstore,
but that the bookstore could do
something to alleviate the
problems. Why should the
students suffer because of
bookstore inefficiency?"
The Kubicek report suggested
that the bookstore send a
representative to Toronto to
confront the Canadian book
agents.
"This would not accomplish
anything," said Hunter. "If the
publisher's agents don't have the
books what good will sending a
representative do. Our order gets
there the day after we send it."
Another of the complaints in
the report charged the bookstore
with automatically reducing the
size of any order put in by a
faculty member.
"We don't cut down the prof's
order intentionally," said Hunter.
"We could order one hundred and
fifty copies of a book. We might
get thirty, we might get one
hundred and fifty. It depends on
the agent's stock."
"We try to keep profs posted
on the availability of the books
they ordered," said Hunter. "We
send cards and try to get them by
telephone. Often we're not
notified by the publisher that a
book isn't available for two or
three weeks."
Police search for jurors
FOR ALL YOUR
TRAVEL
REQUIREMENTS
USE THE
PROFESSIONAL ADVICE
OF OUR TRAVEL AGENTS
UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON WHERE TO TRAVEL.
IN MANY CASES YOUR AGENT HAS BEEN THERE.
HIS   PERSONAL   EXPERIENCE   COSTS   YOU   NOTHING.
TAKE FULL ADVANTAGE OF IT.
ITINERARIES   PLANNED   USING   THE   BEST   MEANS
OF TRANSPORTATION, WHETHER  IT BE  BY AIR,
LAND  OR  SEA,   DESIGNED  TO   SUIT  YOUR  BUDGET.
WE   WILL   MAKE   ALL   YOUR   RESERVATIONS,
ISSUE ALL NECESSARY TICKETS  AT TARIFF PRICES
AND   SUPPLY  YOU   WITH   A   DETAILED   ITINERARY
Call for a chat with
MRS. LINA ROGERS
and
MRS. VERENE SHEPARD
Student  Union  Bldg.  -  228-2980
THIS  WOULD  GUARANTEE  YOU   A   BETTER   HOLIDAY
AND  A CARE-FREE  TRIP
On UBC Campus - 224-4391
5700 University Blvd.
MONTREAL (CUP) -
Montreal police began rounding
up 100 English-speaking persons
of the city streets Thursday in an
attempt to find enough acceptable
jurors to hear the cases of 10
black students charged in
connection with last February's
Sir George Williams University
computer-burning.
After three days of jury
selection procedures in the trial
which began Jan. 19, only 10 of
the necessary 12 jurors had been
chosen—out of a 140-person list of
prospective members.
Presiding Judge Kenneth
Mackay agreed to the unorthodox
recruitment procedure
Wednesday, after a second panel
of 60 reserve jurors was exhausted
and only one of its members
found acceptable for jury duty in
the trial.
Special crown prosecutor Fred
Kaufman suggested the move.
Even the use of press-gang
techniques may not provide the
necessary two panelists for the
court: defence lawyers still have
60 of their 120 peremptory
challenges left. The challenges
allow them to reject any
prospective juror without cause.
The 10 students, all from
Trinidad and Tobago, are the first
of 89 defendants to be tried in
connection with the Sir George
incident. Another 70 students will
learn their trial dates March 2.
ENGINEERS and
CABLE CAR BUFFS
You   could tour  the  San  Francisco
Cable  Car  Power House     ^^^^
and Car Barn courtesy of   HOME
For details - See Page 8
CUSO WEEK
Jan. 26-31
MON., JAN. 26 — SUB 211, noon — Film on development
TUES., JAN. 27 — SUB 215, noon — Panel discussion —
"Canada and Africa"
WED., JAN. 28 — SUB  211,  noon — Film on development
THURS., JAN. 29 — ED. 207, noon — Panel discussion —
"Ethiopia"
THURS., JAN. 29 — International House, 8 p.m. — CUSO Information Sesion — slides, talk and discussion with returned
CUSO Cooperants
FRI., JAN. 30 — BU 202, noon — Panel discussion — "Canada
and Developing Countries."
SAT., JAN.31 — International House, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Caribbean
Workshop — the present situation — with Caribbean students.
CLIP AND SAVE
 1 Friday, January 23,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Pollution problem must
be amplified by media
By JAN O'BRIEN
"The sociological implications of pollution are
if you urinate in a fish bowl long enough, the fish
are going to die," Sun columnist Bob Hunter told
500 students in Biology 2000 Wednesday.
"Pollution is part of a larger environmental
collapse along with overcrowding and starvation,"
Hunter said.
Companies dumping chemicals into the river
say that their chemical is harmless; it is by itself.
Right now we have to prove the cumulative effect
of pollution, he said.
"Pollution is a culturally patterned defect, if we
all behave insanely we don't recognize insanity."
The root cause of environment collapse is
organized anarchy; there are two poles, the social
impulse and the "me first" gratifying impulse.
Corporates are collective "me-firsts", then Canada
first and all the other nations are doing the same
thing.
Chemicals
the worst
NEW YORK (LNS-CUP) - Scientists
announced recently that chemicals used to diffuse
oil spillage at sea are more dangerous than the oil
itself.
"The usual approach is to try to remove the oil
from the public eye by sweeping it under the
ocean's surface by means of dispersants or
detergents," said Ira Gabrielson, a biologist.
"More animal life was killed by chemicals in the'
Torrey Canyon accident than by the oil itself."
"The solution is more control and integration
of forces. Through sheer necessity normally
antagonistic ideologies are uniting," said Hunter.
"This is a self-regulated revolution, there is no
conscious goal. Several groups are working to
implement changes with no control by one group,''
he said.
Hunter told students that planetary
management is a stronger base for a unified world
than the United Nations.
"This is leading us into an different world
where the urge for group survival is controlled,
putting us in a more positive position," said Hunter.
"The precedence of society is shaped, making
use of what is around and having color television in
their cave," he charged.
"Society on a whole doesn't move together."
Canada is under elaborate social controls
already that are taken for granted, such things as
"no smoking in certain areas," said Hunter.
Pollution controls will probably mean much the
same to most people.
"My personal nightmare is that in 1985 I will
be writing my son a letter from jail after being
busted for smoking a cigarette," Hunter said.
Corporations are threatened if they do not do
something about pollution. They need to make a
profit and they can't do it if there is no one around
to consume.
"The key to industrial success is to have the
most educated people. Monetary gain is no longer a
chief motive," said Hunter.
Hunter said unions are making environmental
quality a bargaining power.
"Corporations have their own fancy and are
usually not able to see the pollution problem," he
said.
"It is up to the media to amplify the problem -
it is their existential responsibility," said Hunter.
"My column is a political thing. I use yelling
and thumping to hopefully to activate people."
Local rehabilitation centres
offer alternatives to institution
By SANDY KASS
Browndale is one of those places to go when
there is no other place left.
The rehabilitation centre for emotionally
disturbed young people began in 1952 in Ontario
under the name of Warrendale. At first it was
designed as a home for wayward girls, but under
the direction of Dr. John Brown, it soon
expanded to include boys with all kinds of
problems.
The first B.C. centre opened in Vancouver in
1966 and at present there are five centres in B.C.
— three in Vancouver, one in Surrey and one on
Salt Spring Island.
About 50 young people are served by the
facilities in these centres, but according to
Browndale spokesman Bill Preston, they are not
enough.
"There are at least 2500 young people in
B.C. alone who need treatment. We just don't
have the facilities," he said.
The centres are subsidized $28 per day per
person by the provincial government, and the
money is used to pay for qualified staff, all
supplies, and the establishment of other centres
around the country.
There are several other centres in Quebec,
Ontario, and Saskatchewan, and future plans
include the establishment of centres in the
eastern U.S.
The idea of the centres is to keep disturbed
young people out of an institutionalized type of
environment, where oral rehabilitation is
considered "virtually impossible",
The age of young people in these centres
ranges from five to 19 years, and they stay from
several months to often several years.
"Kids generally come to us when their only
other   alternatives  are  Brannon   Lake,   prison,
foster homes, or places like that," said Preston.
"We want to make sure they don't endup there.
"Our first step is to establish a house in a
community. Getting kids to come here is not
usually a problem. Young people will generally
do anything to stay out of prison. The problem
starts when we try to help them," he said.
"We try to set up a family situation, where
the young people can relate to the staff people
over a long period of time. They eat, sleep, play,
talk, and even bathe together. Staff take over the
role of substitute parents, and offer the kids a
regular routine of family life, which often they
have never had."
"Getting the kids to come out of their shells
is the biggest problem. People don't like to talk
about the skeletons in their closets. The object is
to break through their external defenses. Then
we can get somewhere," he said.
The purpose of the centre is to get the
troubled young people into a rational state of
mind, where they can live normal lives within the
framework of society.
"Volunteer staffers come in once a week,
month, or any time they like. We only ask that
they be consistent," said Preston.
Volunteers help in two ways.
They can come into the houses, and work
with the young people on a regular basis, or
contribute through donations of merchandise or
money. A used piano and toys are the most
welcome donations at present. Those that work
in the houses play games and do regular chores
that visitors would do, such as helping with
meals, and telling stories.
There are meetings every Monday night for
persons interested in helping with the centres in
any capacity, held at the Browndale Office, 7
East 17th Avenue, at 7:30 p.m.
*"**       UK)     DAY ATMR'
DAY IS      \ WW MIKE'S
CHARBROILED STEAKS
4489 W.  10th at Sasamat
Open to 12:30 week nights
8:00 on Sundays
24 Hours a Day
Full Consciousness
and Happiness
Would really
happen
to you!
MAHARISHI
MAHESH   YOGI
A SCIENTIFIC TECHNIQUE
Transcendental Meditation is a systematic, scientific
technique which automatically results in development of
full consciousness and permanent use of full mental potential without drugs, faith, hypnosis or concentration.
FOLK MUSIC PRESENTATION
Rick and June Stanley, meditation teachers from Portland, will give a free introductory folk music presentation
of Transcendental Meditation.
TUESDAY, JAN. 27th - 12:30 - Bu. 104
A college graduate who seeks to serve Canada in the Profession of Arms can find the rewards of a challenging career with
the Canadian Armed Forces. There are immediate responsibilities
under modern management techniques. Good financial rewards.
And the kind of work that will provide personal satisfaction.
The tasks will be worthwhile, in the cause of peace, and in
the service of one's country.
Investigate the following commissioned officer vacancies:
AIR WEAPONS CONTROL
LAND ORDNANCE ENGINEERING
MEDICAL ASSOCIATE (BIO-SCIENCE)
MILITARY ENGINEERING
MARITIME SURFACE & SUB-SURFACE
The Military Career Counsellor at the address as listed will
be pleased to provide complete details and to arrange for an
interview at a time convenient to you.
Why not ask one who serves?
545 Seymour St., Vancouver
666-3136
ix  THE CANADIAN
ARMED FORCES Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,   1970
—bruce stout photo
SINGING RABBI Shlomo Carlebach had students dancing in the aisles, on the stage and all over the
place at a noon concert Wednesday in SUB ballroom.
Win a Week-End
for two in
San Francisco
6 trips for two will be won by UBC students
between January 30th and March 13th.
Trip includes return air fare, meal and
hotel allowance for 2 days for winner
and friend.
1
0
EAT IN •TAKEOUT** DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway      736-7786
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
KOH-I-NOOR
RESTAURANT
SUPERB
INDIAN
CURRIES
& CUISINE
TUES ■ SAT FROM 6:00 P.M.
796 MAIN STREET 688-5236
EUROPE
ON A MINI BUDGET
OPERATED BY YOUNG PEOPLE FOR YOUNG  PEOPLE
CONDUCTED EUROPEAN CAMPING TOURS
By MINI-BUS — SMALL GROUPS
3 Weeks-England-Scotland-Wales $99.00
5 Weeks-N. Africa-Spain-Portugal $179.00
5 Weeks-Scandinavia-Russia $205.00
9 Weeks-Grand European Tour    $367.00
Visiting 16 Different Countries
FOOD  KITTY KEEPS FOOD COSTS TO A MINIMUM
ALL COOKING EQUIPMENT SUPPLIED
We also assist with Charter Flights
For  Full   Information  &   Dates.   Etc.,  Call
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
5744 Cambie at 41st
327-1162
PLUS EXCITING EXTRA PRIZES
EVERY WEEK: Dinner for two at
Hy's Steak House — Canucks Hockey tickets
for two —    Evening for two at Oil Can Harry's
Evening for two at the Daisy — Dinner for two
at the Grouse Nest.
Easy to enter! Fill in coupon and get your special Home \\ Credit Card
We'll mail your special Credit Card to you as soon
as we get the coupon. Every time you use your
Home Credit Card at any of the 298 Home Stations
you are automatically entered in the contest. The
more often you use it the more often you enter.
And the better your chances to win.
GET YOUR   FREE WORRY BEADS TOO!
We'll mail you your Worry Beads as soon as we
get your coupon, along with full contest details,
your special Home Credit Card and fascinating
-Worry  Bead   story.
WORRY BEADS ARE BIG ON CAMPUS.
Fourteen wooden  beads on a
leather thong  .  .   .  anti-uptight
baubles  to get you  through daily
disasters. And they're yours free
in the mail when you apply for
your special UBC Home Credit Card.
TO: Home Oil Distributors Ltd., 505 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Complete this application form (please  print) and  mail  it to  Home Oil. We'll   rush your special
Credit Card to you, plus your FREE Worry Beads K
SURNAME
Christian Names
VANCOUVER ADDRESS (Show Apt. No., Zone No.)
PERMANENT HOME ADDRESS, if different from above. (Street No., Town, etc.)
REGISTRATION No.
Faculty Year
HOME   OIL   DISTRIBUTORS   LIMITED
400   ONE   BENTALL  CENTRE,   505   BURRARD  STREET.   VANCOUVER  1.   B.C. U3YSSEY   VCR
INDEX
IDEA:   TAKE   UORDS   PAGE   FRIDAY,    PERMUTATE   LETTERS*
ALL   POSSIBLE   COMBINAT10N3   (PROBABILITY   POWER   SIX)
PROCESS:   TELEX,   PHOTOCOPIER,   OFFSET   PRINTER,    TYPEWRITER,
SCISSORS,    RULER,    GLUE,    BLUE   PENCIL
EXECUTION:   N.RUEBSAAT,    F.CAWSEY,    *. tlU I C-LEY,    T. WILSON,
-s.nOLAN,    J./ITCHELL,    K.WUCKLES.
UBYSSEY   VCR
WHAT   HO FOR   THE   VANCOUv/EPART   GALLERY
IAN   BAXTER  TELEX?
ONE   MOMENT   PLS
SORRY   ^0   LIST INP
MUST    if    OM**',    '<i<i ) )   '.'-'■'•,3   *'-))3--*i6
SORRY
WILL 'PHONE   GALLERY   THANKS
J-iYSSF.Y   VCR
15.    THIS   TME   A'->T   CALLLLLLLEEERRRYYYY
YEZ
H ■**■■*.    13   EvERYTHI^'P   DOivNNNNN      THEWRRP
NOT   *-.An   lr-   YOU   .-\vm-.   hOV.   TO   USE   THIS   TM I'-.'CS
rv;i   YE I*;
:•*■■'>      *!|JT      TS'Y IN*-   HA-,'0
Tl   YU   ■^■•ALl/IE   EX.MJTL   '.--HAT   YOu   Ay   SAYI-C   A   f\-" J^T-iEMORF
!)~   Y-"iU   ><N^l*:    .■:■?   YU    ■-.*A:"**:E    AN')    WO    v-.'E    ARE
NO    '.-.'HO    ?
Y-jP   NAME   'JILL   HENCEFORTH    •?£   X
0^   Y    A'..:REE
0 <      ' Y
MV;   THAT    l.F   HAVE   THE   A-',EN IT I F.S   STRAI i-HTENEn   CUT
■.*:HY
OK
¥',^
0
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ri i A-.E   YriJ   A   ci:**!i.
YEA
THATS   NICE
I    THINK   Sn
THAT    IS   AN    INTERESTING   REFLECTION   OF   THE    ATTITUDES   OF
OUR   TI.-1ES
REALLY      WHY
NOW   IF    I   HAD   MORE   TIME   AND   A  VISUAL   IMAGE   TO   WRK   WITH   I
COULD      GIVE   A   BETTER   EXPLANATION   B.JT   A3   WE   CANN   ONLY
COMMUNICATE   ELECTRONICALLY   THAT   IS   VIA THIS   MrtACHlNE   AND
NOT   THROUCH   THE   ELECTRONICS   CP   PERSONAL CONTACT   IT   IS
REALLY   IMPOSSIBLE   TO  ELABORATE   IN   ANY   FUNCTIONAL   WAY
DO   YOU   AGREE
MOST CERTAINLY ARE YOU FROM THE UBC NEWSPAPER OFFICE Contemporary Theatre
GALLIMAUFRY
THEATRE
Pinter's  Dwarfs &
Becket's  Krapp's  Last Tape
SUB Ballroom- 12:30 - 1:30
Wed. - Fri., Jan. 28 - 30
ADMISSION 75c
Special Events Contemporary Arts
The World's Largest Card Shop
One Store Only - Downtown Vancouver
SUPPORTS MARDI GRAS 70
Look for our Special Wedding Prize Booth
at- the Bazaar, Jan. 29th
Fill out Free Entry Forms for Grand Prize of
Complete Wedding Invitation Order.
WEDDING INVITATION SPECIALISTS
Phone 684-4011 or write for free samples & price list
GRAD PORTRAITS
Candid Portrait Studios are honoured to have been chosen
to continue this year's Grad portraits. Your portraits will
now be taken & proofed in color. B&W can be ordered.
Re-takes at no extra cost including those wanting re-takes
from the Extension Department.
One 5x7 in a folder, choice of 5-6 proofs inclusive. Sitting is paid for
through your gradfee. Extra copies in folders are: 4x5 size in B & W
$1.50, in Color $2.95, 5 x 7 B & W $2.00. Color $3.95, 8 x 10 B & W $4.00.
Color $4.95. But best of all will be our package rates on which we're
still  working.
Since there is no immediate deadline, we will be taking as much care
and time as possible and take your Grad Portraits at our studios starting
Feb. 2/70. We're located at 3343 West Broadway and have lots of free,
easy and unrestricted parking. Bus stop is practically outside our door.
Leave  bus  at  Waterloo  going   East or  Blenheim  going  West.
We'll be taking sittings Evenings and Sundays too. Come well
groomed. Gown and Tie, etc. covers all your other clothing.
For appointments phone 731-4845, our special UBC Gradline.
Candid Photography & Portrait Studios
731-4845
3343 W.  BROADWAY
"Our Own Ektacolor Lab Makes the Difference, it's the Best'"
(You'll find us in "Birdcalls" & B.C. Tel's Yellow Pages)
Sindair-Dickin Report
on illicit international relations
We have, in the last few days, received word of a friendly Russian-American
Summit Conference taking place in Versaille. You remember the photographs of
the Chief Soviet Negotiator, Seminal Vladimov, and the Chief American Negotiator,
"Genial Joe" Smithers toasting one another with bottles of Uncle Ben's Malt
Liquor.
"Where," we asked ourselves, "did the Russian-American Summit Conference
get Uncle Ben's? As far as we know there is no LCB in Versaille." We got the
answer from a member of our extensive espionage system.
"It's a Canadian snub to the French. The Canadian Government is catering
the affair - the Russians and Americans b6th agreed that this would be a fitting
tribute to Canada's postwar peace-keeping role and decided that, rather than serve
the usual French Champagne, good wholesome Canadian beer would be the summit
conference's beverage," says our informant.
Lveryone knows the results of this fateful decision on the part of the
Canadians. The Russian and American diplomats, being inured to Champagne, did
not fully realize the power of beer, and guzzled it like water.
In a little over an hour, the U.S.S.R. had offered the U.S. all of Siberia in
exchange for Nebraska. The U.S. was reluctant, fearing the U.S.S.R. would use the
state for a missile site.
"No," protested the Russians, "we would like it for a drydock for Russian
Fishing Trawlers."
"Fair deal," said the Americans.
rp^tf
Further, the U.S.S.R. unilaterally decided to deactivate its entire offensive
and defensive missile system. The Americans followed suit, and declared that all
U.S. troops would be out of Vietnam in 24 hours. They also sold the Russians a
certain bridge in New York City.
The next morning, the Russian and American Negotiators awoke to find
themselves with splitting headaches, and to find that their respective superiors had
declared the results of all negotiations null and void. Unfortunately, they had given
the Negotiators full powers. The agreements were binding.
The Canadians, in the meantime, had been severely chastened (verbally) by
both the major powers. The Russians and Americans the next day met and agreed
to divide Canada up among them. The Russians claimed the Yukon and British
Columbia and said the U.S. could have the rest. The U.S. quickly agreed to this.
Premier Bennett, when he heard of this startling development, said that he
has known for some time that the U.S.S.R. was actually a tool of the N.D.P..
"The   Communists,"   he   explained,   "are
trade-unionist Marxist Socialist godless Reds."
a   front   for   that   rabble   of
Public Works Minister Chant, when approached for a comment on the
subject, said, "This temporary take-over by the Socialists will have no effect on our
decision concerning the proposed Vancouver Civic Square. We won't let the
Russians build a square for the Communist hippies in which to run berserk."
Bennett also said that he doubts the Russians will take over B.C. Tel.
President Nixon (of the United States), went on television late last night to
reassure the people of Nebraska. He told them that the Silent Majority is solidly
behind him. He also said that the agreement was not that the U.S. troops would be
out of Vietnam in 24 hours, but that U.S. troops would be out of Vietnam in 24
hours if the Vietnamese were also out in 24 hours.
Asked after his news conference if this meant all Vietnamese he replied in the
affirmative.
"We'll put them in Cambodia or Laos," he explained. "Nobody'll know the
difference since they all look alike. We'll make Vietnam into a mammoth 36 hole
golf course."
ipS 2WO.
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970 THE ELEPHANT
by Slawomir Mrozek
The director of the Zoological Gardens has
shown himself to be an upstart. He regarded his
animals simply as stepping stones on the road
of his own career. He was indifferent to the
educational importance of his establishment. In
his Zoo the giraffe had a short neck, the badger
has no burrow and the whistlers, having lost all
interest, whistled rarely and with some
reluctance. These shortcomings should not have
been allowed, especially as the Zoo was often
visited by parties of schoolchildren.
The Zoo was in a provincial town, and it
was short of some of the most important
animals, among them the elephant. Three
thousand rabbits were a poor substitute for the
noble giant. However, as our country
developed, the gaps were being filled in a
well-planned manner. On the occasion of the
anniversary of the liberation, on 22nd July, the
Zoo was notified that it had at long last been
allocated an elephant. All the greater was their
surprise when they learnt that the director had
sent a letter to Warsaw, renouncing the
allocation and putting forward a plan for
obtaining an elephant by more economic
means.
"I, and all the staff," he had written, "are
fully aware how heavy a burden falls upon the
shoulders of Polish miners and foundry men
because of the elephant. Desirous of reducing
our costs, I suggest that the elephant mentioned
in your communication should be replaced by
one of our own procurement. We can make an
elephant out of rubber, of the correct size, fill
it with air and place it behind railings. It will be
carefully painted the correct colour and even
on close inspection will be indistinguishable
from the real animal. It is well known that the
elephant is a sluggish animal and it does not run
and jump about. In the notice on the railings we
can state that this particular elephant is
exceptionally sluggish.
"Kindly note that both the idea and its
execution are my modest contribution to the
common task and struggle.
"I am, etc."
This communication must have reached a
soulless official, who regarded his duties in a
purely bureaucratic manner and did not
examine the heart of the matter but, following
only the directive about reduction of
expenditure, accepted the director's plan. On
hearing the Ministry's approval, the director
issued instructions for the making of the rubber
elephant.
The carcass was to have been filled with air
by two keepers blowing into it from opposite
ends. To keep the operation secret the work
was to be completed during the night because
the people of the town, having heard that an
elephant was joining the Zoo, were anxious to
see it. The director insisted >on haste also
because he expected a bonus, should his idea
turn out to be a success.
The two keepers locked themselves in a
shed normally housing a workshop, and began
to blow. After two hours of hard blowing they
discovered that the rubber skin had risen only a
few inches above the floor and its bulge in no
way resembled an elephant. The night
progressed. Outside, human voices were stilled
and only the cry of the jackass interrupted the
silence. Exhausted, the keepers stopped
blowing and made sure that the air already
inside the elephant should not escape. They
were not young and were unaccustomed to this
kind  of  work.
"If we go on at this rate," said one of
them, "we shan't finish before the morning.
And what am I to tell my Missus? She'll never
believe me if I say that I spent the night
blowing up an elephant."
"Quite right," agreed the second keeper.
"Blowing up an elephant is not an everyday
job. And it's all because our director is a
leftist."
They resumed their blowing, but after
another half-an-hour they felt too tired to
continue. The budge on the floor was larger but
still nothing like the shape of an elephant.
"It's getting harder all the time," said the
I    first keeper.
—pg
Friday, January 23,  1970
"It's an uphill job, all right7' agreed the
second. "Let's have a little rest."
While they were resting, one of them
noticed a gas pipe ending in a valve. Could they
not fill the elephant with gas? He suggested it
to his mate.
They dicided to try. They connected the
elephant to the gas pipe, turned the valve, and
to their joy in a few minutes there was a
full-sized beast standing in the shed. It looked
real: the enormous body, legs like columns,
huge ears and the inevitable trunk. Driven by
ambition the director had made sure of having
in his Zoo a very large elephant indeed.
In the morning the elephant was moved to
a special run in a central position, next to the
monkey cage. Placed in front of a large real
rock it looked fierce and magnificent. A big
notice proclaimed: "Particularly sluggish.
Hardly moves."
Among the first visitors that morning was a
party of children from the local school. The
teacher in charge of them was planning to give
them an object-lesson about the elephant. He
halted the group in front of the animal and
began:
". .. The elephant is a direct descendant of
the now extinct mammoth. It's not'surprising,
therefore, that it's the largest living land
animal."
The more conscientious pupils were
making notes.
". . . Only the whale is heavier than the
elephant, but then the whale lives in the sea. We
can safely say that on land the elephant reigns
supreme."
A slight breeze moved the branches of the
trees in the Zoo.
"... The weight of a fully grown elephant
is between nine and thirteen thousand pounds."
At that moment the elephant shuddered
and rose in the air. For a few seconds it swayed
just above the ground but a gust of wind blew it
upwards until its mighty silhouette was against
the sky. For a short while people on the ground
could still see the four circles of its feet, its
bulging belly and the trunk, but soon, propelled
by the wind, the elephant sailed above the
fence and disappeared above the tree-tops.
Astonished monkeys in the cage continued
staring into the sky.
They found the elephant in the
neighbouring botanical gardens. It had landed
on a cactus and punctured its rubber hide.
The schoolchildren who had witnessed the
scene in the Zoo soon started neglecting then-
studies and turned into hooligans. It is reported
that they drink liquor and break windows. And
they no longer believe in elephants.
Copyright    1962    by    Macdonald    &    Co.
(Publishers)    Ltd.
Shveei
Empty space . . . stupid
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections for A.M.S. Executive will be held as
follows:—
FIRST SLATE:
President,   Secretary,   Ombudsman,  Co-ordinator   of
Activities
Nominations Open - Jan. 28
Nominations Close -  12:00 Noon Feb.  5
Election - Feb. 11
SECOND  SLATE:
Vice-President,  Treasurer,  Internal Affairs  Officer,
External Affairs Officer
Nominations Open - Feb. 4
Nominations Close - 12:00 Noon Feb. 12
Election - Feb. 18
VOLUNTARY
SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES
Teachers, nurses, secretaries, agriculturists,
administrators, community development
workers,   home   economists,   etc.   are   needed.
A representative of the Mennonite Central
Committee will be at the Placement Office on
February 3rd to interview interested persons.
Please make appointment at the Placement
Office.
Mennonite Central Committee is a Christian
resource for meeting human need. It has over
700 volunteers serving in more than thirty-five
countries.
Contact   $AQ50
La n cac ^T ^F
Any Color - ALL FITTINGS - ONE PRICE ONLY I
Bring Your Optical Prescription
to Us... AND MALLY SAVE!
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OPTICAL DEPT.
SINGLE VISION GLASSES—
Complete from $9.95 Includes Lenses, Frame & Case
SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS & FACULTY ON GLASSES
NOW! - 6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
Downtown
677 GRANVILLE          Opp. the   Bay
681-6174
South   Granville
2987  GRANVILLE     At  1*th
736-7347
Oakridge
5618 CAMBIE           at  41st
327-9451
North   Van.
1825   LONSDALE
98742264
675  COLUMBIA ST.
Opp.   Army  <S.   Navy,   New  West.
521-0751         •
763 FORT ST.
VICTORIA,    B.C.
286-7578
THE       UBYSSEY TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• 3,000  GARMENTS TO
CHOOSE   FROM
• Full  Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors'  Coats
• Whita * Coloured Coats
• Shirts and  Accessories
• 10'/.    U.B.C.   Discount
BLACK & LEE
Formal   Wear   Rentals
631   Howe 688-2481
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DEI/VERY-224 1720
4450 W.  10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS  TO  3  AM
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
Complete Auto
Service
To All Makes
• Electronic Tune-Up
• Brake Service
Disc and Standard
• Wheel Balancing
• Exhaust Repairs
•*•%•
10 YEARS IN THIS.
LOCATION
UNIVERSITY  SHELL
SERVICE
Peter Lissack
4314 W  10th Ave.
224-0828
The Gallimaufry Theatre Company will play a number of
pieces from their summer repertoire next week at UBC. Under
the co-sponsorship of the Contemporary Arts Festival and Special
Events, the company will perform at noon next Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday in SUB ballroom.
This event will bring the Gallimaufry back on the scene
after a difficult period of money problems, police hassles — their
obscenity trial comes up in February — no place to perform, and
certain internal problems. The group is desparately trying to keep
going in spite of these difficulties — and so it deserves all the
support it can get from students next week.
*  *   *
"The Gallimaufry Experiment" is the story of a young,
"avant-garde", "anti-establishment", "revolutionary" group of
theatre people struggling to gain identity, purpose, the freedom
and means to project their vision in a society whose priorities are
somewhat stacked against such a venture. The experiment
involves going back to the very basis of the theatre thing, to reject
the idea of "established" professional theatre which is merely a
"place of work" for actors and directors — and arrive at a new
concept of a more total kind of theatre, involving the whole
person.
Last Tuesday I got together with some of the people
participating in Gallimaufry — Dermot Hennelly, Wayne Robson,
Elizabeth Murphy and Norman Browning — and, under the
watchful ear of the tape-recorder, we rapped about some of these
things: The Gallimaufry; theatre in general, theatre and "life"
(wow) what kind of vision (or revolution) we actually want to
project; the evils of co-option; what kind of situation we are up
against. .. stuff like that — the conversation took its own course;
we rambled into many areas.
Random, scattered parts of this session — statements by
Gallimaufry people, whisps of conversation, comments on the
action — are reproduced below. They are stolen from the much
longer tape-recording, and removed from the general movement
of the conversation. They are intended as an introduction to what
you will be seeing on campus next week.
The Image
.. .Speaking of the need to establish a program, a formalized
image of what the company is and what it wants to do ...
NORMAN — We say one thing and do another. And this
schizophrenia that's plaguing us all has got to go. We got to stop
saying to ourselves that its not going to happen in our lifetime:
it's got to happen now!
WAYNE - Well I was just thinking of the future of the
Gallimaufry, which has a future ...
DERMOT - The future of the Gallimaufry is no fuckin' future
cause there's no such thing as a future, the future of the
Gallimaufry is totally beyond our control.
NORMAN — I hope the Gallimaufry will live happily ever after.
(General laughter).
DERMOT - We are trying to build the Gallimaufry into
something concrete, but the thing is, concrete is an artificial
substance. There is no "form" as such in the company, and if we
think in those terms we will only get hung up in that form. We'll
build ourselves an image, and only fall in — like Narcissus.
—brought to you by your famous Pi person
Norbert Ruebsaat
—photocollages by Dave Enns
.   talKing
Gaitimaufw
Sesst
general, totally unconnected bits, of
recorded live, as it happened, by virt
world of tape recording.
WAYNE - .. . but I still think there are certain objectives which
we should try to attain . ..
DERMOT - We've got them, right here and now ... they're right
here on a tape-recording .. . marvelous, isn't it?
NORBERT - - • speaking of a concrete object. .. (General
laughter at the expense of the recorder.)
WAYNE - What he's saying is that the Gallimaufry should be
true, true to the collective spirit of the people in it. . .
SOMEONE - Far out!
WAYNE - Okay. We tried Gallimaufry twice; and both times it
failed because this collective spirit was lacking. I'm saying the
next time we start it up it will have to be with a group of people
who have this same spirit.
History, the Developing Thing
DERMOT — In fact Elizabeth has been with us right from the
beginning. She was in the original production of Little Malcolm
and his struggle against the Eunuchs way back in 1967.
ELIZABETH — The old days ... in fact that is one instance of
theatre being done by force really. We had no money, nothing.
And yet we managed to put the play on, take it to Kelowna,
Vernon and back to Vancouver. And we made no money on it
ourselves. We than called ourselves the New Studio Theatre. And
we sold out; it was quite successful.
DERMOT — It's interesting because for a full year before that we
were already discussing it, hashing it out. . . because we were all
interested in theatre — now how do we do it, how do we do what
we want to do, and what we think should be done . ..
The original group formed in 1967, out friendships formed in the
Freddy Wood Theatre Dept. The people involved fluctuated, with
old people leaving and new ones arriving. The Gallimaufry staged
two successful summer seasons at the Arts Club in 1968 and 1969
— and hoped this year to expand into a regular season repertory
group.)
DERMOT — And then we went into .. . Oh, we could write a
book about it...
ELIZABETH - Yes, it's all sort of been trial and error .. .
Cop-Outs ... Danger
DERMOT - We are actually now tempted to call ourselves
Gallimaufry 2; because, after two professional theatre seasons,
where we've been operating with an Equity stage manager, this
kind of thing. Along with the union type of rules and all that sort
of crap ... getting bigger and bigger. And ... I don't know ...
there's a big question mark here . .. but once you do that, you
have to be extremely careful about what you're doing and why
you're doing it, why you are using those "conventional" tools.
ELIZABETH — Yes, it's so easy to slip into "just" doing plays.
NORBERT - What's the advantage of getting involved with
equity and that whole trip?
DERMOT - Well the advantages are to the actor, supposedly, to
insure that he can make a Jiving.
■pC 4oiu*i
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970 y Rap
Ion
conversation,; discussion,
e of the wonderful
A   bunch   of people  gathered  together  .   .
- ELIZABETH - But I think far too much weight is put on the
idea of professionalism.
DERMOT — Yes, for the first time in my life, since working at
the Playhouse, I have met "professional" actors. Yes, they're
lovely people ... but all they do is act, they take whatever role is
offered to them.
NORBERT   -  Well  it's  a  job,  right?
DERMOT - Yes. Yes.
NORMAN - I would like to suggest, that when it comes down to
the crux, and Playhouse phones, offering you a job, anyone will
take it, and with the philosophical justification of only doing it
for the money . .. which we do need, let's face it.. .
ELIZABETH - Well there's no other place to go ... what other
theatre is there in Vancouver? ...
NORBERT — This brings up the question: given an acting job,
which comes out of a context in which you don't believe .. . can
you — apart from the moral question of honesty and all that —
can you in fact act that role meaningfully? Does it turn you on?
-DERMOT - Well you can't be that definite about this kind of
thing. ..
ELIZABETH - Yeah, I think you can always find feeling for a
role ... If it's a good play, even if it is being done by an
"establishment" (I don't like using that word) company, the
point is, the play's still there, the play still lives. If it's a good
role, you can overcome acting in this company, and play it with
integrity and belief.
DERMOT - Yes, the play has a life of its own ...
Why the Hell Theatre .. .
ELIZABETH - Do you . . . God, I feel like an interviewer.
NORBERT - Go ahead.
ELIZABETH —Do you want to see theatre used to a purpose?
DERMOT — Theatre is the expression to me of a need. One
dedicates oneself to the expression of a need. It's a need in me,
'and I express it because I think it's a need in everybody, whether
they realize it or not. And I chose theatre to express it because
that's my talent, my taste.
When I'm playing a role, I learn things about myself. And
when I go into acting and directing I do it to show people what
I'm thinking.
NORMAN - But I would add, that when you're on stage, you
find not only yourself, but all the other people on stage, and off
stage.
* # #
ELIZABETH - How much do you think people take home from
the theatre?
DERMOT - How much do they get rid of?
NORMAN - Very little these days.
DERMOT - Well this is where we have to start working, to
improve the quality of perfrformance for one thing ... and not
being afraid of sacrificing one's position.
Vibes—The Group Thing
NORBERT — I have sort of the image of a group of people who
get together with the common idea of doing theatre, as a group.
And it seems to me that this is the only way you're going to get
real theatre. And what happens on stage, will then be - ideally -
a direct reflection of what's going on in the group generally.
DERMOT — Right. This is the great difference between a
company like us, and a place like the Playhouse where, let's face
it, Gardner has to cater to audience demands. Let's put it this
way: ideally, people would come to see us, not for "a play", but
to see us; to see what we are doing and how we are doing it.
Essentially we should be doing our own plays. Unfortunately we
have  just   not   run   into   a  good  poet.
NORMAN - I think the reason that it's difficult for all of us to
get together is related to a very central and deeply ingrained ego
thing ... in terms of directors and actors . ..
DERMOT - Sure, the director is fucking God, let's face it.
NORMAN - Yeah, that's one aspect... and the other thing is
the whole star trip, the idea of the individual star, which has been
with us, well, ever since theatre began.
NORBERT - If seems to me that this "personal" trip is one of
the very first things you have to get over in order to make this
thing, that's happening here, really get off the ground.
DERMOT - Yes; but consider our backgrounds. Our personal
bakgrounds have all been .. well, Hollywood movies, and Old
Vic Theatre . . . nothing "avant-garde" nothing really
contempoary . .. Picasso maybe ...
ELIZABETH — But again, you need to know that what you are
doing is good, is accepted. You need to know that you are getting
across to an audience in what you are trying to do. You're
putting out, putting out, all the time, and you have to feel
sometimes that something is coming back in. And unfortunately
in theatre, the way this has come back to you is through the star
trip, through "you are the greatest, you are the star, you are Julie
Christie" .. . You are fed this from the beginning: "Do it the way
Edith Evans did, be great".
NORBERT - Well it seems to me the thing to do now, is the
group thing; to put forth, and get feedback from the group, and
to erect that as the new "star".
DERMOT - Yes, well this is what we are trying for... but to do
that you have to have a group of individuals.. . who have
tremendous egos, let's fact it. (laughter). But they have to be
rational enough to realize, that their only salvation lies in
subjugating their egos under this group thing.
ELIZABETH - Working within a solid group, so that after a
while, there's no lead actors, there's no extras.. . you just have a
group of people working. So that after a while, any one of them
is capable of being anything. . . then you've become a group,
rather than a bunch of individual stars.
Good Morning
A bunch of people sitting together talking about things:
individual bits of the discussion are reprinted above. They happen
to be talking about theatre, because that's where they like to be.
But there are many groups of people, with various areas of
interest, talking basically about the same things, doing the same
things. Trying to get together, work out individual "star" hassles,
trying to communicate their vision, struggling to remain plainly
"alive". The bits of talk presented here are only a small part of a
wide movement - of which the Gallimaufry Theatre Company is
only one reflection.
■p£ Sivei
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Directed by DANIEL MANN
685-7821
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©fine arts
"Miss this one and you've
really missed one of the
human dramas that really touches everyone."
Les Wedman, Vancouver Sun
un Hvre canadien
un r&vue
The Canadian Novel is Alive, and,
well...
THE LONELY ONES... a novel of
contemporary Quebec. James Bacque.
McClelland & Stewart, 1969. 189 pages.
In his novel, The Lonely Ones, published
late last year, James Bacque of Toronto delves
into the schisms of Canadian consciousness
and emerges with 'a novel of contemporary
Quebec* meaning, of course, the Canadian
Identity Problem. The most significant thing
about Bacque's novel is the fact that he is a
writer in English approaching with
sympathetic understanding the revolution in
Quebec which, if those of us with WASPish
tongues in our heads would only realize, is
one of the best things ever to happen to this
country. For the Revolution means more than
the loss of a few of HM's mail boxes. It means
a whole cultural awakening, most of which,
sadly, goes unknown and un-noticed at this
end of our country; an awakening which,
despite CBC, NFB, CC, CNR, The Plouffe
Family, and all the rest, may yet come too
late to melt the perma-frost or our
imaginations and give us a kind of national
surety that we exist, or co-exist, more than in
-name and emblem only.
As Identity, then, is the favorite Canadian
game, so the novel opens not anywhere in
Canada, but in London, in England, where
Harry, a typically confused and alienated
Canadian artist (conveniently half French
Canadian, so called, half-French Canadian,
so-called) is in the process of escaping his
engagement to an English Girl And Her
Family. He goes to Paris, looking for his artist
friend Andre of pre-revolution Montreal days,
only to find that Andre has returned to his
Quebec. Disenchanted with the whole
European scene, Harry the half-Anglo takes
off for Montreal and immediately adjourns to
a cabin in the woods, to think. The story
unfolds in Harry's running monologue on
events, mixing dialogue with the hero's own
perceptive comments.
The Cabin In The Woods theme in
Canadian Lit. is something to be reckoned
with. It offers a retreat to something neither
too American nor European, something not
too far nor too near the pressured life of the
par B. DOLSEN
metropoli — some kind of unique freedom of
movement and discovery still left to us if we
drift north of everything else. It is in the cabin
that Harry really begins to confront the
problems he faces as a Canadian. For Andre is
there also, in hiding from the police. Andre,
Harry finds, has turned into a raging
Separatist and has given up his art to devote
himself to the movement. He now sees Harry
as an intruder into his life and his country and
Harry, not knowing whether to take his
friend's politics seriously or not, commits
himself to helping Andre in a plan to take
over a radio station and broadcast a Separatist
mainfesto, as part of a scheme of co-ordinated
Separatist activities. Meanwhile, Harry is living
with Andre's girlfriend. Meanwhile, Harry's
erstwhile fiancee arrives from London. More
cabin-in-the-woods, showing the visitor
around. On the night of the demonstrations
things go awry and they all meet at a centre in
Montreal where the PM is speaking. Bombs go
off and the PM is killed. Harry grabs the girls
and Andre, who was injured in the explosions,
and tears out of the city in a Mustang, heading
west, almost instinctively, to Toronto. These
last sections of the book are particularly well
written, after some slow starts and heavy
ideological discussions, streaking along in
Harry's fragmented interior monologue. In
Toronto Andre is on foreign soil. He would
rather return to his Quebec, to his revolution,
violently rejecting the Anglos and the
CBC-Toronto types he encounters. So they go
back, all of them, to the centre of things,
where it's happening. Bacque makes his point
in examining the individual in an environment
of confusion and violence, of the possibilities
for survival in terms greater than ideological.
The book ends on a strangely optimistic note
for these 'lonely ones'.
Canadians, of all extractions, might
eventually discover that London, or Paris, or
Tokyo, or Warsaw are not, after all, their
spiritual homes — that we can all belong here.
Oddly, we don't yet belong to one another,
we are all strangers in our own land. When we
all do come home to ourselves and can be
ourselves, together, "Canada" will mean
something, perhaps. If we don't, someone else
will steal the show.
EXTREME   UNCTION
■pfi 6ix-
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970 REC
ORD
REV
IEW
(This week our record reviewing crew was so inundated with an
overflow of discs that we present the following esoteric offerings.
Say tuned in further issues for more .. .)
Poppyrock •..
Back in my high school there used to be a chick who used
to sing at all the talent shows when the school gym was packed
with hundreds all prepared to suffer from the worst acts ranging
from ballet dancing to rock groups. Surprisingly enough, this
chick was pretty good - so good she eventually ended up singing
on CBC Teen A-Go-Go shows. I used to kid her about changing
her name when she became famous — after all, what can you do
with a name like Susan Pesklevits?
There was a partial compromise when she later changed her
name to Susan Jacks, but that didn't guarantee fame in itself. But
as part of the musical Poppy Family, along with husband Terry
Jacks, guitarist Craig McCaw and drummer Satwant Singh, some
interesting developments occurred. After a couple of single
records and endless engagements in such diverse centers as UBC
and Powell River, their song "Which Way You Goin' Billy" last
summer became number one on all Canadian charts. And then
they were off to London to record their first album, which hit
the local stores around Christmas under the simple title of The
Poppy Family (London PS 568).
It's a nice musical album, one which might even be played
on radio stations other than CKLG. Like the back says, it's "an
album for everyone." Terry apparently took care while producing
it in London for, with the addition of some orchestral backing,
Susan's voice floats nicely through their big boss hit and eleven
other tunes including the popular "Beyond the Clouds" and
"What Can the Matter Be?" The mixing of the instruments and
voices is very clean, even more so than that on some highly hyped
albums being peddled in the stores.
With its distinctive blend of pop and rock, it's an
approachable and likeable album. And it's not a bad effort from
that chick who used to sing in talent shows at Maple Ridge Junior
High School. Try it and see.
-MICHAEL QUIGLEY
... and poppycock ...
If you like surfing music combined with watered-down
Muzak orchestral techniques, you'll probably enjoy Song of
Summer played by The Surf Symphony (Capitol ST-329). (God
knows there must be a market for it somewhere.)
The music is performed by "a combination of a rhythm
section from the tinest musicians available in the recording
studios of Hollywood, in addition to a symphonic line-up which
includes members ofthe Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra."
All that indicates there's lots of talent playing the music.
However, the arrangements have about as much soul as a piece of
moldy seaweed. Ho hum. MARK JACQUES
. •. and just poop
Songs of Experience (Capitol SKAO-338) is an artsy-fartsy
pretentious album of such poor musical quality that it doesn't
even deserve to be played over a fourth-rate Muzak system. It is
also "an anthology of awareness after birth composed and
arranged by David A. Axelrod based on the 18th century poems
of William Blake."
Capitol Records, to save money, has put the words on the
liner and the music on the record. I suppose you're supposed to
get really stoned and read Blake's lyrics while this groovy album
spins in the background. However, the words bear about as much
relation to the treacly music as the cover of Modern Screen
Magazine does to its contents.
Adding to the resulting pretentious Rod McKuenish effect,
the cover has nine (count 'em - nine)-groovy "experiences." If
you're particularly attentive, you'll note that in Experience 5
there's a semi-nude behind a man (the composer?) bound up in
cardboard. Take note all English 200 students - symbolism
abounds!
Thirty-four musicians along with composer Axelrod are
responsible for this atrocity. They have dedicated it to Sandy.
Poor Sandy. Poor Capitol Records.
-KEN "CRANKSHAFT" STRACHAN.
■pfi 7even<
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Friday, January 23,  1970
THE       UBYSSEY AND SO anoth er freaky
ykaerf famer eaker masthead
for this week of PF and they
did it again and again and.
A SALUTE to the
955,000,000,000,000 thing
happening at the Van. Art
Galley and extending to SUB
gAUey (seeee pf cover this
week) tells all telex.
IN THE senterspred a bunch of
people talking in print as we
continue our exploitation of
the whole concept of mixed
media masses mingling
meaningfully maximally
mooning.
AND SO we dive merrily into
HOT POOP
AND ITS alL happening at the
J ARTS
CONTEMPORARY
1970
THE FESTIVAL
OF CONTEMPORARY
ARTS 1970
Unlike the nine previous
festivals which concentrated
events into a five or ten day
period, Festival '70 started in
December, and will continue
right up to and including the
last day of lectures (April 6:
POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE, a Happening).
Monday, Jan. 26
Fine Arts "Students'
Drawings" continue to Friday.
Display in Lasserre lobby.
Wednesday, Jan. 28 (also,
Thurs. & Fri., 29 & 30 Jan.)
12:30 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
50c.
GALLIMAUFRY presents
"Krapp's Last Tape" (Beckett)
and "On the Harmfulness of
Tobacco (Chekhov). Presented
in collaboration with the AMS
Special Events. 10:30-12:30,
and 1:30-3:30; Lassere 204.
NORMAN RICH, of the
Odyssey Gallery: a visual
seminar on drawing and design.
Forthcoming
The Al Neil Trio;
Intermedia Sounds; Warhol
films; Vancouver Living
Theatre; Poetry Week; Campus
film makers; and more.
*   *   *
The Vancouver Symphony
this weekend will be
performing the almost world
premiere of a new piece by
English composer Wilfred
Josephs entitled Variations on
a theme of Beethoven. Will it
be psychedelic, aleatory,
quasi-electronic, stochastic,
duodecophonal or atonal?
Nobody knows, and we can't
figure out much from the
composer's description of the
piece, so go and be surprised.
Pianist Misha Dichter
complements the program.
■pf Sighti
DUTHIE BOOKS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
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OTHER STORES
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THE MANY FACES OF FOLK VOL II
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Thornberry
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—Already with  an  Album  released,  he  is  a  favorite  in   Eastern
Canada
Tues., Jan. 27,  12:30 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM admission soc
GETTING INTO THE
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IS GETTING INTO A
ALSO AVAILABLE   IN  8 TRACK  AND
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TOTAL EXPERIENCE
ON   ItC/l
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970 Friday, January 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
SFU's beauty queen to protest
destructive nature of contest'
Simon Fraser University has a beauty queen,
but for a definite purpose.
For the first time in SFU's history, council has
selected a queen candidate for the Miss Canadian
University contest, to be held at the Waterloo
Lutheran University Winter Carnival in Waterloo,
Ontario.
Candidate Janiel Jolley, 25, is entering the
contest in protest of the destructive and
dehumanizating nature of a beauty contest.
There is no candidate from UBC.
While speaking yesterday in SUB 125, Miss
Jolley said of the other condidates: "I look to them
not in a spirit of competition, but in a spirit of
solidarity."
"It is degrading to have to put our bodies on
the line like that. Beauty contests help to strengthen
the view of a woman as a mere sexual image, rather
than help to realize her potential as a creative,
reasoning human being," she said.
"Our protest is intended to reach women all
across Canada and tell them there is an alternative,"
she said, speaking for the Woman's Liberation
Movement.
"I think women's liberation, particularly in
Vancouver, is the most progressive movement in
North America. We have reached the propaganda
stage, where we must make women aware of the
nature of their depression."
There are approximately 300 women involved
in the Vancouver movement, and most of them are
off-campus. There are representatives in almost
every aspect of the working force.
"Every educational institution in this society
opposes us," said Miss Jolley.
"Our work is therefore aimed at attacking the
institution, rather than the individual man. It is time
we rationally considered the possibility of an
alternative society."
But women, apparently, are not the only sex in
need of liberation*
"Women's liberation affects men's liberation,"
said arts undergrad society president Dick Betts.
"While women are being opposed, men are
being taught to oppress them. It's time men started
to realize their phony type of liberation," he said.
Before Miss Jolley left UBC, she asked for
financial contributions.
"I'm unemployed because of my involvement
with the campaign," she said.
"I had to pay a dollar to park here, and every
dime counts."
Women's liberation at Columbia
ask for study of hiring practices
NEW YORK (CUPI) - A group of women
faculty members at Columbia University has issued
a report charging discrimination against women in
the university's hiring policies and asking for a full
study of employment opportunities for women at
Columbia.
The report, issued last month by a faculty
sub-committee of Co'- bia Women's Liberation
movement, notes tha Columbia grants about
one-quarter of its doctoral degrees to women, but
that only two per cent of tenured faculty members
in the graduate schools are women.
"We are puzzled by the graduate faculties'
commitment to train women, but not to hire
them," the report said.
According to the report, the over-all percentage
of women full professors at Columbia is 5.2 per
cent,    increasing    among    lower,    non-tenured
positions.
The report makes no specific recommendations
about the number of women who should be hired,
but states that "since a woman does not invest time,
energy and money in obtaining a doctorate in order
to be a better wife, and mother, a more entertaining
companion, etc., women should be represented in a
proportion that reflects their degrees earned."
Graduate Faculties dean George Fraenkel said
there is no "overt, conscious anti-woman attitude"
in the university's hiring policies.
"Everyone recognizes this as a serious
problem," he said, and promised the situation
would "change more in the future."
A tenured university position, he said, "requires
a tremendous amount of dedication and time that
interferes with our normal idea of a women's role in
the family."
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purchase or
open an account
10% down
balance to suit
111 liters
• 655 GRANVILLE ST. 683-6651
• 47 W. HASTINGS ST. 682-3801
• 622 COLUMBIA St.       New West'r.
Shop Thursday and Friday  'til 9 p.m.  at  all  3 stores.
CAAAEO PANTI HOSE
NOW
$2.00
2140 Western Parkway - University Square 224-0915
UBC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 brought you the uncut "HIGH1'now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
NO ADMITTANCI TO PHSONS ONDK J«
Warning:    VERY     FRANK    TREATMENT    OF   SEX
R.   VV.   McDonald.   B.C.   Censor
SUB AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY: 23, 30
SATURDAYS:
23, 30 ^
>: 24, 31 j
SUNDAYS:      25,    1
7:00
&
9:00
7:00
Special admission price for this presentation only Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
THE FUTURE BUILDER
What is it? What will it do tor you? How does it work?
BIB stands for Biographical Inventory Blank, a multiple-choice
inventory of auto-biographical questions relating to your own past
experience. The BIB is about you and your career. It consists of a
question booklet containing 520 questions about your past, and an
answer booklet. The answer booklet contains two pages which resemble an expanded application form, and three pages of item options for the 520 questions. It is the result of research which began
thirty years ago, when psychologists for the U.S. Armed Services
found that a BIB was the single best predictor of individual behaviour
and occupational success. Recent applications have included intensive work by NASA and the Peace Corps.
BIB means three very important things to you.
PERSONAL COUNSELLING REPORT
By completing it and permitting the results to be used in a Canadian
research program, you will obtain a personal, confidential counselling report, which will be compiled by the Human Studies Foundation and mailed directly to you. This report will compare your occupational interests with those of persons who have succeeded in the
following fields: • Human Sciences (eg. psychologist) • Hard
Sciences (eg. chemist) • Physical Activity (eg. law enforcement
officer) • Social Welfare (eg. social worker) • Artistic-Literary
(eg. music teacher) • Business Detail (eg. banker) • Sales (eg.
real estate broker) • Verbal (eg. lawyer). Depending on your own
results you may also receive separate advice on your probabilities
of success in the following areas: • Agricultural & Outdoor • Technical Sales • Scientific Research • Scientific Creativity • General Engineering • Sales Engineering • Research Engineering
• Management Effectiveness • Management Level • Specialization Level  • Occupational Level.
This service costs you $5.00 which is remitted to the Human Studies
Foundation and used to help pay for research.
CAREER SELECTION
Provided free of charge to you by Career Assessment Limited. Staff
psychologists will attempt to match your profiles on the BIB with
the actual success requirement of various work situations (jobs).
Whenever this occurs, they will send your name to that employer.
He receives only the information which you place on pages 2 & 3
of the answer booklet. No person except yourself receives information as to your BIB results. The employer will likely contact you in
order to try and interest you in the position. Any decision regarding
hiring is made by you and the employer. This service means that your
BIB acts as an interview on paper, an interview in depth which portrays your inviduality and allows Career Assessment's professional
staff to suggest career opportunities. Careers which are likely to
provide you with long term success and satisfaction.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
This is similar to Career Selection, but is for students planning to
return to school in the Fall. It allows you and an employer, matched
as to BIB profiles and job requirements, to have a summer to look
each other over with an eye to a permanent position after graduation.
For the first time you will be able to receive an impartial appraisal
of your real interests and opportunities for success- It will be based
on a detailed knowledge of you, as outlined by your responses on the
BIB. The research psychologists will take stock pf you according to
techniques validated extensively in industry and government.
It is important to understand the realities of a job before you take it.
The decision is too important to gamble. You no longer need to rely
completely on company interviewers to find out what jobs are really
like. Career Assessment's professional staff will provide experienced
insight so that you will not waste your time in an unsuitable job.
The right career will mean happiness. Happiness could be a better
position, quicker advancement, interesting associates, etc. The right
career depends on the right decision. BIB can help you make the
right decision by screening job opportunities to find those that are
suitable for you, and by providing you with candid information about
your possibilities of success in certain occupational areas.
This is how BIB works.
You buy BIB at your campus bookstore.
BIB includes a question  booklet,  answer booklet,  instructions on
how to fill out the answer booklet, and a large return envelope.
BIB should be completed in a quiet, relaxed atmosphere, and should
be given the attention you would accord any important matter
There is no time limit for completion.
Once you have completed BIB, place the answer booklet in the return
envelope and mail it to the Human Studies Foundation.
If you wish to have the assistance of Career Assessment Ltd. during
the period of Feb. 10th-March 1st. then your BIB must be postmarked no later than Jan. 29th. BIB's received later will not be eligible for job assistance until March 1st. Your counselling report will
be mailed to you within 2 weeks of receipt of your BIB.
THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF BIB
1. Upon receipt, your BIB is sequentially identified to provide a failsafe cross reference.
2. Pages 2 and 3 (expanded application form) are microfilmed and
made into microfiche cards, providing instant identification and reproduction, as well as complete security.
3. Some of the information on pages 2 and 3 is entered into a data
bank.
4. Your item responses on pages 4, 5 and 6 are recorded by optical
scanner and transposed into profiles through the use of advanced
computer analyses.
5. Your BIB profiles are then merged with the. information in the
data bank, producing a detailed picture of the individual that is you.
Over 550 pieces of information are combined into a meaningful portrait.
6. This portrait is then used to compile your personal report which is
mailed to you directly.
7. If you have requested job assistance, then the psychologists of
Career Assessment will match your portrait with work situations.
Whenever success is highly indicated, your name and the information
on pages 2 and 3 only, are sent to the employer. It is then up to the
employer to contact you* to see if you are interested in the position
in question.
8. Except for the information on pages 2 and 3 (which you would
ordinarily give on an application form) all information is completely
confidential.
Any individual assessment or prediction made on the basis of BIB
responses may be partially or wholly invalid. It is nontheless true that
the large majority of evaluations are substantially correct.
If you cannot get BIB from your bookstore, write the
Human Studies Foundation, SO Prince Arthur Avenue,
Toronto 180, Ontario, enclosing $5.00.
REMEMBER JANUARY 29th
Iti^ IrlSSESSn;lE^TflSSESSniEWTflBSEiiSnilEHHTflSSESSmEI^T flSSESSKIEWT
51 PRINCE ARTHUR AVENUE
TORONTO, ONTARIO
1416) 964-7721. 964-7725 Friday, January 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   19
New geology
building by 1972
After 25 years in temporary
shacks (army huts) the geology
department will get a building of
its very own.
The new $4 million geology
building, scheduled for
completion in 1972, is being
financed primarily by B.C.'s
mining and oil companies.
Construction   will   begin   this
spring if the expected corporate
donations are received.
Geology prof James Murray
said the department is "literally
bulging out ofthe huts."
He said the department
supplies 22 per cent of Canada's
geologists and deserves better
facilities.
New arts room in SUB
Now there's a place where the
artsy-crafty types can go to
practice their crafts.
If you dig pottern, leather
work, candle making, batiks, tie
dyes or weaving, you can now do
your things in the new crafts
room, SUB 247 anytime.
Student instructors will be
available every Monday and
Thursday night to teach people
how to throw pots on a wheel,
weaving, and batiking.
SUB cultural supervisor, Fred
Flores said, "We hope to extend
the instruction to every night."
College continues
Experimental College will continue for another term.
"We fear that the university as it stands is a place of
mental stagnation and boredom where students learn only to
parrot the often biased opinion of the instructors," said Tom
Skinner, a member of the college.
Two continuing seminars will be held every second week
beginning Jan. 21.
Topics to be discussed include the guaranteed minimum
income, civil rights and the Canadian bill of rights, university
reform and some special events.
The college meets every Wednesday noon in SUB 125.
Anyone interested in any of the topics is urged to attend.
ZOOLOGICAL LOVERS:
FEEDING HOURS AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ZOO
(Sloat Blvd. & Ocean Beach):
Lions 2 p.m.  except Mondays
Leopards & Small Cats 2:35 p.m.
Elephants 3:30 p.m. daily
Could send you there FREE!
For details - See Page 8
WORK
A seven week series concerning work and its
effect on our lives, our future and its
role in the social/economic
structure of our society.
7PM MON-FRI on IDEAS
CBU-FM, Vancouver 105.7 mcs
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY ■ 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS  TO  3  A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M.
NOW - A NEW SERVICE
EUROPE BY CAR
Buying tax-free cars
Leasing (repurchase)
Renting—lowest   rates
(sample: Volkswagen from
Amsterdam $168 for 30 days,
3000   K.M.   included).
A complete service, including
delivery,   insurance,
shipping,  trip  planning.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
574*4   Cambie   St.
Vancouver   15,   B.C.
Phone:   327-1162
Are You?
RADICAL
REACTIONARY
A WORKER OF THE WORLD
A WASP
P.O/d
tfftl£ e/ectichJ ate ken!
SLATE  I  — Nominations Open Jan. 28
Nominations Close   Noon, Feb. 5
ELECTION - FEB. 11
1. PRESIDENT
2. OMBUDSMAN
3. SECRETARY
4. CO-ORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
UBC FILM SOCIETY which in 1967 broughtyou the uncut "HIGH" now presents
LARRY
KENT'S
FACADE
MO ADMITTANCE TO «RSONS UNDfK 1$
Warning:    VERY    FRANK    TREATMENT   OF   SEX
R.   W.   McDonald,   B.C.   Censor
SUB AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY:
SATURDAYS
23, 30 ^      7:00
: 24, 31 J     9:00
SUNDAYS:      25,   1
7:00
$1
Special admission price tor this presentation only
■IP*        i^"     *t*»        J
B                   i -XV lk^ vi      »*            B
i«         i*     *i
k   *"*
1  km
1
**        **       i
H     •yi
f 1
*              1
[»*                M
?v         M
r   ;; " ■ fc
i
•**
**,
:      i
V               *♦«,**
•«
FIR
MR. RON
4554 W. 10 i
IT'S A NEW DECADE -                             7
A WHOLE NEW BALL GAME!
ARE YOU READY FOR IT?
ST LADY COIFFURES
TENTH AVE LTD.
MR. ELIO of ROME
-      MISS EVALINE      -      MISS KARIN
■\ve.                                                                224-5636 Page  20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
FRIDAY
INNER   CITY
Wanted: people to become  involved—
becojne  a  volunteer  tutor,   noon,  Bu.
100.
AQUA   SOC
Scuba course starts next week.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
The   Palestine   Liberation   Struggle,   8
P.m.,   1208 Granville.
ONTOLOGICAL    SOC
The  Creative  Compulsion,   noon,  SUB
213.
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Meeting,   noon,   Rm.   125.
IWW
Films    from    Newsreel,     noon,     SUB
Auditorium.
COMMUNITY    EDUCATIONAL    AND
RESEARCH   CENTRE
Dance,  130 E.  Cordova,  admission $1.
FILM   SOCIETY
Larry   Kent's   Facade,   Fri.   and   Sat.,
7 and 9 p.m., Sun. 7 p.m.,  SUB Aud.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   MOVEMENT
Meeting, noon, SUB 226.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
McLean,  concert,  8 p.m.,  Recital Hall
of the  Music  Bldg.
NDP  CLUB
Executive   meeting,   noon,   SUB   115.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
General  meeting,   noon,   SUB   111.
LEGAL  AID
Campus legal aid panels, every Mon.,
Wed.  and Fri., noon, SUB 237-237A.
SATURDAY
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Seattle trip meet SUB,  3 p.m.
UBC   SAILING   CLUB
Boat repairs,   10 a.m.,  UBC  Thunderbird Football  Stadium.
MALAYSIAN-SINGAPORE
STUDENTS'  ASSOCIATION
Dance   party,   8   p.m.   to   ?,   International  House.
CHINESE   OVERSEAS   STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Bowling   party,   dinner   to   follow   in
Chinatown, 2 p.m.,  Brentwood Lanes.
'tween
classes
MONDAY
YOUNG  SOCIALISTS
The revolutionary struggle in Quebec,
noon,   Bu.   100.
CUSO
Film,  noon,  SUB 211.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
Discussion,  7 p.m.,   SUB 216B
SAILING   CLUB
Executive  meeting,   noon,   SUB  213.
DEPARTMENT OF  MUSIC
Student recital,  noon,  Recital Hall of
the   Music  Bldg.
SPEAK EASY
Talk   and   information   centre^   Mon.,
Wed and Fri.,   12-9 p.m.,   SUB 218.
TUESDAY
STUDENTS   INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION   SOCIETY
Folk   music   introduction,    noon,    Bu.
104.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL    EDUCATION
General meeting, 6:30 p.m.. SUB 117.
PROGRESSIVE   CONSERVATIVE   CLUB
Meeting,  noon, SUB 211.
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
T>r.   Holm   speaks   on   Genetics,   Wesbrook  201.
AIESEC
Traineeships   abroad,   noon,   SUB  211.
WEDNESDAY
MARDI   GRAS
High  flying  bird   concert,   noon,   SUB
Auditorium.
SAILING   CLUB
Film  and  general  meeting,  noon,   Bu.
104.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Seminar,    noon,    SUB   125     Dr    Powe
speaks on civil rights.
AQUA SOCIETY
SCUBA COURSE
N.A.U.I.  Certification
STARTS  NOW
— First Paid   First  In
— Sign in Club's Lounge
S.U.B.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Remodelled
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
HELP
SCOTLAND
IN    IT'S   STRUGGLE
FOR    SELF-GOVERNMENT
Contact:
Box 705,  New Westminster,   B.C.
or phone  526 9940
E & B RESTAURANT
Deluxe
Western  Cuisine
4423 W.  10th
LOOK FOR ME •
a* l_ *•_■*•_■■**■. run
X
IN PAGE FRIDAY
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Club-3 lines, 1 day lot, 3 days $2.00
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 250;
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
•   •
e
• • •
SATURDAY 2-4 P.M.
Tomorrow Support
ECOLOGY ACTIVISTS
Georgia & Granville area
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DOUBLE DANCE AT PLACE
Vanier with the Crosstown Bus
and Tomorrow's Eyes. Fri., Jan.
23.   9-1.   Non-res.   $1.50.   Res.   $1.25.
TRADITIONAL POLKA PARTY,
Friday, Jan. 23, !l-l, live band, refreshments. Great fun. $1.25 each.
International   House.
DANCE PARTY INTERNATIONAL
HSE. 8:00 lo ? Sat., 24th. Everyone   welcome.    .75e   each.
Al A RDI (IRAS COSTUMjXiTALL —
Jan. 30. Tickets AMS — SITU info
(lesk.
Greetings
12
GOT   A   QUESTION?
GOT  A   HANG-UP?
SPEAK   EASY,   SUB   Rm.   218,   228-
3706.   Mon.,   Wed.,   Fri.,   12-9   p.m.
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
LOST   BROWN    WALLET   IN   SUB
cafe    phone    Dunian    277-6716    or
 leave   at   SUH   info.
LOST: MEN'S ELECTRIC TIMEX
watch. Silver with black cloth
strap; In Urockhall 12 Jan. Rhone
Lloyd   224-0248.   Reward.	
UK WARD: MISSING AND PRE-
sumed lost_ in vicinity of Lassaire
building. 3;>mm negatives (500) in
black 3-ring binder. Represents
many years work. Contact Jim
Moodie, 224-7(186 or planning studio
*B\
Rides & Car Pools
15
Special Notices
16
HAVE   A   SPACE   ODYSSEY   WITH
Guided   Meditation.
A highly creative way—two step by
step instructions on a 12" LP record
—  $6.60,   by  a   Western   Yogini:
Swami   Sivananda   Radha
sharing   ancient   techniques   studied
in  India under  Swami   Sivananda  in
tho   Himalayas.
Ashram    Records,   Box   9,
Kootenay   Bay,   B.C.
THEATRE
10
rules.
5   Hommes
Requis
Linda.
277-7103,   De   6   p.m.   A   9   p
m.
WHY
PAY
HIGH   AUTO   INSl
R-
ance
rate
if  you   are
20   years
or
over
and
have   good
drivin**
re-
cord
you
may  qualify.
Phone   Ted
Ellio
tt,   299-9422.
AQUA SOC GEN BRAT. MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 29, Brock room 303.
Discussion   of   election.
ACADIA   REUNION  —  JAxX'l   AT
The     Ham    S-l.    $1.00    Phono    873-
1285,    732-6608.
NO   TICKETS   AT   THE   DOOR!
MARDI GRAS CAR WASH KAPPA
Sigma Fraternity, Brentwood Service    Station.     Sat.,     Jan.     24,     11
AQUA SOC ~sTCVU.TTX COURSE
starts   next    week.    Sign    in   Club
 Cage   in   S.U.B.   today.	
T**UI0E~ C K N W SKI BUSES TO
Whistler every Monday & Wednesday.    Details   on   CKNW   "IS.
- Double Dance -
TOMORROW'S   EYES
CROSSTOWN   BUS
Fri.,   Jan.   23  —  9-1
PLACE    VANIER
*
Non-Residents   $1.50
Residents   $1.25
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
HISTORY 135 TEXTS. PHONE
Norma 22I-5S92 after 7 p.m. Sunday-Thursday   evenings.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobile For Sale
21
I960 VAL'XHALL, 42,000 MILES.
Excellent condition. 325-0488 between 4 and 10 p.m., radio 4 dr.
$490   cash.	
1963 NSII PRINZ. RUNS CHEAP.
45 mi./gal. Best offer. Phone John
Room  434,   224-5214.	
'62 CHEVY II, EXCELLENT
mechanical condiion. $450.00 phone
224-9045 ask for Rm. 470 after 7:00
p.m. 	
J8 PONTIAC. RELIABLE RUN-
ning condt'n. Only $120. Call 224-
9662,   Philip. 	
'59 VW RUNS WELL NEW PAINT
$265 (or nearest offer). Phone
224-7035.	
1962 VOLVO GOOD CONDITION,
city   tested.   Phone   224-7443.	
1961 RENAULT. GOOD CONDI-
tion. $290. Very economical and
reliable. Phone 224-9720. Paul room
No.   428.	
'59 STMCA, GOOD CONDITION, $75
can be seen at 1935 W. 12th Ave.,
Van.
Motorcycles
25
1965 HONDA S90, HELMET. MUST
sacrifice to pay fees. First offer
$125   takes.   John   224-4146.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating & Copying
32
SCIENTIFIC GRAPHICS-SPFCIAL-
ists in Graphs, Maps, Text-Book
Illustrations, Complex Formulae.
Scientific Displavs, Advertising.
Phone   733-1506.
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
MUST SELL— PRACTICA NOVA
"1:" -— 35mm single-lens reflex
camera — like new. Zeiss Lens.
FL 50mm f 2.8. exposure meter
Asking $79 (new $120). Tel. 224-
9822; R. 3SS Kwakuitl. Totem
Park.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
DON'T  SIT  AT  HOME  AND  SULK
tonight.     Come     to     Place    Vanier
and    dance    to    Tomorrow's    Eyes
and  the  Crosstown  Bus.   9-1.   Nou-
* res.  $1.50.   Res.  $1.25.	
CUPID  IS COMING JAN.   24.   ALSO
Jane.
G  R~E ~E~N~     POOR"
GET     DRUNK     AND     LAY     YOUR
broad   at   Mardi  Gras   '70  Costume
Ball.  A  game  people play.
Sewing & Alterations
38
MARDI GRAS '70 COSTUME BALL
Floorshow "The Games People
Play". Tickets: AMS, SUB info
desk.
Typewriters & Repairs
Typing
39
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—MRS.
Treacy, 738-8794 — 35c page, 5c
copy.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST\
Experienced essay and thesis
typist. Reasonable rates. 321-3838.
Forestry Term Papers.	
TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
Please   call   224-6129
ESSAY TYPING, 3589 West 19th
Ave.   733-5922.	
EFFICIENT TYPING — MY HOME
20" carriage desk model typewriter.  Phone Ruth — 731-8578.
"EXPERIENCED   ELECTRIC
home   typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc.
Neat    accurate    work,    reasonable
 rates.   Phone   321-2102.	
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST  —   ELEC-
tric   machine.   Reas.   rates.   Phone
73S-7SS1.	
I    WILL    TYPE    FOR    YOU.    CALL
Lorraine    6S8-2S26.    9-12    and    1-6
weekly.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
PART-TIME TELLERS WANTED
by Bank of Montreal, S.U.B. Mondays and Fridays. Prev. exp. is
required. Phone Mr. Fisher 228-
9021  or  call  at  the  office.
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
PART TIME HELP WANTED. NO
soliciting. Please phone Al Tarbet
521-7731.	
DO YOU HAVE A CAR? CAN YOU
use an extra $100.00? Can you
spare 5 hours a week? Phone
522-3011 betweeen 3 p.m. and 5
p.m.    for   interview.
Work Wanted
54
GRAPHS AND CHARTS EX-
pertly done for theses, publications,  etc.  Call Vana 298-6805  eve.
INSTRUCTION
Language   Instruction
61A
SPANISH 200 STUDENT WOULD
like to practice Sp. conversation
with anyone interested. Ph. Judv
435-9604.
Music
62
Tutoring
64
WANTED THIRD OR FOURTH
year Eng. major; Geog. major to
tutor second year student, 942-
4281.	
TUTORING IN MATH - PHYS. -
Stat bv instructor (Ph.D.) $5 per
hour.   Ph.   733-6037.   Eve.	
PSYCH 206 TUTOR NEEDED.
Prefer grad student. Phone 261-
5290   aft.    6.	
CLASSES IN EAST TNDIAN AND
Tnterna tional     Cooking.     731-4N61.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your   Student   Telephone
Directory
STILL AVAILABLE — $1.00
at  the  Bookstore,
AMS  Publications  Office
and Thunderbird  Shop
RANGE BOOTS, HEAD 360's,
poles, canvas cover, all one season old. Phone 261-0394 after 6:00
p.m.	
LADIES AFGHAN SHEEPSKIN
coat. Size 14. $80. 321-6954 (before
9:30   p.m.)	
BLLIEPOINT MALE SIAMESE
kitten 3 months. Very good natur-
ed. $20.00. Call 321-6954 before
9:30   p.m.	
HEAD COMPETITION GS SKIS 210
CM and Lange boots, size 10 M.
Phone  Ralph   224-9016.	
1 PAIR 215 CM KNEISSL RED
Stars,    never   used.   Wbat   offers?
$179.00  new.   263-4390.	
SKI BOOTS, LANGE PRO 8%
worn twice. Save $25. Head and
Knessil     skis     Vi     original     price.
Phone   263-9188.	
SILVER FOX FUR COAT. NEVER
been  worn.  Large size.   Phone 327-
0640   $400.	
DESK FORMICA TOPPED. 78%
inches x 42 inches, 30 inches
.height. TV set 26% ins. x 19 ins.
36 ins. height. 19 inch screen.
"Philco"     3713     Blenheim     Street,
Van.   S.   Tel.   731-1749.	
SAVE   MONEY!!!
HE   &   SHE   IS   HAVING
ANOTHER   FANTASTIC
SALE
Misc. For Sale (Cont.)
71
BLACKS    ICELANDIC SLEEPING
bag.    Single    unused $40.    Phone
732-9241    after    today. Amazingly
warm!	
FISCHER ALU SKIIS WITH STEP-
ins. 195cm used four tmes $110.
987-5434.
SIX MOS. OLD SEABREEZE
portable stereo. Automatic change
walnut  cabinet  $220.00.   New.,  now
$145.00.   Ph.   434-1143.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ON CAMPUS ROOMS, STUDY
lamps, mirrors, towel hangers,
w/w carpets, shoe cupboards,
large bunks. Sigma Chi House,
5725   Agronomy,   224-9620.     	
LHK ROOMS, MALE STUDENT,
private entrance, kitchen privileges, near bus. Phone after 5
p.m.   733-5255.	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR 1
student. $34 month rent. Share
kitchen,   T.V.,   etc.   Immed.   occu-
 pancy.   733-7358   eves.
MALES, NEWLY FURN. CARP-
eted room: single or double; T.V.
room; share kitchen. Priv. ent. *
warm;   near   UBC.   228-8040.
AVAILABLE JAN. 31st. PRIVATE
room, bathroom. Other facilities
shared One Other Student. Stu-
dent   landlord.   733-3126.	
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE
bsmt. ste. near gates on W 13th
Avail,   imed.   228-9277.
Room & Board
82
DOUBLE ROOM ACCOMMOdX
tion available in University residences at Totem Park.' Place
\anier *u-d Fort Camp. For details contact Office of Director ot"
Residences   or   phone   228-2811.
SIGMA CHT HOUSE — LARGEST
rooms on campus; two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV,
good food. Come out and see us.
5725   Agronomy.   224-9620,   224-6374.
OX CAMPUS BOARD ""ft^ROOlT
Available immediately at Union
College. Free parking. Home
cooking.   Apply   matron.   224-326H.
TIRED OF COMMUTING: TRY
being a hoarder at Phi Gamma
Delta. Good food and rooms: ten
minutes from anv building on
campus. $90 a month. 221-9769 ask
for   Pave   or  Bob.
SPACE FOR ONE MALE STUD-
ent   in   St.   Anderw's   Hall.   Apply
 to   Dean—phone   224-7720.
I'HI KAPPA SIGILATXOLOR T.V.
Satin;]. Good food, 5785 Agronomy
Roart.   224-9684   or   224-7843.    ^
ROOM & BOARD IN QUIET
home, for male, near Bianca
Street.   Phone  224-3504.
Furn. Houses  & Apts.
83
WANTED — GIRL 30 TO 40 TO
share 2 bedroom furnished penthouse apartment with same. Kitsilano District $85.00 per month
plus telephone and hydro. Tele-
phone  731-3639.	
1 BDRM. FURN. APT. TO SUBLET
Kerrisdale area, couple pref. Ph.
263-9057.	
FURNTSHED SUITeXfULL BATH,
Sep. entrance, near gates, 224-349-1.
SENIOR MALE EO lO M M, ,AT IE
wanted for modern semi-furnished
Beach Ave. Apt. rent $75/mo. Call
Rod   688-9683.	
WANTED FOURTH FEMALE TO
share three bedroom apt. above
campus travel agency. 37.50/mo.
Ph.   224-9159.	
2 BEDROOM BASMT. SUITE,
furn.. wash. Kitchen, sep. ent.
Call 228-9858 aft. 5:30 p.m. 3781
W.   20th  Ave.	
GIRL TO SHARE FURN. APT. ON
campus. $45 monthly. Call 224-
6356. Sat., Sun. or after 11 week
nights.
Unf. Houses  & Acts.
84
SENSITIVE "INTUNE" COUPLE
or guy wanted to share big house
Kitsilano area with growth & joy
oriented people. All expensses
shared evenly. Call Michael Judy
or   Juliet.   733-3385.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN THE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED SECTION Friday, January 23,   1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 21
Loose student coalition may replace CUS
By GINNY GALT
Five major student unions from western Canada met
in Saskatoon last weekend to discuss the formation of a
national students' organization to fill the gap left by the
death of the Canadian Union of Students last September.
Representatives of student unions from UBC,
University of Alberta, University of Saskatchewan,
Regina, Saskatoon and the University ofManitoba agreed
not to try to form a national union at this time, but to
form a loose coalition of student unions in Western
Canada.
According to a press release from the University of
Saskatchewan students' union, the general feeling at the
Western Student Union Conference was that the divisive
forces which were at work to destroy CUS still exist and
that no viable students' organization could emerge from a
national meeting in February as proposed by the
University of McGill students' society.
. "The complete consensus right across the board was
that trying to form a national union would be a waste of
time," said AMS vice-presidentTony Hodge, who attended
the meeting with his brother, AMS president Fraser
Hodge.
"In Western Canada right now we are going to
concentrate on forming strong groups on a regional basis
(i.e. provincial unions)."
Prior to the meeting, the two Saskatchewan
universities formed the Saskatchewan Union of Students.
Manitoba also has a provincial student union.
'The most healthy union is in Alberta, and after the
meeting last Saturday, the B.C. Union of Students (BCUS)
is now in a pretty healthy state," said Hodge.
On a provincial basis the unions plan to co-ordinate
student action in areas of mutual concern — such as
housing, student finance, and unemployment.
Hodge, who is treasurer of BCUS, believes that if
BCUS operates with the policy of problem first, BCUS
second, it will accomplish a lot.
"This is where CUS blew it. So many people were
running aiound worrying about CUS, grooving on the
thought of a national union, that nothing was ever
accomplished as far as solving student problems or
improving the student situation," he said.
AMS external affairs officer, Mike Doyle said BCUS is
going to remain a flexible non-legal thing so people can
use it "without getting hung-up on constitutions and legal
bullshit."
BCUS was created in 1969 after the B.C. Association
of Students folded in 1968. So far its members include
four universities and three large junior colleges. BCUS is
mainly concentrating on the problem of :'udent
unemployment at the moment.
Some of the tentative topics for that meeting are
pollution research, post secondary education, and student
participation in university government.
The purpose of the March conference is to introduce
various members of the ingoing and outgoing student
councils to pressing issues, thus alleviating to some
extent the lack of communication that exists between
coucils from year to year.
"The lack of continuity between yearly councils is
one of the major hang-ups in student government today.
Newly elected members are all fired up with new ideas
and plans, whereas the old ones know what's realistic and
what can be done," said Hodge.
Hodge said the western union conference was
"fantastic". "There's an amazing amount of cohesion
between universities of western Canada right now."
Loyola grants right to appeal
MONTREAL (CUP) - The administration at Loyola
College has suspended letters of non-renewal of contract
issued to 27 faculty members and, on the surface, appears
to have defused the main element in the Roman Catholic
institution's current crisis.
In a statement issued late Tuesday the Loyola
administration said the right of appeal granted to the
dismissed faculty "suspends the effect" ofthe letters — de
facto firings — issued December 15.
More important to Loyola faculty, the administration
agreed to re-negotiate the membership of the college's
Committee on Appointments, Rank and Tenure, the body
which would hear appeals.
Currently,   CART   is   made   up   of   adminstration
vice-president    (academic)    Jack    O'Brien    and    five
administration appointees.
"The nature and constitution of such a reconstituted
body of appeal is now the subject of discussion before the
Meyer commission (the provincial government's one-man
inquiry into the current Loyola crisis)," the statement
said.
Despite the apparent conciliation, however, the
administration at Loyola has not rescinded its severe'
policy against protests at the college. Monday the
administration announced court injunctions would be
used against protestors at the administration's descretion,
and imposed new, stringent closing hours for the campus.
GOING TO
MARDI
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SHOW UP IN A
SELECTION   FROM
OUR VAST ARRAY
OF MARDI GRAS
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1267 Kingsway at Clark
ORGAN - ORGAN - ORGAN
1
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1
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SUNDAY             1
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10:30 a.m.           £
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Suzanne     1
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Gibson       o
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Will play an organ recital z
in connection with the   l
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morning worship at the °
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Lutheran      CAmpus a
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Centre. A brief service of ^
dedication of the organ   \
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sections of the recital. '
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Mrs. Gibson will include >
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appropriate commentary  j
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on her selections.   Her 0
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repertoire     will     be jn
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selected for this small >
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chapel pipe-organ.            2
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RGAN - ORGAN - ORGAN
<f Certainly you make good money
but is that enough?0
"Most students are looking for more than money after they
graduate," says Ron Wing, a 1968 graduate B.A. in economics
from the University of Saskatchewan at Regina.
"Sure, a lot of them want to make a bundle fast, but there's
a lot more to getting started on the right career. You've
got to have the training and confidence to do your job well.
Yet nobody wants to sit around some office for four or five years
getting so-called 'experience' before he's allowed into sales.
That's why I was attracted to London Life. This company made
sure my training was effective, and within three months I was
ready to start out on my own. It's satisfying too, being involved
in one of the most dynamic industries in North America."
There's a challenge waiting for you too, at London Life.
For further information consult your placement officer,
or write to the Personnel Dept, Station 160A,
LONDON LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
London, Ontario Page 22
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
JOY WARD  (RIGHT) AND  KAREN WILLIAMS of the UBC
women's ski team, with the Skimeister trophy won by Joy at a
meet at Crystal Mountain last weekend.
Lady skiers show class
At last weekend's Northwest
Collegiate Ski Conference meet at
Crystal Mountain, UBC's Joy
Ward placed first overall in the
combined women's events,
bringing home the Skimeister
trophy.
She placed seventh in the giant
slalom and slalom, and fifth in the
cross country. Karen Williams of
UBC beat her teammate in the
slalom and giant slalom, coming
second and third respectively.
The UBC team came second
overall, finishing behind the
University of Oregon.
Intramurals
SCHEDULE
HOCKEY—Jan.   27,  6:20,   Rink  I: Eng
II vs. Aggies; 7:35: Beta vs. Dekes; 8:50:
Arts vs. Phi Delta.
BASKETBALL—Jan. 13, 12:30: Pharm
II vs. Eng II; Med II vs. Grad St; Eng
V vs.   Swim Team.
—Jan. 26, 12:30: Dent I vs. Eng I;
7:00: Ed IV vs. AD II; Beta U vs. Figi
II;8:00: PV I vs. Figi I: For I vs. Kappa
Sigma; Comm I vs. SAM *C; 9:00: Beta
I vs. Law I; Union I vs. MBA; 10:00:
DU II vs. ling IV; PV II vs. Ed II; Beta
Pledge vs.  PE VI.
RESULTS
BASKETBALL — Jan. 19: Dent (38),
Med (32); PV* I (45), Kappa Sigma (22);
Comm I/Eor I; Beta (64), MBA (17);
Law I/DU I; Ed II/Phi Delta; DU II
(31), PV II (31); Figi II (27), PE IV (22);
Union III (34), PE VI (29); Beta Pledge/
Dekes; Beta II (41).  Ed IV (40).
HOCKEY—Jan. 20: PE (7), Dekes (2);
Eng II (0), Beta (2); Phi Delta (5), Sigma Chi (3).
BASKETBALI Jan.    21:    St.    Marks/
Law; PE III/Aggies; Union II (55), VCF
(28); Eng III (32), Ed ni (28); For III/
Phi Delta; Carey Hall (59), Eng VI (17);
PV V (30), Union IV (16); PV IV (62),
Eng VII (10); Dekes (50), SAM *D* (10);
Beta   m/Sigma  Chi.
HOCKEY—Jan. 21: For (4), St. Andrew (1); Grad 'B' (6), Union (3); Ed
(1),   Comm   'A*  (0).
BASKETBALL—final division results—
Division II, League D: 1. PE II, 2. Union
n, 3. Ed IH; League E: 1. PE in, 2. St.
Marks, 3. PV in. Division III, League C:
1,   Carey Hall,  2.   For IU,  3. PV VI.
Men's volleyball and softball registration has now started. Please sign up
with your Unit manager or1 at the Intramural office.
Arfs 20 relay road race: Register now
at Intramural  office.
Basketball:
The league leading UBC
basketball Thunderbirds begin
another arduous road trip this
evening as they play their first of
a three game tour of Alberta.
Tonight's opponent will be the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
who are presently in a vigorous
battle with the Universities of
Winnipeg and Victoria for the
final playoff berth. The Dinos,
although they should prove
tougher than in their earlier
109-73 loss to the UBC, basically
pose no serious threat to end the
Birds' undefeated record.
Saturday night, however, UBC
moves on to Edmonton where
they take on the third place
Alberta Golden Bears. With the
infamous Edmonton officiating
and an expected substantial home
crowd the Bears are expected to
give the Birds all they can handle.
After their earlier 92-57 loss in
Vancouver, Alberta coach Barry
Mitchelson said that "it was the
worst his club had played all
year". Considering they shot only
33 per cent from the field and 39
per cent from the line, it wouldn't
seem impossible that they could
improve drastically and scare the
visiting Birds.
The trip concludes on Monday
when the Birds move on to meet
the Unversity of Lethbridge; a
game expected to rate as a
mid-season holiday.
The Birds presently have the
leading rebounder and the leader
in foul shooting percentage in the
personage of forward Derek
Sankey. He also carries an overall
16.2 points per game average,
third on the club behind Bob
Molinski and Ron Thorsen.
WCIAA BASKETBALL
STANDINGS
P
W
L
Pts
UBC
8
8
0
16
Man.
9
7
2
14
Alta.
8
5
3
10
Vic.
8
4
4
8
Winn.
9
4
5
8
Cal.
9
4
5
8
Sask.
9
3
6
6
Leth.
9
2
7
4
Reg.
9
2
7
4
Tickets go on sale Monday,
January 26 at the athletic office,
Rm. 208 of War Memorial gym,
for the Simon Fraser-UBC
basketball game. The game will be
played at the Pacific Coliseum on
February 14. Student tickets are
$1.00 for regular $2.00 reserved
seats. Blocks of tickets will again
be available for groups.
UBC icemen lead   >
in Hamber series
Friday night at 8:00 p.m., the Birds battle the University of
Alberta Golden Bears in the second game of a two game total goal
series for the Hamber Cup. The Birds hold a 10-4 edge by virtue of
their win in Edmonton two weeks ago.
Saturday night, again at 8:00, UBC tangles with the number one
rated team in the league, the University of Calgary Dinosaurs. Calgary
defeated UBC 7-5 two weeks ago in Calgary and the Birds will be after
revenge.
The other important factor for the Birds is that they are now in
the position of fighting for a playoff berth, and need all the wins they
can muster.
The Hamber Cup has long been a jinx to the Birds. They have
been competing for it since 1951, but have only managed to win it
twice, most recently in 1964.
It is probable that the Birds will capture it for the third time.
this year, but Alberta is certainly no team to be discounted easily.
They won the western championships last year and narrowly lost
out in the national championships to University of Toronto. This
year's team roster is very similar to last year's, and the few new
players were forced to beat out last year's regulars for the positions.
On the other hand, the Birds are looking in good shape after a
frightful experience last weekend. Basically the team is very sound,
but lacks the experience of the Edmonton and Calgary squads. The
Birds will be further handicapped by the loss of Laurie Vanzella who
will watch from the stands with a swollen elbow. A replacement will
be brought up from the Braves.
Nonetheless, coach Bob Hindmarch is predicting a pair of
victories this weekend. He feels the team is as ready as they were two
weeks ago when they won in Alberta, and they are certainly eager to
win. Hindmarch feels that last week's loss to Manitoba was largely a
matter of the breaks going against him, and is hoping for a better
streak of luck this week.
Other coaches in the league are rating Calgary as the top team in
the league right now in spite of their loss to Edmonton, but they are
likely to find the going rough here. UBC is no team to roll over and
play dead simply because Calgary has a scary reputation. Besides, the
Birds have something to prove about Calgary's last win.
It is probable that these will be the best games of the year at
UBC and definitely worth watching. Admission is free with an AMS
card, and programs go for the low price of 10 cents.
Rugby Birds open season
As last weekend's action was
cancelled because of frozen turf
Don Spence's rugby squad will
have to use this weekend's game
to prove they are still in shape.
Although they have been
inactive since last November 22
the coach is quite pleased with the
desire the team is showing.
"Last Tuesday's practice was
certainly one of the finest we've
had. The boys were
really knocking heads out there,"
said Spence.
Be that as it may, they'll have
their  work cut out for them at
they take on the Meralomas this
Saturday, 2 p.m. at Thunderbird
Stadium.
The Birds and 'Lomas clashed
in the Birds final fall game with
the 'Lomas handing our team a
16-5 defeat.
Dave Austin and Doug Shick
were absent in that one as they
will be again this Saturday. Austin
and Shick will be vieing for berths
on the BC Reps squad.
However, the coach assures all
that although the conditions will
be much the same the score
won't.
The UBC women's basketball B
team is sponsoring their second
annual invitational basketball
tournament this Friday and
Saturday at the Women's Gym.
There    will    be   eight   teams
representing Kamloops, Seattle,
Prince George, Cowichan, Victoria
and Vancouver.
Games will start at 4:30 Friday
evening and 9:00 Saturday
morning.
Idea ??
Questions??
Information ??
SPEAK
EASY
Hang-ups ??
Suggestions ??
Student-run I  Student organized 1
//I
Talk" and Information Centre
SUB, Rm. 218 228-3706
Monday, Wednesday, Friday - 12-9 p.m.
Rudy & Peters Motors Ltd.
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALISTS
225 E. 2nd Are.
Quality   Workmanship
Competitive Prices
Genuine Volkswagen  Parts Only
All Work Guaranteed
Complete Body Repairs and Painting
879-0491
Bagdad - by - tbe Bay
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home Could send you there
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(There are Six)
For details - See Page 8
OPPORTUNITY
Incorporated Group of
Senior Students engaged in
diversified revenue projects
has an opening for ambitious student. Shareholding
investment required. Send
inquiries to Box No. 6343,
Postal Station 'G', Van. 8,
B.C.
BOSTON PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI
HOUSE
FREE DELIVERY - 224-1720
4450 W. 10th Ave.
WEEKDAYS TO 3 A.M.
FRI. & SAT. TO 4 A.M. Friday, January 23,  1970
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 23
IS
By DICK BUTTON
Ubyssey Hockey Reporter
and JIM MADDIN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
The following story sprang from discussions with
some western-based members of the Hockey Canada
organization on the withdrawal ofthe Canadian national
team from international competition. The Ubyssey's
hockey reporter, Dick Button, and sports editor Jim
Maddin comment on the decision's implications for
Canadian hockey at collegiate, junior A and national
levels.
UBC was the home of the Canadian national hockey
team from the summer of 1963 to the spring of 1964
under the guiding hand of Father David Bauer.
UBC's 1964 Canadian national team placed fourth
in the Olympics, behind Sweden (and two international
referees), Russia and Czechoslovakia. That was the year
the Czechs beat the Russians, the Canadians tied the
Russians and beat the Czechs and the Swedes beat
Canada and the Czechs.
Canada's last game was against the Swedes, so we
were in the battle until the very end. Subsequent
Canadian teams (senior A calibre and the specially
trained national team) placed better, but they were
never so close to the gold.
Father David Bauer
, .. proved his ponit.
Dr. Bob Hindmarch
now his problem .
"There is a distinct possibility that the withdrawl
of the Canadian national hockey team from world
competition and the subsequent collapse of the team
could be the best news for collegiate hockey yet," says
UBC hockey coach Bob Hindmarch.
"The current row over amateur status and Olympic
disqualifications, make the collegiate level the natural
choice for any future national representative team. No
one can dispute the players amateur standing as the
college authorities are hard pressed to even pay the
travelling expenses for their teams, let alone pay the
players at all."
Hindmarch's views are not the only ones coming
from the withdrawal of the national team, however, in
the absence of any statements from the directors of
Hockey Canada, one can only make educated guesses on
what, if anything, will replace the national team.
Hindmarch, as well as being the hockey coach here,
is an active member of Hockey Canada, assistant
professor in the School of Physical Education and is an
executive officer of the Garibaldi Olympic Development
Association.
Hindmarch involves Russians
He attributes the sudden withdrawal and disbanding
of the national team to a political manoeuver by the
Russians. They made it quite obvious that they were not
in favor of playing the world tournament in Canada
since with the advantage of home ice, and the
supplemented players, the Canadians appeared to be a
very strong team. It is conceivable Hindmarch thinks,
with the advantage of home ice, the Russians saw their
claim to hockey supremacy threatened.
Historically the matter starts with Avery Brundage,
chairman of the International Olympic Committee who
started to make noises about his Olympic rules,
especially the one which says someone who plays against
a professional loses his amateur standing. Usually this
would have been ignored as Brundage loosening up his
vocal cords, but the alert Russians turned these words
into their salvation.
"•s First, they got Mister Brundage to remutter his
words, no mean feat at any time.
Then the Russian officials wrapped the mess in pink
ribbons and threw it at the directors of the Hockey
Canada program, declaring they could not risk the
amateur standing of their career hockey players (no not
their professionals, Claude!) by having them play against
the reinstated pros allowed Canada by the International
Ice Hockey Federation.
In response to various pressures, the Hockey Canada
officials withdrew the team from their own tournament
scheduled for February and then disbanded the team.
The officials disbanded the team before even asking for
official rulings from the two governing bodies, the IOC
and IIHF, which leads one to some interesting
speculations.
Speculate, speculate.
Out of the most interesting speculations come the
names of two Hockey Canada directors, Stafford
Smythe and David Molson, who in their spare time
handle the presidencies of the other two Canadian
entries in the NHL. They also have been the most
influential of the directors of the Hockey Canada
organization which disbanded the national team so
quickly. The directors have not given any reasons for the
disbanding of the team, but they certainly did it quickly,
and now the players are free to sign pro contracts with
the NHL teams that drafted them.
With no team, where will the organization go from
here? They are meeting in Toronto this week to decide
their future, and they will undoubtedly be discussing
some of the aims they did not accomplish. Aims, what
aims?
Aims were never met
For an organization that was designed to further
amateur hockey, they have failed to achieve any
reasonable goals. The organization with good faith set
out various goals, and they went so far as to timetable
them. Few, if any of these deadlines have been met so
far, with the major failing coming at the level of
university hockey. Organizers felt that this was the level
at which most of the work in developing a amateur
hockey should be done. Later on, it was proposed, the
program should be extended into the high school level
by providing (1) technical assistance, (2) coaching clinics
and (3) financial support, where necessary.
Another goal set out was to undertake research into
various facets of the game. These were intended to cover
physiological studies, coaching techniques, equipment
research and rink facilities. One of their most important
goals, shaking $2 million from various interested
concerns, doesn't seem to have even got underway yet.
Maybe this is the reason for the lack of success in the
other endeavours.
Since Hockey Canada now has nothing left to
justfy its existence unless they get into college
hockey, the possibility of a national team make up of
college all stars looks good.
Hindmarch feels that the all star team will be
assembled for the 1972 Olympics, and will be based in
Western Canada for political reasons. The decision will
likely be made by the federal government through
Health and Welfare minister John Munro, who is also the
chief official of Hockey Canada. Winnipeg looks to be in
the drivers seat, since the federal authorities in cancelling
the world tournament scheduled for the city cost them
in the order of $500,000 and created bad will for
Hockey Canada and themselves.
Some proposals for college hockey have been put
forth by members of Hockey Canada and include such
highlights as scholarships to promising high school
hockey players to keep them from taking American
university scholarships. It is estimated that sixty
students from B.C. are currently on American hockey
scholarships. This plan will also keep high school
students from giving up their education to play junior
hockey in an obscure Northern Saskatchewan league
where their futures are best, limited.
Father David Bauer, coach of the UBC Olympic
team, has long been an advocate of this approach, and
will carry this theme as a director of Hockey Canada. He
will doubtless be pushing heavily for it at the meeting
this week.
There is no reason why collegiate hockey should not
be well supported. It is probably the best hockey outside
of the professional leagues in Canada, but suffers mainly
from lack of publicity and support.
On the other hand it is far easier for the NHL to
keep tight control of junior leagues, especially in the
east, than the collegiate scene which is under tight, if
archaic, control of the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic
Union.
By dropping the national team, the main route to
the NHL is again junior hockey, and they are the teams
who will benefit the most. On the other hand the junior
level players are not about to benefit from this decision,
but will be trapped by the system again. One protection
the junior player has picked up recently has been the
NHL draft and its age limitation, but he still has to play
where ever he is sent.
Up to now, the NHL has not paid too much
attention to recruiting from the universities. This is
about the change soon, with or without more help, as
there is a wealth of talent there.
College players form team
As for using college hockey players to form a
national team, there are many problems involved. First
of.all there is the recruiting for the team. It is fine to say
you will hold a training camp and invite the 40 or 50
best college players in Canada.
But then what. They stay for a few weeks, then go
back to their home universities and it has all been wasted
unless there is some immediate follow up.
Perhaps the solution lies in a suggestion that the
players picked for any national team be given substantial
scholarships, and distributed amongst the universities in
Canada with hockey programs. This would have the
effect of calling attention to the college hockey, and
would probably get them more press coverage, a sorely
needed necessity.
What UBC will get out of this is a question mark.
For the 1972 Olympic games, they are not likely to
benefit too much. For the 1976 games, who knows.
The most important factor is where the '76 games
are to be held. If they are at Garibaldi as the Canadians
hope they will be, there are several courses of action
open to UBC. Hindmarch has posed one of the more
interesting ones from UBC's point of view. He proposes
that Vancouver host pre-Olympic tournaments in the
two or three years preceding the Olympics and invite B
level teams such as the U.S., Japan, West Germany then
let the UBC Thunderbirds play.
Terry  O'Malley and  Ken Broderick
... piayed for the nationals here.
This would make the Birds the logical core for a
1976 national team, and UBC has proved that they have
the facilities and the men to make a go of it. This of
course is all dependent on Garibaldi getting the
Olympics. And what are the chances of that?
One more thing that Hockey Canada failed in. At
some organizational meeting in the distant past ihey
wrote down some aims and deadlines for accomplishing
them. One of them was to win the 1970 world hockey
championships which they can't do this year. Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23,  1970
Workers should not wait for
a messiah in order to act
By LINDA HOSSIE
"Workers' organizations split hairs among
themselves when their real enemy is their boss,"
said Alex Ferguson, an ex-member of the
Industrial Workers of the World in SUB 211
Tuesday.
The machinery of production has reached
the point now where it should be used for the
whole human race, not just a handful, he said.
Ferguson spoke on the growth of the IWW in
B.C. and stressed the need for man to handle his
own destiny.
"People make history, not great men," he
said. "If you wait for a Messiah, you'll wait a
long time.
"The Russian revolution probably would
have happened without Marx and Lenin," he
said, "It was the conditions that made the
revolution."
Ferguson said he wasn't satisfied with the
condition of the craft unions in Vancouver.
"Trade union bureaucrats" like Ray Haynes
and Paddy Neale sign contracts with the bosses
saying that they won't strike for so long, so
promises of a general strike are bogus he said.
Asked about Hal Banks' involvement in the
Canadian Seaman's Union, Ferguson said "Banks
and his goon squad were brought in by the
Seamen's International Union, the government of
Canada, and Canada's American Federation of
Labour to smash a militant seamen's union."
"Workers of the world unite. You've got
nothing to lose but your chains," he said.
"Just running Canada by Canadians doesn't
mean   too  much.   You've  got   to  change   the
Aggie pancake, apple sale
raises money for charity
The Agriculture Undergraduate Society collected about $750
for charity this week.
AVS president Lome Borgal said that both the pancake sale and
the apple day were successes.
The pancake sale, held Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, raised
$154 which the Aggies turned into the Sun House of Hope.
"The rain held us back on Monday but Tuesday was our big
day," Borgal said. "We could have sold more but the grill was small."
Wednesday's apple day raised close to $600. They sold 29 cases
of apples, the money going to the Kiwanis Crippled Children's Fund.
Alex Ferguson ... change worker's ideology
ideology of the workers. If they believe in
capitalism you've got to change the way they
think," he said.
"American   imperialism   has   moved   into
Canada and gained control of a large sector of,
the economy."
"Personally,  I   don't   care   if   my   boss   is
Canadian or American - he's my enemy."
Ryerson  administration  threatens
to stop  paper's advertisers
TORONTO (CUP) - The chairman of the
board of governors of Ryerson Polytechnical
Institute has threatened to launch libel, action
against the student union here, following the
publication of a satirical article in the January 9
edition of the student newspaper, The Eyeopener.
To drive home its displeasure, the Ryerson
administration also threatened to drive away the
paper's advertisers and refuse to collect student fees
on behalf of the student union.
The story which drew the storm of indignation
was entitled "Chairman Bill on Sodsmanship", and
was credited to Bill Kelly, chairman of the Ryerson
board.
The story linked Kelly's participation in
sod-turning ceremonies with possible political
advantages he might gain as a result of his
participation.
The day after the issue appeared on campus,
Eyeopener editors received a letter from Kelly's
lawyers informing them of possible legal action and
demanding that all available copies of the issue be
turned over to the board's secretary. The Eyeopener
staff refused to comply.
Later the same day (January 10) student
council president Barry Hales met with acting
administration president Tony Wilkinson and board
member David Crombie. The two administrators
were "obviously disturbed." Hales said.
11
The two outlined possible administration
actions over the article: a suit against the students'
union for any libellous articles in the January 9
publication; simultaneous charges for any violations
of the obscenity act found in the same issue; a
campaign to persuade advertisers to withdraw their
support; and, finally, refusal to collect student
union fees..
The campaign to cut off Eyeopener advertising
would cut off all the external aid. Refusal to collect
fees would mean the financial collapse of the
student union.
Refusal to collect student fees has been
attempted on only two other Canadian campuses.
The University of Saskatchewan board
announced December 31, 1968, they would not
collect Regina Campus student union fees unless the
local student council censored the student
newspaper, The Carillon.
The move by the U of S board failed in the face
of prolonged resistance by the entire Regina student
body.
The University of Guelph administration
announced in November, 1969,thatthey would not
collect student union fees this semester if less than
50 per cent of registering students opt for
membership in a voluntary union. The Guelph
announcement followed defeat of a student
referendum calling for a compulsory check-off of
fees.
Large costs in replacing dishes
rr
Food services is able to live within its budget,
working on a system of missed meals, said Ruth
Blair, director of food services.
"If everybody ate every meal, we'd be in
trouble."
Food services receives $1.59 per student
per day in residence, out of which all costs,
labour, utilities, and insurance as well as food are
paid, Blair said.
Problems are wasted food in the dining room
and dishes and cutlery that are removed from dining
rooms.
"It costs about $6000 per year to replace those
dishes and cutlery in the residences," said Blair.
We would like to offer a wider choice of food,
but lack of space and equipment, especially at Fort
Camp, is a problem, she said.
Food services took a survey in the residences in
January to determine food preferences, suggestions
and comments.
"We were quite pleased with replies," said Blair.
"28 to 30 per cent of residents replied to the
survey."
The likes were quite similar and Food services
is trying to please students with the help of the
survey, she said.
Totem Park dietician I. M. Mayrs noted that 70
per cent of her staff is made up of students.
"We listened to all comments on the survey,"
Mayrs said.
TIRED
OF DOING
NOTHING ?
WHY NOT
HELP
OPEN HOUSE '70
Room 230 S.U.B.
"Everyone's A Host For O.H."
± OPERATION ±
T DOORSTEP T
FREE  CHEST X-RAYS
& TB SKIN TESTS
Protect your community,  family  and yourself  from
TB   and   other   ch-est   diseases.
Have your free tests. Volunteers will call at your home
when clinics are in your area.
X-Rays examined by chest specialists of the B.C. Health
Department for: TB, lung cancer, heart abnormalities and
other chest conditions.
CLINICS WILL BE LOCATED AT:
Today, Mon., Tues., Wed., Jan. 23, 26, 27, 28
Student Union Bldg.
Thurs., Jan. 29 — Dalhousie at Allison
Fri., Jan. 30 - S.U.B.
11 A.M.-5 P.M. Each Day
i CHRISTMAS SEALS 31
JFIGHT chest DISEASE J

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