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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1966

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Array No beer
in
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 22
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY,   NOVEMBER   4,   1966
224-3016
'■')\i 4 HrrHf^ -^r
/
Grog legal
in dorms
says lawyer
UBC students have a good legal case for defying
residence liquor regulations, a prominent Vancouver lawyer
said Thursday.
"Provincial  law  states  that |
any  person  over  21   can  con-
—derrick webb photo
RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION spews from paint-bombed engineering president Eric Newell, riding his horde-pulled chariot to victory over red-dyed foresters in Thursday's riotous teacup football  half-time entertainment.
sume alcohol in a private
place," said William Deverell,
executive secretary of the Civil
Liberties Association.
"And a student's room in a
residence constitutes his private abode.''
Accordhig to housing czar
,Malcolm McGregor in a
Ubyssey story Tuesday: "UBC
is a public institution-and must
obey the provincial drinking
laws."
EXPELLED
McGregor also said, "any student caught drinking in UBC
dorms will be expelled."
University regulations state:
"University policy prohibits the
keeping or consumption of
alcoholic beverages in residences" and that students who
do not maintain residence standards "will not ibe permitted to
occupy university accommodation."
Deverell said the regulation
was a "prissy and Boston" sort
of action.
BIG FATHER
"It is a dangerous thing for
the university to try to maintain a Big Father image and to
organize and direct student
morality.''
"A student over 21 would
have a very good legal case in
defending his right to defy this
regulation," the lawyer said.
If students want the support
of the Civil Liberties Association, they can bring the matter
before the association's board of
directors, Deverell promised.
MacGregor's expulsion threat
DEVERELL
. . . good case
came in response to a story in
last Friday's Ubyssey that
drinking was now allowed in
dorms of Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., a private Catholic college.
ESTABLISHED
The university policy has
been in effect for as long as
James 'Banham, university information officer can remember.
"It's a long established regulation," Banham said.
Dr. James G. Foulks, pharmacology department head ,and
a memiber of the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association said the
rules are a definite infringement on the student's civil
liberties but he was not sure
of their legal rights in the
matter.
"Students have a good argument on the basis of student
maturity, aside from any legal
considerations," Dr. Foulkes
said.
ON  THE  BED'   COST  COMMITTEE  $500
Sexy Brock painting turns on students
By BONI LEE
Ubyssey Scandal Reporter
A man and woman were
seen making love fully clothed on a couch in Brock lounge
Thursday.
Unsuspecting students reacted strongly to the act.
Greta Rasmunssen, arts 1,
commented: "It's really moving. They really look like
they're having a good time."
MJurray Dingman, arts 1,
sard: "I think it'll bring the
crowds."
A first year arts student
thought    the   spectacle   was
very   colorful   and   brightened up Brock lounge.
"I think it's good; it's raw.
There should be more of it,"
said Bab Fitzpatrick, arts 2.
Actually the scene seen was
Greg Curnoe's modernistic
"On The Bed."
It depicts a man and woman making passionate love
fully clothed on a couch.
The $500 painting was purchased toy the Brock art committee in 1965.
The painting was mounted
today with the title: "This is
a painting of a man and a
woman embracing. The main
colors used are: ultra white,
bright yellow, geranium lake,
and ivory (black."
A Brock art committee
member commented: "The
public need not be unduly
alarmed. After all ,the only
obscene thing about this painting is the fact that the fornicators are clothed."
TEACUP FUN
see page two
Man and woman embracing. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  4,   1966
ALL FOR A TEACUP
Reds win chariot war
Mad, mad, mad, stark raving crimson mad.
That was UBC stadium
Thursday, as nurses played
home ec in the annual teacup
game. A mob of fans, dissenters, and others stumbled excitedly to benches, railings,
rooftops and spare knees as
the stadium jammed to 7,000.
Nurses at the gates, wearing pink and white stripes,
collected $1,757.73 for the
Crippled Children's Fund.
"We are, we are, we are,"
chanted the dainty cheerleaders, suspiciously clad in
red sweaters, balloons and
thigh high skirts.
We are, we are, we are the
. . . nurses?" they continued
lamely.
The offensive nurses kicked off the first half, and
bumbled aimlessly about the
field until Quita Beraley
scored a touchdown.
Then home economics quar-
t e r b a c k , 5-foot, 103-pound
Carol Spradey, scored for 6-6
at half time.
Chaos  exploded  into  near
Liberals out;
mock house
maybe no go
Model parliament may not
be.
Parliamentary council decided Thursday to postpone decision on whether it will go
forward following a Liberal
club wtihdrawal from the
parliament Tuesday.
Conservative, New Democratic and Social Credit leaders said they will return to
their individual clubs for a decision on future model parliament policy.
A final decision is expected
early next week.
Fall Campus
CORDUROY
SPORT
JACKETS
REDUCED TO
$1995
3   Button   Style
Take advantage of this
Manufacturers    Clearance
by
UNITED  TAILORS
BRITISH    WOOLLENS
549 Granville      MU 1-4649
riot as red engineers and
green foresters began the
man-drawn  chariot race.
Bathed in red dye and
liquid manure, the 35-man
squads battled around the
oval with early leaders engineering winning.
Both teams were pelted
with    eggs,   applecores    and
lunchbags from the stands,
but a 100-man engineer-forester police squad kept
everyone but the charioteers
off the track.
Final score of the football
game was by homewrecker
Judy Insley after a 43-yard
run, to win the golden teacup 12 to 6.
Arts pres. Wise
charged ineligible
Arts president Don Wise, arts 6, appears before student
court today charged with being academically ineligible to
hold Alma Mater Society office.
Wise cannot hold the office
because   he   is   not   an   arts
under graduate.
He is registered in arts 6.
Student court counsel Mike
Coleman, law 3, will prosecute
the case in hut G-l at noon.
Asked how he felt about the
change, Wise answered: "I'm
choked up. I'm going for a
cardiogram to see if I can
stand it."
He said the case will set a
precedent and after this AMS
eligibility will be taken seriously. But he said when he
goes the AUS organization will
go.
Guido Botto, AUS executive
member, said Thursday the
whole case is petty and ludicrous.
"If Don  should   be   consid-
Are Today's Filter-Tip
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How "safe" is the cigarette you
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and nicotine is in the smoke
you inhale into your lungs? For
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tar and nicotine in cigarettes
can be dangerous to health
and can cause deadly lung cancer. Now, U.S. cigarette manufacturers must label packages
with a caution warning. But,
when you buy Canadian cigarettes there is no way of knowing how much tar and nicotine
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Reader's Digest features a factual, new laboratory report
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that in some cases the smoke
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The latest, strange developments provoked by the U.S.
ruling requiring warning labels
on cigarette packages, are also
reported in this interesting article. This Reader's Digest article will be talked about
from Coast to Coast — every
Canadian who smokes cigarettes should read it. It's in
November Reader's Digest—on
newsstands now.
LAURENCE
OLIVIER
OTHELLO
TECHNICOLOR* MUMMSKMI
The Greatest Othello Ever by the Greatest Actor of Our Time.
SATURDAY, 2 P.M. yMffl6
\ve.
ered   in   this   light   why   not
other AMS members?"
He said if Wise is thrown
out he will resign because "I
can't stand those bloody bourgeois snobs."
Theatre casting
frustrated ferns
A sex-starved wife, a
proud beggar, and a disreputable monk are needed
in the old Freddy Wood.
Casting for the three-act
play iRed Magic continues
all week in the old theatre,
across from Ponderosa cafeteria.
Interested students are
asked to go to the theatre's
Green Room between 1:30
and 4:30 p.m.
UFO sighted over Atlantic
'Could be UBC's moralman
Ubyssey cartoonist Arnold Saba, now staffing the
overseas news bureau located somewhere between
Germany and the French Riviera, Thursday reported
a mysterious flying object heading for the Atlantic.
"It might be moralman returning to UBC campus,"
Saba's hurried dispatch said.
He said he would check if he had time.
Moralman last year appeared occasionally in The
Ubyssey to right moral wrongs and indignations of all
shapes and sizes.
See page four today.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—derrek webb photo
PSSST, SHE USES a man's deodorant says one home-
wrecker to another as they attempt to bring down a
charging bedpanner during Thursday's teacup game.
'We won't be policemen
say Lower Mall dons
All four lower mall women's
dons say they are through
with being policemen.
"We feel dons can't do their
real jobs as friends and counselors to the girls when they
must act as policemen in
charge of late-leaves," said
Mrs. E. J. Summerfield, don
of Phyllis Ross house.
The dons and resident fellows of the four lower mall
residences at a meeting two
weeks ago resolved that any
girl old enough for UBC
should be able to regulate her
own life, she said.
"The dons thought some
girls  weren't  ready  for  com
plete freedom, but they agreed
that it was the best way to
learn   responsibility."
Sunday their proposals met
a wall of indifference when
put to housing czar Malcolm
McGregor and supervisor of
women Miss . Lorna Makepeace.
Dons in many other residences approved of the present system.
"I have no complaints, the
system is quite lenient," said
Ann Winter, don of Ann Wesbrook  house.
One don who refused to give
her name, said the decision of
the authorities was fair and
generous,  and  that it was  ir-
Paper protests lock-up
southern camp co-eds
SAN JOSE, CALIF. (PSP) — Curfew lock-outs of
female students at the San Jose State College residences
have been attacked by the campus newspaper, the Spartan
Daily.
"A college coed must determine her own behaviour and
set her own standards — including when to return to her
lviing group" a front page editorial in the newspaper said.
All women students under
21 at the college must live in
Co-ed chases phantom kilt;
finds evidence on fence
A six-foot physical education co-ed Thursday chased a
man wearing a kilt and a
white T-shirt over a construction site fence.
Sarah Burns, p.e. 2, said
she recognized the man from
a description in Thursday's
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey story said
Winona Ford, sc. 3, was grabbed by the bottom in B-lot by
a man in a kilt and a soiled
T-shirt.
She said when the man
squeezed her he yelled: "Yummy."
"I read about the terrible
attack, so when I saw the
man I took after him fast,"
Miss Burns, a track and discuss major, said.
Miss Burns,, who is exactly
six feet tall, said she saw the
man   sitting  on   grass   outide
Aggies choked;
pubsters win race
By RON  SIMMER
Ubyssey Pubsters out-chug-a.-lugged all comers in  the
annual boat race at the tea-cup game half time.
Guzzling   Andres   crackling
vin rose, Ubyssey staffers
easily defeated challenging
aggies Thursday noon, proving again they are the biggest
mouths and fastest arms on
campus.
Four of the hairy red hoard
vanquished a forestry team in
the preliminary Ibeer-bouts,
which were slowed up when
it was discovered engineers
had forgotten the bottle-openers.
Official boat-race judge
Frank Gnup declared the first
engineer-aggie bout no contest
when the hairy red ones spilled most of their ibeer in their
beards.
In a re-run, Aggies won
hands down over the sodden
slip-stickers.
Finally, in an atmosphere of
rotten eggs, aggie muck, and
liquid manure, Pubsters chug-
a-lugged to a glorious victory
over the aggie team, using
Canadian champagne.
A bystander thought he
heard Frank Gnup question the
contest, but the doubter was
later identified as a malcontent engineer.
Already winners for general
excellence i n journalism,
Ubyssey staffers proved again
they are the finest in everything.
Look, look
METROPOLIS (UNS) — A
blue and red form was sighted
flying madiy over the city
today.
the ceremonies office building.
"He was reading The Ubyssey and seemed to be snickering," the discus thrower said.
"I came at him and he
squealed — it sounded like
'yeep'."
She chased the barefoot
man east towards the new
forestry-agriculture building
where he climibed the construction fence.
"He caught his kilt on a
nail on the fenc and ripped
a piece of it," she said. "I got
the cloth and handed it over
to the authorities."
Authorities today refused to
allow a Ubyssey reporter-
photographer team to view the
piece of kilt.
"It's an important clue and
we have to study it," one said.
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approved housing unless
parental permission is obtained for other accommodations.
Approximately 4,000 of the
20,000 students are bound by
a lockout curfew of 11 p.m.
on week night and 2 a.m. on
weekends.
Jim Bailey, staff writer for
the newspaper said: "We are
not just creating an issue —
we feel something can be done
about the situation."
responsible for a don to take
the job and then criticize the
system.
Most other dons would not
comment on the lower mall
proposals.
Residence girls had mixed
reactions.
"My parents trusted me —
I could come and go any time
of the day or night," said one
girl interviewed while necking
in the foyer of Isabel Maclnnes
with her boyfriend.
"The system of graduated
times is foolish," she said.
"Anyone can get around the
rules and stay out all night if
they want to."
Joan Campbell of Ann Wesbrook thought girls had more
freedom at UBC than at
home, and that there were
much fewer restrictions at
UBC than at other campuses.
"I find it amusing that boys
have complete freedom as
soon as they get here," said
Moya Cavanagh of Hamber
house, criticizing the double
standard.
Curfew times for women are
II p.m. Monday to Thursday.
But they can sign for 2 a.m.
late leaves any week night.
Curfew is midnight Friday
to Sunday.
First year students are allowed two late leaves — until
4 a.m. — a year, and four 3
a.m.'s.
Girls over 21 and third and
fourth year students are allowed unlimited 4 a.m's.
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British Columbia's Leading Travel Organization
REPRESENTING AMERICAN EXPRESS IK UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
NOVEMBER 4, 1966
Motherhood
Loath as we are to sob over motherhood issues like
freedom of the press, watching it being stomped into the
ground by the journalism department at Vancouver City
College unnerves us.
Gerald do Boer, editor of the VCC Savant, admits
he has no final say in editorial policy.
Instead., journalism instructor Mrs. Joanne Stemo
claims the sole right to decide if student submissions
are suitable for publication.
For VCC students trying to make the place a
college and not. just two extra years of high school,
Mrs. Stemo's priggish chirp is the last folio.
A few other newspapers still submit copy for administration approval — including Moscow's Pravda and
Madrid's  ABC.
But governmental censorship — even when the
government is kindly Mrs. Stemo — grinds the Canadian journalistic grain.
VCC journalism students who actually want to
become newspapermen will only succeed by abandoning
their present administration pimp sheet. Maybe the
course should be abandoned too, since we haven't seen
a.ny Vancouver newspapers fighting to hire last year's
graduates.
That solution requires VCC students to form their
own paper backed by money they control; now, the
whole activity budget is thoroughly pawed and watched
over by the college administration before students get
near it.
Although there is no reason to doubt the benevolence
of the Vancouver school board, VCC's students — aged
19 to 25 and up — must be old enough to handle it
themselves.
If the adminstration won't let them do it officially
perhaps UBC's student regime, which is autonomous
if nothing else could provide the aid and advice to do
it unofficially.
What mace?
There are strong parallels between the UBC Liberal club's sneak out of mock parliament and the current
scene  in  Ottawa.
But, like all Canadian politics: the parallels cross
and skew and come up confusion.
Campus Liberals correctly decry mock parliament
for bickering and farcical discussion. But then the grits
opt out of a bad situation which they, as the government
in recent years,  are mostly responsible for.
The federal liberals are unable to see the same kind
of inane debate in the house of commons, and although
no party member talks of pulling out, they're not doing
anything to improve Canadian government.
Model parliament deserves the lousy reputation its
got, but it does provide a few days laughter in a dull
week.
For the rest of it, parliamentary council's activities
show as much imagination as the Liberals do when they
advocate dreary forums and drowsy seminars in lieu
Df the play parliament yuk.
The moist alarming part of the parallel is neither
the federal nor the campus debate gets any better, and
our main fear is what happens when the current
university crop hits parliament hill.
Maybe Aristotle's philosopher kings weren't such a
bad idea after all.
23-skid oo
UBC students seemed too cynical to give anything
the old college try until we saw Thursday's chariot race.
We take it all back.
Rah rah is possible because it happened. Nobody
threw acid, nobody got hurt, and the chariot drag
itself — formerly a 200-man bloodbath ending in yearlong animosity—became the friendly, if a bit unsanitary,
contest it ought to be.
To the dyed engineers, dung covered foresters, dis-
sheveled nurses, tea-bagged home economists and out-
chug-a.-lugged aggies, a rousing rah.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Paper  caper
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Said the wicked young ladies
of Ross;
"We grieve not for our
purity's loss.
But the signing of paper
Before every caper
Is enough to make anyone
cross."
J. E. G. WH1TEHORNE
grad. studies
'Gross nonsense
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Your Thursday story and
subsequent editorial is gross
nonsense.
Let us get the facts straight.
I soap-boxed on Wednesday
afternoon to warn students
about the real possibility of
another fee hike.
I also suggested that the
way the financial arrangements are in B.C. the students would be forced to oppose the university administration and not the provincial government.
This, I said, was bad. Our
action should be directed
against the provincial government to prevent a fee increase, I said.
Furthermore, I never suggested that the Students for
a Democratic University committee would plan a strike.
I simply said one of the alternatives facing students, if
something is not done first, is
the possibility of a strike.
The committee has not
made any policy recommendations because it has not
met yet. I hope some students
will be concerned about the
problems facing all of us, and
will meet tonight at Carolyn
Tate's house at 9:30 p.m. to
discuss specific action programs.
And, for your information,
one of the recommendations
I would make, as would
others on the committee, is a
mass lobby of the provincial
government in January. It
doesn't take much political
genius to see the need for
that.
Hopefully, in future I will
not be quoted as speaking for
a group that hasn't met.
Where you have SDU in
your news story, you should
have said students. I spoke
about what I personally felt
all students will be faced with
if we do not act soon.
CHARLIE BOYLAN
first vice-president AMS
'Sensationalism'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Tuesday's front page story
on late-leaves in residence is
yet another example of The
Ubyssey's asinine sensationalism.
You say, "First year students are alowed two late-
leaves—until 4 a.m.—a year,
and four three o'clocks."
"However, you don't mention that any girl in residence
can have a two o'clock leave
any night (except Sunday)
she desires, simply by signing a late-leave sheet.
True, this does produce
paper-work for the resident
fellows, but women's residences are certainly not the
police states you would have
people believe. In fact, the
majority   of   girls   have   far
more freedom in residence
than they would living at
home, and some have more
than they know how to
handle.
This is the second year I
have stayed at Fort Camp,
and another thing which
bothers me immensely is
your constant derision of Fort
and its living conditions.
If you interviewed a typical resident you would find
far less dissatisfaction with
our home than the disproportionate dissasisfaction that
seems to characterize the typical Ubyssey reporter.
It appears all the clamor
about our substandard meals
and general discomfort comes
from pseudocrusaders who
not only do not live in Fort,
but who wouldn't know a
Fort hut, room, or meal were
it stuck up their collective
behinds.
INGA FRIDRIKSSON
Anne Wesbrook Hall
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing          Richard Blair
News       Carol Wilson
City .-    Danny Stoffman
Photo           Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  ._         Claudia Gwinn
Focus      Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News     Pat Hrushowy
CUP     Bert Hill
Ass't Photo    -           Dennis Gans
Appleby, Hroosh, Blair, and
Big Al boat raced, humiliating
aggies. Addict reporter Norman
Gidney, Chinaphile Boni Lee,
Murray McMillan, Mary Ussner,
Bo Hansen, Cook Hrushoway, Val
Zuker, Charlotte Haire, Ron Simmer, and old Irving Fetish made
news. So did Sue Gransby, the
sport.
Cameroids were Kurt Hilger,
Derrek Webb, Don Kydd, Chris
Blake, Al Harvey and the new
leaf.
tfORALKAN
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... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
SFA debates the issue
NOV. 4, 1966
ON THE COVER: Hitting
a high note during construction of the music
building. Photo hi-jack by
Al Harvey.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants:  judy  bing
sue richter
photo: al .harvey
Gnaw
The mishmash over the
new arts program seems
to have settled into the
archives to be forgotten. It has been at least
a month since the plan
was presented for student  consideration.
But before the crawly
bugs gnaw holes in the
proposal lets give it some
second  thoughts.
The subject of free
university is also becoming a major concern. Is
it possible that they
could profit from one
another.
Recently one of our
staff visited the free
university i n Seattle.
The first impression was
favorable.
Classes discuss everything from photography
to the history of the
negro in America. These
classes are free exchanges between the students and the lecturer.
The lecturers incident-
ly are both professors
and laymen or professionals from the given
field. Negro history is
therefore given by a
negro civil rights worker
etc.
Thus the student is
exposed t o something
other than the views of
someone who has studied to a degree on that
topic from someone else
who studied to a degree
and so on.
If the isolation of university is tended toward
narrowness lets go outside into the world or
bring the world inside.
It is argued that the
average freshman mind
is not capable of coping
with this type of verbal
exchange.
But to our way of
thinking this is the time
when the mind is ripe to
such equality . . . when
it still possesses the exuberance and imagination
of youth . . . before the
academic machine tramples  it  into  inadequacy.
Could this be the new
arts concept?
pf 2wo
Open letter to the UBC Debating Union
It is with sincere regret that we
must turn down your kind invitation
to participate in the UBC Debating
Conference Nov. 18 and 19.
Of course, we must elaborate on this
refusal as we owe it to you as well as
to our own student body at SFA.
Your closing sentence expresses the
hope that we shall seek active membership. Our own sentiments are not
adverse to this offer. Yet, we cannot
join you.
It is not that we would not have
delegates nor is it that we are too
aloof on this mountain of ours. The
matter is far more serious.
We believe that you would not object if we define a discussion as an
exchange of opinions and thoughts in
general. And it is easy to understand
that a debate ensues when there is a
point of disharmony.
Each participant then desires to
clarify his ideas as adequately as the
other person's thinking demands, pursuing the goal of convincing the other
to be of a similar persuasion. This
enterprise may or may not attain a
, fruitful conclusion.
Providing that you have concurred
with this generalization, we may comment "so far so good". But here our
agreements are abruptly breeched. The
rules governing the conference separate
us. They separate us because we have
different ideas.
We have certain convictions regarding the role of a debating society, the
role of a debator in such a society, and
our audience. To be with you on those
two days in November would mean that
we  have  discarded these  convictions,
that we have erased them from our
minds so they will not haunt us during
and after those November days.
If we are to be coerced to state our
conflict, we ask of debating whether
it is to be oratory or service. As to
our answer, we opt for the latter:
service.
It is a matter of concern to us that
we cannot speak with similar sureness
of your stand. All indications are that
you disagree.
The indications are that you are playing. The indications are that you are
insincere.
The rules are clear but unacceptable.
We cannot engage in a debate on a
vital issue with our debators' position
chosen at random, as the regulations
specify.
It cannot be denied that you have
had speakers who could not speak the
truth as they wished owing to this
method of appointment. There is no
guarantee that this will not be repeated.
We do not speak on the basis of a
misunderstanding when we say that
you have had speakers who stood before their audience with heavy hearts
for they have stoned the truth.
For the brief time permitted the
speakers improbity was in the air. We
cannot bring ourselves to ask our fellows to do this. We respect them too
much.
Let this be clear: we deny a freedom
to this game, which is what you have
made of an important social function.
Your young men and women are left
with a meagre choice: hypocrisy or
defeat.
To pass an act of insincerity over to
an audience they must engage in
rhetoric and oratorical quiddities, or
lose the match.
So they fool their listeners, so they
are traitors, so they are winners, so
they are applauded.
Our concern lies elsewhere.
You know our choice.
Service is a nice word, isn't it? And
particularly so since we earnestly intend it.
We wish to debate and we wish to
have as relevant a topic as the one
you set forth, but our speakers will
speak their own ideas and not with
borrowed voices. Their stand ,._ a
dispute will be the product of tie dialectics of circumstance.
Their task will not be to win, but
to articulate a coherent series of
opinions that will prove to be of benefit to the audience.
The debating society of this university will endeavour to clarify and pass
on to the student the method and
totality of cogent analyses of matters
of interest, recognizing the intricacy
and difficulty of attempts to make
sense of this world.
The SFA student-faculty Academic
Activities Committee, of which the debating society is a branch, has been
set up in direct response to this.
Let us emphasize that words of accusation came hesitantly to our lips,
after much deliberation. Nevertheless,
we believe that we are acting correctly
in giving public utterance to our views.
We trust that this letter will be received in  good faith, to  parallel our
own, by your membership.
ALEXANDER E. BANDY
SFA Academic Activities Committee
Our Father who aren't in heaven
By LORNA TOWERS
The Sun (Oct. 31, 1966)
printed a precis on Rector
Jim McKibbon's address to
some 65 UBC students at
St. Anslem's Anglican
Church. The Rector quoted
extensively from the Gospel
of Christian Atheism toy
Anglican Prof. T. J. J. Al-
tizer, asserting that the
death of God is a socological
fact, a psychological experience and a theological proclamation.
It is not surprising that
he comes up with this viewpoint. Had he freely used
the Bible, he'd have arrived
at the same conclusion.
Most of the world agrees
but most of the world is not
Christian, and 80 per cent
of so-called Christianity
does not know Jesus Christ.
Behind the Rector stands
a solid, almost impregnable
wall of rebellion against
God.
I am tempted to ask this
Rector if he is a Christian.
Does he, for instance believe
that Jesus Christ is THE
Son of God? Divine?
It is only by personal acceptance of Jesus Christ as
Saviour ("for the Son of
Man is come to seek and to
save that which was lost"—
Luke 19:10) that he has any
right to call himself a
Christian.
Positive life is also in the
believer. It must take a
dead man to proclaim a
dead God.
I am forced to the conclusion that a man. who
knows not God, knows not
Jesus Christ, and that to
deny the existence, importance, need of God, is to deny
Jesus Christ.
That's why I ask the
Rector if he is a Christian,
and challenge all the God-
is-dead exhibitionists to repudiate Christ, not just God,
for   Jesus    Christ   claimed
parity with God. They are
inseparable.
I would say to those 65
and other seeking yet uncommitted students — if
you earnestly seek God, repair to the Bible, you'll
find Him there.
You'll find love that will
shake you to the very
depths of your soul. You'll
sight Calvary and the empty
tomb, and you'll know that
Jesus Christ did what He
said He'd come to do — to
give His life a ransom for
many. And you'll know as
a glorious reality that He
lives with God, right now.
- -. .«m*%* '»«.<'- mw^ti' ■ ** wmsh - - 3<%j^:<<z?<m::-6* *rr,
Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  4,   1966 Candida warms up
By KEN LIVINGSTONE
What does one do with
Shaw when the baribed wit
and caustic satire that make
up a large part of the author's dramatic arsenal are
conspicous only toy their absence, when in fact, the
playwright himself tells us
that this is a pleasant play?
Of course, we say, he is talking tongue in cheek to some
degree, tout in the case of
Candida, which the Playhouse Theatre chose to open
its new season, this is not the
case.
In fact a program note by
the director, William Davis,
describes it as, "a truly positive humanist play."
The answer then and this
seems to toe the approach
taken by Mr. Davis, is to emphasize the play's genuine
humanity and to this end the
Playhouse is fortunate to
have Francis Hyland as Candida. If the production seems
sluggish and static in the
first act, warms towards the
end of the second and only
really succeeds in the third
act confrontation, it is precisely because it is not until
then that Candida takes control.
Miss Hyland succeeds in
maintaining a delicate balance   between   matronly
warmth and strong willed independence without allowing Candida to become the
self satisified ibitoh that she
so easily might.
Peter Haworth is a suitably smug and vulnerable
Morrell and Ted Greenhalgh
would make a fine Burgess if
he were a little less conscious of Shaw's tortuous cockney dialect. As Marchibanks,
the poet with a toleeding heart
Hutchinson 'Shandro, is convincingly tormented, but a
little less limp-wristed anguish might have resulted in
a character whose motivations were more poetic than
petulant.
Daphne Goldrick is genuinely funny as Prossy without having to work at it
quite as hard as Pat Rose
who, as Lexy, in his first
role as a permanent member
of the Playhouse Company
suffers from unfortunate
casting.
Charles Evans' set is faithful to Shaw's description and
creates an effective mood except for the disconcerting use
of obviously painted furniture at the downstage corners.
Candida provides an enjoyable evening's entertainment
and is worth a trip to the
Playhouse for the bonus of
Miss Hyland's performance.
Angels
wheel
along
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Time magazine, with its
usual critical acumen, remarked that The Wild Angels did not give an accurate
picture of its subject, and
that the film was thus a failure—which must be about
the stupidest thing that
Time has done this year.
Of course it's not accurate!
This isn't documentary —
that's already been done by
Kenneth Anger. This is Roger Corman, the master of
the horror film, weaving
another of his fables, a
twentieth century neo-
Gothic extravaganza, in the
toest Horace Walpole and Edgar Allan Poe manner.
The more absurd the plot
gets (as in the funeral orgy,
with the corpse exhumed to
smoke a reefer and the
widow raped behind the altar) the more the film is true
to its own artistic integrity.
The film's serious comment, must thus be channelled through the form. It
cannot come directly. To
quote a latter-day Mohammed, "The medium IS the
message."
Corman delights in the
Gothic, the Baroque — it is
what makes his horror films
stand out from the mass. Applied to war, it produced
that electric masterpiece,
The Secret Invasion. Here it
takes the motor-cycle Hell's
Angels mystique, an almost
ideal subject, and produces
a fascinating exercise in the
grotesque.
The film's major fault is
that it doesn't take the mystique quite seriously enough;
it shares to too great an extent its characters' inarticulateness about the forces
they are dealing with. And
even if it feels compelled to
have its hero confess the inadequacy of the movement's
philosophy, at least it does
not accept any of society's
alternatives.
Blues is left at the end
with nothing to say and nowhere to go.
The final image of him,
left alone to fill his friend's
grave, is only one of many
which, as with all Corman's
films, stick in the mind long
after the lights come on and
you light your first cigarette.
The Wild Angels is, in its
own individual way, one of
the major films of the year.
If you missed it first time
around, be sure to wheel
your bike along to the second run.
. '*v^'S*rt«S$<'' '
\ss - ft:v>
Canadian Premiere
A Play in 3 Acts at the
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
THEATRE  UBC
Nov. 2 to 5    Nov. 3
8:30 12:30
ADULTS    STUDENTS
1.00 75
Tickets at the door
or
BOX OFFICE Rm. 207
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
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Friday,   November   4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 SPECIAL
EVENTS
PRESENTS
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT
TUESDAY, NOV. 8th - 8:30 P.M.
THE AUDITORIUM
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
Tickets now available Vancouver Ticket Centre Ltd., 630
Hamilton Street, Vancouver 3, British Columbia. General
Admission $2.50, Students only $1.50.
Like to look "different" yet stay in style? Of
course you do — that's why the Double-
Breasted Blazer is the answer. It shows solid
good taste. Goes perfectly with the new
paterned   slacks  and   bright  shirts.      $49.50
Sip (Say. Slain* £lpp
FOR YOUNG MEN
550 GRANVILLE   MU 1-7*14
Keep  China yellow
By GABOR MATE
Critics of American foreign policy are
often confronted with several arguments
which, although they do not relate directly to
the criticisms, serve nevertheless to confuse
the debate and to prevent discussion of the
real problems.
I am referring to those arguments which
deal not with what the critics of American
policy have to say, but which attempt to
shift grounds of the debate elsewhere. Of the
many arguments which belong in this category, two come most readily to mind.
"If you don't like what our society is
doing, why don't you go live somewhere
else? If you disagree with America's policy
towards China, for example, why don't you
go live in China?" This argument, though
posed very often, has a number of obvious
defects.
To begin, there are those critics of American policy who are also critical of the Chinese government. These people would have
to find a neutral habitat. But since no government is perfect, everywhere they went
they would have criticisms to make, and
would then be invited to move on.
Clearly, they might as well stay where
they are.
More seriously, even if one considers
Chinese policy more correct and less dangerous to peace than American (which at this
time it definitely is), one does not automatically become a Communist, and even less
easily does one become Chinese. There is
little point, therefore, in suggesting that the
critic spend the rest of his life in Communist
China.
At some time or other most people find
themselves in a dissenting minority, whether
the issue he American foreign policy, fluoridation, or Sunday blue laws. If these minorities   migrated every   time,   our   population
would be reduced drastically. Or would anyone seriously suggest that those people who
favor fluoridation should move elsewhere
merely because Vancouver does not yet have
fluoridation?
The right to dissent loses its meaning if,
having voiced dissent, people are asked to
move to places where their opinions might
be more welcome.
Finally, there is a question of ethics. Ii
you feel your society is pursuing a wrong
course, is it not better to stay and attempt
to dissuade the majority than to flee to safer
climates?
It would be highly desirable that China
and Canada increase the number of exchange
visits, but permanent residence in China
would greatly reduce one's effectiveness as
a conscientious critics of our society.
"If you were in Hanoi or Peking you would
not be allowed to voice your dissent." This
is asking someone to shut up in the name of
freedom.
What this argument says about Peking
and Hanoi may or may not be true, but is
in either case quite irrelevant. One can hard-1
ly be expected to silence himself voluntarily
simply because elsewhere he may be silenced
by force.
What these two arguments have in com'
mon is that they both evade the actual problems to be faced. Either America is right
in Viet Nam, or it is not. Either China has
aggressive policies, or she doesn't. Either
what the Western press reports about China
is basically correct, or it is not. Either the
Johnson administration has lied about the
true facts of America's involvement in Southeast Asia, or it has not.
To say that the discussion of these questions would not be permitted elsewhere, or
that those who persist in discussing them
should shut up or get out says nothing about
the questibns themselves.
People who seek to prove on a factual
basis that the U.S. is pursuing a correct and
necessary policy may be wrong, and in this
writer's opinion they are very wrong, but at
least they address themselves to the basic
issues.
Consequently they are the only ones who
should be treated seriously by opponents of
America's actions.
China Teach In
TODAY 12:30-Auditorium
David Crook who has been teaching in China since 1947 discusses "The
Cultural Revolution".
TONIGHT 8:00 p.m. - Totem Park Lounge
EYE-WITNESS ON CHINA
Visitors' impressions of China presented through a panel involving Rene
Goldman, Clive Ansley, David Crook and Gene Craven.
SAT. 9:30 a.m. - Totem Park Lounge
AMERICA AND ASIA
Professors Holsti, Holland and Brown in a round-table discussion of relations between two continents and the bearing of American foreign policy
on those relations.
SAT. 2:00 p.m. - Totem Park Lounge
THE CONTINUING REVOLUTION IN CHINA
David Crook, Paul Ivory and Rene Goldman present views on the current
upheavals in China and the long-range policies of her leaders.
Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 4,  1966 nUM^^^^K^M^^n^HIM^
Prof vanishes
By NANCY CORBETT
The Vanishing Professor: A university play in four acts
with the leading character increasingly absent.
Roles of leading character: teacher, advisor, fellow
scholar, friend, and fellow supporter of non-academic ideals.
Teacher: 1st year—It is, of course, impossible for me
to see so many students in my office, so I will see none. It is
also impossible for me to mark personally your essays and
exams. Please do not interrupt lectures with questions. Type
them out and hand them in. I will try to deal with them
sometime. Go to the library.
2nd year: Ditto.
3rd year: There will be a five-minute question period at
the end of each Friday's class. Please do not interrupt the
lectures with questions.
4th year: Ditto.
Advisor: 1st year—Go to the counselling service.
2nd year: I don't know.
3rd year: I don't know.
4th year: I don't know, tout take your grad studies somewhere else.
Fellow scholar: 1st year—The reason I specifically asked
you not to come to my office is that I'm engaged in my own
research. Go away.
2nd year: Ditto.
3rd year: Ditto.
4th year: Ditto.
Friend: All years—He might be. Nobody knows.
Fellow supporter of non-academic ideals: All years—I
agree with you, of course, (with reservations) but I am personally, 1) unable, 2) too busy, 3) not convinced that working with students is effective or feasible.
or
this is not, 1) the time, 2) the place, 3) the person.
or
what about, 1) the Indians in Canada, 2) the Russians in
Hungary, 3) the bar in SUB? In any case, I can do nothing
until, 1) I finish my book, 2) a new president is appointed
or 3) any other reason whatsoever.
The above is unfair to, 1) a tiny minority of super-profs,
2) the hardworking comimttee on Arts 1, 3) Malcolm MacGregor.
Red Magician cast
sexy spell, at Studio
By JUDY BING
Michel de Ghelderode believed that life is magic.
But it is not a contest between   the   polarized   moral
forces  of  black magic and
white magic.
Life is red magic.
"Red Magic" is the first
play whose direction, is accepted as partial fulfillment
of the requirements for a
masters degrees in theatre
at UBC, and its director
Michael Irwin has mastered
Ghelderode's idiom well.
Set in medieval Flanders,
it is the story of the wealthy
Hieronymous Dermot Hen-
nelly who is so avaricious
he eats imaginary food and
shows his wife a picture of
fish and fruit to satisfy her
hunger pangs.
He has a chest of gold
coins and his fondest dream
is that they will multiply
through impregnation of the
coins engraved with female
heads by the coins with
male  heads.
Armador plots with the
beggar Romulus, played to
wicked perfection by Brian
Paisley looking like a lecherous satyr, Sybilla, Hier-
onymous's frustrated virgin
wife, voluptuously played
by Elizabeth Murphy, and
the fat monk, John Johnston, the most hilarious character in the play.
Death persists in Ghelderode's plays. He looked on
the inevitability of death,
his translator George Haug-
ner tells us, neither as a
grim terror nor as a happy
release but as an intriguing
fact. "Death? An adventure!"  he   once remarked.
Death catches up with the
plotters. Mortality mocks
materialism for no amount
of wealth can buy time.
Ghelderode embraced the
mysterious and the demonic. He doesn't pass moral
judgments on his characters.
His chief fault is that he
allows mystery to degenerate into obscurity.
His choice of which characters to kill and which ones
to let live has no rationale.
Red Magic is erotic, often
to the point of brutality.
It abounds in images of
copulation. Penny Wolver-
ton's stage design is praiseworthy for its correspondingly mellow and physical
stage design, and the use of
sensuous velvets for costuming.
Red Magic continues to
cast its spell tonight and
Saturday at Freddy Wood
Studio, next to the Ponderosa,
showing once more that it is
possible to produce good
theatre on campus without
the usual heavy reliance on
professionals.
pf 5ive
This weekend don't be left out . . . join the crowd
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring the dynamic Bud Currie
Friday and Saturday Night at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024 Davie
Dancing from   10:00 until   1:00 a.m.
"The Place With the Dancing Lights"
Admission only $1.50
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Practically every major city has one.
The Timken Company has three products: Bearings, Steel, Rock Bits.
Uses for these products number in growing thousands. And there is always
something new stirring.
CANADIAN TIMKEN, LIMITED, St. Thomas, Ontario, is part of this
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If you're interested in learning more about our Company and the challenging
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Tuesday, November 29th
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Friday,   November  4,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9 QUAKER MEETING FOR WORSHIP
SUNDAYS  11   A.M.
FRIENDS' HOUSE, 535 W. 10th AVE.
Visitors Welcome
SUZUKI
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PROCTER
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CAREERS  IN
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A career in business management can offer you unsurpassed opportunities for personal
achievement, responsibility and growth if you select a company to join after graduation that strongly believes in the value of its people.
The success of Procter & Gamble in Canada and throughout the world is made up of
the individual successes of each of its employees. Because the Company recognizes
that personal achievement is a major source of individual satisfaction, every opportunity is provided for its realization.
At Procter & Gamble you can expect:
1        To  be  able  to develop  your   business education   in  a   program   of
■       individualized, on-the-job training.
A      To be challenged daily with  new  ideas  and   new  problems  in  a
*       stimulating   environment   where   intelligence   and   enthusiasm   are
recognized.
A       To be given responsibility based on your capacity to absorb it, and
**       to advance based on your abilities to do a  more demanding  job.
m       To   be   encouraged   and   rewarsSsd   with   continued   opportunities,
*       increasing  income,   and   an   uncommonly  sound   program   of   profit
sharing and other benefits.
You will want facts on which to make an intelligent choice of your career. To learn
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and arrange for an  interview on
November 23, 24, 25
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Graduating students from  all academic disciplines  are  invited   to  apply.
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Ian  seconds
Gordon  review
By IAN WALLACE
Gordon Smith's paintings
are pleasant, often dynamic
and quite competent. They
are classy paintings and although they often show an
attempt to be more significant than elegant, there is
little in Smith's work which
leads the viewer into any
visual experience that does
not smack of the Deja-vue.
Smith is essentially an
impressionist painter in the
sense that he is primarily
concerned with light and
color rather than statement
or structure.
Poet Huff
harpoons
pointedly
By RAY STARRS
Looking like some raw-
faced sea captain of Herman
Melville's, Robert Huff put
on a whale of a show Friday.
An American in the naturalist tradition but with
French-Canadian roots, Huff,
unlike poets in general, has
a real talent for reading his
own poems.
The poems are folksy, humorous, conversational and
clever. So is Mr. Huff. He's
pedalling everyday life: a
forest fire, a small - town
squabble, the facts about
poaching, the childhood memories of a soldier.
His statements are clear
and powerful; his language
realistic and lyrical, and it
moves with the natural
rhythms of dialogue. He is a
story-teller, as is suggested
by the title poem of his new
collection, "The Course".
And like all good storytellers, Mr. Huff is capable
of a first-class joke.
In an outraged, bombastic
and vaguely reminiscent
voice, he read one poem
entitled, "I dream I'm Dylan
Thomas on My Doctor's
Couch." It would have scared
the ass off any English major.
K
V   .''..v'sy^/Vi'
Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
It has often been stated
that he is a landscape painter. Yet a careful look at his
painting as a whole seems to
indicate that he is less interested in organic forms per
se than as a framework
which he can dress up with
color.
As a result one feels a
certain arbitrariness of style
and subject matter.
Red Wizard is nothing
apart from the fact that it
is red. Summer Garden
might suggest organic forms
but the color and light is
far more decorative than
organic.
If there was some kind of
consistency behind Smith's
discrepancies then it might
begin to take on a meaning
and make sense but the various assortment of styles
(even though the feeling for
color is essentially the same)
is more haphazard than congruous.
Within a single year (1966)
Smith has moved from action painting to hard edge,
to Alan Davicism, to op art,
etc. . .
In every idiom he produces a good painting, one
that maintains his color
character, while following
stylistic advances made toy
others.
Smith's most recent op
prints, however, are the
most successful for here he
is using a style that was
made for color painters.
The content of the op
painting is the interaction
of color and Smith's use of
color here leads to harmony
and clarity rather than incongruity.
Incongruity is not a vice
in itself but when the artist
does not intend it it is a
mistake.
This academic criticism
is unfair in that Smith is
an intuitive painter but
nevertheless the solution to
his problems is an intellectual one.
Smith is essentially a decorative painter but he feels
that a painting should be
significant not merely decorative.
I think Smith has been
fooled by art historians into
being prejudiced against his
own sensibility.
Significant painting is
true to itself and explores
all the possibilities of itself
with courage and conviction.
Friday,  November 4,   1966 *%"•**■£> x\«^»J5*
War trains troops
By JOHN REID
The war in Viet Nam is,
for America, not only right
but necessary.
We live in a society which
has agreed that the will of
the majority must prevail,
and the minority must submit to the wishes of the majority. In Viet Nam the
rights of 200 million Americans to proceed with their
vision of Asia is opposed
by merely a few million
Vienamese.
The total figure of Vietnamese objectors is in
doubt, but will undoubtedly
became smaller and smaller
as the war progresses.
As time passes, the right
of America to stay in Viet
Nam becomes stronger and
stronger.
Secondly, Viet Nam serves
as an excellent training
ground in practical warfare
for the American army,
navy and air force. New
techniques can be tested and
troops can be made proficient in the art of war.
The Viet Nam war serves
in much the same capacity
as did the Spanish Civil War
for the Nazis, namely as a
cheap area in which to train
men not to be squeamish
about killing.
Viet Nam offers great
scope for the development
of the American individual.
It offers an opportunity for
those who oppose the war
to lead peace marches, and
for those in favor of war
and destroying communism
to fight for their ideals.
It is an excellent method
for developing the right of
each American to fight for
what he believes.
One must remember that
as our modern industrial
society is based on war, it
is very important to have a
war in progress. But it must
not be a major war which
would strain the economy.
Fortunately, the limited war
against the Vietnamese is
ideal  for  this  purpose.
One of the dangers of our
society is that it is changing too rapidly. While one
is fighting one cannot
change society to any great
extent, since those who
would be building a better
world are now engaged in
fighting.
We are fortunate to possess Viet Nam, which can be
expected to retard growth
to the satisfaction of any
conservative.
The Vietnamese war is
not only America's right,
it is America's necessity.
Coming . . . Sunday, November 13
AN AU NASHVILLE SHOW
STARRING
ROY   ORBISON
THE CANDY MEN - THE NEW BEATS
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE - 6:30 and 9:00 p.m.
TICKETS AT: VANCOUVER CENTRE, MU 3-3255 - ALL EATON'S STORES
(CHARGE THEM) - TOWN AND COUNTRY HOME FURNISHINGS IN
RICHMOND AND KERRISDALE.
'<«s^«**!jgp''*^.«3r$s^£^«^ft^&>'j«9*i^^ ;
We take better care of OUR
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UNIVERSITY
5754 University Blvd.
"in the Village"
Phone
224-3202
IMPERIAL
€sso
SERVICE
MARKETING
(Sales, Merchandising
and Operations)
Students Graduating with a
Bachelor or Masters degree
in
1967
Engineering — all branches
Commerce
Arts (General)
Science (General)
Agriculture
IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
Has Vacancies In 1967
in the following departments
MANUFACTURING
(Refining)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1967
Chemical  Engineering
Mechanical  Engineering
Civil Engineering
1968
Chemical  Engineering
Mechanical  Engineering
PRODUCING
(Production and Exploration)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1967
Engineering — all  branches
Honours Geology
Geophysics
Honours Mathematics
Honours  Physics
1968
Geological  Engineering
Engineering  Physics
Honours Geology
Geophysics
IN ADDITION, PERMANENT AND SUMMER VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS UNDERTAKING POSTGRADUATE
STUDIES IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY IN THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT AT
SARNIA, AND IN THE PRODUCTION RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT IN GALGARY.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR REGULAR EMPLOYMENT ARE ALSO AVAILABLE IN THE CHEMICAL PRODUCTS, BUILDING PRODUCTS, AND COMPUTER SERVICES DEPARTMENTS.
Our Representative, MR. R. G. INGS, will be on the campus on
NOVEMBER 7th, 1966
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled in the above courses
who are interested in filling the advertised vacancies.
MR. INGS will be located in the Studnt Placement Office on the West Mall.
friday,   November   4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11 Centre   art   altared
By IAN WALLACE
The Swiss sculptor Tony
Sisig has erected a circular
bronze altar for the New
Lutheran Student Center's
'chapel in the round'.
Most works of art are
functional only in the pleasure or the revelations that
they give. But the altar has
two functions: to serve as a
piece of ceremonial furniture and to act as a symbolic medium to contemplation of the divinity.
In this way it is used as
a focal point for the visual
senses—something concrete
upon which the non-concrete messages of prayer
mediation  can be traced.
The art of the altar is to
serve as a ritual device to
carry the meaning of the
ceremony. It does this by
creating space.
The ceremony is controlled by the space created by
the altar. It's circular or
spiral mandala platform
pulls one into the center
visually but leaves one
physically on the periphery.
The roof funnels up above
the central altar to a cross
and a skylight giving the
special effect of a cone, with
the congregation circling
the inside periphery.
Besides creating a circular ritual space around
itself, the altar also has an
inclusive map space in its
heavily textured bronze
surface and its strong primitive tactility.
As the congregation gathers around the altar as physical presences in physical
space, their eyes are engaged
upon its surface and the
vertical space above it which
can be spiritually tout not
physically entered; and
hence there is an encompassing psychic space.
This is essentially the
meaning of a religious gathering: to gather as a single
body around a unifying
center (the faith, symbolized by the altar) in order
to join together into a common mediation.
The altar, in creating a
psychic space, induces the
believer to come out of his
isolated individual body into a contemplative realm
that is shared by others—to
move from the particle to
the whole—to move from
the periphery of the circle
to the center.
Liberalism—a dirty word
By  CHRISTIANA  EPP
It all started innocently
enough. There was a pretty
poster in the caf which announced a symposium in
bright red letters. It was to
be held at Rosario Beach.
The word beach convinced
me.
The pretty poster had said
that the topic of the symposium was liberalism, but
from the first panel discussion it was apparent that
liberalism was the dirty
word of the weekend.
I was mildly surprised,
having always thought that
liberal (lower-case "1") was
a complimentary adjective.
That was only the begin-
ing.
Most of those attending
the symposium were activists of the New Left. While
the New Left itself gets a
great deal of publicity, its
actual views and opinions
do not. To those who like
myself attended the symposium without having
more than a superficial acquaintance   with   the   New
Left, it came as a shock to
hear views expressed which
are almost the opposite of
those one reads in the morning paper.
Especially so as these
views were not the rantings
of maladjusted neurotics,
but rather articulately expressed statements backed
by research. This symposium achieved its purpose if
it motivated those who attended to base their views
of the world situation on
sources other than the morning paper and the glossy
American weeklies.
Of course being told that
the miseries of the world
can in large part be traced
to the structure of our society — a society which for
most university students is
very comfortable — can be
a disturbing  experience.
All weekend I had a
strong desire to read Win-
nie-the-Pooh.
JEFFERSON
AIRPLANE
LP.
now at
the
Record Gallery
Robson - Opp.  Library
STUDENT DISCOUNT
life in british Columbia
is wonderful
and   opportunities   are   exciting   for
graduate engineers
at
^■OLUMBIA Va
ELLULOSE
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA
For information, see your Student Placement Office
fc£SEA/?C/y    .
<*>'
n
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'°NaL  Dt *
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
1967
Applications and information booklets are now available in the Placement Office and in Departments.
Please submit your application by 15 November 1966,
to ensure fullest consideration.
to
EMPLOYMENT OFFICER,
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL,
OTTAWA 7, ONTARIO.
Frederic Wood Theatre . .
THE MOST EXCITING AND SENSATIONAL PLAY EVER SEEN ON CAMPUS
The Persecution and
Assassination of Marat
as performed by the inmates of the Asylum at Charen-
ton under the direction of the Marquis de Sade.
By Peter Weiss
Directed by John Brockington
November 18—26,-8:30 p.m.
Special Student Performances: Monday, November 21  — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday,   November  24,   12:30   p.m.
Student Tickets are Available for All Performances.
Due to the elaborate production student tickets for this play only will be $1.00
BOX OFFICE: RM. 207 FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
There has been  a  tremendous advance interest in    this play. You are advised to get your tickets early.
Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   November  4,   1966 Friday,   November  4,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page   13
—derrick webb photo
BURBLE, SPLASH, DROOL says frothy liquid as Ubyssey
staffer participates in most popular sport on campus.
Name of game is a boat race, but who cares whether
it has anything to do with boats or not.
Basketball, football
game highlights here
UBC grads bounce tonight
in the reunion basketball
game.
Action starts at 8 o'clock
in the Memorial Gym.
In football action the UBC
Thunderbirds play the University of Calgary Saturday in
a home game. Game time is
2 p.m.
Saturday is also a big day
for rugby at Wolfson field.
The UBC Rugby Thunderbirds play the Georgians at
2:30 p.m. The Braves play the
All-Blacks, also at 2:30 p.m.
At 1:30, the Tomahawks
play City College and the
Totems take on BCIT.
The cross country Canadian
Championships completes
Saturday's sports events.
CANADIAN BOWL
Scores upset selectors
The selection committee for
the Canadian college bowl ran
into trouble last weekend.
The committee, which must
select two college football
teams to compete in the national final Nov. 19 in Toronto,
were confronted Saturday
with a series of almost unbelievable  scores.
The unranked UBC Thunderbirds, who were expected to
jump into the top 10 by virtue
of its defeat of Alberta were
hard pressed to defeat Saskatchewan 23-22 in Saskatoon
Oct. 29.
Saskatchewan, badly beaten
toy Alberta earlier in the season, are currently rated
seventh.
Queens Golden Gaels pulled the biggest surprise by
dumping previously undefeated Toronto Varsity Blues 23-15
in Toronto.
The   victory   gives   Queens
Staff meets
Important meeting Monday
noon for all sports-writers in
Ubyssey office, North Brock
basement. New writers welcome.
Fall Campus
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CROYDON
in  the  Latest   Styles.
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Take advantage of this
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 4,   1966
Frats attempt UBC hoax
demand 'CUS withdrawal'
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
A group of frat men posing
as outside agitators are attempting to hoax UBC into
pulling out of the Canadian
Union of Students.
A person claiming to be a
non-student began circulating
a petition Thursday asking for
UBC's withdrawal from CUS.
The sponsors of the petition
Scholarships
up for grabs
to top grads
The Woodrow Wilson national fellowship foundation
is offering help to students
entering first year graduate
study.
The fellowships include payment of university fees and
tuition, a $2,000 living allowance, and an additional allowance for married students.
The foundation primarily
supports students showing an
interest in college teaching
but recipients need not necessarily enter that field.
Students cannot apply directly but must be nominated
by a faculty member.
Nominations should ibe in no
later than Oct. 31 to Professor
H. B. Hawthorn, department
of anthropology and sociology.
More information is available from Dr. Peter Remnant
in Bu. 1264.
claim they represent a mysterious  Quebec  organization.
Oscar Fraser, who says he
is one of two Quebec salaried
agents sent to UBC, refused to
comment on identity or size of
the organization.
Fraser said he has contacted
several interested UBC groups
and is playing two UBC students to aid him.
The assistants, Tim Kerr,
arts 2 and Derry Nelson,
comm. 4, refused to identify
themselves.
"CUS is a useless organization," said Fraser. "There is no
Quebec representation and Alberta has withdrawn.
He said CUS would be replaced with another national
organization which would in:
elude French identity.
He would not say who
would set up the new organization.
AMS president Peter Braund
said the petition is not legal.
"It is not properly worded
in terms of the constitution,"
he said.
According to by-law 3 of the
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AMS charter, a petition must
ask for a definite referendum.
"If they do get 500 signatures and re-word the petition," said Braund, "council
still must pass the referendum
with a two-thirds majority for
any action to be taken."
Braund said he is not worried.
"This is probably some sort
of a phantom joke," he said.
"If these people were really
serious and had the confidence
of their convictions, they
would come forward and identify themselves."
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571  GRANVILLE   (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846 Friday,  November  4,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
*_
SCHOLAR CLAIMS:
'Chinese not aggressors'
Br BONI LEE
Chinese aggression is a myth,
a Ford Foundation scholar said
Thursday.
"It is not the Chinese who
have been the main agressive
and expansionist force — quite
the reverse," Professor Morton
Brown told 300 people in Brock
lounge Thursday..
He was the third speaker in
the TJBC China teach-in.
"We gather here overburdened with hearsay and prejuidce,"
Brown said.
"We should forget what we
thought we 'knew' about China.
"We 'know' that China's
foreign policy is aggressive, expansionist, inconsiderate of human life, jeopardizing world
peace and unsettling to the
security of nations."
He said there was evidence
clearly controverting the image
of an expanionist and agressive
China.
Of Korea: "Only by forget
ting the antecedents to Chinese
entry can one parade this  as
an example of Chinese aggression."
Of Tibet: "In Chinese and international law, Tibet has been
regarded as an integral province of China.
"It is hardly convincing to
adduce China's involvement in
the 1959 Tibetan revolt as an
example of Chinese interference."
China amicably compromised
some of her initial claims to
territory in Nepal, Burma, and
Pakistan, he said.
China made no attempt in
her conflict with India to retain control of the areas she
dominated.
"She instead withdrew to the
boundaries she had consistently
offered to negotiate with the
Indians."
In Chinese history, foreign
powers have dismembered and
plundered China, he said.
"The Chinese political strug-
would share the first three
years of a common university
program as a means to promote
interprofessional dialogue.
'Examine redshirts
every five years'
MONTREAL (CUP) — Professional engineers should
be re-examined every five years to make sure they are
keeping up with the times, the industrial engineering
department head said here recently.
At a seminar of the Canadian
Council of Professional Engineers, Dr. Arthur Porter proposed a system of revalidation under which the original licence
to practise would be restamped
after each periodical re-examination.
Lamenting engineering backwardness he said: "Ninety per
cent of engineers who graduated before 1960 know absolute
nothing about computers, yet
they are already the main tool
of engineering design."
Porter forecasted profound
changes in engineering education.
He also said he is looking
forward to a time when all professional disciplines including
medicine, law and social work,
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the sun, set or not, by a dam-
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guess.
gle has been toward an independent government unified and
secure from foreign invasion.
"The Chinese are waging a
defensive struggle against for-
foreign depredation in order to
preserve the integrity of their
own country."
"Orily by discarding the
mythology of Chinese aggression can we begin an accurate
examination of Chinese relations," Brown concluded.
Medical hopefuls meet
for careers conference
The third annnual medical careers conference will
be held this Sunday at International House.
The conference is for all students considering
medicine as a career. Fifteen doctors including general
practitioners, specialists and faculty members will
attend.
Topics discussed will be: future of the GP; merits
of different Canadian medical schools; and medical
ethics.
Prospective medical students should apply to conference chairman Chris Bates at 224-9913. Cost to non-
pre-med club students is $2.50.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  4,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Major fighting farces
CONSEHVATIES
Major Thur good speaks on
Hellyer's United Farces, Monday at noon in Brock.
PRE DENTAL CLUB
Smoker tonight at 7:30.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
203.
PHYSICS SOC
Grad  talk on nuclear  magnetic resonance at  1:30 today
in   Phys-soc.   Lab   tour   will
follow.
SOCREDS
MP Howard Johnston speaks
on Canada's role in World Affairs, today at noon in Brock
Lounge.
DEATH OF GOD
Jack   Shaver   discusses   the
Death of God theology, today
at noon in BE. 350.
ALLIANCE FRANCIASE
D.    Baudoin    discusses    du
sadisme   au   lacisme   today  at
noon in Bu. 102.
KOERNER LECTURER
Professor    Eugene    Vinaver
discusses  Arthurian  Romance,
today at noon in Bu. 106.
NDP
Alderman    Bob    Williams
speaks Monday at noon in Bu.
204.
VIET NAM WEEK
Battle scenes from Viet Nam,
Monday at noon in Bu. 106.
Dr. Inglis of the medical aid
committee shows a documentary   film   in   the   auditorium
Tuesday at noon.
IH
Dance   tonight   in   lower
lounge at 9 p.m. Admission 25
cents.
CREATIVE WRITING
There will be a poetry reading today at non in Ang. 104.
CHINA TEACH IN
iDavid Crook who has been
teaching in China since 1947
speaks on The Cultural Revolution, today at noon in the auditorium.
A panel composed of Dr.
Rene Goldman, Clive Ansley,
and Gene Cravan discusses Eye
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Totem Park lounge.
SPANISH CLUB
Mrs. Helen Grauft speaks on
Brazil to Vancouver today at
noon in Bu. 202. Slides will be
shown.
LSM
Arnie   von   Dehn   discusses
When Should the Christian oppose the State Monday at noon
in Bu. 104.
EUS
Dance to the Shockers at the
Engineering - Residence   mixer
tonight at 8:30 in Brook Hall.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Fire-side discussion of birth
control,   7:30  p.m.   Sunday  at
the Lutheran Student Centre.
VCF
Claude Gelinas speaks today
at noon  in  Ang.   110.   Group
singing in the VCF hut Monday
at noon.
CUSO
Judy Ransom speaks today at
noon in Ed. 100.
GERMAN SPEAKER
Dr. Katharina Holger discus-
INVESTIGATE A
MANAGEMENT CAREER
Write for this free brochure
Our current expansion plans
create outstanding career opportunities for university men who
possess leadership potential, marketing aptitudes, and social mobility and skills. This brochure
outlines thechallengingfive phase
program leading to executive responsibilities in Agency Management. For your copy write direct
to Mr. A. L. Andrews, C.L.U.,'
Agency Superintendent at our
Head Office 200 Bloor Street East,
Toronto 5, Ont.
MANUFACTURERS LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Branch Offices Across Canada
CUSO TALKS
by Miss Judy Ransom
National   C.U.J.O.  Associate-Secretary;   Past  India
Coordinator   and   Returned   Volunteer.
ALL WELCOME
Friday, Nov. 4 — Education 100 — 12:30.
Saturday, Nov. 5 — International House — 7:30. Coffee
Party and Talk.
Sunday, Nov. 6 — Lower Mall Lounge — 6.45 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 8 — Engineering 301 — 12:30 p.m.
Friday,   Nov.   11   —   International   House   —   7:30   p.m.
Public Meeting.
Miss Ransom will show slides and movies and is interested in meeting
students individually. For appointment or further information. Phone International House or contact Brock Ext. 165.
ses Heinrich Heine: Ein Dichter
z w i s c h e n Deutschland  und
Frankreich.   Monday   at  noon
in Bu. 320.
PHRATERES MIXER
Dance to the Organizations
and the Cumberland Four Saturday from 8 to  12 p.m. in
Brock lounge.
WUS
General  meeting in  council
chambers at noon Monday.
DISSENTER'S CLUB
First meeting today at noon
in Bu. MM).
VIETNAM WEEK
by student Vietnam Comm., N.D.Y., Scm.
NOV. 7- 11   NEXT WEEK
Mon., Nov. 7 Vietnam Films - Bu. 106
Battle scenes from Vietnam
Tues., Nov. 8 Dr. Inglis of Vietnam
Medical Aid Committee plus Documentary Film - Auditorium
Wed., Nov. 9 "Bitch-in"
Student Vietnam rally-in front of the
library or auditorium if rains. Come
and bitch about the war.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST KEY RING WITH THREE
keys including one UBC key return to key clerk buildings and
grounds.
HELP! — WOULD THE PERSON
who took wallet from glove compartment of white '56 Pontiac, return papers, AMS card, etc. —
Reward if everything returned—
Contact R. E. Townsend, 327-7077.
LOST — MAN'S BROWN WALLET
vicinity book store on Tues. Please
phone Allan Harris 263-8021 evenings.
ROY    POLISCI    PH.D.     CONTACT
Jan 224-6062  for lighter,  cigs.
HITCH HIKER WHO LEFT
black woman's umbrella in my
car call RE 8-5778.
Greetings
12
GRANDPA:      HAPPY     ANNIVER-
sary Sat.  Love T.O.L.O.B.M.
Coming Dances
12A
ED. U.S. INVITES YOU TO THE
Blue Grotto formal, Commodore
Sat., Nov. 5th, $6.00 ($4 with Ed.
card). Tickets in AMS office and
Ed Building,   B.Y.O.B.
MIXER BROCK SAT., NOV. 5.
8:00 featuring Organization, Cumberland-Four. $1.00 per person,
sponsored by Phrateres.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualllfy for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted Elliott,   224-6707.
ANYONE WITNESSING ACCI-
dent in "B" lot Monday, Oct. 31
at 9:10 a.m. Please contact Alex
at 224-7235 betwieen 5:00-6:30
p.m. or 224-9088 between 10:00 -
6:00  p.m.
RE-REELECT LOCKIE FOR MR.
Gullible of 1966. He has a
PROBLEM.
MARDI GRAS TRYOUTS. TODAY
is last day, please come if interested in dancing or singing. Brock
Stageroom.
GRANNY DARLING ONLY 21%
months left. Then two weeks in
Fiji. A huge bed, 14 children, a
St. Bernard and I'll love you for
the rest of my life.  Love Granpa.
HEAR   A   TRULY   ENLIGHTENED
man,  Brock  Hall,  Nov.  9,  12:30.
WHY USE ACID OR POT? TAKE
a trip in your own boat, Brock
Hall,   Nov.  9,   12:30.
J.M.   WHO  IS  ME!   CONTACT  ME
about  M.P.   E.N.
DESERT CLUB PRESENTS
Ernest Eberhard M.D., Professor,
Counsellor from Provo, Utah discusses "The New Morality" Mon.,
12:30,   Bu  100.
Transportation
14
RIDE    WANTED    NORTH    BURN-
ay,   298-3452.
RIDE HOME URGENTLY NEED-
ed M.T.W. - 6:30. Friday after
2:30. Vicinity Edmonds and Kings-
way. Please call Lorraine 521-
4189.
GOING SOUTH AT XMAS WE
need a ride as far as you are
going and farther. Phone Joe:
224-9064 or Ed 224-9049. Will pay.
Travel Opportunities
16
SAVE ON AIR FARES
Group fares via Air Canada DC 8
to Toronto and London, Ontario.
$196.00 return economy, leaves on
December 19 and 21. Return any
time any flight within one year.
Phone Mr. Paul Bourke for further   information.   521-6496.
A.M.S. CHARTER FLIGHT TICK-
et for sale — one way only —
London to Vane. Aug. 25. Phone
Derek 224-9769.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE. 1962 M.G.A., BLACK,
glass slide windows, $1,260.88.
733-4858.
1950 PLYMOUTH. GOOD. CONDI-
tion. Recent engine overhaul.
Radio.   Offers.   738-8180 after   6.
1964 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE: RE-
built engine, radio, new tires, one
year guarantee. Only $1,050. Ph.
224-6857.
1952 HILLMAN MINX 22,000 MILES
guaranteed. New paint, tires.
Good engine, trans. Call Bob
324-0600.
EXCELLENT BUY — 1963 DAT-
sun Sports Mechanic owned. Must
sell. Leaving for Australia $1000.
Phone day 521-1700. Nite WE 9-
5333.
1960 CONSUL DELUXE FOR SALE,
green and white. New seat cover,
fine good tyres, $300. 736-0859 after 6 p.m.	
•53 CHEV. '54 REBUILT MOTOR,
76 miles, 6 tires w.w., radio. Must
be seen to be depreciated. $246,
733-3426 after 5.
'56 FORD, $195.00. V-8 STANDARD,
Radio, good condition. Ph. first
224-1753 or second 224-0781, Kit
Taylor.
Accessories & Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them all  at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%   Student   Discount)
Automobiles Wanted
25
Motorcycles
27
66% SUZUKI 250, X-6. Leaving
country. Must be seen. Call Barry,
321-8142.
FOR SALE 1964 HONDA 55X.C $130.
($20) Helmet included. Perfect
cond.   879-4807 after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
Scandals
39A
ELEVEN    BEWARE!!     THE    PA.
Jama grabbers will get you.	
HEY SAMPSON COME IN AND
and see Del-Eila at the Campus
Barber Shop,  153 Brock Hall Ext.
EVEN COLD SHOWERS, MY
darling Wendy, can be fun (when
they're with you) — Fond love
for  everything,   Terry.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS    LIMITED
70th   & Granville  Street        263-4630
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FEMALE OFFICE MANAGER RE-
quired for UBC Alumni Association to supervise a small office
staff and manage all aspects of
office operation: — accounting —
stock — payroll — mass mailing
— records. Address all applications in writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252
Brock Hall, U.B.C, Vancouver,
B.C.
Help Wanted (Can't.)	
FEMALE:     APPLICATIONS     ARE
invited  for position of
PROGRAM  DIRECTOR
of the
UBC    ALUMNI    ASSOCIATION
This   position   requires   a   young,
energetic    person    to    service    a
vrtde range of alumni committees
and programs, on a full-time year
round basis.  This person,  preferably a UBC graduate, must have
organizational  skills,   and be  able
to work under pressure.  Applications in writing to: Mr. Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252
Brock  Hall,  UBC,  Vancouver 8.
OFFICE MANAGER
MALE: REQUIRED FOR UBC
Alumni Association to supervise
a small office staff and manage
all aspects of office operation:—
accounting — stock payroll —
mass mailings — records. Address
all applications in writing to: Mr.
Tim Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director, 252 Brock Hall, U.B.C,
Vancouver 8.
BABYSITTER TUESDAY-THURS-
day afternoon weekly. 14th and
Sasamat $2.50 per 4 hour afternoon. CA 4-6042.
Music
63
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
PRIVATE LESSONS, COACHING
for exams, English, German,
French Translations, 731-878$ —
1265  W.  10th  Avenue.
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR   WANTED   FOR   BC.   804.
Phone John, YU 6-3946.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 75 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,  or the Bookstore.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964,. 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office In Brock.
ROBERTS 1600 RECORDER, Philips
portable record player, Pentax
35 mm camera; as new. Bryan,
after   g  p.m.   261-2831.	
TWO PAIRS LADY'S SKI BOOTS
size  six   to   seven  phone   261-7026.
FOR SALE LARGE OAK DESK
top with legs. 738-7400.
RENTALS  8c REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
TWO SINGLE BEDROOMS $30
each $45 with breakfast, close to
everything. Mrs. Mainfroid, 2210
Macdonald.Phone   733-2069.	
LARGE ROOM FOR RENT. JUST
outside gates. Fully self-contained. Suitable for two male students.  Phone 224-6757.	
SINGLE ROOM, PRIVATE EN-
trance. Private bathroom. Near
gates, male graduate student.
Phone after 6,  CA 4-3152.
Room & Board
ROOM AND BOARD PLUS JOVIAL
companionship at Zeta Psi Fraternity House. Reasonable rates.
Phone Sandy Sandilands 224-0897
or 224-9662  after five  p.m.
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
S3
WANTED: GIRL TO SHARE WEST
End Apartment $60 per month,
Thurlow and Harwood. Phone
874-2489  after 10.
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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