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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 1965

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Array Beware
of Grits
Vol. XLVIII, No. 9
VANCOUVER, B.C.JHURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1965
CA 4-3916
PETERSONS PIN
UNREASONABLE'
BLADEN BUBBLE BURST
—norm betts photo.
LIKE A LITTLE LEG? Melinda Whitaker (left) and Kit McKinnon, followed an unidentified pair of legs down the runway in the annual frosh queen contest fashion show. The
show was run to the strains of the jerk and frug and the 15 girls danced through the
usually staid frosh event Tuesday noon in Brock.
AMS men non-committal
on Bladen's fee fancy
Officials of the 'Alma Mater
Society were largely non-
commital on the Bladen commission's recommedation regarding tuition fees.
AIMS second vice-president
Peter Braund said he would
make a complete statement on
the Bladen report to council
on Tuesday night.
But he said Wednesday: "I
am unhappy with the Bladen
fee   recommendations   as    I
understand them."
The Bladen report urged the
provincial governments to resist popular pressure for the
abolition of university fees.
It says free tuition for college and university students
is impractical for the next 10
years.
AMS president Byron Hender said: "On what basis can
Free tuition promised
Newfoundland students
Newfoundland university students will have their fees
paid next year.
Premier Joe Smallwood told 2,000 Memorial University
students at St. John's Tuesday: "The provincial government
will make tuition free for all students at this university."
The offer includes students in fifth year and will cost
more than $1,600.
The plan will take effect on the fall of 1966.
Students will also receive a salary to help finance their
education. Resident students will receive $50 a month and
boarding students will receive $100 a month.
Based on a total of 22,000 students at B.C.'s three public
universities with an average tuition fee of $475 a student,
it would cost the B.C. government $10.4 million to remove
university tuition fees.
you draw a line between high
school and university when it
comes to paying tuition fees."
"The real problem with the
report is that the commissioners have not looked at
students who have never
reached university," said
Hender.
He said, however, that the
proposed increase in federal
per capita grants to $5 from
$2 was tremendous.
The report urges provinces
to calculate their grants to
universities on the assumption
that tuition fees will continue
at about the same level.
The commission cautioned
against any general increase
in fees "without assurance of
a simultaneous increase in student aid."
It argued that free tuition would be unfair to taxpayers who could not get a
university education.
"University graduates earned
higher incomes as a rule and
they and their parents should
be expected to finance their
studies as much as possible."
Universities must
control costs'—Les
By AL DONALD
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
B.C. education minister Leslie Peterson said Wednesday the Bladen commission's call for drastically increased
government aid to universities "may well prove to be unreasonable".
The report, released Wednesday, urges a five-fold boost
in combined federal-provincial
grants to higher education, to
$1,704 million by 1975.
Canada's total university
costs will soar from 1965's
$537 million to $2,032 million
in ten years, the report says,
and this price must be met to
combat the country's campus
crisis.
Peterson told The Ubyssey
the Bladen commission's work
is "a good report, deserving
of careful study by all governments. Parts of the report' on
financial assistance have to be
given   serious   consideration."
"But," he said, "to suggest
that the (provincial education)
budget be increased that much
LESLIE PETERSON
. . . serious
Based on static fee line
may well prove to be unreasonable."
Peterson said the provincial
government would deal with
increasing university costs as
they came up.
"But the universities will
have to make a determined effort to keep costs under control," he said.
Peterson welcomed the report's recommendation that the
present $2 capita operating
grant be increased to $5.
"T h e federal government
should share equally with the
provinces the cost of higher
education," he said.
"Federal grants have lagged
in the past."
The report urges the federal
government raise its combined
aid   to   universities   from   $80
DEAN BLADEN
... his report
Increase   gov't   aid
million to $330 million in the
next fiscal year.
This increase must be met
by increased government aid.
donations by business and private concerns, and contributions by university graduates
of one per cent of their income,
the report says.
Appointed 18 month ago by
the Canadian Universities
Foundation,   the   inquiry   was
headed by dean Vincent Bladen
of the University of Toronto.
UBC president John Macdonald said the report was a
welcome analysis of the problem facing Canadian universities.
"It   seeks   realistic   expression of the federal interest in
higher education while recog-
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: BLADEN Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,  1965
—norm  betts photo.
THE JERK, part of annual frosh queen' fashion show, draws unenthusiastic response
from lunch-munching Dr. Malcolm McGregor. The classic head's judging duties Tuesday
included watching queen candidates dance to popular music.
EAP cost cuts grants;
six down 13 per cent
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
Alma Mater Society grants
to six UBC groups have been
cut because of the cost of the
Education Action Program.
AMS treasurer Mike Som-
mer's budget, handed down
Wednesday, gave $3,802 to
the EAP.
As a result, discretionary
grants to the groups have
been reduced approximately
13 per cent each.
Receiving reduced grants
were Clubs' Committee, Debating Union, undergraduate
societies, Grad Students' Association, Radio Society and
the Canadian Union of Students Committee.
Other non-discretionary
grants are set by a general
meeting vote or referendum
and cannot be changed without a general meeting vote
or referendum.
Sommerse said: "There are
some accounts that cannot be
reduced because the council
has stated particular policies
that preclude any reduction."
"These include AMS office
salaries, and the world University Service."
"Other grants cannot be reduced because the events have
already taken place; for example registration photos and
frosh retreat," said Sommers.
"Because of these cuts there
will be more appeals to the
finance committee."
The AMS constitution states
there must be a margin of
five per cent of the revenue,
but the margin this year is
five per cent of the AMS fees
instead of five per cent of the
total revenue.
Last year the margin was 4.3
per cent of the total revenue.
Last year three changes
were introduced to prevent
the recurrence of the overspending of $15,500 which occurred in the 1963-1964 budget.
The changes included summer work on the budget, hiring a publications manager
and hiring an assistant business manager.
Estimated revenue from
AMS fees this year is $423,-
400. Other revenue comes
from such things as college
shop profits and rental income.
The largest expenditure is
for administration and general expenses, which amount to
$46,630.
(See budget breakdown, p.
6 and 7.
BLADEN'S PROBLEM
(Continued from Page 1)
nizing provincial rights and responsibilities," he said.
He also termed "realistic"
the report's proposal that tuition fees should not be eliminated within the next ten years.
The report's recommendations are based on maintaining
tuition fees at their present
level.
It warns that able students
would be kept out of college
and the quality of higher' education would drop if its recommendations are ignored.
"Canada cannot afford not
to invest these sums if we are
to achieve the goals of general
economic   growth   which   we
have   set  for   ourselves,"   the
report says.
University costs are rising
dramatically becaue of an unprecedented rush among young
Canadians to get advanced education.
The report says that al
though half the high school
graduates could benefit from
a college education, only one
in six graduate from university.
"In the long run we may
achieve even greater wealth
by this greater concern for the
individual; we will surely come
nearer to achieving the good
life."
Burling contest!
It's log-rolling time again at
UBC.
The forestry undergraduate
society has challenged all members of student council to a
burling contest at noon Oct. 14.
Hie contest will be held in
the Buchanan quad, pool with
the (FUS supplying caulked
boots.
Birth control
is only answer
Stepped-up food production
can only prolong the overpopulation crisis, an authority
on Asian economics said Tuesday.
Sir John Crawford, in a
noon-hour talk said he saw no
satisfactory solution to food
shortage and overcrowding that
excludes birth control.
"If man doesn't start controlling his rate of increase, it
will be controlled for him by
external circumstances of an
undesirable nature," said
Crawford, who has worked extensively in India.
He said recent improvements
in birth control have made
family planning practicable
even in inert societies..
"I refer mainly to the inter-
uterine device. Interest in this
device has spread much faster
than had been anticipated."
FOR SCHOLARS
McGeer wants
free tuition
Students with first-class marks should have free tuition,
a Liberal M.L.A. told Simon Fraser Academy's liberal club
Tuesday.
Patrick McGeer, MLA for
Point Grey and UBC professor,
said the provincial government
should pay full fees of first-
class students, two-thirds of
the fees for the top half of
second-class students, and one-
third of the fees for the rest of
second-class students.
• •    •
"Bursary and student loan
aid would then be more available for the passing student so
that everyone would benefit,"
he said.
He said students who attack
their universities for increasing fees had little understanding of the situation.
• •   •
"They are like old-time doctors . . . who frequently bled
their patients to try and help
them."
McGeer said university fees
should not rise because "the
very purpose of the educational system is defeated when
capable people reject educational opportunity because the
price is a deterrent."
• •    •
British Columbia was feeling the cost now, he said, of
providing insufficient funds
for education a decade ago.
"Our economy has been
handicapped by a shortage of
much larger infusions of public
highly skilled people and our
government resources drained
by the unskilled and unemployed. In the near future,
money must go to our educational institutions."
Nobel winner speaks
Nobel Peace Prize winner,
Dr. Linus Pauling will speak
Friday noon in the Hebb lecture theatre.
His topic will be "Molecules,
disease, and evolution."
Pauling won the 1963 Nobel
Peace Prize and the 1954 Nobel
Prize in chemistry for his work
on the nature of the chemical
bond.
Here are
highlights
of Bladen
Here are the highlights
of the Bladen Commission's report on university financing which was
released  Wednesday.
• Both levels of government urged to boost
combined annual aid to
$1,704 million by 1975,
compared to $335 million
in 1963-64.
• Federal aid of $330
million recommended for
next fiscal year, with increases each year following. The current year's
budget allows only $80
million.
• Increases in federal
per capita grants for operating costs to $5 from
$2 immediately.
• New federal per
capita grants of $5 for
capital costs.
• Appointment of federal minister of higher
education.
• Increased income tax
relief for students, parents and university donors.
• Federal grants for
new medical, dental and
nursing schools and
teaching hospitals.
• Boost in federal and
provincial bursary aid to
students to $245 million
from $39 million planned
next year.
• Universities urged to
improve administrative
efficiency to save money,
and hold the line on tuition costs.
• University and college enrolment projected at 461,000 in 1975
compared with 180,000 a
year ago.
• Rejects conception of
free tuition.
• Provincial scholarships should be tenable in
any province or any
country.
THE LAST JERK I From right, Jon Furberg, Arts IV, Guy
Sobell, Arts IV, and friend ogle frosh queen cuties
in Brock Lounge Tuesday  noon. Thursday, October 7,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
SWEET SERENADE for sorority pledges (from left) Janis Stewart, Jill Newby, and Marg
Mortifee, came from fraternity members (again from left) Stan Webber, Jim Trites,
Mike Sommers and Larry Lacterman (piano) on Tuesday night.
THE NEEDLE DUG DEEP Tuesday noon in the armory. But students packed into Brock
Lounge to watch frosh queens dance and the blood donor clinic went dozens of bottles
short of their daily  quota.
UBC students will have
weekend off for vote
HIKERS LINE UP
UBC students are running
out of excuses for failing to
vote in the Nov. 8 federal election.
President John Macdonald
said Monday that students unable to cast ballots in Vancouver would be given the
weekend of Nov. 5-8 off to go
home to vote.
Following Macdonald's announcement, student council
formed a committee to arrange
inexpensive transportation for
students leaving the city that
weekend.
The committee is made up
of AMS second vice-president
Peter Braund, arts president
Chuck Campbell, and commerce president Rick McGraw.
Students wishing to register
for transportation should go to
the public relations office up-
DR. JOHN MACDONALD
.  . . weekend off
stairs in Brock Hall within the
next two weeks.
At least 200 of the more than
2,000 students eligible for the
service must apply before
transportation can be arranged.
Meanwhile, the UBC Liberal
Club continued its fight for
students from outside Vancouver who feel they should be
able to register to vote here.
Club president Allan Gould
said Wednesday the club is
going ahead with plans to appear on behalf of these students in a court of revision
Oct.  15-20.
Anyone wanting help in registering should leave his name
and details of his situation in
Box 121 at the AMS office in
Brock.
Council counts
little in march
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey   Council   Reporter
UBC students will march on
the Vancouver court-house and
the Bayshore Inn Oct. 27, student council willing or not.
Sixty students almost unanimously agreed Wednesday to
support the proposed National
Student Day march.
Of the 60 attending the organizational meeting chaired
by Education Action Program
co-chairmen Bob Cruise and
Peter Braund, only undergraduate society representatives from arts, pharmacy and
engineering would not support
the march.
* •    •
The others strongly supported Cruise's proposed mass
march and rally. They said
they would follow him with or
without Alma Mater Society
council   approval.
Braund said that if council
didn't fall behind his committee, "the march could turn into
a golden opportunity for the
commies and socialists to put
on a display."
Cruise said all interested
groups would probably parade,
but he hoped they would do
so as students and not as organizations.
*    •    •
Both Cruise and Braund said
they would lead the march if
council wouldn't.
The only official opposition
voiced so far has come from
the faculties of forestry and
engineering.
Both have said their student
faculties do not want to march.
But one forestry student at
the Wednesday meeting said
many members were willing to
march. He claimed forestry
undergraduate president Dave
Parker's statement that the
foresters were against the
march was untrue.
* •    •
During the meeting, Cruise
circulated a list asking people
to sign up for work on the
National Student Day rally,
the January seminar on education, and speakers bureau
which will talk to luncheon
groups off campus.
These sub-committees will
report to the EAP committee
which reports directly to the
studen council.
—norm  betts photo.
DIANE NEUFELD, a frosh
queen contestant, jerks
down the runway in Tuesday's frosh fashion show.
500 students in Brock Lounge
watched 15 freshettes model
the latest in clothes and
dancing.
Com.   students
shake  cans
The United Appeal launches
its campus drive Oct. 18.
The fund raising program
runs from Oct. 18 to 22 with
a blitz program by 100 commerce students Oct. 20.
The Appeal's cans will be
distributed around campus
for donations.
Campaign head Steve Mar-
rit, Commerce IV, hopes the
drive will raise $2,000 as compared to last year's $1,500.
AVID UBYSSEY READER ignores shapely calves during
frosh queens fashion show in Brock Monday. Interested
spectator to his left said he had already finished the
paper, and had nothing else to do but watch the show. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,   1965
mmsssr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, OCT. 7, 1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blake.
Another Fowler?
Well, Dean Vincent Bladen's report on financing
higher education is out, and it looks good.
Increases in federal per capita grants from $2 to $5,
as Bladen suggests, would certainly nullify any board
of governors' excuse for a fee increase next year.
Appointment of a federal niinister of higher education, as suggested by Bladen, would mean at last the
federal government would be unable to sluff off its
responsibility of insuring tomorrow's Canada has a
population equipped to  handle  tomorrow's  problems.
A boost in federal and provincial grants to universities of five times the present level (over 10 years), as
suggested by Bladen, would mean universities' plants
could expand to meet the students pouring in.
And both the annual student population increases,
and a few affluent students suddenly finding the doors
open, would be in the rush. For the latter would be
coming as a result of a, boost in bursary add, as suggested
by Bladen.
And the universities would find yet another source
of income to help finance plant expansion if university
graduates were asked to contribute one per cent of their
income, as suggested by Bladen.
Yes, as suggested by Dean Bladen, the report on
financing higher education has a number of very good
things.
We wonder, though, about the good Dean's opposition to free tuition.
Since tuition costs are already above the amount
students can earn in a summer, and since Dean Bladen
suggests fees should not go up, and since student fees—
as they stand—will make up a very small percentage of
the $2 billion cost of higher education Bladen predicts for
1975, we are puzzled.
We cannot see why he could not advocate an opening
of the doors to opportunity, by advocating lowering of
fees.
Bladen says he is against free tuition because it is
impractical, because of the amount represented by student fees (about 5 per cent of the 1975 budget), and "for
the sake of social justice."
Fantastic.
We say again, as so many tiresome times before,
no strata of society could possibly oppose having the
opportunity for their children to attend university.
The Bladen report now goes to the Association of
Universities and Colleges of Canada meeting in Vancouver Oct. 26 to 29. They plan to modify it as they see
fit, and present their version of the report to the federal
government as a brief.
We hope the federal government will see fit to
implement this brief, even though some progressive
suggestions may be considered too radical for the AUCC,
and therefore watered down.
Still, unless the AUCC is entirely reactionary, those
positive points of the Bladen report they do pass on to
the federal government will be worth putting into effect.
Only one thing troubles us.
Does anyone here remember the Fowler commission
report on broadcasting?
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News     Ron  Rlter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City    .     Richard   Blair
Photo    Bert  MacKinnon
Sports      Ed  Clark
Ass't News    Dan   Malien
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
Asst City    Al   Donald
Page Friday   John Kelsey
Managing    Norm   Betts
Features   Mike Bolton
CUP    Don Hull
Doug fiajverson, Pat Houshowy,
Howie White, Ann Slipper, Susan
Gransby, Richard Taylor, Anne
Rate], Diane Forster, Vivian
Gigun, Gordon McLaughlin, Anne
Bishop, Robin Russel. Derick
Blackie, Mary Treloar, Dennis
Gans, Joe Varesi, Rick Magnon,
Cole Byfleet, Fearon Whitney and
Powell Hargrave.
nevns item:
UBC STUDENTS
GRrXDE PROFS
—from  the  Ryersonian
Hey Charlie I Is there a hyphen in 'meat head'?"
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Dear Rod ...
Rod MacKenzie, Law Faculty:
Although I am addressing
this letter to you, it is intended for all the students at
the University of British
Columbia.
It was very distressing to
read in the newspapers that
the students of your University had given Mr. Lesage a
rousing, spontaneous stand-
ovation.
Mr. Lesage is a smooth talker, a real 'sharpie' and it is
a shame that university students were "taken in" so to
speak, by his speech of Sept.
28.
The French-speaking people do not want Quebec, they
want Canada .... all of it,
unilingual. The sooner the
English-speaking people realize this, the better. The English people as a general rule,
are too complacent, too easily
led.
Do not let fast talking politicians blind you to the facts.
B. J. Barlow, Danville, Que.
Why now?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
May I use your columns to
solicit the assistance of your
readers? In brief, I would like
to know "What They "Wish
They Had Known Before
Coming To College".
I am now writing a book
for Canadian high school and
college students. Some of the
proposed sixteen chapters are,
Selecting a Canadian College,
Selecting Courses, The Care
and Feeding of Professors, Information Display, Instant
Sophistication, The Search for
Maturity and Residence Life.
Anyone who has time to
write during this busy period
may reach me c/o U. N. B.,
Fredericton, N. B.
W. J. Heddin,
Associate professor
Fee fight biz  just  non-dynamic
By DANNY STOFFMAN
Fee rebels can rest assured.
Their protests have been
receiving careful attention in
the highest councils of our
government. In fact, top level
deliberations took place only
recently and we are pleased to
be able to release the first full
account of these discussions.
The Premier, reports our
agent in the corridors of
power, was sitting at his desk
chatting with his Minister of
Highways and Col. Mac,
liquor control board cxar.
The Great Man, says our
correspondent, effused a wide
grin as he discussed his recent
visit to Rome.
"Colonel, youd never believe it. There's this street
called Via Veneto, where they
sit at tables on the sidewalk
and actually drink alcoholic
beverages. Why there's even
bars without hotels!"
"My goodness!" shrieked
the colonel. "Such sin! And in
"That's what happens when
you don't have a dynamic society," remarked the premier,
suddenly turning pensive.
"Is vodka allowed, preem?"
asked the Highways Minister
breathlessly.
"I don't know," replied the
Great Man coldly. "Gentlemen, let's get down to business. I had a great time in
London. Really great. Rome
was great and I saw the Pope
and he was great. Now I come
home expecting to find everything great and what do I see
—the students don't want to
pay their fees. Gentlemen, I
can tell you right now, I don't
consider that great. It isn't
even dynamic."
"I'm sure they've been
drinking, Mr. Premier," shuddered the colonel.   "
"Say preem, why don't we
raise the campus speed limit
to 70?" suggested the Highways Minister brightly. "That
oughta shut the little bastards
^^^^^m^mm^^^mm&
k'C'3A'/.V'.V'
"Free higher education!
Where do they get such
ideas?" exclaimed the Premier with a gesture of frustration.
"Next they'll be wanting
pubs without hotels," squealed the colonel, as he paced
the carpet with haughty, mincing steps.
"Preem, we can't eliminate
them fees," roared the Highways Minister. "If we do how
can we afford that four-laner
from Horsefly to Bella
Coola?"
"We won't eliminate them,'
said the Great Man, slamming
the desk with his fist. "Those
people will just have to learn
that in this world you don't
get something for nothing."
Then our leader relaxed,
sitting back in his chair and
grinning widely, showing all
his iteeth. He pressed a button
on his intercom.
"Irving, are the plans ready
for raising the homeowners'
grant? They are? That's great!
. .Really great!" . ...,.-.,, Thursday, October 7,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Withholding fees
No answer, AMS!
By MIKE BOLTON
Ubyssey Features Editor
The AMS will be executing
its fee-fight plans over the
next few weeks.
Soon there will be no time
or space for back-tracking.
We will be committed to
the present policies.
Now the time is ripe for a
thoughtful look at what's happening.
AMS policy aims are reduced tuition fees, more government aid for the operating
and capital funds of universities, more student aid
through scholarships and bursaries and more power for
student leadership vis-a-vis
faculty and administration.
Admirable purposes from
the student point of view.
Springboard for these aims
is a sort of shock campaign.
Basic strategy is to foster
mass awareness. Tactical weapons range from a protest
march to the court house to
passive resistance in refusing
to pay second-term fees.
To this point the council
and the Education Action
committee, the special agency!
created to effect the fee-fight
policy, are getting almost
blanket support from The
Ubyssey and AMS membership.
Disapproval has been minor
and spasmodic.
Is the policy flawless?
The original goal was the
prevention of further fee increases. To that end the council adopted a policy of persuading students to withhold
second-term fees.*
A referendum for student
ratification of the policy will
be held Oct. 29. Almost 1,500
students signed petitions asking for the referendum.
No one will object to action.
How well does the don't
pay - second - term - fees stack
up?
What ends will it achieve?
Will it increase the status
of the university in the eyes
of the provincial and federal
governments and the public at
large? Will it convince people universities deserve more
money?
More likely it will simply
deplete the universitie's operating monies. Maybe UBC
will be forced to shut down.
Who will look foolish then?
Or possibly students adhering to the policy will find
themselves threatened with
expulsion for not paying fees.
Perhaps students will find
it is to their benefit to reject
this policy.
The policy of asking students to withhold second-term
fees seems doomed to utter
failure.
The wisest move for council now would be to drop
this policy before it becomes
embarrassing.
To describe precisely the
process of AMS decision-making is difficult.
Do policies develop from
directives of President Byron
Hender or from the chief fee
BYRON HENDER
... in command
fight protagonists, vice-presidents Robert Cruise and Peter
Braund?
So far councillors Cruise
and Braund have been the
spark plugs of the fee fight.
But I don't want to imply
that President Hender is too
weak to direct AMS policy.
I dislike equally the implication that councillors Cruise
and Braund could design such
a hollow plan.
The policy of withholding
fees grew from the need to
react immediately and decisively to the fee hike in May.
In candid moments councillors have intimated the policy was meant as a publicity
gimmick and not designed to
be effective.
The only effect it can have
is disaster.
And no amount of rationalization can justify a public relations gimmick that gives
only  adverse  publicity.
There's a whole world outside   the   gates,   councillors.
Lets show them we're
ready to fight—but don't
rubject us to ridicule.
Nuns and birth control: j Court, sport,
What about the pill?    I spots filled
The following article is reprinted from the San Francisco Examiner. It was brought
lo The Ubyssey's attention by
Librarianship student Sieglin-
de Stieda, one of the founders
of the UBC Demographic Society. The Demographic crowd
is dedicated to spreading the
word on birth control.
Roman Catholic opposition
to contraception pills does not
go to the point of denying
them to nuns and other women
in danger of rape.
This is the conclusion to
which three of the most eminent Vatican theologians have
come after mature study. Their
findings are reported in the
authoritative Catholic Church
publications, Sludi Callolici
(Catholic studies).
Msgr. Ferdinando Lambru-
schini, professor of moral theology at the pontifical Lateran
University, one of the main
Catholic seminaries of Rome,
made the point that Catholic
married couples are denied the
right to use the pills even if
there are good reasons not to
have any more children. They
can use an even more radical
technique for avoiding children—abstention.
The rape victim lacks this
alternative and therefore can
take the pills, Msgr. Lambru-
schini said.
Father Francis Hurt, a Jesuit
professor at the Georgian University, the main Rome seminary, said that a farmer has the
right to defend his property
even with machine guns and
that a human being in certain
circumstances is justified in
suspending various bodily
functions,   causing   temporary
blindness, deafness, indigestion, or interference with lung
or even heart action.
In like manner, given the
circumstances of threatened
rape, the female victim would
be justified in defending herself by arresting the germination  function of the egg cell.
Msgr. Pietro Palazzini, the
secretary of the Vatican's councilor congregation, the section
concerning the Catholic bishops of the world, shared the
Jesuit's view. He said a nun
would be justified in small
self-mutilations, such as injections to cause facial carbuncles, in an effort to disgust a
rapist and that a suspension
of a procreative function
would be even more easily
justified.
The discussion was promoted
in part by sexual abuse of
nuns in the Congo several
months ago and by danger of
new race riots in other parts
of the world.
Appointments to student court and the winter
sports centre management
committee were made
Monday.
Student council appointed Bruce Greyell,
Law II, to one of four
student court judges' positions to be filled.
Greyell previously held
posts as president of the
i United Nations club and
co-chairman of the International Clubs Symposium.
Donald Thomas, zoology grad student, and
Roger  Parkes,  grad  stu-
Idies I, were appointed
members of the student
sports     centre    manage-
I ment.
i     The management com-
II mittee is a student-faculty
|| group which operates the
arena, built two years ago
by student money.
The Return of
THE
ROAD RUNNER
(meep-meep)
five (beat Films
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FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
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PH. 263-3410
GSR   NEWS
PHOTOS FOR TOTEM
Students who plan to graduate during this academic year
and who wish their photographs to appear in the Totem
Yearbook may have their pictures taken on campus by
Campbell's Studios, at their mobile unit which will be
located next to the Stadium. The GSA has reserved the
following date: Thursday, October 14, from 9:30-12:00
and from 1:00-4:00. Students who are unable to appear
at this time may have their photos taken with students
of other faculties, at the same location, up until October
22, 1965. Thereafter arrangements must. be made with
Campbell's Studios.
. . . "On the other hand, the Roadrunner's sensitive
development was almost Dostoevskian in depth of feeling,
as contrasted with the Becket-like austerity of the plot . . ."
Friday October 8
Tuesday October 12
in the
Auditorium
12:30 Both Days
Sponsored by The Ubyssey and Pique Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,   1965
COUNCIL BOX SCORE
Here again is your handy-dandy box score on council
attendance.
Brought to you courtesy of The Ubyssey, it is a regular
feature to tell you who is working and who isn't.
For the second meeting in a row, there was 100 per
cent attendance.
Newcomers to the council are recently-elected architecture president Ken Hutchinson and library president Nick
Omelusik.
Title
Names
Present
Missed
Quebec  government  has  deaf ear
for French  student's  demands
MONTREAL <CUP)—L'Union General des Etudiants
du Quebec is getting tired of waiting for answers from the
government.
Stating they will soon be forced to think Education
Minister Paul Gerin-Lajoie does not consider UGEQ the
official representative of the students, the co-ordinating
committee of UGEQ has threatened unspecified action if
they do not receive by Oct. 8 an answer to a letter sent
on July 19.
The three points raised by the ultimatum are:
• Freezing of tuition fees.
• The provision of space for student unions and cooperatives in new institutions.
• The "centralization" of collection of fees for student
organizations in all institutions of the Ministry of
Education.
r _Vw**w#||_
You don't have to wear spectacles I
CONTACT LENSES-give better vision
Hove them expertly fitted at o reasonable price by
MU3-18U      LAWRENCE CALVERT   n» ■_*.«_«.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Homecoming Decorations Chairman
Needed to supervise the set up of Homecoming Dance
decorations in the Armouries and Field House; male
or female. Submit applications to Brock Hall, mailbox 81.
Student Court
Applications are open for: Clerk of Court.
Applications should be sent to the Secretary, A.M.S.
Box 54.
University Debating Team Tryouts
Apply in writing to'Debating Union, Box 31, Brock
Hall. State telephone number. All students are
eligible.    Deadline 4:30 p.m. Oct.  15.
Leaders needed
for conferring
President
Byron Hender
2
0
First v.p.
Bob Cruise
2
0
Second v.p.
Peter Braund
2
0
Secretary
Joan Curtis
2
0
Co-ordinator
Graeme Vance
2
0
Treasurer
Mike Sommers
2
0
Agriculture
Ed Curylo
2
0
Architecture
Ken Hutchinson
1
0
Arts
Chuck Campbell
2
0
Commerce
Rick McGraw
2
0
Education
Neal Wells
2
0
Engineering
Art Stevenson
2
0
Forestry
Dave Parker
2
0
Frosh
Kim Cambell
2
0
Grad Students
George Wotten
2
0
Home ec.
Ann Colquhoun
2
0
Law
Peter Hyndman
2
0
Medicine
Con Michas
2
0
Music
Cliff Noakes
2
0
Nursing
Patty Mathers
2
0
Pharmacy
Chuck Willett
2
0
Rehab. Medicine
" Lyna MacLean
2
0
Science
Dave Williams
2
0
Social work
Barry Worfold
2
0
Librarianship
Nick Omelusik
1
0
Leadership conference is
Co-chairman -Graham Nixon
said Tuesday more than 80 senior students are needed to attend the conference at Camp
Elphinstone Oct. 15-17.
"If we don't get delegates,
we won't have the conference,"
he said.
Purpose of the annual conference is to have senior students discuss university problems in an intellectual atmosphere.
"We worked hard on this all
summer," said Nixon, "and we
have good speakers."
Speakers at the conference
will include president John
Macdonald, Simon Fraser Academy president Patrick' McTaggart-Cowan, Victoria College
president Malcolm Taylor, and
UBC dean of graduate studies
Dr.  Ian McTaggart-Cowan.
Theme of the conference will
be The Changing University
with respect to the Undergraduate Student.
Buses will leave Brock at
4:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 15 and
return Sunday afternoon.
Application forms can be obtained from the AMS office.
Cost of the weekend is $7.
desperate for delegates.
Brew  blows
in  chem  lab
An explosion in the chemistry building Tuesday sent
grad student Dave Dawson
to hospital.
He is in satisfactory condition in Vancouver General
hospital with chest and face
cuts and a possible eye injury.
Dawson was mixing chemicals in a sealed tube when
the explosion occured.
Dr. W. R. Cullen of the
chemistry department said
he was unable to explain the
explosion.
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.  8th  (at  Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Fearn,
Minister
THANKSGIVING
Services al
11 a,m. and 7.30 p.m.
A Special   Welcome
To All Visitors
BEAT THE BUS
Make  your   grades   better
by making it to your class on time.
Solve your transportation problems with a good car
Take advantage of our fall clearance sale and save
"EVERY SALE ARRANGED ON BANK FINANCE PLAN"
1959 Volvo    $46 per month
1960 Volkswagen   37 per month
1959 Volkswagen   Window  Van        37 per month
1956 Austin A90 6-Cylinder   23 per month
1959 Hillman Convert.     37 per month
1961 Vauxhall Station Wagon 40 per month
1957 Dodge Automatic   18 per month
1957 Volkswagen    32 per month
For the sporting set try these for size:
1963 Black ITR4 in perfect condition __. 79 per month
1964 Sunbeam Alpine with removable
hard top for only   98 per month
There are many good buys in our used car dept. For
those who want to trade up to a new 1966 Volvo the best
deal in town is at:
VANCOUVER VOLVO SALES
1090 W. Georgia - MU 2-4708
and 1080 Marine Dr., N. Van. - 987-4458
"It never hurts when we put you in the driver's seat"
ACHTUNG!
Rain or shine, Flying Officer Peter Baxter, B.A. (B.C.),
hopefully the next gallant and honorable Member of
Parliament for Comox-Alberni, will make a walking tour
of UBC and SFU next week.
He will carry a sign reading:
BRAINDRAIN BAXTER
For De Facto President of Canada
He asks, respectfully, not to be confronted with questions
during this tour as he is most willing to accept an
invitation to address a noon-hour meeting for that purpose.
He hopes that it will not be presumtuous to suggest a
modest admission charge for such a noon meeting, and
he requests the proceeds be donated to the YMCA to
help start a branch in Parksville.
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
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W. PARKER
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from Birks Thursday, October 7,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
v5tsSS*U»-«^
Cash comes and goes...
Statement of  Estimated  Gross Revenue  and Proposed Expenditure
For the
YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1966
REVENUE
Director to A.M.S.
Alma Mater Society Fees
Rental Income
Interest Income
Sundry Income
Revenue   from  Subsidiary   Organizations:
A.M.S. Charter Flight
Campus Activities and Events
College Shop
Publications Advertising
Publications Sales
Undergraduate Societies   etc.
University Clubs Committee
Revenue of Associated Organizations:
Grad Class
Men's Athletics
Women's  Athletics
Total Revenue
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED
Non Discretionary:
$ 423,400
2,200
20,000
3,700
55,050
27,745
30,770
42,750
12,250
72,806
28,787
15,000
32,750
4,500
$ 449,300
270,158
52,250
$ 771,708
Student Union Building
$ 219,000
Accident Benefit Fund
1,460
Brock Art Fund
1,500
Brock Management Fund
7,300
Canadian Union of Students
8,760
Men's Athletic Committee
61,320
Women's Athletic Committee
11,680
$ 311,020
Discretionary:
Undergraduate Societies, etc.
80,906
Intramural  Fund
1,350
Open House Reserve
1,000
World University Service  Committee
11,700
94,956
EXPENDITURE
A.M.S. and Subsidiary Organizations:
A.M.S. Charter Flight
55,050
Campus Activities & Events
46,800
College Shop
28,270
Publications
77,850
Registration Photographs
4,400
University Clubs Committee
33,312
Administrative & General Expenses
46,630
292,312
Associated Organizations:
Grad Class
Men's Athletics
Women's Athletics
Total Allocation & Expenditure
MARGIN
15,000
32,750
4,500
52,250
750,538
21,170
$ 771,708
...to these groups, things
Statement of Estimated Net Revenue and Proposed Expenditure
YEAR ENDING MAY  31. 1966
Proposed
1966
Pet.   of
Budget
TotaJ
1965
Alma Mater Society Fees
Profit from College Shop
Rental Income
Interest  Income
Sundry Income
$ 423,400
2,500
2,200
20,000
3,700
93.71%
.55
.49
4.43
.82-
$ 430,168
3,665
2,019
12,119
3,739
Total Revenue
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED
Non Discretionary:
Student Union Building
Accident Benefit Fund
Brock Art Fund
Brock  Management Funa
Canadian  Union of  Students
Men's Athletic Committee
Women's Athletic  Committee
W.U.S.C.
Discretionary:
Undergraduate Societies
Academic   Symposium,   Schedule  2
Grad  Stud.  Association,   Schedule   2
Radio Society, Schedule 2
Intramural Fund
Open  House  Reserve
W.U.S.C.
EXPENDITURE
Campus Activities & Events,  Schedule. 3
Publications,  Schedule  3
Registration Photographs
University Clubs   Committee
Administrative &  General Expenses
Total Allocation & Expenditures
MARGIN
$ 451,800
219,000
1,460
1,500
7,300
8,760
61,320
11,680
100.00%   $ 451,710
48.47%
.32
.33
1.62
1.94
13.57
2.59
311,020
7,136
400
350
215
1,350
1;000
11,700
22,150
19,055
22,850
4,400
4,525
46,630
97,460
430,630
21,170
451,800
68.84
1.58
.09
.08
.04
.30
.22
2.59
4.90
4.22
5.06
.97
1.00
10.32
21.57
95.31
4.69
100.00%
$ 219,555
2,927
1,500
7,318
8,782
61,476
11,710
14,637
327,905
11,027
400
400
250
1,464
1,000
14,541
18,677
22,819
4,491
5,694
46,183
97,864
440,310
11,400
451,710
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Casual Birkdale Shirts
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Bulky-Knit Cardigans
Birkdale fully fashioned saddle shoulder style. Leather
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D. Birkdale Custom Light Blue Dot, eac|I 10.00 Page  8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,   1965
UBC commerce dept.
aids Asian universities
By MARILYN LEESE
Help.
That's what members of
UBC's commerce faculty have
been giving the Universities
of Singapore and Malaya.
The .project .which began
in May, 1961, saw the establishment of courses in accounting and business management at the two universities.
Directing the project was
Professor Leslie G. Wong who
recently returned to UBC
upon completion of the program.
The need for the courses
was brought about by the government's decision to "Malay -
anize the civil service," said
Wong.
The government also urged
business in the country, which
is now split into Singapore
and Malaysia, to adopt the
same policy.
The resultant departure of
foreign personnel sparked an
urgent need for local talent
capable of assuming managerial positions.
Wong was first invited to
Singapore in 1958 and spent
ten week there assessing the
feasibility of establishing commerce courses to train future
executives.
In the same year the University of Malaya in Singapore, established nine years
earlier by London University,
split with a second division in
Kuala -jumper, which is now
in the separate state of
Malaysia.
Wong recommended that
accounting and business management courses be introduced
at the Singapore division, but
a change of government took
place and the implementation
of his program was deferred.
In 1960, Wong returned to
Singapore to reassess his original survey, this time spon
sored by the Canadian government under the Colombo Plan.
His report, made in January
1961, included a recommendation that business courses also
be started at the Kuala Lumper division as well as at
Singapore.
By May 1961, the Canadian
government agreed to underwrite the program up to a
maximum of $500,000, and the
first team of UBC professors
was on its way.
Wong believes this to be the
fastest Colombo project implemented and he credits former external affairs minister
Howard Green with the swift
action.
The first team of five professors included Professor
Arthur Beedle, Professor
Daniel McDonald, Dr. William
Hughes, Dr. Noel Hall and
Wong.
UBC members of later
teams were Professor Harvey
Babiak, Dr. G. David Quirin,
Professor John C. Mitchell
and Professor Hugh Wilkinson.
The business courses were
offered by the department of
economics of each division as
a three-year program leading
to a bachelor of arts degree.
During the past five years
2,097 Singapore and Malayan
students have registered for
these courses.
In order to sustain the
quality of the program with
local staff, selected graduate
students have been recruited
under Colombo Plan scholarships for graduate studies at
UBC.
Wong said about nine are
now attending UBC prior to
returning to teaching positions at either the University
of Malaya or the University of
Singapore.
The  two   became   separate
and autonomus institutions in
1962.
The Ford Foundation Thursday made a grant of $250,000
to the two southeast Asian
universities to finance a continuing program of graduate
studies at UBC and Harvard.
Wong said: "One of the advantages of UBC handling the
project was that one institution was charged with the responsibility of staffing, and
controlling the substance and
continuity of the courses."
"Another advantage was
the coordination of administrative detail simplified such
problems as adequate housing," he said.
Wong said the expulsion of
Singapore from Malaysia
should not affect the project.
He said the universites have
established a liaison committee and co-ordinate such matters as new courses and the
level of faculty salaries.
He said both the governments of Malaysia and Singapore are anxious to promote a
higher standard of living and
are rushing programs in education and industrialization.
Proof of the success of the
project was the citation it received at the 1963 Commonwealth University Conference
in London, England.
The citation praised UBC's
action as an ideal example of
assisting higher education in
developing countries.
Pentax _■». _■»_
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SURE!
ON A BODY
FOR BODY SWAP
Trade your Pentax S.V. body and coupled Meter II
(in good shape) on a new SPOTMATIC body for only $99
this week. Slightly more for older bodies or other makes.
KERRISDALE CAMERAS
FROSH BALL-
CORSAGE ? ?
Call  Strathcona  Floral
Co. Ltd.
5555 W. Blvd.
AM 1-7271
FREE
Transportation
From   Campus   to
College   Bible   Class
at
Broadway
Tabernacle
each Sunday A.M.
Please contact the
Pentacostal Chaplain
Miss Bernice Gerard
or Ken Gaglardi
266-9275
Room 118, Physics Bldg.
UNDERGRAD BUDGETS
Prop.
Alloc.
1965
Agriculture $
Architecture
Arts
B.Comm.-C.A. Students
Commerce
Education
Engineering
Forestry
Frosh
Home  Economics
Law
Librarianship
Medical
Music   Students
Nursing
Pharmacy
Physical Education
Rehabilitation Medicine
Science
Social Work
Undergraduate Societies Committee
Margin
326
174
Alloc.
1966
$  425
154
120
400
1,044
1,192
152
725
1,100
1,490
300
57
783
117
275
900
731
218
174
239
191
83
692
692
290
900
260
265
300
235
120
840
550
Bal.
May 31,
1965
$   142
"(     62)
110
1
118
(    781)
(    300)
938
(    177)
294
52
55
102
(     211)
(      13)
(    266)
(      21)
91
(    301)
971
$ 7,135        $ 8,839        $     742
$     400       $     400        $ ( 124)
Academic  Symposium
Graduate Students' Association   $     350      $     400
Radio Society
$     596
$     215       $     250       $<1,367)
*  Bracketed amounts are deficit..
This Year's
GRAD BOOK
. . . will be a combination of "campus life" and the grad
edition.
300 picture-packed pages in a hard board cover.
. . . advance orders receive an 8-page graduation supplement of your graduation ceremonies—mailed to YOU
in June.
... all this is yours for only $5.00
CAMPUS LIFE . . .
... 144 pages of you and your campus.
. . . photos and photo essays with a record of events as
they happen.
• for undergrads - only $2.00
BUY YOUR TOTEM NOW
Avoid disappointment
At AMS business office and totem office BE 168
2170 W. 41st
AM 6-2622
ATTENTION UBC STUDENTS
Our Selection of Sporting and Athletic Equipment
Is Selected With YOU In Mind
See Our Selection of Bauer and C.C.M. Skates
Also Sticks — Pads — Helmets, etc.
HOCKEY, SOCCER, FOOTBALL
SPECIALISTS
NORTH
WESTERN SPORTING GOODS
LTD.
Tenth at Alma
Phone 224-5040 Thursday, October 7,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Hitch a ride with Mike
—Air Canada dubious
St. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP)—
(Prime Minister Pearson told
students last week that if all
else fails they should try to
arrange free flights home with
Air Canada to vote in the Nov.
8 election.
He made the suggestion
after he stated that the chief
electoral officer had not advised him there would be any
difficulty with student voting
before he called the election.
Air Canada President G. R.
Women  sweep  into
mens  residences
By  BILL GRAF
Students in the men's residences at Lower Mall, Acadia
and Fort Camp may wake up one morning and find a
woman in their quarters.
They'll be female janitors
wearing identification card attached to their lapels.
Residence cleaning and
maintenance has recently been
organized under a housekeeping section which is subordinate to the housing administration.
The newly created department,   under   Mrs.   Doreen
KNUTE BUTTEDAHL
. . . teamwork
CUSO wants
600 more
volunteers
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Universiy Service Overseas (CUSO) wants to triple its
program by 1967.
At the national conference
of CUSO held in Ottawa Oct.
2 and 3, the student organization resolved to increase its
present S23 overseas volunteers to 1,000 within the next
two years.
Whether the projected expansion can be achieved will
depend on CUSO's relationship
with the federal government
and the Company of Young
Canadians, according to Paul
Ladouceur, international affairs secretary of the Canadian Union of Students.
CUSO has a budget of $215,-
000, half of which comes from,
corporate donations and half
from the federal government.
Prime Minister Pearson, ad-
^dressing the conference at a
^ttKicheon Oct. 1, said the government would continue an
"active partnership and co-operation with CUSO whether
through direct assistance or
through the Company of Young
Blackwood, will function as a
kind of "janitor-pool."
Instead of the system of one
janitor to a house or hut, personnel will be assigned for
specific tasks.
"The aim of the new system," says acting housing director Knute Buttedahl, "is to use
our present staff to best advantage and develop specialization and efficiency.
"For example, extra demands on janitorial staff would
occur after a residence dance,
or for spring cleaning.
"Functioning as a team, several men and women can work
more effectively in cleaning"
he said.
Buttedahl said the system
was first tried experimentally
at summer school in all residences and women janitors
have been at work in Totem
residences since the beginning
of the fall term.
"In both cases, it seems to
have worked very well," he
said.
Lower Mall, Fort Camp and
Acadia residences have not
yet been affected.
In a prepresentative poll of
residence students, it was
found that less than 1% were
aware of the change.
In fact, not one of five janitors polled knew of the change.
Reactions among male students were: 64 per cent against
26 per cent indifferent, 10 per
cent in favor. Virtually all
were opposed if the change involved a lay-off or dismissal of
present staff.
Many students plan to actively oppose women janitors
entering men's residences.
Some of the plans of resistance
were ingenious. Others were
obscene.
"I'd rather fight than
switch," said Larry Gradin,
Arts II, of Lower Mall.
Said one Fort Camp student.
"I guess it's all right if they
hire some nice young ones,
preferably recent immigrants
from Sweden."
"If a student lives off cam-
pus—in a boarding house or
hotel for example—one must
use a little discretion," said
Buttedahl. "There's no reason
why the same principle cannot
be applied in residences.
"Female staff especially will
be thoroughly instructed to employ discretion  at all times."
"Signs will be posted on
washrooms and in halls whenever a janitoress is present,"
he said.
Buttedahl denied that any
present staff will be laid off
or fired as a result of the
changes.
MacGregor, in a phone interview, reacted to the story by
telling students:
'They are wasting their
time getting in touch with us.
There are a few laws about
this you know,"
Asked whether the Prime
Minister had been in touch
with him he replied:
"No."
The Canadian Union of Students estimates that over 7,000
students of voting age live at
least 500 miles from home.
Nearly 4,000 of these live at
least 1,000 miles from home.
According to Air Canada
figures it would take approximately 28 Vanguards and 30
DC-8's to airlift the students
to the polls. Total cost at
charter rates for the return
trips would be a minimum of
$375,000.
WINRAM INSURANCE LIMITED
SPECIALIZING IN REDUCING
SURCHARGED AUTO PREMIUMS
RE 1-5328
1678 West Broadway
Anglicans and United
Come Together
to
A Short Service, Discussion
and Coffee Hour
"
University Hill United Church
5375 University Boulevard
this Sunday, October 10th, at 7:30 p.m.
Speaker: Rev.  Desmond  Kimmitt,
St.  Anselm's Anglican Church
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
advanced jacketry
... wide wale corduroy with leather-
like detail on pockets, matched with
leather buttons . . . combined to be a
worthy escort for a smiling co-ed and
equally adept on-campus or off! Subtle shades of beige, brown, green or
grey all coming up effectively in
lustrous cotton corduroy, in 3-button,
natural shoulder styling, with centre
vent. Sizes 36-44 for regular, short
and tall.
Each 29.95
The Bay Career and Campus Shop,
second floor
Canadians." Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,  1965
FOOTBALL BIRDS SET FOR HOME OPENER
IAN DONALD
.  .  . these
GEORGE BRAJCICH
. . , five
MIKE ROHAN
. . . will
Thunderbirds entertain
Lumberjacks Saturday
By DAN MULLEN
The UBC Thunderbirds will
try for their first 1965 football
victory when they open their
home season Saturday against
the Humboldt State College
Lumberjacks.
UBC has lost to Western
Washington and tied with
Southern Oregon and McMaster, while the Lumberjacks
have defeated Central Washington and Hawaii, and lost last
week to Williamette.
Humboldt State is a small
school (its enrolment is barely
over 3,000), but its football attitude is big league.
"They take the game very
seriously, and it pays off for
them in the win column," UBC
head coach Frank Gnup says.
"Their coach (Phil Sarboe)
has won 100 games and lost
only 33 since he took over at
Humboldt in 1951, and when
you look at the films of their
games, you see why. They're
big, fast and tough. They charge
straight ahead at good teams,
and they beat them."
Yanks-Soviets
clash  at  UBC
Tickets for the Russia-U.S.
volleyball match are now available at UBC Memorial Gym.,
in the athletic office.
The Russian men's team,
Olympic and world champions,
play the U.S. Nationals, Oct. 16
at the Memorial Gym.
The Soviet women, who won
a silver medal at the Tokyo
Olympics, play an exhibition,
while a local all star team plays
the U.S. national women.
Tickets are $3, $2, and $1
rush, and are also on sale at
Vancouver Ticket Centre, Kerrisdale Travel and. all Eaton's
stores.
Nicholson speaks
John Nicholson, minister of
citizenship and immigration,
will speak on community planning Friday noon in Lasserre
102.
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE  FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
Humboldt State arrives here
this afternoon from Areata,
California, to prepare for Saturday's clash at Varsity Stadium. Game time is 2 p.m.
The Lumberjacks won eight
games and lost two in 1964,
posting a 4-1 record in Far
Western Conference play. They
mauled Whitworth College 21-3
in an small college playoff bowl
game.
Sports Illustrated lists them
as strong contenders for the
Far Western title again this
year.
And the Thunderbirds are
bracing for a rugged afternoon.
Veteran Dick Gibbons will
start at quarterback for the
Thunderbirds. Newcomer Aldo
Venier will run from the full
back slot, flanked by halfbacks
Paul Danyliu and Ron Kincade.
Ian Donald, in his fourth
season with the Birds, will man
one end post, and speedy Lance
Fletcher will be at the other.
Leading UBC interior lineman will be captain George
Brajcich, tackle. His running
mate is John Christopher.
At the guards the Birds will
have Kevin Murphy and Paul
Kileen. Mike Rohan is the
center.
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
IVOR WILLIAMS
VARSITY
SPORTING GOODS
SKI SPECIALISTS
HART-GRESVIG
STUDENT HEADQUARTERS
FOR ALL SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Skate Sharpening — Restringing
4510 W. 10th 224-6414
U.B.C THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —   Students .35*   Adults .60<
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75?
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The Centre will be closed all day Christmas Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:  Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
LANCE FLETCHER
.   .   .  start
DICK GIBBONS
. .  . Saturday
Exfension department
offers IBM courses
Five evening courses on computers start next week.
The UBC extension department is offering introductory courses in digital computer applications, IBM 1401
programming and Fortran IV programming.
Classes meet Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
A mangement operation research course will be held
Mondays at 8 p.m.
A short course in the use of computers in structural
analysis is also planned.
Further information may be obtained from the UBC
extension department.
... GO TO LONDON DRUGS
OPTICAL DEPT.
for the
lowest prices in town.
Eyeglasses $0-95
INCLUDING FRAME, %M
LENSES AND CASE FROM        ^*
Bring Your Optical  Prescription
D-f-_-___l__   with lenses, frames 1A AC
bllOCalS   and case from   l_C_93
Contact Lenses 49.50
•Single Vision Glass.] Only
Emergency Prescription Service Available
Our Prices
or* THE
Lowest in
Town!
imiTEl
OPTICAL  DEPT.
ONE LOCATION ONLY
677 Granville, opposite The Bay.  Phone 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite Park Thursday, October 7, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
SPORTS   BACKGROUND
Canadians were finally there
The following is an account written for the
Canadian University Press by Bruce Kldd, famed
Toronto track star, who accompanied the Canadian
team to the Universiade 1965 in Budapest, Hungary. These are the World Games of the "Federation Internationale du Sport Universitaire"
(FISU). University athletes from 38 countries participated in the games from  Aug. 20-29.
By BRUCE KIDD
If it wasn't for the spanking new Maple
Leaf flag they were marching behind, you
would have thought the team members of
Canada's first entry to the World Student
Games were just ten gypsies who had wandered in from the moors and accidently got
mixed up in the gala parade of the Games
opening ceremony.
In sharp comparison with the other 1700
smartly-stepping, nattily uniformed athletes
parading into Budapest's National Stadium,
the Canadians, dressed in a motley assortment of suits, sweaters, sports jackets, and
blazers, plodded aimlessly around the track.
Yet they were there.
After many years of frustration for Canadian college athletes who wanted to compete
in the Games, but couldn't, Canada had
finally sent a team.
Sending it there had meant a good deal of
blood, sweat, and tears for the Canadian
Union of Students executive, who last year
seized the initiative and decided to get some
Canadians to Budapest. Just raising enough
money was a major problem, and CUS was
barely able to scrape together enough to fly
in ten athletes and provide them with competitive uniforms.
But the effort was well worth it.
For a significant contribution has been
made to both the international and the Canadian intercollegiate sports movement.
Up until the Universiade, the Games had
suffered from the absence of many western
competitors. Canada's appearance and the
entry of such athletes as Bill Crothers and
Harry Jerome contributed to the raising of
performances to such a level that very soon
the Universiade will rank second only to the
Olympics.
And the fact that now Canadian college
athletes can look foward to international
competition in the Tokyo Universiade in
1967 has provided a tremendous boost to
the college sports scene.
While they dressed like paupers, the Canadians ran like princes, capturing four
medals in the last four days of competition.
Harry Jerome began the march to the
podium with a bronze medal in the 100
metres. After Cuba's Enrique Figuerola withdrew because of a pulled muscle, the anticipated race of the year between the two still-
competing medalists in the Olympic 100,
Jerome and Figuerola, was all off, but spectators got the race of the year anyway.
In a photo finish final, Japan's Hideo
Iijima nipped USA's George Anderson for
the championship, while a near-lame Jerome
was a half a body's width behind. The winning time was a fast 10.1 and the first six
finishers were clocked in 10.3 or better.
Bill Crothers gave the Games its classiest
victory a day later with a thrilling exhibition
of steel nerves and a quick kick. Until a
mere hundred yards from the finish, the
Toronto graduate pharmacist lingered in
seventh place — and then he moved. Forty
yards later the 800 final was in the bag, as
the fastest 800-meter men in the world tried
in vain to catch the fleeing Canadian.
Crothers' winning time of 1:47.7 established a new Games record.
Easily one of the most courageous performances in the Games was Abby Hoffman's
third-place finish in the women's 800. Miss
Hoffman literally fought her way past Hungary's Olga Kazy on the final bend to enter
the stretch in third about ten yards up on her
nearest pursuer. But then fatigue hit her
like a hammer and it appeared that she
would never finish. But hang on grimly she
did, and staggered across the finish with a
bronze medal by a yard and a new Canadian
record of 2:07.8.
Despite the keen competition which characterized every sport contested at the Games,
rivalry was powerless to stop spontaneous
outbursts of camaraderie and good spirit
among the student athletes. Best example of
this was the victory ceremonies, where instead of the national anthem of the winner,
the international student song, Gaudeamus
Igitur, was played.
Every time a winner was declared, the
whole stadium rose as one and joined in,
often with interlocking arms. And usually
the athletes on the podium sang the loudest.
Hardly lacking any of the heights of performance of other international games, the
Universiade in Budapest by its friendly spirit
demonstrated without doubt that sport can
be one of the world's great unifiers of men.
H. W. PARKER
design director of the Royal Ontario Museum
faolulion ogih* C/huaJ UJohld
Being an examination of the world of sight and sound
It is unique and edifying and not to be missed
NOON TODAY
25c
AUDITORIUM
SPECIAL
EVENTS
TODAY 12:30 BROCK 25c
THE THREE D's
Specializing in folk music, they expand from there and
run the entertainment gamut from light comedy to sem-
classical song,  accompanying  themselves on a  variety
of instruments from trumpet to banjo. The three D's won
the best song academy award for
their Chim Chim Chiree, the theme song
of "Mary Poppins"
OCTOBER 8, 9 & 10
B.C. UNIVERSITIES
TEACH-IN AT BROCK
B.C. UNIVERSITIES' TEACH - IN
A faculty-student seminar discussing RESPONSE to REVOLUTIONS
FRIDAY, OCT. 8, 8 P.M.:   Panel discussion to introduce the issues.
10 P.M.: Dr  Linus Pauling.
SATURDAY, OCT. 9, 10.30 A.M.: The UBC Teach - In joins the University of Toronto
Teach - In by direct wire to hear representatives of the U.S. State Dept., the Saigon
government, the National Liberation Front (Viet Cong), and Cambodia discuss the
war in Vietnam
2:30 P.M.: A panel chaired by Dr. Holland, Head of UBC's Asian Studies Dept.,
discusses Vietnam.   Panelists include Dr. Wm. Willmott and Dr   K. Holsti.   Also
Robert Scheer, of Berkeley.
8:30 PM.: Canada's Role in crisis situations is discussed by Howard Green (P.C.),
Jack Austin (Lib.), and Bob Prittie (NDP)   Chaired by Dean F. H. Soward.
SUNDAY, OCT. 10,9:30 AM.: Delayed broadcast from Toronto of the debate between
Cheddi Jagan (British Guiana), A. Lock ward (Dominican Republic) and A. Berle
(U.S. State Dept.).
11:00 A.M.: UBC panel discusses self-determination in S.E. Asia, Africa, Latin
America and  Eastern  Europe.
2:30 P.M.: Moral Responsibility: the question of personal committment is debated
by Wm. Nicholls (Head of UBC's Religious Studies Dept.), Robert Scheer of Berkeley
and two students.
ALL SESSIONS include time for STUDENT DISCUSSION from the floor.
ALL EVENTS IN BROCK HALL - FREE
..F_»-_«_T_fc.-r_,i Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 7,  1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Pubsters
go beep!
The Ubyssey and Pique are
running the Second Annual
Roadrunner Film Festival Oct.
8 and 12. Cartoons run at noon
in the Aud. Friday and next
Tuesday for only 50 cents.
• •      •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting noon today,
Chem. 250.
• •      •
NEWMAN CLUB
All new and prospective
members invited for today ant
Fri. noon.
• •      •
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
General meeting in BU. 216
noon today. All members
please attend.
• •      •
POETRY READING
Subversive introduction today noon in BU. 102.
• •      •
SQUARE DANCE CLUB
Important meeting noon today, Hut L6. All welcome,
especially beginners.
• •      •
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Filth-free-tfun with the Three
D's today noon in Brock.
• •      •
SUS
General meeting noon today
in Hennings 200. All science
students welcome.
• •      •
CUSO
General meeting noon today
in BU. 202. All interested invited.
• •      •
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Jack Wise will discuss his
paintings today at noon in library basement.
• •      •
DANCE CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Dance Club Lounge, Brock
Extension. All welcome.
• •     •
FIGURE SKATING
Practice tonight at 6:15 in
Winter Sports Arena. All interested please attend.
• •      •
SAILING CLUB
General meeting today noon
in Angus 110.
• •     •
COMMITTEE   TO   END   THE
WAR IN VIETNAM
Founding meeting today
noon in BU. 100.
Brock food isn't
Jor  councillors
Hungry student councillors
are looking for a new place
to eat.
"We are not satisfied with
what we are getting in Brock
for the price we are paying,"
said AMS treasurer Mike Sommers.
Councillors have dinner in
Brock every Monday night before the council meeting.
"Off-campus caterers are too
expensive,"  said Sommers.
George     Wootten,     grad
studies   president,   is   looking
> into the possibility of having
\the    councillors   eat    at   the
Graduate  Student   Centre   on
Monday nights.
Dean's Welcomes Back
U.B.C. Students
TRY OUR TAKE HOME SERVICE
OsanA fisL&tauhanl and (Dining dhoom
4544 West 10th Phone 224-6919
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock  Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lot! & Found 11
LOST AT TOTEM PARK DANCE,
Oct. 2, UBC jacket (white leather
sleeves), pockets contained personal papers. If found contact
John Hopkins, Acadia Hut 30,
Room  3,  or phone  224-9946.	
BLACK KEY CASE, LOST IN
front of Ponderosa Sept. 28. Finder  phone   684-7053.	
LOST: WALLET AT FROSH RE-
treat. Reward. Please contact
Clive, AM 1-8737.	
LOST: CALCULUS AND ANALY-
tical geometry in Chem. 200, Mon-
day.  AM 6-0587.	
LOST: BLACK LADY'S HANDBAG
in Chemistry 424 Lab., Monday
afternoon after Chem. 230 Lab.
Can keep money, but I need I.D.,
etc. Phone Carol Wilson, 224-9047,
Maclnnes Hall, Fort Camp. Reward.
FOUND IN LIBRARY FRIDAY
girl's black glasses. Pick up in
Publication Office,  Brock Hall.
FOUND: SET LAB. INSTRU-
ments in front of Wesbrook Hospital Thursday, Sept. 30. Phone
731-1991.  Ask  for  Barry.	
FOUND: ST. CHRISTOPHER
Medal with "Protect U.S." on one
side.   Call   731-6465  after   5.30  p.m.
FOUND: MAN'S SILK SCARF,
grey pattern, outside Registrar's
Office—east side, Tuesday, 11:30
a.m. Call at Publications Office,
Ubyssey,  Brock  Hall.	
FOUND: EDWARD       TAYLOR'S
English 451   notebook.   Call  Penny
at UBC Radio, South Brock Basement.
FOUND: 3 KEYS (EATON'S) (Mc
Kay Cycle) on chain. Apply
Brock  Proctor.   	
LOST: BLACK SCHAEFFER
foutain pen, vicinity A Lot or Fort
Camp. Reward. Greg Lee. Phone
224-9016.
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242. 	
Special Notices
13
FORESTRY  WEEK —  OCT.   11 - 15
Watch  For  Special  Events.	
FORESTER'S HARD TIME "UN-
dercut" Dance Oct. 15 PNE Show-
mart Bldg. 8:00 p.m. Buses from
Residences.   All   students   invited.
ONLY SEVEN MONTH TO QRADU-
atlon. Next Year's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office.
INTERESTED in Figure Skating &
dancing on Ice? UBC Thunderbird
Arena Tuesdays 7:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Special rates. For full information
call Pt. Grey Winter Club. 224-
7628. 	
EVOLUTION OF THE VISUAL
World. H. W. Parker talks about
Iconic and Pictorial. Noon today,
Auditorium.      ;
WANTED AFTER 6 P.M. THURS.,
ride to Cranbrook or Golden for
two. Will share exp. Ph. 224-9054,
Rm.   403. 	
GOING SOUTH? WOULD LIKE
ride to Seattle or Portland Friday
night. Share gas. Maggie. RE 3-
9544. 	
THE SONICS AND THE VANCOU-
ver Playboys will be here this
Saturday in the armories for
Frosh Reception Dance. Tickets
sold at A.M.S.  Office.
THE SHOCKERS, HAVING RE-
cently placed fourth in a Pacific
Northwest Contest (88 bands participated), will be at Campus A
Go-Go playing all your Mersey and
folk-rock favorites! And they're
only the SECOND of SIX great
reasons for you to be at Campus
A  Co.-Go!
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED TO SAN FRAN-
cisco this weekend. Share gas,
driving. Leave Friday aft. Return
Tuesday morning. Contact Kim,
Room 392, Haida House (Totem
Park),   224-9751   evening.
RIDERS WANTED, VICINITY 3200
Block, Broadway. Call 731-1991.
20c  a  day   return.	
RIDE WANTED TWO ROAD AND
Steveston Hwy., Richmond, 8:30
classes. Phone Liliane, 277-8189 or
277-3661.	
CAR POOL URGENTLY NEEDED,
area of Lynn, Valley, Second Nar-
rows,   North   Van.   Phone   985-3202.
RIDE WANTED TO CALGARY
Friday, will share driving and gas.
736-7001  evenings.
RIDE WANTED FROM 63rd AND
Cambie. Please call Cathy, 321-
2482. 	
Wanted
15
WANTED: GEOGRAPHY 101 TEXT
—Strahler Economics 100 Text.
Heaton. Phone 921-7028.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61 MOD.  SPRITE,  NEW  BRAKES,
tires,  paint.  Also  snow  tires,   ski
rack.   Mowich  253-8876.	
ATTENTION    RALLY    FANS!    160
Skoda   Sports   Convert.,   spotless,
new tires, brakes, clutch, etc. 1100
cc. Twin Carb. $500 or offer. BR
7-2012. 	
1962 VALIANT SIGNET — 2 door
hardtop-automatic. Fully equipped.
In excellent condition. $1700.00 or
best offer. Phone 738-2988 after
5:00 p.m.
1957 SUNBEAM RAPIER. Sale or
trade for sports car. Stick, tach.,
good  cond.  AM  6-0162 Grant
1953    MG-TD,    GOOD    CONDITION,
best offer? Phone 684-7053.
1950   DODGE FOR   SALE.   PHONE
321-6461. 	
PRIVATE—'57 METEOR 6 CYL.,
auto, trans., radio, motor recently
overhauled. Priced for quick sale.
Mr. Wagner, WA 2-4111 or YU
7-0164. 	
M.G.A. CONVERTIBLE, WIRE
wheeles. Except, clean condt., $700.
Phone Mike at 263-599L-	
1955  CHEV.   61 STANDARD,  $325.00.
Call Fred at 224-9720.	
MUST SELL, 1961 SIMCA. DEPEN-
dable transportation, $395, or best
offer. 224-9066 or 731-5009. Gary
or Janet.
60 ALPINE, WIRE WHEELS,
tonneau, radio. Good shape. Dave,
WA   2-6327. 	
Automobiles — Wanted
25
Motorcycles
27
1965 HONDA "90", 5500 MI.
Valves and rings done at 4900
mi. Good condition. 434-8246 after
6 p.m.
•64 HONDA 160 SUPER SPORT.
Excellent condition. Windshield,
legshields, saddle bags, two helmets, two rear sprockets, plus
more. $465. John, 922-3497, after 6.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriter- & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repair* at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone KB
1-8322.
Typing
42
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, and cases typed by qualified typists. From 40c per sheet
including paper, one carbon copy,
and binder. See us for mimeographing, dittos, stencil cutting,
and Multilith master preparation.
We also offer complete editing
and rewrite service — Ardale
Griffiths Limited at 70th and
Granville.  Phone  263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
BABYSITTER WANTED: ACADIA
Camp. Usually three mornings
every second week. Simultaneous
studying possible. Call CA 8-8026.
FREE ROOMj AND BOARD FOR
female student in exchange for
baby sitting and very light duties.
Day help maintained. Car pool
nearby.  Phone  AM 6-0628.
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,  701 Beach.
Work Wanted
32
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
$4
Instruction Wanted
66
GERMAN 200 TUTOR WANTED.
Basically for conversation. 224-7592
after 6. 	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
MARTIN      6-STRING     GUITAR.
Phone Craig,  526-6070 eve.
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 15-45 lbs. From $7.50.
FA 1-1776  and AM 6-2869.
Rooms
81
UBC GIRL TO SHARE MAIN
floor suite with same. RE 8-3064,
2273  3rd Ave. West.
Furnished Houses & Apts.     83
SELF-CONTAINED, FURNISHED
suite. Ideal for one or two students. Phone RE 3-5561, evenings.
HOUSE of STEIN Ltd.
901  GRANVILLE or 1005 GRANVILLE
VANCOUVER, B.C. MU 3-6120, MU 3-6311
MU 5-5611, MU 5-8657
BRINGS YOU
For The First Time Under $300
a
A
A PROFESSIONAL MINIATURE
„^ TAPE RECORDER
• MOST BRILLIANTLY ENGINEERED
Dimensions
TRUE FIDELITY - '*™""«'
FULLY TRANSISTORIZED
Automatically stores: your ideas, reports, {nemos . . . repeats them en
.errand. A "must" fer the busy
executive or professional man.
Check These Outstanding
Features:
• SO minutes recording or
playback time.
• Capstan driven, precision 15/16 I.P.S.
• Weighs only 1V* lbs.
• Operates on  four  inexpensive panlite
batteries.
• UNCONDITIONALLY
GUARANTEED
As Illustrated:
Eicrou
Complete with dynamic microphone, batteries, earphone, reel
of  tape,  empty   reels.
o«w
1.50
Introductory Offer!
You get absolutely free with each
recorder 3 long playing tapes.
Plus
Telephone adapter to record from
any phone, your important conversations.
ORDER BY PHONE, MAIL or WRITE
Discount to UBC Students
10%

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