UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 21, 1972

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127722.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127722.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127722-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127722-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127722-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127722-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127722-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127722-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127722-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127722.ris

Full Text

Array Jesuits claim mixed-coffee capers illegal
SUDBURY (CUP) - A student
picket line at, Laurentian
University and its' three affiliated
colleges Thursday has resulted in
Laurentian senate criticism of the
University of Sudbury residence
administration's decision to evict
three students.
The three University of
Sudbury students were accused of
drinking coffee together in a room
in violation of residence
regulations barring the mixing of
men and women in residence
rooms. The university claimed the
right to evict the students under
the     provisions     of     the
Landlord-Tenant Act.
The Laurentian students set up
a picket line around the residence
and convinced drivers approaching
the residence not to cross it.
Delivery trucks turned back and
the only vehicle to cross was a
University of Sudbury snowplow.
The picketers also converged
on the Laurentian senate
chambers where the regular
agenda was dropped in favor of a
discussion of the U of S issue. The
senate "publicly deplored" the
action of the University of
Sudbury and passed a resolution
favoring the abolition of "all
vestiges of 'in loco parentis'"
from the university and its
affiliated colleges.
A lawyer retained for the
evicted students by the
Laurentian student association,
told them the Landlord-Tenant
Act does not apply to universities.
An organizer of the protest
told the local press that the
adverse publicity from the picket
was designed to stop the
university from "setting a
precedent" in residence
administration.
The residence is run for
Catholic students by Jesuit
fathers.
LEADERS OF THE LAUNDROMAT are members of Troupe, city acting company which
has developed play Rinse Cycle, about life in the fifties. Production is part written, part
improvisation  and  features  quaint  period  costumes  and  sleazy jargon.  It runs until
Saturday at Intermedia Hall, First and Semlin, starting at 8:30 p.m. Price is $1.
Principal denied leave to speak
By SANDY KASS
A speech scheduled to be given today by
Campbell River secondary school principal John
Young, was cancelled Friday when Young's school
board refused to allow him time off to visit UBC.
Young, who was scheduled to speak to the
education students association at noon, claims the
move is purely political.
The board invoked a rarely-used technicality
preventing him from taking a one-day leave of
absence.
Young and his school received attention when
he dropped a number of restrictions on behavior
and choice of classes, resulting in the removal of the
school's accreditation from the B.C. education
department.
Young said Monday there are two methods of
obtaining a leave of absence from the board.
The first, he said, is the granting of a leave
request at a regular board meeting.
The second method, which Young said is not
formal board procedure, is getting verbal approval
from a number of board members over the
telephone.
"While this isn't formal procedure and legally,
is not allowed, I did this because it is common in
cases where there isn't enough time to get formal
approval at a board meeting," said Young.
at UBC
Young said when he approached board
members to get verbal telephone approval, he was
told he would have to get the approval at the next
board meeting tonight.
He said he was invited to speak to the EdSA as
part of Education Week early last week and did not
have time to approach the board for the leave at last
Tuesday's meeting.
"But there is a long history of leaves being
approved over the phone and in seven years at
Campbell River, this has never happened to me
before.
"The majority of school board members are
against me personally, but not giving me this leave,
after all the extra hours I've put in at this job, is just
despicable."
He said he often works nights and weekends
and spends an average of one summer month per
year planning activities for the school without pay.
"This whole thing is a very shoddy business,"
he said.
However, a spokesman for the Campbell River
school  board told The Ubyssey Young did not
approach members for permission to take the leave.
Don Timchuck, board secretary-treasurer, said
Monday the normal procedure in asking for time
off is to bring the request before a board meeting.
"But Young did not do this, nor did he try to
get approval over the phone," Timchuck said.
However, Young maintains he tried to get
permission over the phone and was refused.
Said Timchuck: "If Young was willing to lose a
day's pay for the absence, perhaps we could arrange
it."
EdSA president Rick Rodriguez said Monday
he was very disappointed at the board's decision.
"Not only did Young try to get verbal approval
to speak to us, but (education dean Neville) Scarfe
and I both phoned the board personally to try and
arrange it.
"But on Friday I was told definitely there was
no way the board would give in," Rodriguez said.
He said he would try and arrange another time
for Young to speak at UBC, and Young said
Monday he would try to accept any further
invitations offered to visit the campus.
"It is important that people know about
current educational issues, especially from the
people in the field," Young said. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
Disaster
tential
in CBC
stri ke
Last Post News Service
The author, who must remain anonymous,
works for CBC television.
TORONTO - The rotating strike of CBC
technicians is not being viewed very seriously by
most Canadians. The discomfort it creates is
negligible except on Hockey Night in Canada.
Besides, it's fun to see Knowlton Nash screw up the
National News.
And right now, negotiations are going fairly
smoothly in Montreal, even though the CBC and
NABET (the National Association of Broadcasting
Engineers and Technicians) haven't tackled the
rocky issues of wages and working conditions.
But this sleeper strike has all the elements of a
potential disaster.
First of all, there have been many indications
that the CBC and the government are prepared to sit
it out and try to defeat the union.
One member of parliament reported privately
that he spoke to Gerard Pelletier, the minister
responsible for the CBC, and Pelletier said firmly
that the technicians are making plenty of money as
it is, and "I am prepared to take a strike that lasts
months if necessary."
If this is true, and it is by no means certain that
it is, it's a bitter irony.
Pelletier was among Quebec intellectuals who
supported the 1959 French producers' strike against
the CBC, when Prime Minister Diefenbaker was
virtually trying to quash Radio-Canada, the CBC's
French service. The Tory government's callous
disregard for the importance of Radio-Canada to
Quebec culture was not lost on some of the
strikers — Rene Levesque, Pierre Bourgault and
many other nationalists who went on to defect from
the Quiet Revolution to the Parti Quebecois.
It would be tragic if the same disregard for
underlying realities has found roost in Pelletier's
department today.
First of all, most of the technicians' demands
are justified, and relatively moderate. They are,
along with the office workers, at the bottom of the
salary heap in a Disneyland of overpaid performers.
The support the technicians have drawn from the
announcers, the news writers and the producers in
this rotating strike should convince the CBC and the
government that there is a great deal of justification
in the technicians' demands.
The most important thing, and here the analogy
to 1959 comes in, the technicians' strike is only the
tip of the iceberg. The situation in the CBC is in
great ferment.
CBC radio is undergoing a revival — it has
excellent people in it, and it has taken a strong
nationalist turn. Younger producers are replacing
the older hacks.
Television, which has been a disaster area for
years, is falling apart. And well it should. It has been
consistently unable to develop good Canadian
programming. Television, saddled with a rotting
managerial stratum, has the embryo of a revolt
among its lower ranks.
All this sentiment is now rallying around the
technicians, and the strike has grown to be a
symbolic issue for much of the production sector.
Their aim goes beyond supporting the immediate
demands of the technicians, to beginning the war
against dead management.
And on this tableau, the CBC negotiators are
playing tough. And the government, through
Pelletier's department and the treasury board, which
holds the government's purse-strings, are backing
them up. If the rotating strikes blow up into a
national general strike, a war between the
production and managerial sectors may be touched
off. Not that such a war isn't overdue, but it's the
wrong time and the wrong set of circumstances. It
would crumble into a bitter battle of attrition as the
1959 strike did.
Rumours and speculations about the
government's position are rife, and even much of
middle management is worried. Does the Trudeau
government want a strike, a strike which would
annoy Canadians in their living-rooms on Hockey
Night, so that anti-labor (and therefore anti-NDP)
feeling can be generated? Airline strikes mostly tie
up the businessmen, but a CBC strike would affect
every Canadian in some way or other.
Does the government want to put the CBC in
its place, and allow some of the
Clamp-Down-On-The-CBC hearties of the right some
rein? The CBC lias, after all, been a more effective
opposition at times than the Tories. It's also full of
lefty nationalists.
Or perhaps none of these reasons fits. Perhaps
it's just management trying to play management and
keep a union in its place. Perhaps the government
isn't too involved. But if that's the case all the more
cause for concern. Because then a bitter war could
be touched off almost accidentally because of some
narrow-minded bureaucrats.
The CBC is a quiet, sleepy little bureaucracy
most of the time. But too many writers, actors,
documentarists, journalists and academics are tied
somehow to it. It is a very key buttress to the
cultural and intellectual life of the country. Gerard
Pelletier should know that the CBC should not be
treated lightly, and he would be wiser to let sleeping
dogs lie.
HAPPINESS IS
Living better for less in '72.
Manufacturers samples and subs.
Sizes 7 to 20 at great savings.
Happiness is Boutique, 4576 West
10th (across from big Safeway)
228-9931.
5% OFF FOR U.B.C. PEOPLE
Selling your home?
Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
Rutherford-Thompson-McRae
733-8181
To All Members Of The
GRAD CLASS
Voting on the Grad Class Gift will
be carried out on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22
Balloting stations will be situated in:
S.U.B.
Main Library
Buchanan
Civil Engineering
Woodward Library
Henry Angus
Macmillan
Education
ST. JOHN'S
BOYS' SCHOOLS NEED
FIVE TEACHERS
YOUNG MEN OF STRONG CHARACTER, MIND AND
BODY, WILLING TO COMMIT THEMSELVES TO AN
EXHAUSTING PROGRAM WHICH INVOLVES FRESH BUT
DEMANDING APPROACHES TO TRADITIONAL
ACADEMIC SUBJECTS, PLUS MOUNTAIN TREKS,
1000-MILE CANOE TRIPS, SNOWSHOE AND DOGSLED
EXPEDITIONS, COMMERCIAL PRINTING, MEAT AND
HONEY PACKAGING, FARMING AND RETAIL SELLING,
ALL FOR A STIPEND OF $1.00 A DAY, ROOM, BOARD
AND THE KNOWLEDGE THAT YOU ARE SERVING GOD.
THE ST. JOHN'S SCHOOLS OF MANITOBA
AND ALBERTA ARE OPERATED BY THE
COMPANY OF THE CROSS, AN ANGLICAN
LAY ORDER WHICH PLANS TO OPEN A
THIRD SCHOOL IN ONTARIO.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN THE WORK, THE
COMPANY IS INTERESTED IN YOU.
APPOINTMENTS
Monday, March 27
Call University Placement Office
Singles' Europe Adventure
We want you to run away to Europe
with us.
We'll drain our last pint of Guinness
at the Tournament Pub in Earlscourt,
London, hit the road south to the Channel
and be in Calais by sunset.
A month later, we could be in Istanbul.
Or Berlin or Barcelona. Or Athens. Or
Copenhagen. Or just about any place you
and your Australian, English, New Zealand
and South African mates want to be.
On the way, we'll camp under canvas,
cook over open fires, swim, sun and drink
in some of the most spectacular settings on
the continent.
We'll provide a small zippy European
motorbus and your camping gear and a
young cat to drive it who knows every
wineshop from here to Zagreb, plus how to
ask for a John, or how to find your way
back home to bed, smashed, later on.
You can go for as little as 28 days or
as many as 70. Spring, Summer or Fall.
The cost is ultra reasonable. And
we'll get you to London from here just as
cheaply as is humanly possible.
We've got a booklet that fills in the
details and prices.
If you're single, under 30 and slightly
adventurous, send for it.
We're booking now.
9)         Please send me details, itineraries and an application.
A        Name	
Address.
City_
_Prov._
Mail to: Europe, Going Down the Road,
214 A Adelaide St. West, Toronto, Ontario. UBC Tuesday, March 21, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Exposure: a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
BOOKSTORE RIP-OFF NO. 1346
The bookstore, at the start of
each year buys back textbooks at
a large discount from students
who have used a particular book
in the previous year. The books
are then offered for re-sale to
students taking the course each
new year.
It seems that a number of these
books instead of being placed on
the second hand piles are checked
and if they are clean and
unmarked they are placed in with
the new books.
Usually you won't notice it but
John Mintoft, Arts I, purchased
his French 110 grammar book
early this year only to discover
later that someone else's name
was written in the front cover. He
had of course paid the new price.
_ The Co-op bookstore in the
basement of SUB by contrast
label each book as to how much
was paid for the book new, how
much it is selling for and how
much money will return to the
original owner.
BOOKSTORE RIP-OFF NO. 1347
Another    example    of    the
bookstore's pricing policy was
brought to our attention by
George West, Arts 4.
For those people taking Poli
Sci 404 you will find that Thomas
Plunkett's, Urban Canada and Its
Government, is 13 per cent
cheaper if you pretend you are in
the School of Planning and take it
from that section.
HOTDOGS
You probably thought they
were crap but do you really know
how bad they are?
According to a February 1972
Consumer Union (U.S.) study, hot
dogs are on average 11.7 per cent
protein, 28 per cent fat and the
rest mostly water. While to this
writer's knowledge there is no
equivalent Canadian study, it is
fair to assume that the same is
true in Canada, especially since a
number of the brands in the
States are sold in Canada.
Interestingly enough, in
addition to a large amount of
non-meat products in the
frankfurters, some 19 per cent of
the samples had insect and rodent
contamination. So much for those
sanitized factory conditions.
-'"^WV-_.«%fv. ;.
Only 25 per cent of the
samples counted at less than one
million bacteria per gram.
Economically speaking at 85 •
cents per pound for franks you
are paying about $6.50 a pound
for protein. Most hamburger
averages out at about $4 a pound
for protein.
What really bothers me is that
people often consider hot dogs as
a cheap, filling meal — especially
for small children. Probably
nothing could be worse for
young, growing bodies.
Author Margaret Atwood reads
Margaret Atwood as she appears on the cover of Power Politics.
Mystery fire found in EUS office
The UBC fire department
discovered the remains of a fire in
the Engineering Undergraduate
Society offices late Saturday night
after a caller reported smoke
coming from the civil engineering
building.
After checking the building,
firemen found wads of burned
paper on the table and floor of
the office. The fire had apparently
been put out shortly before the
arrival of the firemen.
The fire seemed to have started
_L.srs. _/..____} Xs * ■%.*' ' . * ' #
on top of a table in a pile of old
paper. The floor of the office was
covered with water, broken beer
bottles and charred bits of paper.
In reply to questions from the
fire chief, about 15 students who
had been studying in the building
said they did not know who had
been in the office that night and
that they have no access to the
office unless an EUS executive
member is present.
When none of the executive
could be located the chief told the
students to clean up the office
because as engineers they are
responsible for the EUS office.
Some engineers refused and went
back to their studies.
One said: "if the EUS brass
wants to play games they should
clean up the mess themselves."
However, seven other students
supervised by the fire chief
cleaned the office in short order.
There was no immediate
explanation of how the fire
started.
Canadian author Margaret
Atwood will talk and read some
of her work tonight at 7 at the
women's studies program in the
SUB ballroom.
Atwood has published five
books of poetry including The
Journals of Susanna Moodie
(1970), Procedures For
Underground (1970) and Power
Politics (1971).
She won the Governor
General's award for poetry for
The Circle Game (1966). She has
also published a novel, The Edible
Woman.
The following poem, A
Dialogue, is from the anthology,
40 Women Poets of Canada.
My sister and I share the same
place of recurring dreams
(the lake, the island, the
glacier-smoothed rock, they
bay
with low ground, spruce and
cedar)
though because we were born in
different years we seldom see
each other.
She says it is a swamp
at night, she is trying to get away,
her feet won't move, she is afraid
of things that live under the water
For me it is clear day
so bright the green pierces,
but in the distance I hear a motor,
a chain-saw,   the invaders are
coming nearer
I passed her at evening, she was
running,
her arms stretched out
in front  of her; I called but
couldn 't
wake her
She watched me sinking
among the reeds and lily-pads;
I was smiling, I didn 't notice
as the dark lake slipped over my
head.
We talk about this in calm voices,
sitting at the kitchen table;
she is examining
her bitten hands, finger
by finger, I draw with a pencil,
covering the page with triangles
and grey geometrical flowers.
Bigger, better
The arts undergraduate society
is planning a bigger and better
than ever anti-calendar for next
fall and needs volunteers to work
on it. It's all happening in
Buchanan 107 for anyone who is
.%* s^     so inclined. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
No chance
UBC is ahead of its time.
Avid readers of The Ubyssey will have noticed on
page one of today's paper that three students of the
University of Sudbury who committed the atrocity of
allowing members of the opposite sex to commingle with
them in residence rooms have been evicted from their
garrets.
Of course, UBC tower-dwellers left such indignities
behind long ago. For $114 a month, the residents of
Totem Park are privileged to be able to visit one another
for a whole 14 hours, between noon and 2 a.m.
It is a credit to UBC and its students that this licence
has been tempered with responsibility. Residence students
here retire to the safety of their own rooms — in
segregated blocks— at the 2 a.m. withdrawal deadline.
Did we hear vague rumblings of discontent? Faint
feelings of affinity with the Sudbury students?
Naw, not a chance. We're ahead of our time.
-P.K.
MARCH 21,1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Reek Virile and the Phallic Phreaks were playing while it happened. I
can remember every nuance of that night. And I can remember thinking
that my time was then, had to be then, even my stars were pulling for me
then. It was glorious too. Perhaps I should start at the beginning, if there
was a beginning, if there is ever a beginning.
It was David Schmidt who first had the ldea.,0'Brien and Andersen
said it was impossible but I knew better. Something in my heart said
"Woodward, forward, unafraid", and I did, past doubting Krueger and
snorting Shreve.
Something told me this rock festival would be different from those
other humiliating experiences when it was always Knox that got the good
acid, always Winkleman who got the neat chicks, always Gidora that met
the groups. This time, I said fervently, I would go home the hero.
Spencer and Gibson, if you're reading this, Kass if someone is reading
this to you, never forget: It was only I who did what all of us aspired to
do. <
I astral-projected back to the womb.
This is better than crystal stoned.
, v _. «     «*
* t   ii* »_$J™W
"~~ IN CONGRESS THIS MORNING, THE PRESIDENT ASKED FOR FORMAL
> DECLARATIONS OF WAR AGAINST BRAZIL, PERU, AND CHILE-AS
lAMPMCA'SjiOnN AMERICAN WAR MOVES INTO
^ITS 2nd YEAR."
&emsii»mmss m.M*ua*m
RgJBB
z%
Letters
Slander
If I slander an individual, I
know I may be tried in court and
punished. But if I slander many
persons, providing they belong to
minority groups, I have
confidence that the worst that
could happen to me is a
reprimand. Whether I am a
student at UBC or someone from
outside, I have that confidence.
Why is this so?
I cannot recall many — any —
court cases in which the accused
was charged with slandering a
minority group. I don't seem to
recall anyone from the private
clubs in Vancouver which
discriminate on racial and
religious grounds coming before
the bar of justice. I can't
remember anyone being put on
trial for slandering people on
welfare, to give another instance.
It gives me confidence that at
most I will be tush-tushed for
"bad taste, insensitivity," etc.
I know there will be those
who don't even think my slander
is in bad taste. To them,it's,"just
a joke," and those who are abused
by it are "over-sensitive,
over-reacting." I'm confident that
I can hit and run behind my cloak,
of anonymity because I merely
voice the unspoken prejudices of a
lot of people. The difference
between them and me is that they
lack my derring-do.
I have confidence because I
know   there   is   a   great   silent
majority which "won't take
sides." This puts them on my side,
in the same way as those who are
neutral at the scene of a physical
assault. This silent majority, I
know, includes persons who
themselves would never actually
build gas chambers and ovens but
who on the other hand will not
speak out against the verbal
conditioning that makes these
instruments possible.
I know there are those who
will not press hard to find me,
saying they do not want to
conduct a witch hunt... not
realizing that witches do not exist,
whereas I do. And that there are
others who cannot see any
difference between professors
who fight against bigotry and
whose who are bigots themselves.
No, I would not slander an
individual... but with the- kind
of support, overt and tacit,, that I
expect, I am willing to risk
slandering entire groups.
Jake Zilber,
George Ryga,
Michael Bullock,
George McWhirter,
Robert Harlow,
(Total faculty of
the creative writing
department)
P.S. There was once a student
who thought Jonathan Swift \
actually wanted to solve the
problem of Irish poverty by
offering the children of the poor
as food. In case there is any such
student still around, we do not
believe in slander.
Target
I presume Mr. E. Kravitz (any
relation to Duddy?) was indulging
in some feeble attempt at humor
in his letter of March 17 accusing
me of undertaking
counterinsurgency research for
the U.S. government. My friends
and colleagues had a good laugh.
Personally, I am somewhat less
amused, as it pains me to be
identified with mass murderers
even in jest. So, for the benefit of
those who do not know me and
my research, let me set the record
straight.
To begin with, the Sun report
linking my research on Quebec
with the U.S.-based Correlates of
War Project was completely in
error. The C.O.W. Project is solely
concerned with interstate conflict,
and is not examining civil wars or
domestic conflicts at all; my
studies of Quebec are not
connected with it in any way.
Second, my sole collaborator is
these analyses of violence in
Quebec is a graduate student of
mine teaching at the Universite de
Quebec a Montreal, and who
incidentally is a left-wing
independentiste.
Third, this research is funded
solely by the Canada Council and
by UBC research grants and
nobody else.
Fourth, I have never in my life
obtained research support for any
research project from any U.S.
source,    either    corporate    or
governmental. The National
Science Foundation Grant Mr.
Kravitz refers to is in professor
David Singer's name and goes to
pay for research assistants and
computer time at the University
of Michigan. Although I
collaborate closely with professor
Singer in his research into the
causes of interstate war, I do not
spend or receive a penny of this
money.
Fifth, the National Science
Foundation has no connection
with the U.S. department of
defence or any military agency
whatsoever, and its grants are
administered by a committee of
scholars in a fashion similar to the
Canadian National Research
Council.
Sixth, all Correlates of War
data and analyses are published
and freely available to anyone. No
classified or military research is
undertaken in this project, and
indeed none of our work would
be of the slightest use to anyone
wishing to wage war.
This is not to say that it has no
practical or policy application. We
receive numerous queries from
peace research and peace action
groups throughhout the world,
which gives us no little
satisfaction since it suggests that
something we are doing has some
relevance to the struggle for
peace.
Finally, far from being
"defence intellectuals", the
Correlates of War researchers are
almost to a man activist-peacenik
types who were drawn to this
study out of a conviction that
traditional academic pursuits were
largely irrelevant to the problem
of war in the contemporary
world. Two of us have arrest
records as a result of our
participation in peace actions, and
a former research assistant with
the project has been indicted in
connection with the release of the
Pentagon papers. I am sure you
will agree this scarcely indicates a
pro-establishment political
orientation.
I wish Mr. Kravitz had had the
courtesy and good sense to drop
in to my office or give me a call
before writing his letter. I would
have been more than willing to
give him all of the above
information, and he would then
have been free to pick a more
worthy target.
Michael D. Wallace,
Assistant professor,
Department of political science
Qualified
I take issue with the recent
correspondence regarding certain
members of the Dept of Slavonic
studies — further libellous
allegations which seem to be part
of a concerted campaign to
destroy various departments of
the faculty of arts, including its
dean.
As a graduate student in
another department and
remembering my course some 23 Tuesday, March 21, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
years ago with Irene Carlsen, now
Mrs. Reid, I am appalled to find
your correspondent saying that
she has small competence in the
Russian language. I found her to
be an excellent instructor in that
she was ____ painstaking and
enthusiastic. I greatly profited
from her course and am dismayed
by the scurrilous attacks on
people of such manifest standing.
Her MA work in Slavonic
studies was done under the
direction of the late William J.
Rose, MA, PhD, FRSC - formerly
head of the school of Slavonic
studies, University of London and
a scholar of world-wide renown
whose publications are too
numerous to list. Mrs. Reid is a
trained, native Russian speaker
which  makes her very valuable
since such teachers bring to their
instruction the tonal quality of
the language; a non-native speaker
is usually incapable of this even
after the completion of a PhD.
The allegations concerning Mr.
Solecki are incorrect since not
only does he have an MA in
economics but also an MA in
Slavonic studies. Having a native
command   of   Russian,   he   has
organized an intensive Russian
workshop for the past four years,
he has taught in the Arts I
program, English and the reverse,
and he has given a number of
lectures on the economic aspects
of Russia.
Is it not a fact that Mrs. Reck
received her doctorate within the
past year at the age of 61? Who is
to say that Mr. Solecki, Mrs. Reid
The consumer and anthrosoc
I have been impressed thus far
by the general tone and quality of
Art Smolensky's consumer
column. It has been very
instructive and I have learned
several important lessons from it.
In what follows, I would like to
apply some of Art's techniques, if
I may, to one of the worst
products I know of . . . namely
The Faculty of Arts.
However, that would be a huge
undertaking and I can only speak
with authority about one
department. It would really take
stories from several of the
departments in arts to give the
ordinary student consumer a real
knowledge of just how bad the
product is. Nevertheless, I think
there should be a start made
somewhere, and the department
of anthropology and sociology is
as good a place as any to begin.
You all remember the faulty
computer "Hal" in the movie
2001 don't you? Well, a similar
situation exists — perhaps to a
lesser degree — with our
computer, "Cyril". You see, our
department is fully cybernated.
Our computer can tell you
everything the department needs
at any given time within seconds.
When it is operating correctly it is
really a beautiful thing to watch;
memos come pouring forth from
its office on the third floor of
Angus with crisp regularity,
committees are set up to look into
problem areas and we are even
told when we are not making
proper use of office machinery
and are reminded to use certain
machines more regularly. You see,
all this is done for us and as I say,;
it is really a beautiful thing to
watch when it is working
correctly.
Our computer was running fine
until the beginning of this
academic year. You can imagine,
therefore, knowing what a fine
precision machine it is and how
proud we are of it, how reluctant
we were to admit that there might
be something wrong with it.
Occasionally there would be a
quick sideward glance between
colleagues, or maybe a raised
eyebrow when it spoke (yes, it has
a voice simulation device built
right into it) in a tone unfamiliar
to us.
But quick glances turned to
expressions of worry, and raised
eyebrows burned to open-eyed
astonishment when our computer
started sending memos like
"Bombard The Ubyssey". Since
that time we have had several
opportunities to witness
malfunctions and now most of us
are pretty well convinced that it is
running haywire. For instance,
when we tried to rectify one of
Cyril's earlier mistakes by voting
30 to 8 to call back some tenure
cases that it had botched up, we
were given a flat "NO — do not
fold, spindle or mutilate" and told
that "Doug" (a computer that has
charge of "Cyril", an older model
with some defects of its own)
would not let "Cyril" reprocess
that information.
I could go on like this, giving
you inside information on defects
but I do not think that is really
important at this particular time.
What is important, however, is for
you to know how a faulty
computer screws up the works,
and how it leaves a department on
the verge of collapse. And when
that affects the quality of the
product you get from that
department then something has to
be done.
But all that is going to take
time. Even then we cannot be
assured that quality control will
improve or be restored. For those
of you who have enjoyed some of
Another hot one
English grad student David (Rock) Schendlinger resurfaces with
another topical column.
Those puzzled by Howard Hughes' sudden appearance in town
are obviously not aware of his connection with the poor people's
school, Peon U. It is a little-known fact that Hughes is a distinguished
alumnus of the school — the only one, so far.
Even in his university days Hughes showed signs of the
eccentricity that was to make him famous. "He used to sit on his top
bookshelf for days on end. Said he was practicing," reminisced Homer
Burnwhite, school historian. "Never thought that boy would ever
amount to anything. Wonder what ever became of him."
It was at Peon U. that Hughes laid the foundation for the
Hughes Tool Company by inventing the screwdriver. The invention
did not begin to pay off until several years later, when he invented the
screw.
Wilson Tibb, chairman of the applied agriculture, remembers
another Hughes invention, the cantilevered manure spreader. "I don't
know what we'd do without it," he exclaimed.
Everyone at Peon U is certain that Hughes has returned to bail
the school out of trouble in its hour of need. It has been rocked by
promotion, tenure, scholastic, athletic and nutritional disputes in the
departments of English, Slavonic studies, French, mathematics,
forestry and industrial philosophy.
Sources close to Hughes (his kidneys, his spleen, his thyroid) say
that he plans to buy the university, take over the presidency,
deanships and department chairmanships and go into seclusion for 10
years, letting the chips fall where they may.
our department's products in the
past, I must tell you straight out
that we will not be able to
guarantee those same products in
the future. For those of you who
have enjoyed a product that we
marketed as Howard Boughey, I
am afraid we are discontinuing
that line. A couple of other brand
names that had almost reached
the status of household word,
Silvers and Speier, are also being
phased out. We are cutting back
on two fairly new products too.
I'm sorry if you were kind of
getting used to Bloobaum or
Wilson because we are getting rid
of both of them. In fact there are
going to be seven empty spots on
the shelves next year.
A fair question to ask here is:
"OK, just how does this affect
me?" Well, I'll tell you how it
affects you.
First off, it affects the quality
of everything being turned out in
that department. Nobody has had
time to prepare lessons properly.
When do people have time for the
students when everywhere you
look you see friends getting axed,
or resigning their positions?
Furthermore, it is going to affect
you if you have acquired a taste
for a special flavor in sociology.
At this time we cannot guarantee
what our product will look like in
a few years.
I would urge you to think very
seriously before taking any more
courses in either anthropology or
sociology. Stay away from it. Wait
a few years. Maybe after we get
things under control again (that is,
if we do) our department will
once more turn out some good
quality material. I would also urge
you to let incoming students
know about our problems.
Remind them next fall about
some of the things that have gone
on this year. You students who
have been around for a year or
two will be able to show new
students where the nice quiet
departments are ... somewhere
that a student can have a
reasonable chance of being able to
see the same people for a number
of years.
Maybe things will improve in
our department in the next couple
of years. Right now that seems
like a slim hope. But maybe if you
as students would stay away in
large enough numbers, we could
finally convince someone that our
whole cybernated system is
overdue for a complete overhaul.
(-An anthrosoc member.)
or Mr. Ohanjanian will not have
their doctorates by that age?
The pseudonymous Raymond
Chandler alleged in your edition
of February 4 that in 1947 UBC
was a "jerkwater college". How
does he know? Was he a student
at that time? There were, fact,
some 9,000 students enrolled
during that year and living in
Acadia and Wesbrook Camps were
many professors, including Dr.
Sobell, who have since achieved
outstanding repute.
Surely the non-renewal of a
one-year contract lies under the
jurisdiction of the dean of arts
and I fail to see that such
administrative matters are the
proper concern of anyone not
qualified or entitled to deal with
E. A. Milsom
gpeil AU.eUMM£fl
TfielautetfT prices
•on c&mt>us*
The $3
good-tripper.
We've got a way to get your next trip
off the ground in great style — but
you've got to make the first move. Just
take a little trip to your nearest PWA
ticket office and buy a Youth Fly Pass.
It's $3. Be sure to take proof of age
along. (Sorry, old-timers, it's for people
under 22.)
Your little effort will now start to
pay big dividends. For one thing, you
get up to 1 /3 off your fare. And your
space is confirmed. In advance.
Effective May 1st
To keep your trip
rolling along on the ground, ship your
bicycle along. (Sorry, nothing
motorized.) Wheel on down to your
local PWA freight office at least three
days before your flight departure and
we'll ship your bike to your destination
for only $7.50 prepaid. Just show us
your air ticket, and we'll put your show
on the road.
For local information, call your
nearest Pacific Western Airlines Office.
pnciFic
LUESTERn
AIRLINI
Count on us. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
Beautiful
clothes...
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All. the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less '
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
SUB Lower Floor- 9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri. 224-4636
OS
COOPERATIVE INSURANCE SERVICES LTD.
C.I.S. Insurance, a Leader in the field of Insurance innovations, has career
opportunities in the marketing of the Insurance product (Estate Planning —
Annuities — Pensions — and all aspects of Life Insurance; also
advising their clients on General Insurance, i.e. Auto Home — and
Business). The sound philosophy of Cooperation offers a young man or
woman an excellent opportunity to assist in advising the public on their
insurance necessities.
Please write or phone MARKETING SECRETARY, D. STONEY, C.I.S.
INSURANCE, No. 96 East Broadway, Vancouver, B.C., 872-7454.
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village)
224-3939
0 BARTON BUCKS  0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
Good for Cash or Merchandise.
TOMORROW
fake a break from school work
VOTE YES
FOR ABORTION LAW REPEAL
YOUR VOTE IS NEEDED I
Textured gold at its best
in this bark  finish.
Many otlter stylish rings, too
^
&
LIMITED
REGISTERED JEWELLERS, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
«*__
| Af By Ian Wiseman
"' "»•?" Canadian University Pres
f , 3_jg-u._a_.i_jii-m-i.jj ,mmf,«
-     r     "  '     * T   "*■
'*r/--i^S^jgtt^j
THECC
THAT!
PHIL0S
~""Sf
I The concluding instalments c
I of the computerization of Ca
C
PART TWO:
THE CANADIAN VIEWPOINT
Fanada, while by no means a pioneer in the
research and development of computer technology,
is rapidly becoming a world leader in the
applications of that technology to university
education.
Within the next five years there will probably
be a nationwide computer network connecting
every Canadian university to every other one by a
complex arrangement of computerized telegraph
lines and electronic transmission via satellite.
This will give every university's computers)
access to other universities' computers, making the
total academic resources of Canada (that can be
computerized) available to every student in the
country.
This    network,    the    Canadian    University
Computing Network (CANUMET), is now being
studied   and  designed  by  some  200  experts  in
government, universities and the computer industry.
*   *   *
In the years between 1964 and 1970, the
installation of computers in Canada jumped over 500
per cent, from a total of 504 computers in 1964 to
a total of 2,700 in 1970.
Of these 2,700 computers, International
Business Machines, the American corporate giant
which pioneered in the field, built and sold (or
rented) 47 per cent, accounting for 67 per cent of
their market value. (But more about IBM later).'
The 1970 computer census showed the
universities to be one of the largest markets for
computers in this country, with 58 universities,
including community colleges, possessing 281
computer units. Practically all of the largest
computers were IBM-made.
Technology had an impact on science ...
a change in science's own definition and
image of itself. From being "natural
philosophy" science became a social
institution. The words in which science
defined itself remained unchanged "the
systematic search for rational knowledge".
But "knowledge" changed its meaning
from being "understanding" ... to being
'control".
— Peter Drucker
Technology, Management and Society
As the number of computers j
number of universities offering cou:
science — 33 universities and 23 con
included computer studies in their
How are the computers being
being   used    for    computer-assist
including a bizarre experiment at W
where a course on the Danish ph
Kierkegaard is being taught by comr.
The computer in this example
with every word that Kierkegaan
three languages: English, Frenci
Danish). The computer subdr
information into an analysis of tc
student wanted to know what Kierl
about the Jews, for example, the c
give a book and page reference to
prolific Dane had written \
'synagogue', 'Israel', etc.
Very few CAI programs are yet
as  this,  but  the  use  of CAI is
wide-spread in Canadian university
the   fields   of science, mathemati
language.
All of which is quite normal i
industry of the western world. 1
electronic star shines, however, is i
design of computerized libraries and
the means of setting up a far-reachi
around these specialized information
This concept, the nation-spam,
the cornerstone for the building ol
the truly global village.
*   *   *
The University of Quebec, wh
spending $75,000 of federal mone
feasibility of CANUMET, last Apri
computer network of its own.
The mini-network, connecting
(Montreal, Quebec, Rimouski, Ch
Rivieres) and a handful of researi
called a 'star network'. This compul
that one gigantic central compu
Quebec City, can be used by severe
cannot all afford large computers."
The University of Quebec n
widely for administrative purposes <
computer science, and has limited e
in CAI and library applications.
The computing equipment — tib
— cost the university a total of $8
from Control Data Corporation.
Meanwhile, Ontario, with ovt
computers in Canada, has been coi
up a network of its own. The ne
developing fairly slowly, however,
Council of Ontario Universities 1
separate bilateral computer connect
handful of universities.
On   the   west   coast,   UBC's Tuesday, March 21, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
IT   -»'•   *
IHPDTER
WHY
an examination
adian universities.
w, so did the
s in computer
unity colleges
?70 curricula,
ed? Some are
instruction,
Jill University
isopher Soren
er.
programmed
published (in
and original
es all this
c. Thus, if a
>aard had said
nputer would
rery time the
v',    'Jewish',
sophisticated
;coming very
especially in
and foreign
the computer
iere; Canada's
the study and
ita banks, and
user network
anks.
g network, is
wired world,
ti is currently
to study the
inaugurated a
Ive campuses
ontimi, Trois
institutes, is
jargon means
r, located in
Anpuses who
work is used
d for teaching
jeomental use
machines only
,000 a month
half of the
idefing setting
/ork has been
nd today the
s a series of
>ns between a
omputers can
transmit to those at the University of Victoria and
vice-versa.
All minor steps in the grand scheme of things,
but nonetheless significant as the universities move
closer and closer to being a totally integrated
network.
Another computer network, 'star network' with
the National Research Council's massive computer
at the centre, is currently studying the possible ways
of standardizing computer language so that
computers can transmit to one another without
having to re-program the information.
The NRC network (which currently includes
University of Calgary, the Ontario Institute for
Studies in Education, McMaster University,
Algonquin College, Seneca College, and the
Danforth School of Technology) is also used for
research; and development exploration of other
possibilities for computerized education.
The practical functions of the network at this
time — it has been operating for several years — are
the comparative cheapness of using the NRC'S
powerful computer, and the access to specialized
scientific data banks that NRC is beginning to
construct.
*   *   *
The Science Council of Canada, in August
1971, showing much more bark than the
government (and its corporate backers) will ever
show bite, attacked the foreign-owned computer
companies operating in this country and called for
an independent Canadian computer network.
In a special report on the possibility of a
trans-Canada computer communications network,
the council took exception to "branch plant status
for the Canadian computer industry."
"Leaving aside questions of exports, excessive
dependence on foreign suppliers and lack of
worthwhile jobs for highly-educated Canadians" the
report continued, "we are above all else faced with
the urgent need to exercise control over the shape
and thrust of the industry, so that its development
may be harmonized with our social priorities."
Those are harsh words indeed for a report by a
|!^gjigi|<i    _*-■    i .;—U.  -1/1  IIW \'\ -    "
u— -j.u_i M_'  ....ag-
^ -uj~j^
■   ■  m^   ■ ■ *■  ii m i«     pi
__.._■■ g j.     .    l       111  ■ I 1   l^mfamWUMmJ-m-
••«**m*«»"»M_»* *♦*#*•<
^m^^^^^f^^^'f^^'^iWm
• _.
M'li
_»■¥-
r t. >; * i«.'
ill
tt:
..-■. >v ■.■i-j;
government that tolerates 90 per cent foreign
ownership in other industrial sectors of the
economy.
But then again, maybe the government is
genuinely concerned with national control of the
Technology of Technologies. After all, 1984 is only
12 years away.
*   *   *
On all sides, then, the stage is being set for a
giant computer network encompassing all Canadian
universities. But it may not be possible, at least in
the near future, for Canada to develop and build her
own network.
In point of fact, Canada may not even run her
own network.
These questions of development, ownership and
control remain suspended, however, as plans
continue to begin on CANUMET.
CANUMET, being organized by the federal
communications department and the University of
Quebec, will span up to 28 universities within the
next three years, and its membership will be open to
all universities.
The network, now in the educational-design
process stage, is being studied thoroughly by
educators, programmers, and hardware producers in
a massive systems-analysis session.
One of the immediate problems is that of
financing; how much are the universities, the
provincial and federal governments willing to pay?
Enough to cover transmission costs which run to $3
million a year for 28 universities?
A similar network in the U.S., the Advanced
Research Project Agency, has similar costs, and
transmission costs here in Canada are an average of
two to three times higher. One conceivable way of
cutting these exorbitant transmission costs would be
for CANUMET to use the Telesat satellite. Telesat is
a Canadian crown corporation and the satellite
(built by U.S .-owned Hughes Aircraft) is to be
orbited this year.
Initially CANUMET will be an interconnected
system of data banks and information retrieval in
which  universities  can  use   the  machinery and
Technique requires predictability and no less, exactness of-
prediction. It is necessary, then, that technique prevail over
the human being. For technique, this is a matter of life and
death. Technique must reduce man to a technical animal,
the king of the slaves of technique. Human caprice crumbles
before this necessity; there can be no human autonomy
in the face of technical autonomy. _ Jacques E||u|
The Technological Society
programming of other universities' computers. For
example, if Queen's and Ottawa universities are in
the network, then other universities could dial into
the specialized legal data bank mentioned earlier.
The future of this network hinges on questions
of financing and computer-language
standardization, but there seems little doubt that
CANUMET will become a reality. On a minor scale,
with its first five to 10 members, it should be in
operation within 18 months.
Once the network is there, and the concrete
basis for immediate inter-university communication
exists, any story attempting to make projections into
the future becomes almost absurdly speculative. The
experts themselves have no idea of the limits to the
realm of electronic educational potential.
The plaguing question remains, though, who
will run the system? There are several possibilities,
including the Department of Communications, or a
crown corporation, or a private company such as
Trans-Canada Telephone System (communications
business) or IBM (computer producers).
The government, insiders say, does not want to
bear the responsibility for electronic education at the
university level, and would rather turn the controls
over to an independent operator.
A
PART THREE:
THE MONOPOLY OBSTACLE
bnd now, from the people who brought you
the computer, a sweeping new innovation that will
dramatically change industry-monopoly.
International Business Machines Corporation
(IBM), with assets over $5 billion, is the world
leader in the computer business. In gaining the
position, IBM has been through two anti-trust suits
filed by government (U.S.), and two suits charging
monopolistic practice, filed by competitors.
A multinational corporation (although only four
per cent of its' shares are owned outside the U.S.),
IBM owns 80 per cent of the world computer
market.
It controls the majority of the domestic
markets in Canada, the United States, Britain,
France, Japan, West Germany and Italy.
How does IBM cope with the growing
tendencies toward industrial nationalization in
Europe and Japan? By renaming its subsidiaries,
trying to look as much as possible like a a native
industry, and by working towards national goals in
every country in which it operates.
After the Science Council of Canada report last
August, which lambasted the foreign control of our
computer and communications industry, IBM issued
statements urging a greater national consciousness
of the importance of computers.
But, but, but, questioned a Montreal Star
reporter, isn't IBM of Canada an American-based
firm?
Silly boy! "IBM of Canada," said David Fraser,
an IBM vice-presidential assistant, "is an
independently-run operation and is listed on the
Toronto Stock Exchange."
Huge multinational corporations like IBM
supersede international boundaries and have
developed power to rival that of most national
governments.
To consolidate its monopoly, IBM has made
certain that university students, the potential
operators and buyers of computers, receive their
training on IBM equipment. This has often meant
that employers, rather than retrain graduates on
other makes of equipment, have found it easier and
cheaper to switch to IBM hardware.
This concentrated drive on the student of
computer science also ensured IBM of. another
expanding market: the universities themselves. The
use and potential use, of computers in universities
will keep IBM in the driver's seat for some time.
How did IBM get its stranglehold on the
Canadian university market? In many ways, some
questionable; in others showing shrewd business
savvy.
IBM offers educational discounts on machinery,
and gives frequent grants to universities who own or
rent IBM equipment. This guarantees the
corporation that, as new studies are done on their
computers, IBM can develop new products and new
uses for the machines.
The Canadian branch plant of the American
giant refuses to make public the total amount of
money they grant to universities and colleges. It did,
however, grant 68 scholarships and 58 fellowships
last year, as well as matching any contributions that
their employees make to university research.
IBM gives generously to universities in other
See page 8: COMPUTERIZATION Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
From page 7
ways too, to supplement the scholarship-fellowship
fund and to shore up the long-term investment that
it has in higher education. It gives outright research
grants to educational institutions, and it donates to
university building-fund campaigns.
The straight discount rate to universities
("please, we prefer to call it our 'educational
allowance program") was a flat 10 per cent for the
past few years.
But the true rate of discount is hidden in a
maze of joint research and development projects
that IBM carries out with universities. These
projects are performed on IBM equipment that is
cost-shared by the corporation and the university.
These joint research programs occur with
frequent regularity all across Canada, from
Memorial University of Newfoundland to the
University of Victoria. Other centres with major
cost-sharing programs are Simon Fraser, University
of Alberta, Queen's Toronto, Moncton, and so on.
IBM also maintains a superslick travelling
display package that moves about the country from
university to university, showing films, equipment,
samples, computerized programs, graphics and
brochures.
And when the sales department falls down on
the job, there are more blatant and insidious
business connections. Members of the top brass of
IBM sit on the boards of governors at the University
of Toronto, Queen's University, Trent University,
York University, Seneca College, and University of
Western Ontario's school of business administration.
Oh, it's hard work maintaining an effective
monopoly, having to be on your toes 24 hours a
day. As CANUMET gets to the stage where it needs
a body to govern and administer the network, you
can be sure that IBM will be looking to its own
network which stretches from coast to coast.
And let's hope that there are some educators
who object strongly enough to a foreign company
running our university education system. And let's
keep our fingers crossed that the computer
producers don't turn their monopolistic power- to
programming those computers that are affecting our
daily lives.
But those hopes would be less tinged with dire
apprehension if the people running corporations like
IBM didn't look so very much like the people who
run our universities, our economy and our
government.
ABORTION
REFERENDUM
"Are you in favour of repeal of those
sections of the Criminal Code dealing
with abortion?"
VOTE
Wednesday, March 22
POLLS open from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at
Angus-Education      Civil Engineering
MacMillan Law
SUB Woodward Building
Main Library
Sedgewick Library
Buchanan
Exams
be damned
The hell with exams anyway.
Let's go to Puerto Rico next week
for the rock festival.
As a matter of fact it can be
done for only $149 plus a trip to
New York.
Island Ventures of New York
City has published a slick glossy
pamphlet advertising the pleasures
of "Mar y Sol" in Puerto Rico and
hawking an all-inclusive deal
whereby rock fans with nothing
better to do can fly to the island
for three days of decent rock and
roll, 300 acres of beach, "plenty
of fresh water" and a low-high of
70-85 degrees with no rain.
Bands appearing April 1, 2 and
3 include Faces with Rod Stewart,
Alice Cooper, B.B. King, Dr. John
the Night Tripper, Flash Cadillac,
Fleetwood Mac, Herbie Mann,
Poco and on and on.
Flights leave New York,
Boston, Philadelphia and
Washington every day next week
for $149 return, including ground
transportation, festival ticket and
camping facilities.
If you want to leave from
Miami it will cost $10 more and
from Atlanta an extra $20.
But what's money after all
when we can have fun and get real
stoned and ball all night and get
fuckin' wasted, eh?'
Info booth
doing well
The newly-expanded
information desk and concession
stand on the main floor of SUB is
doing very well, Alma Mater
Society co-ordinator Rick Murray
told The Ubyssey Monday.
The concession stand is now
selling pens, pencils, combs,
paper, and other similar items, as
well as candy and cigarettes.
"We haven't hired any extra
staff, so the increased revenue is
helping us get past the break-even
point.
"I don't think we're competing
with the Thunderbird Shop. We're
providing a service to the students
by staying open until 11 at night
when the Thunderbird Shop is
closed," Murray said.
15 FACTS
YOU SHOULD
KNOW ABOUT THE
ABUSE OF
ALCOHOL.
1. Alcohol abuse is the most serious and
widespread drug problem in Canada.
2. A person can become an alcoholic
just as readily on beer as on wine or hard
liquor.
3. Alcohol passes undigested into the
bloodstream which carries it to the brain.
It impairs judgment, reflexes, coordination, speech and vision.
4. Alcohol has no food value other than
calories; 95% of it is burnt up by the liver
at a constant rate. Coffee, exercise, or cold
showers cannot speed up the process.
5. People who use alcohol as a sedative,
a painkiller, or for escape should realize it
can be addictive and dangerous to their
health.
6. Alcoholism is the one illness that results in problems in all the major areas of
a person's life — physical, mental, social,
and spiritual.
7. There is no known "cure" for alcoholism, but most alcoholics have a reasonable chance for recovery.
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ggjtf  COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
>^fS'3 Hon. D.L Brothers, QjC, Minister of Education-Chairman
8. A person who "needs" a drink is at
least psychologically dependent and can
become physically addicted.
9. A person who averages five or six
drinks a day is a "hazardous drinker".
10. British Columbia has at least 80,000
hazardous drinkers; of these, approximately 42,000 are confirmed alcoholics.
11. Only a small percentage of alcoholics
are on Skid Road.
12. Industry and business lose millions
of dollars annually through absenteeism,
accidents, damaged equipment and upset
public relations due to problem drinkers
on the payroll.
13. At least 50% of traffic deaths involve drinking drivers. If you drink, that's
your business. If you drink and drive,
that's everyone's business.
14. A positive approach to life's problems and tensions is more realistic than
using alcohol as an escape.
15. If you have a drinking problem you
can get expert, confidential help by calling
the nearest office of the Alcoholism Foundation of British Columbia or Alcoholics
Anonymous.
For more information, mail this coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of '' What You Should Know
About The Use And Abuse Of Alcohol."
Name ___
Address . Tuesday, March 21, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Students support rejected editor
MONTREAL (CUPI) -
Students at McGill University are
organizing to oppose student
council's decision to reject the
unanimous choice of this year's
McGill Daily staff for editor of
next year's paper.
In a five-hour marathon session
Wednesday night (March 15),
_ council elected law student
Timothy Denton over the Daily's
choice Nesar Ahmad, by a.
one-vote margin in the second of
two secret ballots.
Earlier, the council had passed
a 14-point "contract" laying
down rules by which next year's
Daily editor must abide. Student
Society president Gabor Zinner,
' who had drafted the document,
defended it to the meeting.
Claiming his remarks were not
meant to prejudice the council
against the Daily's choice for
editor, Zinner launched into a
detailed criticism of this year's
Daily, saying that it had neglected
1 the coverage of campus events and
had promoted a "monolithic"
political position.
Nesar Ahmad voiced the
concern that "certain ethics in
journalism are involved here, such
as the right of any newspaper to
autonomy."
However Denton - who has no
newspaper experience — carne out
strongly in favor of the contract.
After four hours of heated
debate, including an unsuccessful
attempt to reject both candidates
and re-open applications for the
editorship, a motion asking for
the ratification of Ahmad was
proposed. A motion to vote by
secret ballot was passed.
The first ballot ended in a tie,
the second gave Denton an 8 to 7
plurality.
The students in the audience
then shouted for an open vote but
were ignored by council.
The meeting was hastily
adjourned after a call came from
the audience to convene a meeting
of those wishing a "free and open
AMS agonizes
over apathy
The Alma Mater Society is
crying out in agony for lack of
people to help organize next
year's Orientation Week during
registration and this month's AMS
co-ordinated activities of Open
House. Students who out of some
misguided pity relent in their
disinterest may contact Hillary
Powell, Sally Clarke or Lynne
Phillips in the SUB AMS executive
offices.
Daily." About 125 people
gathered in an adjoining room and
began planning resistance to the
council decision.
At this meeting Ahmad called
for all students to mobilize
support for a free and open Daily
and charged that the council
meeting was characterized by
"red-baiting".
Sociology professor Marlene
Dixon, who supported Ahmad's
candidacy, described a meeting
that she and other faculty had had
earlier with president Zinner, "at
which he made it clear that he
supported Denton and wanted the
Daily to, as he put it, 'help him
fulfill his mission of keeping the
Students' Society from falling
apart'."
Earlier Denton had told
council that "the process of
dissolution of the McGill
community is being perpetrated
by people with an ■ interest in
destroying this community. The
role of the Daily editor next year
will be to restore some kind of
belonging to this place."
A student at the organizational
meeting stated:
"We played by their rules and
we lost. It's been useful because
now we know the enemy."
Many students came to the
Daily office after the meeting
ended    and     declared    their
determination to campaign against The council decision is being
council. A petition supporting the appealed    to     the    judicial
Daily staff gained 500 signatures committee    of    the    Students'
in four hours. Society.
AL HORNE
Singer
Guitarist
FREE
S.U.B. Art Gallery
TODAY NOON
SPECIAL EVENTS
SENSATIONAL CLASSICAL RECORD SALE!
THE WORKS
OF THE
MASTERS
ON . . .
SDL3774 —Verdi  Don  Carlo.
Domingo Caballe'. Giulini cond.
Sugg, list $25.98 — 4 L.P.'s.
OUR PRICE $13.49
SB3778 — Sibelius Kullervo
Op. 7. First recording, Bournemouth Symphony Orch., Paavo
Berglund. Sugg. List $12.98.
2 L.P.'s.    OUR PRICE $6.98
1501 B/L
3556 B
S 3559 C/L
S 35*3 D/L
1359* EL
S 3604 C/L
S 3*13C/L
S 3615 C/L
13622 D/L
13623 C/L
SCL 3625
S3649BL
Tosca (La Seala/Callas/
Di Stefano/Gobbi/De Sab-
ata)
Dinu  Lipotti: Last Recital
Rossini The Barber of Seville (Callas / Gobbi / Alva,
etc/Phil.   Orch./Galliera)
Der Rosenkavoller (Schwarzkopf / Ludwig/Edelman/
Phil. Orch./Karaian)
J. S. Bach: "St. Matthew
Passion" (Complete) (Phil.
Orch./ Klemperer)
Puccini: Madame Butterfly — (Complete) (Jussi
Bjoriing / Victoria de Los
Angefes/Othprs)
Bizet: Carmen—[Complete)
(Nicolai Gedda/Others)
Bellini: Norma (Complete)
(Franco Corelli/Others)
Gounod: Faust—{Complete)
(Gedda / Christoff / de Los
Angeles/Others) .''
Verdi: La Traviata—(Complete) Victoria do Los
Angeles/Others)
Beethoven: "Fidello" (Complete) (Phil. Orch./Klem-
perer)
Verdi: Requiem Mass (Ludwig / Gedda / Schwarzkopf
/Philharmonia/Carlo Maria
Giulini)
Mozart: "The Magic Flute"
(Gedda / Schwarzkopf/Lud-
wig / Berry/Fricfc, Others/
The Phil. Orch./Klemperer)
i 35953
S 35974
S 35977
S36005
S36010
t 36020
S 36029
Poulenc: Gloria in G. Major
(For Soprano Solo, Chorus
and Orchestra Sung in
Latin; Poulenc: Concerto
in G Minor (For Organ,
Strings and Timpani) (R.
Carteri, Soprano and
French National Radio-
Television Orch. Cond. by
Georges Pretre)
Faure: Requiem, Op. 48
(De Los Angeles/Fischer
Dieskau, etc.J
Debussy: La Mer Noc-!
turnes (The Philharmonia
Orchestra Conducted by
Carlo Maria Giulini)
Saint-Saens: Concerto No.
3 in B Minor for Violin
and Orchestra; Chausson:
Poeme tor Violin and
Orch. (Nathan Milstein,
violinist/Phil./Fistoulai
J. S. Bach: Two Violin
Concertos; Vivaldi: Concertos—Nathan Milstein
Beethoven: Piano Concerto
No. 2 in B. Flat; Thirty-
two Variations in C. Minor — Emil Gilels (Piano),
The Cleveland Orchestra
cond. by George Szell.
Beethoven: Concerto No. 3
in C Minor, Op. 37 (Emil
Gilels, Piano and The
Cleveland Orchestra, conducted  by George Szell)
SCL3742—Verdi   Otello.   Mc-
Cracken, Jones and Dieskau.
New Phil. Orch. Barblrolll,
cond. Sugg. Hit $19.98. 3
L.P.'s. OUR PRICE $9.99
136162
SB3757—Verdi Requiem. Caballe', Cossotto, Vickers, Rgl-
mondi. New Phil. Orch. &
Chorus. Barbirolll cond. Sugg,
list $12.98. 2 L.P.'s
OUR PRICE $6.98
SB3763 — Bach. The Four
Suites for Orchestra. Klemperer. New Phil. Orch. Sugg, list
$12.98. 2 L.P.'s.
OUR PRICE $6.98
MAIL ORDERS:
Moil orders promptly fillod: Just tick
off the records you want, enclose your
list with remittance, plus 5% tax and
postage, and we'll get your order away
promptly. First record 35c—each additional record 20c postage and handling charge.
3361 S3
136231
136236
136246
S36247
136350
(36359
J. S. Bach: Choruses and
Chorales from "St. Matthew Passion" Phil. Orch. &
Chorus cond. by Otto
Klemperer)
Mozart: Symphony No, 40
in G Minor, K.550; Symphony No. 41 In C Major,
K.551 ("Jupiter") Philharmonia Orch. cond. by Otto
Klemperer
Mozorti Violin Concerto
No. 1 In B Flat, K.207
Violin Concerto No. 2 In
D Major, K.211 (Yehudi
Menuhin / Bath Festival
Orchestra)
Flotow — "Martha" Highlights (Frlck / Wunderlich/
Volker/Koffmane / Others/
Chorus of the Municipal
Opera, Berlin and Orchestra cond. by Berislav Klo-
bucar)
Dvorak: Symphony No. 9
(5) In E Minor, Op. 95
("From The New World")
(Philharmonia Orch. con.
by Otto Klemperer)
Mozart: Serenade for Thirteen Winds—London Wind
Quintet & Ensemble/Otto
Klemperer
J. $. Bach: Four Flute Sonatas — Elaine Shaffer
(flute), George Malcolm
(harpsichord), Ambrose
Gauntlett (viola de gambol
Purcell: Dido and Aeneas
Oe    Los    Angeles    and
I 36531 Grieg: Peer Gynt (Patricia
Clark, Sheila Armstrong,
Halle Orch., Barbirolli)
I 36532 Vaughan Williams: Pastoral Symphony (No. 3) —
The New Philharmonia
Orchestra conducted by Sir
Adrian Boult
S 36564 Verdi: Aida—Blrgit Nils-
son, Grace Bumbry, Franco
Corel II & Orchestra and
Chorus of The Opera
House, Rome cond. by
Zubin Mehta
I 36584 Ravel: Bolero (Rapsodie
Espagnole)—Orchestra do
Paris cond. by Charles
Munch
S 36587 Messlaen: Quartet for The
End of Time—Erich Gnjen-
berg (violin), Gervese De
Peyer (clarinet), William
Pleeth (cello), Michel Ber-
off (piano)
S 36598 Chopin Waltzes (Augustln
Anievas)
8 36604 Handol: Music for tha
Royal Fireworks (Menuhin
Festival Orch.—Y. Menuhin
8 36609 Schubert: Symphony No. 8
("Unfinished") (Menuhin
Festival Orch.; Menuhin)
S3661S Bach: Magnificat; Bruckner: Te Deum (Soloists and
New Phil. Orch. & Chorus
cond. by Daniel Barenboim)
S 36711 Montserrot Caballe: Puc
cini Arias; Montserrot
Caballe (soprano) — London Symphony Orchestra,
Charles Magkerras _con<l_
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY S FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
Hot flashes
Ecfucaffoii
to fake place
This is Education Week and to
help the education faculty
celebrate, everyone is invited to a
series of noon-hour activities in
education 100.
Surprise activities are
happening today, followed by
Mandrake the Magician on
Wednesday.
Thursday will feature a student
talent show and prizes are
rumored to be offered.
The week rounds out with card
shark Martin Nash demonstrating
his techniques on Friday.
Saltpetre
Is there a pharmacy student in
the house who knows about the
effects of saltpetre?
If so please leave your name
with John Twigg at The Ubyssey
office, 228-2301. It's for a
possible scandal.
Grandeur
A seminar grandly entitled
"The Environment — some ideas
as   to   how   we   can   ensure   the
survival of our air, forests and
waters — and ourselves" will be
grandly held tonight at 8 p.m. at
Cecil Green Park.
Grand speakers will include
representatives of SPEC, the
Greenpeace Foundation, the
Council of Forest Industries and
grand Bob Hunter of the grand
Sun.
Fascination
A fascinating, scintillating and
downright heavenly discussion of
entering the English majors and
honors pogroms, er, programs will
be held today at noon in Buch
106. The discussion, inscrutably
titled "English Majors and English
Honors", is sponsored by the
English department.
Jliusicians
Not only is this Ed week but
it's music week too, heaven help
us. The musicians inform us
"students should be on the
lookout for string quartets and
jazz elevators appearing at
mysterious times."
Highlight for tin-eared students
will be a variety concert put on by
music students Thursday at noon
in   SUB   auditorium,  which  will
include the big band sound of
UBC Stage, the UBC Barbershop
Quartet, Brahms works for kazoo
and assorted virtuoso and
soon-to-be-famous pianists.
Union merits
A debate on the relative merits
of Canadian versus international
unions will be held Thursday in
SUB 125 (in the northeast corner
of the cafeteria.)
Kent Rowley, president of the
Canadian Chemical Textile and
Allied Workers Union will speak
in favor of Canadian unions.
Organizers are trying to confirm
Ray Haynes, president of the B.C.
Federation of Labor as speaker
for international unions.
Vanity
Wanted — poets who want to
read their work.
The special events committee is
sponsoring a poetry reading at
noon Wednesday in the SUB art
gallery.
Interested poets should leave
their names and phone numbers in
the committee's office, SUB 220.
'Tween classes
TODAY
ANTHROPOLOGY—SOCIOLOGY
Nathan   Keyfitz  of the department
of      demography,      University     of
California,      will      speak      on
"Population and Space" at noon in
Buch 100.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
A display on Papua New Guinea in
the upper lounge all day.
CUSO
Information on job opportunities in
Papua New Guinea In International
House upper lounge at 7:30 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Guaranteed     income     with     Prof.
McNiven at noon in SUB 111.
FINE ARTS
German choir and music of the 16th
century   in  the  fine arts gallery at
noon.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT
General meeting Buch 104 at noon.
NDP CLUB,
General  meeting SUB 213 at noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Open   poetry   readings   in  SUB  art
gallery at noon.
WEDNESDAY
CAMPUS MINISTRY
General meeting at noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre, and Bernice Gerard
will speak on the Bible and the
Occult at  noon  in the green room.
IL CAFFE
Election for next year's executive in
the New Gym B at 8:30 p.m.
VANCOUVER STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Peggy Morton will speak on
"Women's Liberation and the
Anti-Imperialist Revolution" noon
in SUB 207-209.
THURSDAY
CCF
Film   "Dust   or   Destiny"   noon   in
SUB 211.
WARGAMERS
Meeting SUB 119 noon.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT
Robert  Cruise of the CPC(ML) will
speak in SUB 207-209.
MUSIC UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
UBC stage band, pianists,
barbershop quartets and a kazoo
performance, noon in the SUB
auditorium.
VCF
Drama: Christ in the Concrete City
noon in the SUB ballroom.
HAMSOC
General meeting, elections, noon in
Brock Hall extension room 358.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Election meeting noon in Angus 24.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Elections SUB 205 noon.
CEREMONIES OFFICE
C.A. Fisher from the University of
London to lecture on "Japan: the
Ecological Climax" noon in
Geography 100.
Tours of
Walter H. Gage
Residence
Noon -4:30 P.M.
*
Tuesdays-Fridays
and Sundays
"Claim Your Freedom"
a Christian Science
Lecture
—by Eugene Tyc
Friday, Mar. 24th
12:30
Clubs' Lounge SUB
ACCESSORIES AND PARTS FOR THE IMPORTED CAR
#y%
4442W. 10th
228-9755
OVERSEAS
AUTO
RUSS HILTON - BOB COURTNEY
INCLUDED IN OUR LINE OF PRODUCTS ARE SUCH
FAMOUS NAMES AS-
Abarth, Amco, American Racing, Ansa, Armstrong, A.S.M.,
Bell, Cannon, Carello, Castrol, Cibie, Classic, Cosmic,
Derrington, Dunlop, Fapa, G.T., Haan, Hepolite, Heuer,
Iskenderian, Janspeed, Koni, Lucas, Lukey, Marchal, M.G.
Mitten, Maserati, N.G.K., Personal, Pirelli, Renamel, Repco,
Smiths, SAH, Stebro, Stevens, Svezia, VDO, Warneford,
Weber.
Special Discount to
UBC Students and Faculty
#y%
Distributors of:
Robbins Auto Tops
for Western Canada
BOUTIQUE
Handmade Clogs
Local Pottery
Open 9-5:30 Mon.-Sat.
till 9 F:i.
4430W. 10th
224-4513
OPTOMETRIST
J.O. MacKENZIE
Eye   Examinations
Contact   Lenses
3235  W.   Broadway
732-0311
CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Compos - 3 lines,  1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3  lines,   I   day $1.25;  additional
linos 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads ere not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., ihe day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
LAST   DANCE  AT TOTEM   PARK
Sat.,     March     25. 9-00-1:00.    Full
facilities.      $3.00 couple.      Band
Sunshyne.
Greetings
12
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST: GOLD JADE RING—MAR.
13 Educ. Bldg. Women's washroom, heirloom. Chinese inscriptions    on    inside     Reward      Gail
876-6853.	
BEAUTIFUL GENTLE PREG-
nant black part Persian cat urgently needs loving home—Owner
leaving    733-4202.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested    phone    224-1910    or    684-
7750.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'69 -VW VAN CAMPER. EXCEL-
lent tires, recent engine work,
new muffler Great shape 731-
0943. '
'58 VW DRIVEN DAILY $150 OR
best offer. Phone Ruth 224-3166.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
JOB INTERVIEW ? ? WE HAVE
short haired wigs to cover that
long hair at Corky's Men's Hair-
styling,   4th   and   Alma.   731-4717.
HEAVY MECHANICS — GROOVY
prices — Hans et. al. now repair
Mazda, Toyota and Datsun cars
in addition to B.M.W., Volvo,
Porsche, Mercedes and Volkswagen. Try us, 8914 Oak St. (at
Marine in Marpole) or phone us
at 263-8121.
TTping
40
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Jfrs. Akau, days 688-
5535,  evenings  and weekends  263-
4023.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.
'TPYED YOUR OOWN ESSAT
lass time". It's easier to call
Dari.    738-6498.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.   Reasonable   rates.
Typing—Con*.
40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis typist. Beautiful work
Mrs.   Ellis  321-3838.
ESSAYS, THESIS, MANUSCRIPTS,
Term Papers. Fast, accurate.
Near 41st & Marine Drive, 266-
5053.
ESS.AY   TYPING
19th   and   Dunbar
733-5922
PROFESSIONAL BILINGUAL —
typing, IBM Selectric, open days,
evenings, "weekends phone Madeleine at 738-3827 reasonable rates
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
II
WANTED: ATTRACTIVE GIRL
with afternoons off to work 1-B
in Law Office — some typing,
shorthand, and reception skills
required — good deal of time for
study   available   —   call   731-2101.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION St SCHOOL!
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early. Limited enrollment.  G:'Alfred, 261-4764.
Tutoring Service
83
TUTORING CENTRE CLOSES
Friday, March 24. Your last
chance now to get help for exams.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SONY TC-127 CASSETTE TAPE
dgck with 10 tapes and microphones — total value $225, (new
in January). Will sell for best
offer over $100. Phone Dave at
228-9537  after  7  p.m.
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone  Directory
Now only 25c
at tha Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS k REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
FREE BED-SITTING ROOM. PRI-
vate bath. In lovely south Granville home for responsible male
student. On bus line. No cooking.
Quiet, conducive for study. Available  May  1st.   Phone   224-6090.
Room It Board
■X
Furnished Apts.
S3
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, March 21, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
—jim adams photo
HEAVY GOING doesn't stop UBC's Rob Burns from latching on to loose ball during this lineout in the
'Birds' 34-0 rout of Ex-Brits.
More fodder for 'Birds
By JIM ADAMS
A no-show Saturday by Washington State left
Ex-Britannia as cannon fodder for UBC's rugby
'Birds and a 34-0 exhibition waxing.
One of the stronger teams in the Vancouver
Rugby union this year, Ex-Brits' aggressive play and
hard hitting intimidated many clubs, but not UBC.
A tough, heavy scrum gave the city team their share
of lineouts, sets and even the loose in the first half.
The backs, however, under constant pressure
from both the UBC scrum and three line, never
mounted a threat and repeatedly kicked the ball
away. Not having possession, they never scored.
UBC's first break came after three minutes.
Running up to meet his man, centre Eric Lillie
blocked a kick, recovered the deflection in mid-air
and raced 25 yards unmolested to score under the
posts. Score, 6-0.
Ten minutes later on a scrum rush with Rob
Burns and Eric McAvity, hooker Bob Jickling got
the ball at the two and dived over foi the second
try. Ray Banks again converted.
Minutes  later  Ex-Brits   blew  their  only  real .
opportunity to mark the score sheet. Given a 25
yard penalty kick at centre field, they missed and
got no more.
Much of Brit's strength, like UBC's, is in their
loose play, but there the similarity ended. Britannia
lelies on hard hitting, elbows and an ability to take
the ball from an opposing player. Coming quickly
into the loose, they attempt to cut an opponent
from his pack and recover the ball.
The 'Birds met their opponents' strategy by
getting to the loose faster, giving support, and by
using more hands in the loose than feet. Given
referee Dave Lindsay's reluctance to call the
penalties, the strategy worked; given Lindsay's
failure to call Brit's continuing off-sides, it was
justified.
For most of the game each of the scrums drew
their share of the rucks. Brits blasted, two at a time,
into the loose. UBC finessed its way to their share.
The difference in the scrums lay in their running
ability. With numerous individual and scrum rushes,
UBC forwards counted four tries.
Prop Chris Hinkson scored 20 minutes into the
game. From a loose maul controlled by McAvity,
Hinkson chose to display his talents with the backs
and ran into the three line to score near the posts.
The 'Birds' last try of the half began with a fake
by McAvity at the Brit's 20 and ended with Leigh
Hillier cradling the ball carefully against the back of
his neck as he went 15 yards for the score. Half-time
score, 22-0.
Coach Donn Spence's half-time remarks
reflected the play.
"You're going to get a lot of late hits and
chippy play. Keep running and wear them out."
The chippy play and aggressive hitting resulted
in four injury time-outs, a player replacement and
couple of unfinished scraps in the first half.
Fortunately, the 'Birds had enough policemen to
counter the rough stuff, but also had the
intelligence to play their own game.
The second half produced less scoring, but
some excellent play.
Countering Brit's kicking through the lineouts
and off-sides in the loose, UBC forwards
consolidated well and pulled the off-sides into the
rucks giving scrum-half Rod Holloway more
protection and the backs more ball.
Though given ample opportunity, UBC's backs
never penetrated Ex-Britannia's defences. Before
being replaced by Peter Macdonald, Spence
McTavish nearly succeeded in chasing down two
kicks ahead by Doug Shick, but most of UBC's
thrust came from pop kicks and loose play.
Rucking at Brit's 20, UBC scrummers sent
Holloway and winger Mike Wyness on a
combination that Holloway completed beneath the
posts. Three minutes from the whistle, loose play by
Holloway, Jickling and Hillier got the ball to
Britannia's three. Tearing the ball from Hillier's
grasp, prop Warrick Harivel dove over for the final
try. Score, 34-0, UBC.
In the Frosh game, tries by Bill Wyndrum and
Rob Adams gave UBC a 15-0 victory over Pocomo
for their first win in the VRU's 2nd Division.
Shrum Bowl dropped
It was a noble experiment. But, like most noble
experiments, it was doomed to failure from the
start.
The UBC athletic department has decided to
withdraw from the annual Shrum Bowl football
competition with SFU.
After five years of play, the 'Birds' record was
four losses and one tie. Their worst defeat came in
1970, when they were clobbered 61-6. Other years
were not much better, with scores of 42-0, 32-12
and the UBC high point, a 6-6 tie.
The Buchanan Trophy basketball competition
will not be affected by this decision, because some
semblance of competition still exits.
«_H_HHSHm_^PH
UJihUi
Highl
Soccer
The UBC Thunderbirds came
out double losers in Pacific Coast
Soccer League play Sunday,
dropping both two points and a
game to the New Westminster
Blues by a score of 3-2 at Empire
Stadium.
Gerry Larson and Len Lendvoy
scored for UBC, one in each half,
to put the 'Birds ahead. However,
poor defensive play by UBC
allowed New Westminster to score
a few goals of their own and give
them the win over the 'Birds.
Coach Joe Johnson promised
there would be some changes in
the UBC line-up when they next
take the field in an inter-collegiate
game against the University of
California.
Currently on a tour of the
Pacific     Coast,    the    California I
ights
school boasts a record
unmarred by losses. UBC should
provide their stiffest competition
of the trip when they meet
Thursday noon in Thunderbird
Stadium.
Half-time entertainment will be
courtesy of the Nurses and
HomeEccers who will indulge in a
game of soccer to amuse the
fans.
Applications
Applications for the positions
of president, secretary and
vice-president of the Men's
Athletic Association will be
accepted until 12 noon, March 28.
Applicants should submit a
written summary of their
qualifications to the Athletic
Director, War Memorial Gym.
INTER COLLEGIATE
SOCCER
Univ. of California (Davis)
versus
UBC Thunderbirds
THURS., MARCH 23
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
12:45 Noon
FREE — ADMISSION — FREE
Authorized Agents for
United l/an Lines
♦MOVING With Care EVERYWHERE
100% TAX WRITE-OFF
FOR STUDENTS AND FACULTY
ON MOVING. STORAGE AND ALL
RE-LOCATION EXPENSES
Phone for our Brochure on
New Income Tax Regulations
FREE PRE-PLANNED MOVING
BOOKLET and useful information
on your new area; such as maps,
housing, schools, churches,
recreational facilities, etc. -
R EM EM B E R, - ask for Bette Malone
INDIVIDUAL STORAGE VAULTS
- SHORT or LONG TERM -
BUTTERWORTH'S MOVING &
STORAGE LTD.
padded vans & warehouses ^*_5SEi5
'FREEESTIMATES'   299-7488
2040 Alpha
Bby.
LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 21, 1972
Abortion legality vote coming
The^articles on this page were
prepared by the UBC Abortion
Action Committee as background
to Wednesday's referendum on
repeal of Canadian abortion laws.
Last weekend in Winnipeg
more than 250 women from eight
provinces met in the first
cross-country conference called to
discuss repeal of the Canadian
abortion laws.
Women ranging in age from
under 18 to over 50 launched the
Crosscountry Women's Coalition
for Abortion Law Repeal, whose
purpose is to work for the full
removal of abortion laws from the
Canadian criminal code. The
gathering, representing over 40
groups and organizations, also
celebrated the victories of 10
campus referenda held within the
last month on the question of
repeal. The results of these ranged
from 75 to 83 per cent in favor of
repeal.
It is hoped that UBC will join
the number of campuses voting
for repeal in the referendum
Wednesday. UBC students will be
asked to vote "yes" or "no" to
the question: Are you in favor of
repeal of those sections of the
criminal code dealing with
abortion?
It's sometimes thought that it's
easy to get an abortion today.
After all, a "liberalized" law was
passed in 1969 and the Vancouver
General Hospital is performing
more abortions than before.
There's one primary catch —
the new law is within the criminal
code. In other words, abortions in
Canada are basically illegal. Only
some — known as therapeutic
abortions - are legal; the grounds
for obtaining these are restricted
and application procedure is
complicated.
According to the Royal
Commission on the Status of
Women,    the    procedure    "may
make it even more difficult to
obtain a therapeutic abortion than
in the past. It can be
demonstrated by the experience
of other countries that a
therapeutic abortion committee
has the effect of reducing the
number of therapeutic abortions
performed by a hospital."
The new law has not reduced
the number of illegal abortions or
the maternal deaths and injuries
attendant on many illegal
abortions. The Status of Women
report estimated that
30,000-300,000 illegal abortions
were performed in one year —
after "liberalization" of the law.
As well, Statistics Canada reports
over 2,000 women admitted to
hospitals in 1971 with
complications from illegal
abortions. At least 1,000 women
suffered severe disability or death.
In major urban centres those
hospitals which do perform
abortions have been faced with a
backlog of cases. Many women
have had to wait over three weeks.
Because abortions should be
performed in the early stages of
gestation, the long waiting period
has forced some women to bear
unwanted children, and has
caused a complication rate of 17%
on those performed at an
advanced stage of gestation.
In rural Canada, in fact mostly
everywhere outside major cities,
abortions are obtained with great
difficulty. Many women must
travel to larger cities or outside
the country. Added to this cost
are the often outrageous prices of
illegal abortions.
Poor women are the hardest
hit. Student women — and men
who are involved — are also
affected. Seventeen per cent of
legal, abortions obtained,
according to the Canadian Medical
Association Journal, have been
performed on campus women.
How many campus women must
resort to illegal abortionists is not
known. As well, research in
Ontario has shown that unwanted
pregnancy is one of the highest
factors causing high school
women to drop out.
As long as the law is in the
criminal    code,    thousands    of
women will break it, resorting to
methods that seriously endanger
their physical and emotional
health, and risking up to two
years' imprisonment.
It is now felt by more and
more individuals and
organizations that the law must be
removed from the criminal code.
Abortion would then become the
choice of the individuals
concerned, and would not be seen
as an illegal act, a crime against
society.
Those in the repeal movement
strongly affirm that they are not
out to force or even encourage
abortion. They respect the views
of those who oppose abortion on
moral or other grounds. But they
call for the same respect in return.
Tens if not hundreds of thousands
of women each year seek
abortions; they should be allowed
to do so as their own conscience
dictates — without the onus of
criminality.
Many church groups, including
many Roman Catholics support
this view. Doctor Harriet Christie,
deputy  secretary of the United
'Injunction ignored liberty'
A 37-year-old mother of four recently had her
plans for an abortion halted by an Ontario Supreme
Court injunction.
The woman was advised by her doctor on Jan.
17 that the continuation of her pregnancy would
likely endanger her health and that, in his opinion, a
therapeutic abortion was justified and would be
carried out by way of a Caesarean operation. The
therapeutic- abortion committee at Riverside
Hospital in Ottawa agreed with his decision and
granted the woman permission for the abortion.
But on Jan. 25, English-language documents
demanding her presence in court in reference to an
injunction to prevent the abortion were presented
to her. The French-speaking Quebec resident did
not fully understand the meaning of the papers and
was advised by her husband that it was not
necessary for her to attend court.
David Dehler, Alliance for Life member and
lawyer for the husband and 'infant plaintiff,
persuaded her that it would be in her best interest
to see another doctor, of his choice, who would
testify in the court case. The woman discovered that
this doctor was against abortion on principle.
The injunction was granted at the court at
which she was not present.
On Jan. 27 she was informed of the significance
and nature of the proceedings and decided to fight
the injunction because, she said, "it was my duty to
do something because it is a question of liberty, and
all women were involved in that case." She
succeeded in getting the injunction lifted on Feb. 8
but has since decided to have the child.
Her original reasons for wanting the abortion
and her general situation remain the same.
Church Division of Missions in
Canada, spoke on the moral issue
at the Winnipeg conference.
"Because we believe so
strongly in the worth of persons —
the 'right to life' - we believe in
full life, not just living," she said.
A potential human being, as yet
unborn, has a right to be wanted,
to be loved, nourished, fed,
educated and enabled to grow to
full maturity. An unwanted
child — for whatever reasons —
has a potential from the beginning
of being denied fullness in life,
which is the right to life."
Dr. Christie continued, "A
woman, who is already a fully
human person, deserves the
freedom to decide about her own
life and how it, and the lives of
family and others involved, can
best be expressed in relation to a
pregnancy without the possibility
of the decision being a criminal
offence."
The repeal movement has had
opposition from the Canadian
government. The Prime Minister
recently spoke out against the
right to choose, and a private
member's bill, calling for repeal,
has sat, unpassed, in the House of
Commons for three years. In
Ottawa, the Ontario Supreme
Court recently issued an
injunction preventing a woman
from terminating a pregnancy.
Tomorrow's referendum at
UBC is asking students to decide
if they are for, or against, the
individual's right to choose. The
movement for repeal will not end
with tomorrow's referendum; a
week of activity is planned right
across the country for May 1-6.
But as many votes as possible,
"yes" votes for repeal, will
strengthen the campaign, and, in
conjunction with other campus
votes, bring victory a step closer.
Take a break from studying or
writing essays — a good turnout is
vital for a successful and
representative polling.
COiVlE IN TODAY! I
BEING
ROBBED
ON
YOUR
INCOME TAX
COMPLETE
RETURNS
If you prepare your own
tax return, chances are
you've been robbing yourself of perfectly good deductions that may reduce
your taxes. Why not see
H & R BLOCK. We'll prepare, check and guarantee your return for accuracy. Come in to H & R
BLOCK today. 	
== GUARANTEE —
We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return.
If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or in-
terest, we will pay only that penalty or interest.	
I   BLOCK    1971
H<* tttjO^K'LTD.
Canada'sUrgest Tax Service Wilh Over 6000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST.
3519 E. HASTINGS,
I
6395 FRASER
3397 KINGSWAY
1685 DAVIE ST.
J
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY I
327-0461
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
INSURANCE   COMPANY
□
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
City.,	
Phone: Home-
Occupation. ...
Prov..
. Office..
Age     Married □ Divorced □     Male □
Separated □ Never Married O Female D
Date first licensed to drive  .._.'—-_—
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past Ave years?
Yes Q No G (" "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?	
Are you now insured? _ 	
Date current policy expires       	
This  coupon   is designed  solely to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Car No. 1
Car No. 2
No. of cylinders
Horsepower
2/4 dr-sedan, 8/w, h/t, c
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area.*
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from wor
 Daysj
 Miles.
  ..Days
  .  Miles
k)?
Yes □ No D
Yes n No D
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
%
%
%
%
%
%
FPR UBC 52

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127722/manifest

Comment

Related Items