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The Ubyssey Jan 19, 1968

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Array WE UBYSSEY
>o\. XLIX, No. 36
U^-
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1968
48
224-3916
— kurl hilger photo
Unsuspecting campus cop snitches loaded cookie from arsty engineer.
Cookies give science red runs
Sciencemen were treated to what they de-
icribed as a pretty crumby engineers' stunt
Thursday noon.
Claiming to be artsmen, several engineers
et up a free cookie stand in Hebb theatre while
Salazar's forces use
napalm in Guinea
CONAKRY, Guinea (CUP-LNS) — Amer-
can-made napalm and phosphorous bombs are
>eing used by the Portugese government in
Guinea, according to a report in the Christian
science Monitor.
The bombs are being used to put down a
lational rebellion in the country, the report said.
The report is based on numerous eye-witness
tories and photographs which appear to be
lenuine and was written by Russell Warren
lowe for the U.S. publication.
He reports that napalm and fire bombs were
Iropped on villages wrested from the control
>f the Salazar government by nationalist forces.
Under a NATO agreement Portugal would
ise such armaments only to defend external
gression.
science held  a  pep meet  in honor  of science
week.
Under a sign reading Arts Loves Science,
the masquerading engineers passed out hundreds
of the innocent looking oatmeal cookies to
happy sciencemen.
But the cookies weren't as innocent as they
appeared.
They had been filled with phenolthalein,
a chemical indicator.
"The sciencemen will piss red for days,"
said Peter Chataway, engineering 1, the leader
of the stunt.
Chataway, who was wearing flowered pants,
steel rimmed glasses and a mustache, said the
chemical was harmless and that engineers
checked with medical authorities before making
the cookies.
The 400 cookies were baked Wednesday
night in six ovens of a home economics lab.
The necessary materials were purchased by the
engineering undergraduate society, which backed the stunt.
Chataway said they gave cookies to almost
anyone but tried not to give them to girls.
"One poor scienceman came back and said
he had had five of the cookies and wanted
more," he said. "We wouldn't give him any."
Chataway said he would notify Wesbrook
hospital of the stunt in case stricken students
go there for aid.
Forced moves,
doubled rents
face families
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Married students in Acadia Camp huts are being forced to
move to new Acadia Park at double their old rent, says the president of the Acadia Park residents' association.
John Tilley claimed 40 families are being pressured into
leaving $65 a month suites in Acadia Camp for Acadia Park
suites with an average $120 rent.
He said, they are being evicted to make way for additions
to the health sciences centre. Clearing, officially due to begin
in February, will not begin on time, he added.
"The board of governors has frozen the project for a year.
"Why should people be forced to move and
leave the huts empty for a year"
Acadia Camp families are being told they
are assured of a place to move to if they move
now, Tilley said.
"But if they wait until September, housing administration is saying they can't be guaranteed accommodation.
"Housing is facing a budget crisis this
spring, so it is forcing the load on people in
the shacks." ROHRINGER
Housing administrator Les Rohringer said Thursday physical plant construction supervisor Franz Conrads has assured him
the schedule for replacing the huts with a 410-bed research and
teaching hospital was unchanged.
"The resolution passed by the board does not affect housing," he said.
"The board decided to retain those huts used for academic
purposes which were scheduled for demolition at the end of this
academic year."
Housing's plans are unchanged, Rohringer said. Seven families in four huts on Clement Road are to move out by Feb. 1.
He sent them a letter last August, offering them alternate
accommodation in either Acadia Camp or Acadia Park.
Five families have already moved into the Camp and another
will do so soon. One family chose Acadia Park.
"Other people have moved into the huts on a strictly temporary basis—month to month," he said.
"They know they'll be out in February."
Eight more huts, on Wesbrook Crescent (including Tilley's)
go at the end of May, he said, and the occupants have received
the same offer of alternate accommodation.
Rohringer said he suggested they move now, while vacancies in other on-campus housing were still available.
Board of Governors |
aids ailing  library
UBC's board of governors has acted to alleviate critical
difficulties faced by the UBC library.
Director of information, Arnie Myers, said a request
has been sent to the provincial government for a supplementary appropriation to offset a lack of funds outlined in
the library's annual report.
In the report, head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said
the future of the university will be in question if funds
are not found to replace the 1966/67 donations of H. R.
MacMillan.
The board's request covers the academic year 1968-69
— the last year of the current five-year UBC budget.
Stuart-Stubbs said: "I find it inconceivable that the
board of governors would commit themselves to aiding
the library financially before the provincial government
budget is set in February."
Myers said all of Stuart-Stubbs recommendations for
library construction have been included in the next five-
year budget.
These included new undergraduate, science and education libraries.
Meanwhile, the possibility of temporary measures to
relieve the crisis is being investigated by deputy acting
president William Armstrong.
The library may use empty buildings on campus or
erect temporary facilities, said Myers. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19, 1968
Improvements a must
for sluggish bookstore
By ALEX VOLKOFF
Any improvements made to the bookstore are made very
slowly.
In January, 1965, the faculty association appointed a committee to inquire into the function of a university bookstore and
suggest improvements for the operation of the present bookstore.
That was three years ago, and recommendations made at that
time have still not been followed through.
The purpose of this series of articles is to make public the
findings and recommendations of the committee, and see how
far the bookstore has come in the intervening years.
The report said the bookstore should complement the research function of the library by providing a cultural centre for
students.
The following are the specific functions that the committee
feels the bookstore can and should perform:
1. It must make required texts readily and quickly available. They should be available at the lowest possible price compatible with service.
2. It must provide efficient service in supplying staff and
students with highly specialized books which individuals may
need or want to own, but which might be impractical to keep in
large stock.
3. It should stimulate curiosity in fields other than those
of established interest and make it easy for this curiosity to be
satisfied.  It  should  encourage  impulse  buying.
It also suggests an extension of the bookstore's stock into
quality recordings and art reproductions. Finally, it suggests the
importance of careful attention to attractive and convenient
display.
Ex-editor wants job
WINDSOR (CUP) — John Lalor, who resigned last
week as co-editor of the University of Windsor Lance,
wants his job back.
Lalor submitted his resignation a week ago when it
appeared the senate committee on student conduct, activities, and discipline (SCAD) might expel him.
But SCAD Monday decided against any further action
in the case, and Lalor wants his old job back.
Co-editor Marian Johnstone returned to the post
Friday.
Lalor said he now wants to be editor and has asked
the board to rescind their motion accepting his resignation.
BLOOD DONOR CLINIC:
ARMOURIES
Mon. - Fri. Jan. 22 - Jan. 26
Mon. - Fri. Jan. 29 - Feb. 2
9:30 a.m. — 4:30 p.m. (continuous)
'HILARIOUS WILDLY RAFFISH
SLAPSTICK   AND   SATIRE"
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DUE TO STARTLING SCENES IN
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ATTENDANT WILL 9E ON DUTY AT ALL
PERFORMANCES
NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
Wed.,  Jan.  24,  8:30 p.m.
Adults  $2.00.  Students  $1.00
Regular Showings
beginning Thursday, Jan. 25
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WIDE SELECTION AT LOWEST PRICES IN B.C.
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MU2-1919 Friday, January 19, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
"Good grief I The traffic conditions for us bus awaiters and
riders get worse every year.
Why doesn't the highways department do something about
the horrible conditions on University Boulevard ? A guy
could drown. Boy would I like
to have Lucy here right now.
Boy would she get wet.-Ha, ha,
ha . . .
Group of ratepayers
tries to close hostel
A UBC English prof is leading a fight to stop the operation of a hostel for Indian girls in the Point Grey area.
Thomas Blom heads a group of ratepayers asking city
hall to close the hostel on West Thirteenth Ave., operated
by the Naisaka Lodge Society.
The zoning appeal board has postponed judgment on an
appeal by the society for a change in zoning regulations to
permit more than two boarders in a single dwelling in the
area. '■"'
"The boarding house will create a precedent that could -
lead to our single-family way of life here being wiped '/
out," Blom said. |';
His wife Margaret, a UBC English lecturer, said Wed- '-'i
nesday she hoped residents in the area would stay longer '?i
than six months. p
"We'd like to be able to exchange backyard gossip with 0,
our neighbors," she-said. |f
The Bloms stressed that racial discrimination has noth- %
ing to do with the protest. g*
NDP council coup?
UBC New Democrats meet at noon today to discuss running
candidates in the next Alma Mater Society election.
Rodney Dickinson, NDP campus newsletter editor, said the
meeting, in Bu. 212, was prompted by a council situation in which
most AMS officials are Conservatives or Liberals.
"They are most concerned with furthering their own reputation," he said.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said Thursday anyone is free
to run for AMS office under a political banner.
"It doesn't matter to me if any political group runs candidates," Sullivan said. "There are no restrictions.
"In fact, you could have a better working executive if they
all had similar views."
Harold Clare, UBC Social Credit Club president, said he
doubted if any SC candidates would run.
"I doubt if any of our members would be interested in running," Clare said.
Andrew Gates, president of the UBC Conservative Club, said
it was possible that his group would sponsor candidates, but not
likely.
"We don't think there is much point to field candidates."
Council reneges on policy
By  FRED   CAWSEY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan confirmed Thursday two resolutions of a
policy report passed last March by student council have stagnated.
The report, submitted to council March 13
by former Ubyssey editor John Kelsoy, was
entitled Academics and the Alma Mater Society,
or To Free a Nigger.
It was designed to encourage better communication between various sectors of the
campus.
A resolution that the AMS first vice-president expand his role to include liaison with the
faculty association and establish contact with
association officers to coordinate? activity for
mechanical reforms of the university has not
been implemented.
Meetings were scheduled, but never were
held Sullivan said.
"I must admit, however, that we didn't pursue the topic very vigorously."
Said the report: "With the faculty, we could
survey examinations and attempt to judge their
effectiveness as a measure of competences their
afuse, and their validity as a system. That report would go to the senate for consideration,
as would other similar reports.
"We   might   seriously   examine   the   whole
Twenty minute wait
for injured pair
Two students injured in a traffic accident
last night at UBC waited 20 minutes in a cold
downpour  for  an  ambulance.
Pedestrians Leonard Winter, comm. 3, and
Kathy Sheppard, ed. 2, were hit Thursday at
East Mall and University Boulevard at about
5:55 p.m.
An ambulance didn't arrive until  6:15 p.m.
Dr. Conrad Schwarz, UBC consultant psychiatrist, came from Wesbrook hospital nearby
with blankets and examined the two until the
ambulance arrived.
question of percentage grades as opposed to
pass-fail systems, and advocate adoption of pass
fail marking for courses outside one's discipline
which may be taken for general interest without risking his average through failure due to
pressure from other course's or loss of interest."
A second resolution that the second vice-
president prepare a document and promotional
material for a challenge lecture series to sturl
last fall has been ignored.
Sullivan said he hadn't heard of the resolution.
"Kim Campbell might know something about
it, but I don't," he said.
A further resolution to form a trust fund to
finance an annual project aimed al the solution
of specific academic problems was shelved.
It was passed by council, but subject to the
passing of a proposed AMS fee hike. This was
turned down by UBC students in a referendum
last spring.
February freak,
festival feature
The armory freaks out this year starting
Feb.  7.
That's when the eighth annual Festival of
the Contemporary Arts will  start.
Performances and exhibitions of musle,
poetry, art, dancing, drama, film and photography will .saturate; the; armory and other
campus points for eight days.
After being attacked by UBC slude-nts and
Intermedia, the armory will become an e;nvlr-
inment full of light, color and sound.
Among attractions are readings by U.S. ipoot
Robert Crecley, a poet's marke-t In which 15
local poets will read and se-ll their own work,
and a production of the- audle-nee participation
play, Daddy Violet, in Fre-ddy Wood theatre.
The festival will also feature two art exhibitions by Iain Baxter and Arnold Rockman in
the  UBC fine arts gallery. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays end Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press'. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific 9tudent Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pag*
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, lot 24; sports, toe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
JANUARY 19, 1968
Nonconformists
There are few things uglier in the Canadian university world than the insistence upon academic conformity.
There is increasing evidence at Canadian universities of the removal of young instructors and professors
from their posts for the sin of failing to emulate the
thought and behavior patterns of senior department
members.
This happened at University of Victoria last year.
It happened at University of Waterloo last week.
And there is evidence that it is happening in some
faculties at UBC right now.
At Waterloo, a, political science professor and a
psychology lecturer were dismissed from their posts
during the Christmas vacation.
Administration officials at that university claimed
one of the men was fired because he wasn't "living up
to the accepted standards of the profession" and the
other because he was "unsympathetic to the purpose"
of the institution.
But students at Waterloo were unconvinced of the
administration's claims, especially since the two professors were among the chief critics of Waterloo's academic status quo. About a quarter of the students boycotted classes at the institution in protest. These students acted in the belief that diversity of thought and
experimentation with new teaching methods are essential at Canadian universities if education is to improve
and universities are to fulfill their role as independent
critics of society.
Encouragement and support of such professors is
natural to students who see themselves as full-fledged
citizens of the university community rather than as
passive recipients  of a standardized education.
The magic micro mini! The dress only fools can't see.
SUBject
The students at Waterloo who are protesting the
firing of two nonconformist profs are acting on one of
the gut issues that determine the nature of a university.
Similar action on an issue at the heart of the educational system occurred this week at the University of
Toronto. It concerned that university's bookstore facilities and, believe it or not, it was taken by U of T's
student council which, unlike its UBC counterpart, is
in the habit of concerning itself with educational
matters.
The council announced that it will go into direct
competition with the administration bookstore unless
student demands for improvement are met. These demands include:
A 10 per cent discount on all books sold in the
store.
Creation of a committee including students to determine bookstore policy.
It is time similar action was taken at this campus.
The inchoate efforts for a co-operative bookstore here
do not meet the need of providing effective on-campus
competition to an administration store that is unsatisfactory in organization,  efficiency, and pricing.
The demands made by the UofT council are unlikely to be met by the Toronto administration. Nor are
similar demands liable to success at UBC. Rather, we
should make sure there is room for a bookstore of our
own in the Student Union Building.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman Laurie Dunbar appeared and disci ty _ Stuart Gray appeared because she felt ill and
News                                 Susan Gransby Judy    Young,    Fred    Cawsey,    Irene
Managing   Murray McMillan Wasilewski and Alex Volkoff lurched
Photo    Kurt Hilger in  later.
Senior   Pat Hrushowy Lin  Tse-Hue   was  four  hours  late,
Sports   Mike Jessen humbly    starting    to    work    without
Wire       Norman   Gidney punishing   anyone.   Mark   DeCoursey
Page Friday  _  Judy Bing beat   kettledrums.
Ass't. City   Boni Lee Sports  men were  John  Twigg  and
It  was  a  day  of the  annual  post- Bjorn   Simonsen.
exam   return   to   the   shrinking   staff Lawrence Wood, Bob Brown, Chris
malady. Paul Knox, Mike Finlay and Blake  and Dennis Gans shuttered  in
Steve    Jackson    appeared    at'  noon; the wind and rain.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Ed  Action  works
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The education action program was aimed at pressuring
the provincal government into
increased support for higher
education by bringing to the
attention of the public, the
mass media, and the provincial
legislators the needs of higher
education. The campaign has
included mass student rallies
on various campuses, meetings
ctt students with their own
MLAs, press coverage of
higher education problems,
student speakers talking to
groups (from Kiwanis clubs to
high school students), and
speeches by MLAs on campus.
At this point the results clearly show increased public
awareness of the crisis in education. It is essential to the
good of higher education that
the students of UBC be accurately told by their newspaper
what Ed Action is doing. Do
students really have to read
about education action only in
the downtown press?
GEORGE SHINDLER
education action committee
Burau
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Open letter to education students: What happens when a
teacher sees his marks being
revised to allow daughters and
sons of prominent community
members to pass an exam in
which he or she had failed?
Not only did this teacher see
his marks being changed but
the teacher was also informed
by his students of this procedure. The person I write
about is a person who believes
that students must learn to
think first and then learn. A
long time ago I remember a
substitute teacher coming to
our school and this teacher
taught us to think. (If you
have elicited a hint of association, let us continue.)
Once he taught another student to think and the student
decided to write a letter to
correct a publisher's mistake.
The letter was concerned with
crime and mistakes and why
both should not be punished.
The publisher wrote a letter to
the student and thanked the
student for correcting the
quote. The letter got into the
hands of the principal and the
teacher was made to be the
instigating force behind the
student's action. Remember
that time, Ken French? The
teacher backed the student's
action and the principal
thought that the 12-year-old
student was not supposed to
embarrass an important publisher. One thing led to another
and  the  teacher's  second  dis
missal read the same as the
first: "Mr. Burau is found to
be an incompetent teacher." I
forgot to tell you that the
teacher's first dismissal came
when he refused to allow the
principal of Vanderhoof School
to keep him silent. Mr. Burau
posted the true marks. This
teacher has tried now for four
years to have a hearing set in
Victoria or Ottawa. (Nothing.
Why should you be interested? How far can you incorporate your individualness without disrupting the education
system? Five people on campus distinctly remember that
one hour class seven years ago.
Karl Burau will be on campus again to answer your questions. Watch 'tween classes for
experimental  college.
WAYNE ALEXANDER
arts 1
With luv
Editor, The Ubyssey:
'Pigeon brain — I grudingly
extend my congratulations to
you and your staff on winning
the Southam Trophy for the
seventh time. Considering the
state of the student newspapers
in Canada, it is a dubious
achievement.
Sorry for being late with the
congrats, but the mail is slow
in these parts.
MA ©1967
&}ffl@>W
PnnteilioEn^a««L JANUARY 19, 1968
Now we know where
Page Friday gets its name
from! Revelation came
from photo by Ron Pears
on today's cover.
Judy Bing lay sick abed
this week; chief surgeon
was Stephen Scobie, while
Bert Hill administered anaesthetics, Arnold Saba
handled scalpel, Gordon
Fidler wiped up the blood,
and Reilly Burke read
apposite pages from a
19th century Home Medical
Guide, Grant's Atlas of
Anatomy.
Two weeks from today
we will be publishing our
first theme issue of the
term, on Education. This
term is to be interpreted
in its broadest possible
sense. We shall welcome
any articles, suggestions,
cartoons, photos, jokes, or
prognostications for this
issue. All material should
be submitted to the Page
Friday office in Brock by
Wednesday noon of next
week.
Page Friday's artists (of
glorious renown), Arnold
Saba and Gordon Fidler,
will present a new film on
the CBC's Enterprise program next Wednesday. The
film is entitled Three
Poems and consists of, not
surprisingly, three poems,
'which are written and
read by UBC author Jim
Brown.
Another forthcoming
event is a Symposium at
Rosario Beach on February
9th to 11th. The basic subject is "Why the hell
bother studying English
literature?" Among those
participating will be UBC
Creative Writing poet-in-
residence J. Michael Yates,
and pf's Stephen Scobie.
Anyone interested should
see David Robinson, who
can be contacted through
the Academic Activities
office in Brock.
A group of nameless radicals on Fifth Avenue (a
very in street these days)
are reported to be engaged
in a gigantic plot to change
the colors on every set of
traffic lights in town. All
that hinders them is that
they are uncertain whether to use lilac or nasturtium as the stop signal.
They, too, are open to suggestions.
Castle in Kingdom of Swat
ARCHITECTURAL   PLAYMATES
By DONALD GUTSTEIN
Who is Miss December? "Diminutive Lynn Winchell
— bright-eyed, soft-spoken and knowledgeable ..."
What is she? Is she kind, generous and aware? Or is she
avaricious and hateful? Is she beautiful or a bitch? Is
she a lesbian or frigid? What does she smell like? We
don't care because we are performing the Romantic
Fallacy.
The method is to take a static visual image, project
your frustrations, desires and fantasies onto the image
and then begin to interact with it. You can fuck Miss
December (in your mind) but you cannot communicate
with her.
The "Architecture without Architects" exhibition
now at the Fine Arts Gallery at UBC is to the art buff
as a collection of Playmate photos is to the playboy.
Both types use people as objects for the attainment of
their own ends. In both cases, the visual sense has been
isolated and expanded to abnormal limits, and when
the visual sense predominates, can separation into parts
be far behind ?
Presumably, Miss December is based on a real person, as the physical disposition of elements is based on a
social organization. Miss December's body has been
separated from her being, and those picturesque layouts in the photos have been separated from their cultures, with meaningless, if not dangerous, results.
It is still held by the older generation of architects
that visual form is one of the dominant qualities of architecture. This belief originated in Hellenistic times and
reached a peak during the Roman Empire. It then subsided until the Renaissance during which it produced
its most damaging effects.
In the near future, architecture will be defined as
the physical manifestation of social realities. Apart from
the periods mentioned above, physical manifestations
were based on an unconscious interaction of the members of a group. No individual existed apart from the
society. Then came the process of individualization,
especially from the 15th to the 20th centuries, coinciding
exactly with the main period of emphasis on visual form.
Now, social needs can be considered consciously, through
the biology of the brain, communication theory, social
science, etc.
It is safe to say, then, that there has been no architecture since the 15th century, only visual design. The
title of this exhibition should properly be: Architecture
without Architects as seen by Architects without Architecture. The equation is: architecture minus architects
plus architects minus architecture equals zero.
Some clues that this is so: a mere 15 % of the pictures
have more than one person in them, and 33% of the
pictures are taken from the air.
In the former case, because space and time are not
continuous in nonliterate societies, a "building" has no
meaning when not in use. In the latter case, seeing from
above, which was never experienced by the inhabitants
in that way, introduces the Renaissance invention of
perspective.
What this exhibition is, then, is a series of photographs of forms and patterns interspersed with a text
based on a number of misconceptions.
Rudolfsky's understanding of architecture may be
bad ("Yet even before men and beasts walked the earth,
there existed some kind of architecture"), but his understanding of ethnology is non-existent ("The absence of
any large buildings, vehicles, or even streets would
suggest to us barbarian conditions, had not extensive
ethnographic investigations disclosed a highly sophisticated culture").
Another reviewer (Richard Blagborne in the Province, Jan. 13) stated: "... as one walks round the exhibition there arises an awareness of the shape of the
communities, who they are, what they are, and sometimes, why they are."
This attitude, Which is also Rudolfsky's, is the main
reason for my review. It is as good an example of
ethnocentrism as you're likely to find. Using the empty
spaces and the villages, as seen from above or below,
as cues, you apply your values, perceptions and ways of
organizing experience to them. This is how they would
live if they were us. "I would feel happy here; I would
be excited in this space; I would like to live here."
To make the exhibition relate to its title, it is necessary to reorganize it. Deal with one or two cultures only.
Give some ideas of their categories of time and space,
the assumptions of their languages, their world views
and social organizations. Then stick the pictures in as
an appendix. Otherwisej change the title.
And by the way, the forms are great.
Borneo bachelors' club
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1968 <sv<=y)
MIJFFINs   Junior jollies
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
After the last plaintive "Goo Goo Goo Joob" fades
out of "I Am The Walrus (No You're Not, Said Little
Nicola)", various assorted sounds can be heard.
Chief among these is a chorus of deep bass voices
giving forth the fine old traditional British ditty "Oompa
oompa stick it up your joompa"; but there is also, if you
listen hard enough, a portion of some Shakespearean
play being performed.
Your diligent and learned reporter has tracked down
the exact quotation, and here reproduces it in full. It
comes from King Lear, Act Four, Scene Six.
OSWALD: Slave, thou hast slain me. Villain,
take my purse:
If ever thou wilt strive, bury my body,
And give the letters which thou find'st about me
To Edmund Earl of Gloucester; seek him out
Upon the English party. O untimely death!
Death! (He dies).
Edgar:   / know thee well. A serviceable villain,
As duteous to the vices of thy mistress
As badness would desire.
Gloucester: What, is he dead?
EDGAR: Sit you down, father; rest you.
Any metaphysical relating of this to the theme of "I
Am the Walrus" will be considered portentous. It must
also be related to the fact, of which I am informed by
erudite sources, that the whole song is based on a passage
from the Bhagavad Ghita.
As I walked down the waterfall of the Library steps
yesterday, I was reminded of an old Scots rhyme written
by a Glaswegian humorist called Bud Neill. (It should
be pronounced in a fitting accent: the present writer will
oblige on request.)
Ra rain is naw
As nice as snaw;
For why?  Ra rain is we'er.
I likes the snaws
Cos when they fa's
Ye can shake it aft ye be'er.
I am informed that Film Society is looking for actors
to perform in a short fictional film they are producing,
and that auditions will be held this afternoon in Buchanan 2225 at 3:30.
And now, a word from the kitchen. How many of you
poor people who are deprived of the delights of Residence
cooking attempt to make up for this, and your own lack
of variation on bacon and eggs, by patronising the various forms of Instant powdered breakfasts now available?
Should even these culinary decoctions turn stale on the
plate and/or palate, may I offer a very special recipe:
Instant Breakfast a la 3530 West 15th.
Take two eggs, separate yolk and white. In a bowl,
beat the egg whites until stiff. Add a little sugar if you
have a sweet tooth. When stiff, add the yolks, and beat
them in. Flavour with generous pinches of cinnamon
and/or nutmeg. Add two glasses of milk, and two Instant
breakfast packages. Mix thoroughly. Brandy, or other
additives of a lubricative nature, may also be inserted.
Far be it from me to question a colleague's judgment,
but it seems to me that Mr. Saba, in his article last week
on Donovan, overlooked an important aspect of Mellow
Yellow. This album seems to me to be an abberation
from the true development of Donovan's thought from
the Sunshine Superman album, which is infinitely superior to its successor.
(Ed. note: I disagree. Signed, A. Salba.)
In Mellow Yellow, I detect (apart from a premature
cashing-in on his own success) the reactions of a provincial eye, casting on the wicked city of London a jaundiced
and satirical eye. This is most obvious in a song like
"Sunny South Kensington", but it also shows up in most
of the other songs.
We should remember that Donovan's background is
primarily that of Glasgow; his present accent is a very
carefully developed one, almost (but not quite) purged
of Scotticisms.
My own favourite Donovan song is a short ditty which
runs as follows:
Three fat ladies in a Mini-mini car
(Ha ha ha ha ha)
Off to the slimming shop they are
(Ta ta ta ta ra)
And the woman from the Physical
"ulture Depart-
' went to their aid to help to
- them out of the Mini-mini car
(Ha ha ha ha ha).
By KEITH PRASER
The Physicists at the Freddy Wood Theatre is billed as an intellectual thriller; and
I suppose it is, if your mind derives its
junior jollies from unravelling ideas which
neatly unravel themselves. The author,
Friedrich Durenmatt, writes until his paradoxes become so increasingly obvious that
his additional 21 Points on the play, dutifully reprinted in the program, seem
pedantic. Instead of a crisp echo there
seems a dull thud because his verbal hammer continues to bang at the wall when
the nail is clearly in the hole.
But if this play lacks sufficient finesse
to leave us to unravel an idea or two for
our very own, what it says and how it is
presented on the stage is still worthwhile.
The action occurs in a private sanatorium know as Mon Repos where two of the
patients have strangled their nurses, and
the third is about to.
Mobius, played by Tom Wheatley, came
originally to Mon Repos to escape a world
whose ubiquitous power politics made it
impossible for him to function as an individual with  sense of personal freedom.
He has led his wife and society to believe
him insane. Lodged with him are Barney
O'Sullivan and Joseph Golland, also apparently mad because they believe themselves to be Sir Isaac Newton and Albert
Einstein. Their revelation as undercover
physicists from opposing governments, each
assigned to return with Mobius, contributes
to an absurd yet rational concept that our
world is interested only in perverting the
order that is the raison d'etre for any physicist. But because the walls of the mad
house close irrevocably about them, the insanity of their former roles appears to
harden its grasp until Newton and Einstein
live again. Mobius is somehow fulfilled because Mon Repos now embodies tacit harmony. Despite the fascist environment, this
world is real, and he is safer here because
no one from the outside world would care
to usurp the apparent unreality.
In this production there are no exceptional performances and no poor ones. Per*
haps this is intended, because in the madness of the modern world lies a constant
commonality among its role players. If so,
maybe there is an idea left to unravel after
all.
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Friday, January 19, 1968
THE      UBYSSEY I  ■' I ■ I
University   Hill
United Church
ON THE BOULEVARD
"Morning Worship"
11 ajn.
Reverend  Harold   MacKay
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Applications are enclosed.
LANGUAGE - CULTURE -FUN-
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send $1.00 AIRMAIL to: ISIS,
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Brussels 6, Belgium.
Who's afraid of the
By BERT HILL
Once a month, eleven men assemble in
the board room of the administration building of this university. All but one are from
outside the UBC community. They decide
the financial affairs of the university in complete secrecy.
This body has the real power as it can
veto Senate proposals for academic programs
simply by refusing to allocate money for
them. The Senate, theoretically the academic
arm of university government, is required
to have the board's OK if it decides to
change academic  programs.
Since UBC began over fifty years ago,
there have been sixty individuals who were
governors of the university. These people
were all appointed by the cabinet of the
provincial government until 1932. Now six
of the governors are appointed by the cabinet and three are elected by the senate. The
chancellor is elected by all people who hold
degrees from UBC and faculty. The president
is selected by the board.
The argument for this system of appointment is that since the government finances
virtually all the university's budget (student
fees account for 25 per cent) the ruling body
should be made of figures who repre-
sent the public interest.
In later disputes it was found that it was
necessary that the academic community of
UBC should have a voice and thus the Senate would elect three of the members of
the board. However, regulations stated that
the person could not be a member of faculty
of the university.
Other regulations state only that the governor be over 21 years of age, not an MP,
MPP, school teacher, education civil servant
or living outside B.C.
Despite this regulation, the otherwise
broad constituency from which the board
can be chosen has only been narrowly explored (see the table).
Despite the many official powers of the
board, many people do not consider it to be
the centre of real power or that it at least
has given up much of real decision-making
power while continuing to maintan a superficial rubber-stamp power.
The Duff-Berdahl report suggested that
the president like other administrative figures tends to dominate the board and the
senate by virtue of having a close contact
with the day-to-day affairs of the university.
This argument closely parallels that of the
'managerial revolution' that ex-Trotskyist
James Burnham developed several years ago
in arguing that the owners of large corporations (bourgeoisie) who sat on the board of
directors had lost control over the executive
officers of the corporation. However there
is little evidence to show that the officers
followed a course <maximizing profit) that
the directors couldn't agree with and when
they failed they were fired.
In respect to the university, recent evidence at the University of Calgary suggests
the system is the same. Here it was found
that the president couldn't get along with
his board and he was fired. Closer to home
at Simon Fraser University during the dispute last spring, the president of that university backed the actions of the board in
firing the five teaching assistants and it was
left to the dean of arts to defend what he
saw as the interests of the academic community. For his pains the dean was in effect
fired.
Other people, usually academics argue
that the real power is at the departmental
level. These bodies by virtue of skillful
negotiation can win the appointments, salary
raises and research grants that they want
from the administration and can fight any
outside interference by departmental solidarity. Since the education industry has become fragmentized into such small specialties these academics may be guilty of a form
of ethnocentrism. There maybe some power
in the committee system of decision-making
that former president Macdonald d
continually. Then again it may haV
only inefficiency.
Students generally are little v
about the affairs of the board althougl
think that students should have a vo
the board. Others argue that a studen
would mean the students would leg
the decisions of the board, but lac.
majority could not effect these decisis
Attempts to have the board open
deliberations to the press have no;
successful.  Former president John  B
BOARD OF
GOVERNORS 1913-1
No.
businessmen
18
lawyers
8
judges
7
newspapermen
5
presidents
4
academics
4
physicians
4
housewives
3
farmers
3
labor
2
civil servants
2
60
donald's reply to this request last yes
that a university was "an institution t.
to learning" and that open board me
would not produce "an atmosphere
ducive to sound decision-making." Th«
pears to be some contradiction here
assume that an institution of higher
ing is essentially a democratic one
faculty and students engaged in a le.
enterprise with administration serving
interests. Democracy implies open d<
making with special provisions for n
best handled privately.
A recent Vancouver Life story a
us that a matron in Shaughnessy (uppe
residential district where some memb
the board live) frequently threw mar
cjn <t{s cjs cjs els cjs cja cjs cjs cjs (ijs-cjs cjs <^> cjs eijs <ijs e^s cjs <^9|eXs etto <tj9 eJS
Board  of Governo
EINAR GUNDERSON
Government appointee, on
board ten years (term expired in 1967, not yet reappointed). Accountant, had
directorships in 12 concerns including provincial
government bodies, fishing
companies, Bank of B.C.
68 years old.
WALTER KOERNER
Government appointee, on
board ten years. Chairman
of board of Rayonier Canada (B.C.) Ltd., has directorships with five companies including CNR, Air Canada, Toronto-D o m i n i o n
Bank. 69 years old.
ARTHUR FOUKS
Government appointee, on
board four years. Lawyer,
president of Puritan Can-
ners Ltd., vice-president
Made-Rite Meat Packers
Ltd., director of Panco Poultry Ltd. 47 years old.
DONOVAN MILLER
Senate electee, on board
four years. President of
Canadian Fishing Company, has directorships in
six other fishing companies.
50 years old.
STUART KEATE
Senate electee, on board
four years. Publisher of
Vancouver Sun, has directorships with three companies associated with Sun. 54
years old.
NATHAN Nl
Government app
board ten years,
of the Board* of <
B.C. Supreme Co
since  1963. 54 ye
Are YOU interested in a
SUMMER STOCK COMPANY
FREDERIC W
• !•   §
THEATRE
JUNE 17 - AUGUST 10
If so, further information on Theatre Bulletin  Boards or in
The Green Room (Basement F.W.T.)
You re Needed and Welcome!
i
ir
is
4
IT
C
of
I
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1968 Big Bad Board?
eplored
'i? been
ssured
r class
(ers of
ijuana
parties. Some people who refuse to take the
big bad board of governors seriously suggest
that this is the only reason for closed board
meetings.
Why a board drawn from outside the
university and specifically from among businessmen ?
There have been a number of reasons
presented. The first is that a businessman
has a skill for the financial affairs with
which the university is concerned. This argument is true except that UBC has competent
accountants and bursars and there is little
that a board can question about financial
accounts. That is the concern of auditors.
The board has connections to help UBC
out of its chronic financial problems. "I
thought this was the whole point" I heard
an English professor say two years ago when
a graduate student ran against John Buchanan for chancellor. Fewer business executives have personal wealth but their corporation connections can help. Yet it is worth
remembering that the last capital grants
campaign fell drastically short despite support of companies run by governors.
These arguments are sometimes refuted
by suggesting that businessmen should be in
an advisory position.
"The word 'service' ranks high in the
vocabulary of motives, tout the number who
want to 'serve' only as commanders is curiously high," says John Seeley former head
of the sociology department of Brandeis
University.
Objection to businessmen as businessmen
has frequently been expressed.
"Put eleven businessmen on a governing
board and they'll talk about everything in
terms of business" is how a former editor of
The Ubyssey, Tom Wayman put it.
Former president Macdonald defended
the board by pointing out that many governors have considerable education. John
Leirsch was once head of the UBC Forestry
faculty and Donovan Miller has a master
degree from MIT. Yet he doesn't do much
for the argument by this quote which he
made when he joined the board four years
ago:
"We have a good plant at the university
and excellent management, but not too much
capital to turn out a first rate product."
The only real argument is that an educational system always serves a society (it
doesn't exist in a void). Thus a feudal society
would have barons on its university boards,
a communist society will have bureaucrats
and a capitalist society will have businessmen.
The point is that the society has to learn
that it gets its best education from independent scholars and students. North American
society does not appear to have learned that
lesson and I do not speak only of ham-fisted
intervention in the style of Ronald Reagan
of California. This is a different intervention; a more liberal one is the style of the
multiversity which has been created by
that a university was "an institution devoted
people like Clark Kerr and all his North American contemporaries.
The multiversity serves its society in a
blind unquestioning fashion: look at all the
research for Vietnam and the CIA. It lives
off research grants from public and private
sources. The point usually missed is that
faculty have been willing hand-maidens for
the boards.
Liberal education and independent free
research are respectively maintained only in
ghetto colleges like Arts One and in commencement addresses.
The biggest corruption of the whole enterprise is the product (that is the only word)
of the multiversities.
Here is how one student put it: "Education in the university is related to its function of channeling manpower into the corporate structure of society. Education over
which we have no control prepares us for
jobs over which we have no control."
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
j|*Q I^T^^R 'e^seTjeTjcTjeTj^^^Tj^Ts^Tj^Tj^
iMETZ
•intee, on
Chairman
governors,
urt Judge
ars old.
RICHARD BIBBS
Senate electee, on board
three years. Vice-president
of MacMillan-Bloedel. 47
years old.
JOHN LIERSCH
Government appointee, on
board four years. Vice-president of Canadian Forest
Products, has directorships
in two other forestry companies. 62 years old.
ALLAN McGAVIN
Government appointee, on
board two years. President
of McGavin Toastmaster
Ltd., has directorships in
five companies, B.C. Forest
Products, Seaboard Life Insurance Co. and three breweries.  57  years  old.
JOHN BUCHANAN
Chancellor since 1966, on
board 1951-57 (senate electee). Retired President of
B.C. Packers, has directorships in five companies including MacMillan Bloedel,
Canadian Imperial Bank,
and Canada Trust Com;
pany.  70  years  old.
1
Primer
i which  it
explained how
rou
ay become a
Jovernor
JBC
How does one make it to the
big board? Clip out this handy
primer, follow it religiously and
about twenty years from now
you may be; a governor; that is
if faculty and students don't
like being run like a colony and
take over in the meantime.
If you are a woman you can
pretty well forget about it.
There have been only five
women on the board,' one of
whom (Phyllis Ross) was Chancellor.
Otherwise it appears not to
matter where you were born
or what your religion is. It isn't
a WASP wasteland. Koerner
was born in Czechoslovakia,
Fouks and Nemetz are Jewish.
Politically you can be liberal,
Conservative, Socred or unaffiliated.
While at UBC it helps to be
involved in student government. At one time it was important to be a member of a
fraternity if you were to have
any chance of winning AMS
elections or working on The
Ubyssey.
Upon graduation it appears
from the present board that you
Friday, January 19, 1968
had better enter business. No
fewer than seven or eight of the
present members of the board
can be considered businessmen
which is vastly out of proportion to the figure of 30 per cent
of the board over the years being
businessmen.
At one time, it was generally
sat on the board. Now it is increasingly executors of corporations; men who may not yet be
chief executives, and definitely
don't own their own company.
It is important to judge in
which direction you think the
business world is headed. At
one time, UBC was considered
to be the research institute of
the provincial agriculture economy and thus there were a
number of farmers on the early
boards. At present it appears
to be a safe bet to get into forestry companies since no fewer
than five Of the present board
members have ties with the forestry industry either through
executive positions or directorships. Almost as important are
the fishing industry and food
industry.
The   important companies to
to PF 6
THE      UBYSSEY
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 1968
Positions in Socio-economics and Administration
Thinking of a Career?
TRY US OUT FOR THE SUMMER!
QUALIFICATIONS
All applicants must either be post-graduate students,
students in the final or penultimate year of an Honours
Course or students of equivalent standing. Students in the
Social Sciences, Commerce, Administration and Law are
eligible.
METHOD OF SELECTION
Candidates will be selected, on the basis of written
applications, according to education, special training and
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SALARIES
Approximately $380 to $640 per month. Most positions
are in Ottawa and return transportation expenses in excess
of $30 will be provided by the employing department.
APPLICATION FORMS
Complete application form 425-402 (available at your
Placement Office) and submit not later than January 31,
1968 to:
Administrative  Manpower  Recruitment
and Development Program,
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF CANADA,
Ottawa 4, Ontario.
Quote Competition 68-60. elselselaelselaejsejsejsejaejsejs-ejsejsejsejs
Primer Continued
ejsejsejs^sejsejscjsejsejsejsels-ejsclselscls
continued from PF  5ive
get into are the big ones. Heads
of smaller companies may end
up in the senate.
For many years, the head of
B.C. Electric when it was a private utility generally sat on the
board. At present Einar Gun-
derson who sits on the board is
a director of B.C. Hydro, the
publicly-owned successor to B.C.
Electric.
MacMillan-Bloedel is also an
important company for UBC
governors. Richard Bibbs is vice
president and John Buchanan
is director of MB. There are
numerous other MB figures
elsewhere in UBC government.
H. R. MacMillan himself has
never sat on the Board of Governors though his donations are
interesting to watch in terms
of UBC's history. In the early
years he donated largely to
forestry and fishery matters at
UBC. Later donations were to
unrelated fields. In recent years
the strain on library facilities
has been met by some of his aid
for book purchases. But now as
UBC needs to expand its gradu
ate school to provide teachers
for future students, he donated
over three million dollars for
51 fellowships for 45 years.
MacMillan received an honorary Ph.D. in 1950 and the new
forestry building was named
after him in 1967. He was one
of the first to hire university
graduates for his enterprises
setting an example reflected
elsewhere in North America
but apparently unrecognized
yet by Social Credit.
The dividing line between
philanthrophy and investment
becomes distinct when we consider this example: the late
George Cunningham head of the
same drug store chain and longtime member of the board contributed to the foundation of
the school of pharmacy.
The next best profession for
eventual membership on the
board is law. UBC has divided
its number of lawyers almost
evenly between judges and lawyers (usually lawyers with extensive corporation ties). A
study of the make-up of state
universities   in   the   U.S.   shows
essentially the same board patterns except that UBC is much
stronger in judges and much
weaker    (none)    in    clergymen.
If there is such a thing as a
set place on the board for one
profession (in a style similar
to the U.S. Supreme Court where
there is usually one Jew) then
it has to be for a newspaperman. While the Board has only
had five newspapermen, they
have been distributed over the
years so that invariably but not
always, there was one newspaper publisher who was a governor. Presumedly this is to ensure a good press.
And if you can't make it in
these positions not to forget the
few civil servants, farmers,
physicians or even labour officials, you might make it as president. Other academics have
been involved in private corporation research and some
positions now closed.
Yet as is obvious to anyone,
UBC has countless graduates
even within these narrow groups.
It takes more to make the big
board.
Following from a participation in student government it is
invaluable to be involved in
alumni association affairs and
general fund raising for the university. This is an extension of
charity work in the city and
business world. Looking
through the background material available on the members of
the board in Who's Who in
Canada you are struck by the
number of charitable associations that the governors have
been involved in. These are usually the major appeals as well
as an assortment of others including sports and cultural matters like the symphony and art
gallery.
The reasons for this work are:
fulfilling a sense of civic duty
or obligation and providing a
good form of public relations
for the persons and his company.
Studies of this sort of work
shows there is a definite heir-
archy of charitable works. At
the base are race relations and
inter-faith work, followed by
good-government activities, wel-
Why two years with Cuso may put you
five years ahead in your field.
For one thing, there's the kind
of experience you gain, working
in your own field overseas in a
developing, country for two
years. The salary is low, but
almost invariably you get
broader, more varied
experience, and get it earlier
than you would in Canada.
You learn to handle
responsibility—and prove it—
in a job that lets you test your
knowledge, prove yourtheories,
experience the challenge of a
different culture.
And it is a challenge, working,
through.Canadian University
Service Overseas to help close
the knowledge gap that exists
between developed and
developing nations. Right now,
about 900 Canadians are
working for CUSO—a
non-profit, independent
organization—in 40 developing
countries around the world,
spreading their technical and
professional knowledge
wherever their particular skills
have been requested. But for
every request that's filled, so
many go unanswered—for lack
of people like you.
How about it? Would you like
to play a small but important
part in the nation-building
that's going on in Africa, Asia,
Latin America and the
Caribbean? If you have a
degree, a diploma or a certified
skill, you can contribute to their
progress—and your own—
with CUSO.
(A-68)
Want to know more? Tell us what you can do.
We'll tell you where you
are n
eeded.
1 am interested in learning
more about CUSC
and the kind
of overseas work available.
My qt
jalifications are as follows:
1 (will) hold	
(degree, diploma
certific
ate or other ver
fication of skill)
in	
(course)
from
(university, college, trade or
technical institute, etc.)
Name	
Address	
Send to:
Mr. Jack Thomas,
International House,
CUSO
Aworld of opportunity
University of British Co
Vancouver, B.C.
umbi
a.
fare and fund-raising activitiesT
If a businessman has managed
to scramble up his company's
heirarchy as well as this good-
work heirarchy he will have
reached the pinnacle where university governorships are on a
level with cultural and hospital
work.
The board renews itself by co-
optation: it chooses successors
for appointment or election.
It is thus important to be
known as a good-man-and-hard-
worker. This will be known to
all by the point you have reached in your company, by your
charitable work and your faithful labours for the alumni association in some executive capacity. It helps of course to belong to some of the major clubs
especially the University Club
and if you can make it, the
Vancouver Club.
Chances for getting on the
Board are improving simply be-
caused of increased turnover. In
the past there have been several
who served as many as thirty
years on the board. In 1963, the
length of term for government
appointees was cut in half to
three years, the same term as
those elected by Senate. There
was also a stipulation that you
could not serve more than three
consecutive terms.
Needless to say there are exceptions to the rules. For example, it helps to be a close
friend of the government as in
the case of Einar Gunderson.
If all else fails, make a revolution.
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NEW WESTMINSTER
622  Columbia   St.    526-3771
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1968 u
no *FLIES &***$ I
i i\j £ on Mosmw 8
By YEVGENY MOKHOV
I am an exchange student at UBC from
the Soviet Union and from Moscow in
particular. I have read the articles "It's
Circus Time" and "The Magic Carpet" published in the January 12 edition of The
Vancouver Sun. Thanks to Mr. Barry Broad-
foot I'm no longer a representative of the
"vast faceless mass" as I have found another
source of fun besides the circus. But I'm
laughing just as heartily as those Russians
Mr. Broadfoot describes, who having worked at "their long and monotonous jobs"
enjoy themselves at the circus once or twice
a year. And, since I'm no longer the type
described in the articles and am susceptible
to emotions, I decided to express my gratitude to the author on behalf of all citizens
of Moscow for the entertainment-value of
his articles. They will react similarly, I
am sure, when I deliver the articles to them.
But after a second reading of the articles, I decided to take them seriously. I
think that you might like to hear the attitude to the articles of a person who was in
Moscow a little bit longer (I was born in
Moscow and I'm now 29) and who, I dare
say, has fresher impressions of the city (I
left Moscow 2Vfc months ago), and who,
moreover, knows not only the word "spasi-
bo" in Russian.
First some words about the author: I
have thought a lot about him and have
been trying to imagine his character. I am
sure of at least one thing about him: he
must suffer from "a lack, a complete lack"
of sense of humour. And, indeed, how is it
possible for him to complain about Moscow
taxi drivers grumbling when he himself
grumbles all through the article ?
I am not about to describe what sorts
of "people-fun" we have in Moscow. I
think that tourists wishing to find it can;
the author's lack of knowledge may remain
a matter for his own conscience. That is
not what surprises me. The question which
remains unanswered for me is how a person
who knows nothing about Russian culture,
traditions and sense of humour can make
any judgments about these things ? It is a
pity that the author has not read Gogol,
one of the greatest humourists of world
literature. It is a still greater pity that he
takes it upon himself to make pronouncements on "the tradition of their (Russian)
novelists" when he does not know the
correct spelling of Dostoevsky (Dostevesky,
in his version), a name which is familiar
to most readers in the West. (I agree, that
by mistake it is possible to write "Volvo-
grad" instead of "Volgograd".)
In any case, this is not the basic question
in my mind. I am wondering what the
author wanted to find in Moscow. I do not
find it surprising that in Moscow restaurants the cocktail "screwdriver" is unknown.
To me that seems perfectly natural. For this
reason I have never tried here to order a
"Krasnopresensky cocktail".
I would like to address to Mr. Broad-
foot the following words:
"Sir, as I understand the concluding
words of your article, you intend to visit
my homeland again. You are welcome, since
I hope that your opinion of the Soviet Union
will change. On one condition. Bring in as
many sink plugs as you can without exceeding your baggage allowance on the airplane since you are seemingly unable to
live without them. (By the way, I am not
happy that the type of taps in the washrooms of our dormitory at the university
do not allow me to turn on the water and
wash in running water as I am accustomed
to doing; however, I do not make a tragedy
out of this).
Please do not take with you next time
the pre-conccptions which saturate your
article, otherwise, there is not reason for
going there again. And before writing
articles of this type again, think about
your readers who may possibly be going
to the Soviet Union. Perhaps they will
want to look not only at the "ugly sides"
of Moscow but will also want to see the
ballet, listen to Russian operas, visit the
theatres (and by the way find out that
tickets to the theatre are much more
difficult to obtain than tickets to the
circus). Perhaps after learning more about
Russian culture and history, the beauty of
Moscow and other cities and towns of the
Soviet Union will please your readers.
Tastes, you know, can differ. Spare your
readers. And don't pretend to be a gourmet.
I am certain that Russian fried eggs will
appeal to very many Canadians. And it
seems to me that many of them could come
to prefer 'kvass" to Coca Cola."
I do not think that it is necessary for me
to refute every outpouring of the author.
Of course, his empty gossip about the role
of women in Soviet society seems strange to
me. I wish only to say, or rather, to add
that women do hold responsible positions
in our police force and (poor author !) in
our government. They teach our children,
educate them to be eager to learn, to be
kind, and, significantly to the point, to be
objective when presented with a new situation. As doctors, they care for us, and
persons who have been treated by them
and who have felt the warmth of women's
hands and their sincere sympathy for
human pain, would not write about Soviet
women in the tone of Mr. Broadfoot.
And lastly,—those "miserable" Muscovites "spoiling" the beauty of the city with
their "sober faces!" You know, the "vast
faceless mass of nonenities" can sometimes
be gay even without the circus. Rather
often. That is, almost always. I, at least,
have seen them both joyful and serious
but not miserable. They will not be
miserable even after reading your article,
I hasten to assure you, Mr. Broadfoot.
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No. 36 (SURREY)
Interviews with student teachers who have completed their
professional year of training and who will be eligible for an
E.A. certificate or better by September, 1968 will be held
regularly at the School Board Office in Surrey, 14225—56th
Avenue, Cloverdale, each Friday.
Interviews during other days of the week may be arranged
by phoning 594-0411.
E. Marriott,
District  Superintendent
of Schools.
QhooML (L (DiamonjcL
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
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What ever life you lead Eaton's  has  the clothes
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Friday, January 19, 1968
inc       UBYobtT Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
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UNITED TAILORS
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'$fek Healed, Lame Walk, Blind See, Deaf Hear, Wars, Revolutions End, Deserts Blossom, at I
CATARRH, TONSILS,
FEVER, 1909-1917
Testimony
By Ollie Stevens, Ohio
When I was three or four
jrearsjrid, one morning It seems
I still had what they called
catarrh then in a very bad way.
I remember after mother' was
dead (She died when, I was nine)
Dad and I had typhoid fever at the
same time. Hie doctor who lived
, about a mile from us did what he
could. I didn't have confidence,
so, being able to get on my feet
"most of the time Just a little, I
would slip through the door near
my bed and kneel down and pray.
Didn't dare stay long. Then when
it came time for medicine I ,
would act Ilka I was asleep- but
dad bought a six dollar treatment for my catarrh from men
who guaranteed it. I used it just
according to directions, but It
did not help, and we didn't hear
from the men anymore.
Finally I got able to go to school,
but one morning while combing
my thick long hair it began coming
out by the long locks so fast,
and tangling up so badly that my
arms got tired. My step-mother
had to finish combing it, and it
was noon when I reached school.
The pupils began to laugh at me
because I looked so different
with the skinof fny head showing.
ideas? WE pay you Burninq feet'
SEND  OS YOUR IMA   ON ANY SUBJECT. 5J   "^Wi  •
Itching feet?
Scaling feet?
Aching feet?
Tired feet?
THE WltOER THE BOTES IT COtHD MAKE
YOU MCH....- WE ABE IDEA BROKE*! WITH
CONTACTS   IN   BUSINESS. SCIENCE AND
OF YOUR IDEA. IF ITS GOOD, WE PAY YOU
BIG MONEY. COMPANIES UKE FORD .
MIDWEST RESEARCH - LE. 0UPONT NEED
THOUSANDS OF IDEAS A MONTH..... DO
THEY NEED VOURS7 -SEND YOUR IDEA TO:
IDCO.O*.aOX5227.KANSASCrrf.MO.MM2
I   Ophiolatry Is the worshlr* of
snakes.
Big Sloth
Discovered
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A woman
who was' struck by a car and --*
crippled as she left church in CfiFAT
1962 observed her 107th birth- ^'i1*7*1
day Sunday.
But plans for a birthday celebration were called off when
Mrs. Mattie Lumpkins' -grandson who cares for her, fell" hi!        r
k
Watched Themselves    ARMS' MD-' BRE
'     rniMi,     ,Aiii .*.    .. 'J> .'    Olft/lPO
from this to this
"The next year, after hearing
my aunt testify, I decided I was
going to trust the Lord for my
body, no matter what they said.
Different tests came up, but my
mind was made up. I was the
first one who took the flu of 1918
In our family, and the second in
our community. Could hardly
bear to lie in bed at night, was
so smothery. My feet swelled
badly, and at the very beginning there was a pain in my
forehead like a V-shape. The
other children couldn't realize
how sick I was. Dad fixed some
turpentine In sugar and brought
it to me, but I refused to take
it.   He   thought   I  should mind     iA.i.i/vjt v™;—mio. uuiumj
him. I told him that he was my Langridge, 43 years old, thought
boss in everything else, but In more of her Labrador dog than P'   \1
religion I had to go the way I her husband and three children,  \S »IV
saw ltf FinallyJheothers took the Justice Seymour Karminski said   ^'
flu, and described It as I had in ti divorce       wu_
felt a lot. But they thought If 1 -   * T „*s*m tu» i,„i„„ „„;j
ever  got  it  I  would know it. ^™^ngndge. The .ucjge said
who took the flu Molly, j champion f latrcoated
California Man
Discovers Way to
Hold False Teeth
TZm'Giincia e Saude.com a Chave
das. Escrituras, Mary Baker Eddy, a
meio dos ensinamentos da Biblia e
de Cristo Jesus, aceitaram a verdade ,
de que o. bem e Deus, a Mente que
taenke og handle rigtigt. Mary Baker
Eddy^Opdageren og Grundlaeggeren
swiatu podrecznik Chrzescijariskiej
Nauki*, „Science. and Health with
Key to the Scriptures" (Nauka i
zdrowie z kluczem do Pisma swie-
tegol. objawia_ w tym podreczniku,
• schen. Aber wo hort unsere Familie-
eigentlich auf?
Christus Jesus liebte seine Fami-
lienangehorigen, dpch_er fiihjte. sich
Gud, samt erkende det guddommelige'
s^nneforhold."
Kristus Jesus Sbenbarede vort gud-
.dommelige s0nneforhpld, og Kristen
at f0lge i  Kristi  Jesu fodspor,  op-
0vede han  sin aridelige opfattelses-
evne. Han indsS det uvirkelige i sin
taja ja Perustaja   (s.  476):   "Jee'sus
naki   Tieteessa   taydellisen   ihmisen.
jpka ilmeni hanelle, missa syntineix
rhafs seule, la Science revele le Principe divin de la bonte et en demon-
, tre les regies. >
Chrystus Jezus wyraznie  oswiad-.
1 czyl, „Ktobykolwiek nie przyjai kro-
lestwa  Bozego  jako   dzieciatkf).   nie
halten, daB Jesus oft moralische und1
geistige Lauterkeit als Voraussetzung'
v—. «k   11 iu   HEADi var tidhfor Mary Baker Eddy, Upp-
-..-.,.   r^-.'S*')   *,,w  ,M""*tackaren och Grundaren av Knsten
BAByLON^Jb^   OF COLD  Vetenskapt,
Blessed be the Lord God of Israel for he hath
redeemed his people.
TEN
>w
LONDON   (CP)  - Alsatian
guard dog Bruce suddenly felt
!like_j»tiardin2 something, so he
swam out to investigate but the
''man picked up the cat by- the
tail and used the animal to
.-strike the policeman on the
lead.
Dog in Bed tnas Marriage
LONDON (AP)—Mrs. Dorothy
1 was with many	
but didn't have it any more. Dad
told the doctor I had had it already.       _     	
Dad had uy tonsils taken out
when I was fifteen, but they came
back. I got so tired of medicine,
and after hearing others tell how
the Lord could heal I began to
want to trust the Lord altogether.
SCRATCHY
EYEIIPS?
retriever, gave birth to 12 pups^
Mr. Langridge Bad especially
disliked having the dog clirnb
into bed with_them.
FIRST CONVERT
, och hon framstaller dem
della salute. Cristo Gesu ci mise in
la source en est Dieu, qui. ne change'
jamais. Lorsqu'un jeune homme s'a-
dressa a lui en disant :  « Mon bon
*W!\"\     -— 	
""" FA/5T ' OF **a^™ *> ^ repondit immediatement
li
Mary Baker E«r£r9&iift£«S
rot" «Science and  Health witli Key to
the  Scriptures*   ("Ejiiottjut)  xai  fr/F.iov
\tk   >^.Etoo   twv   Toaqptov)   tij;   Mary
Baker  Eddy,  Tf);  'Avaitai.i)wtoia;  vtoVj
'I8ot)Tpta; trj;  Xptatiavixfjs  'Ertiottj-.
lit];, r\ ywai/.a oitTT) eIxe oiSaxdrj 5rr/
teren Bescriaftigungsmognch^eitenv?"^
tTi    Christus Jesus,  dessen Werke die
L .JChristliche. Wissenschaft*  unter B<S-
ijt w.eis_steiljfin,  war fortwabrend n\it
mente na Biblia e em Cristd Jesus,
a Ciencia Crista ensina que o horhem.
e a imagem de Deus e reflete a Sua
natureza. Deus e Espirito, por isso o
som hon ger sken av aft vara. Jesus
sade att man inte skulle doma efter
deciendo de una dolencia fisica. Pero,
Cristo Jesus le dijo: "Levantate, alza
'..tu_lecho, j anda" _(Juan  5^%Y^_ La
Erscheinung    treten.    Mary    Baiter
Eddy,   die   Entdeckerin   und   Qruin-
derin der Christlichen Wiss^nschaft.
i—die   geboorte   van   die   Verlosser,
V Christus Jesus.   Nadat hy sy bood-
AJ^D Cliol skap aan die herders gegee het, net
,,'fi menigte van die hemelse leer-
skare^' wat God_ verheerlik. .gn wat
van cAristus Jezus in Lucas lezeiic
we 6"»t Maria en Jozef naar Bethlehem gingenom belasting te Jbetalen
♦•Bi^b }g;jg.JL»g3 Chriiitian Science
- -Christus Jesus brachtesein ganzes
Jf1bn:.certe3. C'esi une cnoyance mor-
tclle
so much for you
THIS IS THE PICTURE OF
THE  IMAGE   WHICH   KING
NEBUCHADNEZZAR   SAW
IN HIS VISION OF HIS OWN
Pastor  Curtis   Lanier, (left) KINGDOM AND THE OTHER
trin^oTwfd^fH^hl   UNIVERSAL   KINGDOMS
|&1SL1JSl!rttSiK™AT were to succeed DEVON SALMON MAY
tag   of   their   new   church, on, HIM DOWN TO THE PRES-
Burdine St., Anderson, S.C. The     ENT  TIME,   AND   THEY
Jchief carpenter, shown with him     HAVE   ALL   COME   AND
'above, after the completion of the GONE   WITH   THE   WIND
'^A^^C^Tom***1* HAVE BEEN REPLAC-
a cnristian, was the nrst one ED By y^ KING OF KINGS
GOVERNMENT.
saved  ta  the new  church, both
very happy In the Lord.
HAVE DISEASE
Giri" accused of
6 evil threats'
«•■
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19, 1968 THE BLACK PLAGUE
VOL. 68, NO. MINUS 321
BUBONIC CITY, SCIENTIA
JANUARY  19,  1968
/•**    «•■        tf*j$lif* * >*■   »    .   '
XL
"WE GOT ONE !" shout jubilant Sciencemen  in  this year's first confrontation.
Brockburger ... yech
(Editor's note: Three years ago, Sciencemen analysed Brock
coffee and showed conclusively that it was made from dirt, steel
wool and rubber tires. Another group has been commissioned,
this time to investigate the concoction know as a Brockburger.)
A fairly pure sample of the substance was obtained from a
low flat building full of low flat people called Brock Hall.
The sample woud dissolve only in fuming sulfuric acid —
it was untouched by other solvents including normal gastric
juices. However, it would dissolve almost anything including
steel, glass, plastics and stomach lining.
A small sample was subjected to more extensive analysis
including ultra-violet, X-ray, NMR, ESR and classical semi-
micro analysis.
It was found to contain ash (23.1%), water (30%), aggie
mud (46.8%), butyric acid (11.7%), arsenic (6.4%) and sand
(9.0%).
It is concluded that these Brockburgers are only useful in
warfare either as projectiles or as a means of poisoning air and
water supplies. '
Physicists please
Something new was added
to Science Week celebrations
this year in the form of Fried-
rich Duerrenmatt's The Physicists playing all this week in
Freddy Wood Theatre.
Cognizant of the importance
of Science Week on this campus, the Department of Theatre,
upon consultation with the
Science Undergraduate Society, has appropriately chosen
this commentary on the social
responsibility of scientists as
part  of  the   Faculty   of  Arts'
contribution to the week's festivities.
The play is concerned with
three inmates of an insane
asylum, all formerly physicists,
one of whom has feigned madness in order to carry on his
research without having to release his results for the shortsighted use by national power
structures.
Duerrenmatt uses the physicists' plight to point out the
far-reaching effects' that modern scientific research must
have on society.
Blue  Review
printed  again
in  September
This spring, Science
council puts together the
third edition of the Black
and Blue Review. The
Review is the Science
anticalendar. It is a student opinion poll about
courses and instructors.
It tells students what
they are letting themselves in for in a given
course on the basis of
previous students' experience.
Professors and students
are asked to give up a
few minutes of class time
to complete them, so that
the 50% response needed
for a valid resume is
obtained. The results are
compiled, printed and
published by a team of
volunteers during the
summer.
Science week
proclaimed
Dean's Message . . .
I would like to extend my best wishes to the members of
Science Undergraduate Society on the occasion of their Science
Week. The purpose of the week is of course, to draw the members of the Faculty together and to enjoy the fellowship of people
with common goals and interests.
I feel that during the past year the Faculty continued its
very healthy growth and development. For a second time we
led the university in the organization of summer pre-registration,
we attracted some very eminent outside scientists to give us
lectures, and we acquired a small common room to serve as a
focal point for the Science Undergraduate Society.
However, not everything is rosy. Our laboratories and lecture rooms are overcrowded, and we badly need space for individual study and research. It should be our joint effort to inform the public and the government of the reality of our needs.
In the resignation of Dr. J. B. Macdonald, we lost a friend.
I am certain, however, that Dr. Kenneth Hare, our new president*
who is also an eminent scientist, will give the Faculty of Science
his full support and understanding of its needs.
V. J. OKULITCH
dean, faculty of science
President's Message
It is customary for a president's message to appear in the
faculty edition of the Black Plague, which means I must write
a blurb. By the very nature of my faculty and major, this is not
my line; however, here goes.
For an undergraduate society that is little more than five
years old, Science has already distinguished itself more than
some who have been in existence fifty years. We have not devoted our time and intelligence soley to distinguishing ourselves
as rabble, nor wasted our energies on protesting for the sake of
protest alone.
We have succeeded in establishing exceptionally good understanding with the Science faculty, and especially with Dean
Okulitch, whose advice and help has been invaluable in all
aspects of Science activities and especially in setting up academic
ventures such as the Science lecture series.
For the first time we have an office-cum-Common Room in
a central location; and with this to provide a centre for activities,
the Science Undergraduate Society cannot help but increase its
participation in all campus activities.
Bleed for the trees
The Forestry Undergraduate Society has announced its sponsorship of a two-week blood drive in the armory. Anytime during
the weeks of 22 January-2 February, you can do down there and
drain an arm to save a life.
The Foresters remind us that this year 16 per cent of us
gave blood, compared to 26 per cent of SFAsians. That's two
good reasons for UBC to turn out and bleed with a will.
PUB CRAWL
FRIDAY, 1.30
AT THE
DUFFERIN
"DE NOMINE SCIENTIAE, et Octopi Supremi, et Jacob! Verlupini, Sancta." SPLASH! Page   14
THE      BLACK      PLAGUE
Friday, January   19,  1968
NON VIOLENCE        THE BLflCK PLAGUE       Classified
Interfaculty rivalry is probably the most misunderstood phenomenon on campus. To a neutral observer
it would seem that Sciencemen and Engineers hate each
other. Unfortunately, some of both sides really do.
Members of other faculties consider Sciencemen and
Engineers a group of madmen, and both use and expect
violence in their contacts with them.
It's time for a re-evaluation of the interfaculty
rivalry.
Is the fun worth the risk? There is a risk—several
years ago a person died as a result of frosh hazing here
at UBC. Nothing can justify that. If the present trend
toward violence continues, stunts must stop before
someone else dies.
To counter this swing to violence, Science has
adopted a simple rule: Do nothing that will cause injury,
even in self-defense.
If fights start, break off and go home. This was
demonstrated in front of the Buchanan building three
months ago.
We like stunts; we like tankings; we're going to
go on raising hell on this campus but we're not going
to hurt anyone.
Our philosophy is simple — it's possible to have
fun without hurting anyone or being materially destructive. We hope other faculties will adopt it.
SEE OURSELVES
The diversity of attitudes and interests that strongly
characterizes the Science student body is a mixed
blessing — it saves us from the herdlike conformity of
certain other faculties, but it also complicates SUS
Council's job of providing services of appeal to all
Sciencemen and Sciencewomen. I regard Science as
divided overlappingly into five categories, and present
here interviews with "typical" members of each attitude
group for the consideration of other groups.
THE COMMON ROOM KEENER
Q:    How do you regard SUS?
A; As my primary social reference group, the
working core of the Science students.
Q:    What should be the objectives  of SUS?
A: To provide fellowship, contact and imaginative
activity for its members; to promote faculty consciousness and pride.
Q:    What problems does SUS face?
A:    Insufficient  support and participation;  Science
is too large and too young  to have strong tradition.
THE NEWCOMER SCIENCEMAN
Q:    How do you feel about SUS?
A: I feel like a member and want to be involved,
I wish that more people  would.
Q:    What do you consider SUS's purpose to be?
A: Interfaculty competition and extracurricular
activity.
Q:    Does SUS fulfill your expectations?
A:    More or  less,  although  as yet  I haven't  given
or gotten much.  I think  we  could  be  more   successful
with more and more  consistent publicity.
THE SILENT SCIENCEMAN
Q:    How do you view SUS?
A:    With indifference — it's an in-group.
Q:    What do you think SUS should be doing?
Q: Voice student opinion to the faculty to affect
courses and programs; sponsor social activities that encompass all Science students.
Q:    Do you feel isolated?
A:        Yes. I'm not interested in current SUS activities. I  rarely hear of them.  I find the  SUS group indifferent to newcomers.
THE  PROFESSIONAL  SCIENCEMAN
Q: How do you feel about your membership in
SUS?
A:    I didn't know I was a member.
Q:    What do you think of SUS's programs?
A:    They sound useful but don't affect me.
Q:    What purposes should SUS have?
A:    Student-faculty liaison, academic services, social
functions and inter-departmental contact.
THE ARTSY SCIENCEMAN
Q:
A:
Q:
A;
them.
Q:
A:
What does SUS mean to you?
A juvenile bunch that does nothing but stunts.
Do you support SUS's more serious programs?
I   was   unaware   of   them,   but   would   support
What should SUS be doing?
Stress   constructive   projects;   have   interesting
lectures (not necessarily on science), dances and musical
performances.
Q: Why do you prefer JSM Lounge to the Common Room?
A: More people here are concerned about other
people and their problems.
Like it or not, a sizeable group of us thinks in each
way depicted above. The problem of keeping them all
happy is quite evicient. It is encouraging to note that
each interview displayed at least some interest in SUS
and felt the SUS is basically a good thing that should
be continued and improved.
Published annually in tabloid form and semi-monthly in r.ewsiatter
form by the Science Undergraduate Society. The opinions expressed ere not
necessarily those of the AMS or the university or anybody else. Winner of
SUS award for most Wurlitzer newspaper on campus.
"The labor we delight is physics."
January 19, 1968
Editor: MIKE McPHEE
Contributors: Robin  Russell, John  Taylor, John  Friiell,  Jim  Hughes, ?ran
McGrath,   Blake   Hoffert,   Howie   Brydle,   Tom   Skinner,   Barry   Narod.   Thanks
to all others,  Dean  Okulitch  and The  Ubyssey for  their  help.
SPECIAL NOTICES
SORRY.   THE   NEANDERTHAL
debate scheduled for Friday is
cancelled
CREATIVE WRITING SOC
meeting, noon today in Hen-
nings 109.
OPEN COUNCIL MEETING,
Tuesday noon, Math Annex
100. Shaun Sullivan will discuss the Senate sit-in.
WOULD ANYONE IN A Position to know please inform
the Physics Department as to
whether the Gear's chariot
obeyed Galileo's law of gravitation or not.
PUB     CRAWL     STARTS
Friday at  the Dufferin.
PERSONAL
1:30
OH. JOE, I LOVE YOU.
Please conic back.  Lynne.
LONELY "BLACK AND BLUE
Review" editoress would like
to meet questionnaire distributors, compilers and binders.
Apply Common Room.
THE EDITOR'S COMPLIMENTS
to the girl who studies Math
203 in Sedgewick.
WILL RETIRED NIHILISTS,
terrorists and arsonists interested in part-time work con-
tact the EUS Executive.
SELL AND TRADE
FOR SALE, 196612 BULTACO
Scrambler, phone 731-6664.
Help a Sciencemen pay his
fees.
WHITE WEDDING GOWN, UN-
used, will swap for .38 revolver.
FOR SALE, FIREWOOD, AL-
ready split, contact EUS.
MISCELLANEOUS
PRK-MEDS DEFINE HYSTERI-
cal pregnancy as laboring under  a   misconception.
-*»-*.
9PJW-
FIRST VICE JOHN TAYLOR watches his step during the Foresters' annual log-rolling contest. Taylor found swimming as
inevitable for him as for everyone else.
THIS MAN'S WIFE WAS SO
naive that when lie told her
that his was the only one in
the world, she believed it. But
one night she told him his best
friend has ■me, too. "Well, I
had two, so I gave him one,"
he lamely explained. "But
why did you give him the
b'-tter one ?"
A WOMAN" CAME^INTO A
furniture store and asked to
see "a sexual piece of furniture ". ■• De you mean sectional '''• she was asked. "Well,
whatever it is. I want an occasional piece in the living
room."
SOMETIMES~~W HAT GOES
with a maternity dress is a
paternity suit.
Gee, Blake, I knew it was here this morning. ,ay, January 19,
'TWEEN CLAS
.ASbPS
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Tory boss hits campus
Robert   L.   Stanfield,   noon,
today in the auditorium.
SPECIAL LECTURE
Prof. E. J. Greene discusses
a structural approach to Mari-
vaux's theatre, today, noon,
'Bu. 2238.
WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL
Managers'   meeting  Monday,
noon.   Basketball   entries   due
Jan. 29.
EUS
Education, nurses and engineers annual skating party
and mixer, tonight, Thunderbird Arena. Skating 7:30 to
midnight, dancing 9:30 to 1
a.m. Admission, girls 25 cents,
engineers 50 cents.
FORESTRY US
All   students   invited   to   a
week-long,     all-day    everyday
coffee party in the armory.
SAILING CLUB
Sailing instruction continues
Saturday, 10:30 a.m., Kitsilano
Yacht Club.
AMS
Constitution revisions committee meets today, noon, first
vice-president's office. Open to
all students with ideas or suggestions.
AMS
NDP    MLA    Dave    Stupich
speaks    on    education,    today,
noon, Bu. 106.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Film: A Day in the Night of
Jonathan Mole, Monday, noon,
Bu.   203.   Non-member   admission 15 cents.
PRE MED SOC
Seminar:    the    Sanctity    of
Life. Medical,  legal and  clerical views on abortion. Sunday,
7 p.m., IH.
CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
Prof. C. W. Eliot discusses
Athens   in   the   time   of  Lord
Byron, Monday, noon, Freddy
Wood theatre.
DANCE CLUB
Today — Viennese waltz;
Monday — tango; Tuesday —
fox-trot; Wednesday — samba;
Friday — open.
LECTURE
A lecture about Israel at the
Jewish Community Centre, today, 8 p.m.
UN CLUB
Discussion     Monday,     noon,
IH,   with   guest   speaker   Dr.
Zacher.  Topic:  UN aid versus
non-UN aid.
AQUASOC
Super-dive happens Jan. 27.
Sign up in the clubroom.
CLASSICS
G.   Magnuson   will   talk   on
Polykleitos of Argos at 8 p.m.,
today, 4069 West Eleventh.
FILM SOC
Auditions for a short dramatic movie, today, 3:30 to
5:30 p.m., Brock TV room.
LSM
Is society worth it, Monday,
noon,    Brock    lounge.    Panel
with    Fred    Latrimo,    Father
Ryan and Gordon Briggs.
ARTS US
All   candidates   meeting   for
arts    elections,    noon,    today,
Bu.  104.
LSM
Get me to the world on time
— Dr. Lome Halverson (Minneapolis), Sunday at the Luth-
ern Student Centre. Dinner
6 p.m., topic 7 p.m.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting    today,    noon,    IH
upper    lounge.    Choir    meets
Monday,   noon,   music   301.
SLAVONIC  CIRCLE
Meeting today, noon, IH
music  room.
WUS
World University service
challenges you to communicate
an identification with the
world university community.
Local committee needs a PR
man. Apply Brock Est. 257.
HILLEL
Skating party Saturday 7:30
to 9:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Arena. Admission 50 cents.
Party and film after skating.
VCF
Dr. Ian Ross speaks on God
— Image of Man, today, noon,
Ang. 110.
Warring ladder cut in crash
SPUZZUM (Reiters) — World War Three started a few days
ago, it was reliably learned here yesterday.
Sources close to ground zero, action central Spuzzum said
the Hell's Gate fishladder suffered cuts and bruises when the
car it which it was riding careened off the highway, delaying the
seventh superblock ultimatum for at least three years.
Fieldhouse  out
as SUB builds aloft
UBC's chilly fieldhouse will
move south this| spring.
"The administration plans
to move the fieldhouse to the
physical plant area of the new
south campus development,"
said UBC information officer
Jim Banham. "It will be used
as a storage building."
Banham said the move is to
make way for the new student
union building.
Moving is scheduled after
classes end this spring.
LETTERS
Pleased?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Not only are some of us
pleased, but some are displeased. Not only are less of us displeased than pleased but some
of us eat jelly beans in moving
picture house balconies. It is
pleasant and affords less rigorous analysis than appears in
your classified columns. Turn
to page 457 of any dictionary.
What do you find? Yes, indeed
— but don't tell your local
haberdasher.
It is not for us to question —
although more are pleased than
displeased—the extent, or even
couthness, of bird seed such as
is specially reduced in local con-
fectionaries. Please.
YORK KENSINGTON
arts 1
SKIERS
LOOK
FAMILIAR?
Get your Volkswagen
tuned-up now so you'll
really enjoy your ski trip.
AUTO - HENNEKEN
Specialized  Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
DR. HUSTON SMITH
— Prof, of Philosophy at M.I.T.
SPEAKING    ON
'The Coming World Civilization"
AUTHOR OF:
1. "The Religions of Man"
2. "Condemned  to  Meaning''
3. "The Purposes of Higher Education"
4. "The   Search   for America"
Prof. Smith describes his current interest as centerig in Philosophical Anthropology — Reflection on the human condition; What it means to be a human being, to live a human life
or alternatively; can we, by taking thought, add to our stature, increase the quality of our
personal lives?
He has pursued this interest by attending to the complementing perspectives on man afforded
by east and west, science and the humanities, and philosophy and religion.
$an. 26th, Tloon — Bhoch Jtjumtpi — 3>hidaif,
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
 11
NEED A COSTUME" l'"OK MARDI
Gras? Call or drop in at Deluxe
Rentals, 121)2 Kingsway, 874-6116.
Costumes  and   service   to   please.
DANCE AT TOTEM PARK. Shockers
and Epics. $1.25 person after 8:30
p.m. Only 75c 8-S:30. Dancing till
2:1)0   a.m.   (his   Sal.   January   20.
Lost & Found
13
LOST HKFOKE XMAS IN CHEM. :S24.
Opal ring.   Reward offered.  736-7063.
LOST MEN'S BLACK CLASSES ON
Campus without case. Phone 738-
741)6,   ask   for  Bryan. 	
LOST   ENGRAVED   ELGIN   WATCH.
Phone John Burns, 224-111)10.  Reward
LOST: NAVY ULUE DUFELE COAT
al farmers Frolic, Jan. 13. Please
return!    261-071)6.    Reward offered.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE: BLACK
topcoat from Bus Stop Cafeteria
Tuesday   night.   If   you   want   yours
_l>aek1_ please  phone  Dennis,   298-1473
ONE" PATR MENS GLASSES IN
leather case, possibly in E.M.A. late
Tues.   Phone   Dave   433-0069.
LOST: LIBRARY BOOK, BREST-
Litarsk. "The Forgotten Peace."
finder  please  phone  Bruce,   733-8056
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDER WANTED FROM PATULLO
Bridge. Travel via Marine Drive
for   8:30s,   526-4903. 	
WANTED RIDERS FOR CAR POOL,
west of Granville phone Ian after
6   al   733-4031.
RIDERS WANTED FOR CARPOOL
vie. of Nanaimo and Kingsway, ph.
Tit.   4-171)8—Pete.	
RIDE WANTED OR JOIN CAR POOL
from   Mallardville,   Ph.   936-8941.
URGENT RIDE NEEDED FROM
the vicinity of Simpson-Sears Bur-
naby immediately. Please phone
435-3206   after  6:30   (Sue).	
RIDERS WANTED ALL CLASSES
9:30. From Knight via 41st Ave.
Phone 325-7843 after 6:30.
Special Notices
IS
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualify. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
SEE AND HEAR THE HONOtlR-
able Robert Stanfield in auditorium,
Friday, noon.
UBC BARBER SHOP OPEN WEEK-
days 8:30 till 6 p.m. Sat. until 5:30
p.m.   5736   University   Boulevard.
VOTE VERN HUNCHAK FOR ARTS
Vice-president. Hte guarantees a
good  job.  	
OPEN DOOR DROP-IN CENTRE.
(Coffee house in Church cellar.)
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner of 11th and Fir.
Travel Opportunities
IS
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED     —     ONE     TICKET     TO
Crystal Ball.  Please phone 876-3871.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
I960 AUSTIN 850, $325 OR BEST
offer. Rockie Palmer, Hut 6. Rm 3G
Fort  Camp.   Ph.   224-9880.	
62  V.W.   DELUXE $600.  224-9758  AF-
ter 6:00 Ask for Elwood.
Automobile Parts
23
SEE OUR COMPLETE RANGE OF
Sports Car Accessories. 109& discount with AMS card. Overseas
Auto Parts. 12th and Alma. 736-
9805.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Unit*
New and Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O     Motors     S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Scandals
37
UBC BI0AUTY SALON. EXPERT
Styling and cutting. Reasonable
rates.    5736    University    Blvd.    tel.
228-8942.
EVE: IN THE CANDLE LIGHT AT
St. Marks Lounge, Friday night —
the 19th — Adam.
CANADA'S     NEXT    PRIME    MIN-
ister?  Friday   noon.  Auditorium.
PICKUPS AT THE  TOTEM  DANCE.
Sat.   Jan.      20   8:00   p.m.-2:00   a.m.
Epics    and    Shockers!    $1.25    each,
after   8:30   75c.   8-8:30   cheap!   not   responsible   for   chromosome   damage.
Typing
40
ESSAYS     AND     TERM     PAPERS
neatly  typed,   736-0538.	
EXPERT   TYPING   BY   PART-TIME
writer —  revisions  and   corrections.
Theses. 738-5615.
EXPERIENCED THESIS AND ES-
say typist. Work collected and delivered if necessary. Phone: 921-9449
after 6 p.m.
"KASi"ACCI'RATK~'l' YPING~dF ~ES^
says and thesis IBM Executive.
Reasonable    terms.    Call    days   688-
_  1745   eves:   263-4023.	
SHORT NOTICE TYPING. REASON-
able rates. Phone RIO 8-4410 after-
noon   or   evenings.
essays,     manuscripts!     tHeTsTS
rates.    Please   call   683-2859.	
ESSARS,     MANUSCRIPTS,     THESIS
accurately     typed.     elec.     machine.
Phone  Barbara  MacKenzie,  228-8465
after  6   p.m.        	
EXPERT- TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC    —
221-61211    -   228-8384.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
81
GIRLS  INTERESTED  IN CREATIVE
photographic modelling, ph. 224-0711.
Work Wanted
54
BABY SITTING DAYS IN MY HOME,
Acadia Park. 224-1201.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
84
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
tutoring given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Individual, $2.95 hr. Phone
736-61123.	
EXP. ENGLISH TUTOR. EXCEL-
lent references and results. Phone
AM   6-9740.	
MATH, PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, Biology lessons given by competent
tutors. First year only, 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
Still a few left
—    BIRD CALLS    —
on Sale at: Publications Office
Hrock   Hall   or   UBC   Bookstore
STUDENT DESK AND CHAIR. CALL
224-1201.
VERY WELL MADE OLD DESK IN
excellent condition. Phone 738-4618
after 6:39 p.m.
1960 M. OXF. STN. WAG. GOOD
cond. $415, offers. Fridge $40, elec.
stove $30, dresser $12 or offers.
Leaving Canada. 224-9459.
SITARS FROM INDIA. OLD WORLD
quality hand crafted. Roy Lowe
Agencies,   phone   434-6947.
SACRAKICE -^PRNDER BASSMAN
Bass-Amp $250. No. 3-2500 West 1st
738-1633. ___
FOR SALE — KASTLE SKIS 205.
$60. Excellent condition. Phone
988-8868.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SINGLE   ROOM   AND   BREAKFAST,
ITRC   student,   266-9280.
ROOM ON CAMPUS (MALE). CLOSE
to meal services. 2250 Wesbrook
Cresc.  $40.00 monthly. 224-9662.
ROOM AVAILABLE NOW, 9th AND
Blanca. Possible room and board.
Girls only. 224-7574.
FREE RENT FOR PLEASANT STU-
dent girl in exchange for some
baby-sitting. Vic. Main-Broadway
Phone   Mrs.   Jacobson,   879-6438.
CLEAN, QUIET, FOR SAME. KIT-
chen priv. phone Sunday after 10
a.m.   736-0625.
Room & Board
BE A BOARDER AT PHI GAMMA
Delta. First-class food and friends.
$85  mo.  Call Jake or L.B.,  224-9769.
IGNORE CLAIMS OF BRAND X —
check with Dekes first, phone Len,
224-5916. after  6.
EXCELLENT FOOD — GOOD Accommodation for second term. 2280
Wesbrook  224-9986.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE BEAUT,
furn. apt. with 5th- yr. girl., $70
per month,  926-2869,  after 5 p.m.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
URGENT! 3rd GIRL WANTED TO
share furnished apt. 1751 W. 7th
Phone  738-3385  after 6:00 p.m.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Page  16
THE      UBVS^EY
THE
WSSSY
£pertJ
jry 19, 19..
i     i** >*»«ijjir. i
MILES DESHARNOIS of the ice hockey Thunderbirds will be shooting for goals in Powell River
this weekend.
Most teams away or idle
ICE HOCKEY
Powell River will be the
scene of two non-conference
games between Powell River
Regals and the Thunderbirds
Friday and Saturday.
JUNIOR VARSITY
BASKETBALL
The J.V.'s travel to Victoria
to play the University of Victoria   Vikings   this   weekend.
Coach   Norm   Watt's   team
has already beaten UVic twice
this season and have a seven
win, two loss record.
GYMNASTICS
The UBC gymnasts travel
South for a pair of meets this
weekend.
Friday night UBC takes on
Washington State University
in Pullman, Washington, then
on Saturday they have a meet
with Eastern Washington State
in Cheney.
SAILING
The Sailing club will compete with Seattle University
Saturday and Sunday in
Seattle.
SWIMMING
Coach Jack Pomfret's swim
team heads south this weekend
for two collegiate dual meets.
On Friday they take on Pacific   Lutheran   University   at
Tacoma and Saturday they
meet the University of Puget
Sound, also in Tacoma.
SOCCER
At 2 p.m. in Callister Park,
the UBC soccer Thunderbirds
take on Burniaby Villa.
BASKETBALL
Coach Peter Mullins' basketball Thunderbirds are idle
this weekend as they prepare
for their Tuesday game
against Portland State College
in War Memorial.
D
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jr3rai=MraiaMiBiaraiarararacaiai=jiar=ai=|
She'll Cut A Smart
Figure ... with your
0. B. Allan Ring!
"Gainsborough
$300
Convenient Budget Term*
Balance in 12 Manthi
^
&
&&/Wa*
I
I
LIMITED
CranvWa at Pender Sine* 1*04
REGISTERED JEWELLER. AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
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m
^f1*!*'
There is a certain type of skier (often seen skiing out of control) who maintains that ski lessons are only for sissies, little
old ladies and ski bunnies with romantic illusions about ski instructors.
Lessons are really for everybody and a skier, no matter what
his abilities are, can theoretically profit by taking them. It is often
suggested that ski lessons should be made mandatory for all beginners, a license to ski so to speak, mainly in the interest of
safety.
That's a bit much and I hope it never gets to that stage. Skiing can only be enjoyed to the fullest when
there are no strings attached. The ultimate being a perfect union of skier and snow.
I said that lessons can be profitable
theoretically. It is here that the ski school must
play its most important role. Most make the
mistake of over-emphasizing safety and technique instead of developing a skier's "natural"
abilities.
Vern Anderson, coach of Canada's national
women's   ski   team,   recently   explained   the       SIMONSEN
meaning of this concept. "You should ski the way that feels most
comfortable to you . . . turn your skis and your body with a minimum of movement to get the job done," said Anderson.
Any time you can say, "I had a real good run," you know it
was because you were coordinated and skiing naturally and not
because you thought you looked like Stein Erickson„
Instead of monopolizing on a person's natural way of skiing,
ski schools graduate technique conscious skiers who never really
enjoy themselves until they get over trying to carve each turn
in the "proper" manner.
The ski schools are not the only ones who are overconcerned
with technique but perhaps even more harm is done by the ski
magazines who are completely obsessed about advocating "correct technique".
Rugby game highlights
sports scene on campus
The University of Victoria Vikings invade UBC this Saturday  to   play  the  Thunderbirds   at   2:30   p.m.   in   Thunderbird
Stadium.
FIELD HOCKEY
The Thunderbird indoor field hockey tournament concludes
this Sunday in the armory beginning at 2 p.m.
VOLLEYBALL
The B.C. Championships take place Saturday in War Memorial Gym commencing at 9 a.m.
WRESTLING
The UBC Wrestling team takes on Vancouver YMCA Saturday in the wrestling room in Thunderbird Stadium at 1 p.m.
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
P\e$ctit>tioii Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
A.M.S. Elections
First Slate
Wednesday,   Feb.   7,   1968
President
External   Affairs   Officer
Internal   Affairs   Officer
Secretary
Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator of Activities
Ombudsman
Nominations for first slate will open on January 24, 1968
and close at 12 noon on Thursday, February 1, 1968;
for second slate, nominations will open on January 31,
1968 and close at 12 noon on February 8, 1968. Nominations forms, certificates of eligibility and copies of the
election rules and procedures are available from the
A.M.S.  Office.
Second Slate
Wednesday, Feb.  14,  1968

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