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The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1985

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 25,1986
228-2301
Firestarter:
Spiritual enlightenment.• •
Last Saturday night at 10:30 p.m. approximately 20 people walked across a 15 foot
stretch of burning embers in the back lot of a
Burnaby hotel. Most of them felt no pain and
suffered no burns. Several of them burnt
their feet slightly, yet still claimed that they
were glad that they had walked on fire.
The workshop had begun several hours
earlier in a room in the Skyline Hotel. The
workshop leader, David Boone, has been
teaching firewalking for two years. He led the
workshop with calm self-confidence. The
workshop ranges through relaxation techniques, creative visualization, conjuring tricks,
zen stories, and more. Boone gently and
amiably tries to convince his listeners that
they can walk on coals without being burnt,
and that it will be good for them.
Most of the people at the workshop were
'normal people'. No one was wearing robes
or beads or sandals, and no one sat in the
lotus position and said 'ohm.' Some of them
had been to firewalking workshops before.
Some were involved in parapsychology and
alternative medicine. Several of them were
UBC students. I talked to one who wished to
remain anonymous. She suggested the
pseudonym of Dolores Newton. Dolores is a
charming yet somehow curious third year
English student. She claims that she attended
the workshop with no intention of actually
walking on the coals, and says she's never
gone to "anything like this before."
L.B: Why did you go then?
DN: Curiousity. I wanted to see what it
was all about. And I thought it might help
me, just to be there.
LB: Help you how, exactly?
DN: Get over my fears, as David said.
Help remind me that much more is possible
than we let ourselves believe, help me understand that limits can be pushed through so
easily.
LB: And has it done that?
DN: God, yeah, I mean, hey, I just walked
on coals, y'know! (She giggles).
The main thrust of the workshop is conquering fear. Boone explains that fear is a
conditioned program which can be changed.
The enlightened person, he says, doesn't
regard fear as a barrier. Many of our fears,
he says, are based on inappropriate programming and limit us unnecessarily. Once someone has transcended their fear of fire and
walked on coals, it ought :o help them reexamine their other limitations.
LB: What was it that made you walk, if
you weren't planning to?
DN: Thafs a hard question to answer . . .
lots of things . . . David made it seem so
natural. It was nice that he didn't get up and
act like a preacher, or like he was pushing a
miracle. He made me believe that walking on
fire was natural. And I took the risks into account; I thought that I could end up like that
guy David mentioned, who ended up in a
wheelchair for six weeks and had to have skin
grafts ... I never forgot that that might happen to me, but I was 99% sure that it
wouldn't.
I was dying to know how I'd feel afterwards. The firewalking became a metaphor
for life . . . there's always a chance that the
worst may happen, but if you don't go for it,
if you don't do what you really want to do,
then you stand still. If you don't go for it you
have no chance of anything bad happening to
you, but then you have no chance of
anything wonderful happening to you either.
LB: How do you feel now, after walking
on fire?
DN: (Giggles) High. Really high. Kind of
in a daze. I guess I need time to assimilate the
experience ... But I feel really good. (She
giggles again). Except my foot hurts like hell.
The bubbly Dolores has a 2 inch blister on
her left foot.
licking
at her
heels
L) hod's cl 1,'UU pcU/v
for tkc sake. of-
LB: So you did burn yourself. Doesn't that
invalidate the whole thing?
DN: No ... it just hurts. Why didn't the
other foot burn? Why didn't that guy's (she
points to one of the other firewalkers) feet
burn? He walked five times, and moved a lot
slower than me. Why aren't I in the hospital?
One little burn is nothing. I guess I got burnt
because I wasn't 100"% confident.
LB: What did you feel as you approached
the coals? DN: (giggles) Wow . . . well I was
amazed at myself, thinking, "Am I really doing this?" I had to throw a lot of stuff away,
almost go blank. I looked at the coals in
front of me . . . wow, this is amazing,
remembering this ... for half a second I did
see them as hot, burning, threatening coals,
then I thought, I am going to walk on those,
and I'm not going to be burnt. And then I
just walked. It was like diving off a high diving board, only a lot more intense.
LB: How did the coals feel?
DN: It didn't feel like anything much until
about half way through, then I felt my foot
burn. I didn't panic, I just thought, shit, I'm
burning myself, and hurried to the other end
of the coals.
Firewalking is becoming a fad. It has even
been mentioned in People magazine. Since
Tolly Berkand first introduced firewalking to
North America, 50,000 people have walked
on coals. Skeptics theorize that the ashes of
the coals insulate the heat, or that the feet
sweat, and the sweat becomes steam which
creates a shield between the foot and the
coals.
Leon Hawrylenko, who organized the
firewalk said, "I've walked twice now, but
always there was this doubt in the back of my
mind: are the coals really hot? So when no
one was out there tonight I threw a piece of
baloney on the embers, and it burnt to
nothing in about ten seconds.
DN: Of course the coals are hot. We built
the fire ourselves.
LB: How finally did you account for the
fact that you walked on hot embers and
didn't burn yourself badly?
DN:   1  think  it's  a very down-to-earth
By LAURA BUSHEIKIN
thing, really, there's nothing mystical about
it. David talked about quantum physics, and
about mood and sensation altering chemicals
released by the brain ... I think eventually it
will be explained in scientific terms. That
shouldn't lessen its miraculousness. David
talked about Christopher Columbus. Most of
the people of his time were as convinced that
the world was flat as we are convinced that
hot coals will burn us. Those people couldn't
conceive of another dimension. It's the same
with people today and firewalking.
LB: So do you feel that some sort of
miracle has happened to you?
JN: No . . . the most important thing, the
only thing which might be close to
miraculous, is getting over the fear. It's not
the walking on fire itself that is important.
LB: Will this change your life at all?
DN: I don't know yet. Probably not in any
obvious way . . . I'll still have to do
homework tomorrow and get up and go to
classes and go to work like usual. But I think
I'll feel pretty high for a while.
LB: And you'll have a sore foot.
DN: Yeah.
LB: Would you do it again?
DN: I don't think so . . . maybe . . . well,
yeah, I just might. I don't know, (giggles). Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1985
Canadian admiral  opposes  S.D.I.
WEST COAST
By ERIKA SIMPSON
"If I were in Ronald Reagan's
position today the first thing I
would do is denounce Star Wars,"
said the Canadian Centre for Arms
Control and Disarmament chair
Tuesday.
Admiral Robert Falls spoke
Tuesday evening in the Great Hall
of Justice to about forty people at
an event sponsored by Lawyers for
Social Responsibility.
Falls served as chief of Canadian
defence staff and chair of the
N.A.T.O. committee before he
became chair of the Canadian arms
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UBYSSEY
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control centre. The centre advises
government on issues like the
testing *of the cruise missile and
Canadian involvement in Reagan's
strategic defence initiative or "Star
Wars."
Falls said despite Canada's
"halfhearted" rejection of the Star
Wars proposal debate should continue around the world.
"We are given an image of a
perfect shield behind which people
can live in perfect peace without
fear of attack." But most scientific
opinion doubts an enourmous, protective "astrodome" is possible, he
said.
Falls likened American defence
policy to a disease. The disease is
the feeling that Mutual Assured
Destruction (M.A.D.) is an inadequate defence policy. "Star Wars is
less a disease than a symptom," he
said. East-West relations have to be
resolved by changing attitudes and
desires, he said.
"You don't create the right attitude by calling your adversary an
evil empire," he said.
Falls isn't optimistic anything
dramatic will occur at the Geneva
summit but he is encouraged by the
Soviet Union's proposal to reduce
arsenals by 50 per cent. "It's much
better than anything the Americans
have done," he said.
He told the audience Canada, as
an equal member of N.A.T.O.,
should speak up about security problems. Falls revealed well reasoned
remarks submitted by Canadians
stunned the Joint Senate House
Committee, which ultimately
recommended the government not
commit itself to SDI. The centre is
pressing the government to urge
multilateral, not one-sided disarmament he said. "But in existing circumstances nuclear weapons scare
the pants off me," Falls concluded.
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Canada
Canada Friday, October 25,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Union works to rule over Ritchie
By DEBBIE LO
For the first time in its 11 year
history one of UBC's major unions
has voted to work to rule.
UBC's Canadian University
Employees 1350 member union
voted Thursday to work to rule until the administration agrees to meet
with their employees to change the
way efficiency tests are being conducted on campus.
Over 500 "angry, and enthusiastic members disgusted at the
way the university is treating
them," attended the afternoon
meeting said the union president.
Kitty Byrne said the union will
work to rule immediately.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC vice-
president administration and
finance said he had not been contacted of the unions decision Thursday. "I'm not sure I 'inderstand
what it (work to rule) means," he
said.
Gellatly declined comment on
how the unions decision would af
fect the university. In a memo
distributed to union members
Thursday the union said work to
rule entails:
• working thoroughly and showing concern for quality while not
slowing down or being obstructive
or insubordinate.
• doing strictly an employees own
job duties including those they do
occasionally.
• taking all breaks, lunches to the
minute.
• working overtime only if requested and not voluntarily.
The memo also encourages union
members not to take direct orders
from Ritchie and Associates the
firm hired to do the efficiency
review. The memo urges workers to
fill out Ritchie's efficiency forms
correctly but strictly during
employer's time.
Union coordinator Ted Byrne has
said the union is worried the efficiency reviews will mean staff
layoffs. The union wants a written
agreement from the administration
promising there will be no layoffs as
a result of the reviews, said Byrne.
In a letter to union members
Thursday Byrne said: "We want
some serious attention paid to the
consultative process outlined in our
collective agreement. We feel this
can best be done by the university
agreeing to meet with a committee
— photo by dan andrews
UBC CAMPUS SAMURAI takes a fling at modern protection methods as older techniques have been flogged
to death. Darth Vader was unavailable for comment.
Research funding called necessary
By CARL ROSENBERG
Universities must be a high
priority for federal and provincial
governments, said the University of
Manitoba president after a recent
university presidents' conference.
"In the long term, opportunities
for the development of university
research cannot be achieved unless
we have adequately funded universities," said Arnold Naimark.
University presidents across
Canada met Oct. 1 and 3 for an annual meeting of Association of
Universities and Colleges of Canada
in Charlottetown.
The importance of maintaining
sufficient funding for federal grant
granting councils, such as the
Medical Research Council, Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council, and the Social Sciences
and Humanities Research Council,
to carry out five-year plans was
stressed.
Naimark said most of Canada's
basic research and much of its applied research takes place at universities. He said universities were
"virtually the sole providers of the
advanced research-based education
and training for this country's
future professionals and highly-
trained specialists.
Naimark said while university
research depends on a variety of
sources for funding, the councils
have "the most important and effective instruments of federal
research suport," although he said
increases in support for the councils
hsould not come at the expense of
general funding for higher education.
Acting UBC president Robert
Smith who attended the conference
said while funding for research
councils have been "maintained at
a healthy level," the conference
participants were trying to "impress
on the federal government the importance of the granting councils.
UBC medicine dean William
Webber siad the medicine department has had more problems with
funding consistency than with a
lack of funding.
Weber said a recent problem oc-
cured when a council was granted
$20 million one year and $10 million
the next — adding up to a total increase of $30 million. This increase
was not built into the council's
budget, so that when the newly
elected Progressive Conservative
government allocated fund it was
$30 million below previous levels.
The original amount was eventually
restored.
"What tends to happen is funding drops and public concern rises.
Then, when funding is restored,
public concern wanes and funding
drops again for the moment," he
said.
AUCC information officer Mark
Gaberson said funding levels have
been decreasing in the last decade.
Last year provincial funding across
Canada decreased to a low of five
per cent in B.C. and increased to a
high of 7.85 per cent in Quebec.
The federal government has approved in principle the MRC grant
but has not reviewed the NSERC,
and SSHUC plans.
The AUCC founded in 1911
represents 70 universities and
university-level colleges across
Canada.
of our members."
The administration has refused to
"change the way the review has
been proceeding," said Byrne.
CUPE national office has also
agreed to financially support the
UBC union's work to rule by providing assistance from their national defence funds said Byrne.
CUPE national president Jeff Rose
would not return The Ubyssey's
telephone calls Thursday.
The UBC faculty association
recently passed a motion demanding the administration reconsider
hiring the outside firm to do the
review.
About 1.4 million was paid to
Ritchie and associates, which is also
conducting similar reviews at the
university of Victoria and
Dalhousie. The firm is under contract at UBC to conduct twelve
reviews.
Ted Byrne also said in his letter,
that if the campaign is effective it
"will not only serve as a strong expression of our feeling about the
current situation at UBC, but also
bring some pressure to bear on the
university to reconsider its use of
this firm to accomplish what it
should be able to accomplish in a
humane way with its own
resources."
Acting president Robert Smith
was not available for comment.
Survey impresses
By DEBBIE LO
The first efficiency report of an
American firm investigating waste
in the university budget suggests
UBC can save $27,500 this year and
a possible $70,000 next year in the
Audio-visual department without
laying off any staff.
"I was impressed," said Ted
Byrne, Canadian union of public
employees coordinator.
"It is a thorough report.
Frighteningly thorough."
Audio-visual department director
Ian Franks said his department has
become more businesslike because
of funding cuts.
"We have to quantify activities in
dollar terms ... we must be able to
justify our existence on campus,"
he said. The $67,000 report
prepared by American based Ritchie and Associates said the department will save $25,000 by not
replacing a vacant position left
open since June because of the hiring freeze imposed on the university
last September.
An additional $2,900 can be saved by contracting out work including a temporary position in the
front office.
Franks said the department will
also save money through increasing
service charges for department services and more efficient scheduling.
"The work days will be scheduled
more tightly," he said.
Project supervisor Larry Zamer
said the report recommended keeping "more work m-house".
The report says a new "follow up
and review" system should be implemented where employees are required to complete daily reports to
all work assignments to "alert
supervision iQflydQtfk operating
problems affecting performance.."
Byrne said "the system allows
control. They are capable of tracking work by quantifying and
measuring performance."
The A.V. report is the first in a
series of 12 contracted to the Los-
Angeles based firm.
The firm has been on campus
shadowing non-academic staff to
time their job performances for
about six months.
Zamer said the present AV supervisors have not been "fully trained
in management skills. They are
more trained to manage their
departments."
He said the project had five objectives:
to enhance the performance of
audio-visual services as a business;
to train staff to optimize the
utilization of time and facilities;
to provide supervisors and administration with information to
improve control and resource
deployment;
to establish cost recovery relationships where customer services
can be implemented and evaluated
and;
to devise and implement an
operating system which is
understood, used by and is of value
to A.V. services.
Canada designs new tech committee
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal
government is trying to catch up
with the global technology race by
establishing a parliamentary committee on research, science and
technology.
Although the federally-funded
Science Council first recommended
forming such a standing committee
in 1983, the proposal wasn't accepted by Tom Siddon, the minister
of state for science and technology,
until this month. The proposal was
formally forwarded by the special
committee of reform of the House
of Commons, chaired by MP James
McGrath (PC - St. John's East).
A report recently released by the
Science Council said Canada is one
of the few Western countries
without such a body. And Gene
Nyberg, Council secretary and communications director, says the need
for the standing committee has
never been so pronounced.
Nyberg says Canada's MPs are
not well-versed in many of the
issues they debate. "Generally,
they're very ill informed about the
impact of science and technology,"
he said.
"Very few issues of the day don't
have a science and technology element to them," Nyberg said.
Nyberg said the committee could
have tackled issues that other
government bodies have been studying. "The government has to set
up a task force on Star Wars
because there was no committee,"
he said.
Although the proposal has not
formally been presented before
Parliament, the committee will likely be in place for a one-year trial
run effective Jan. 1, 1986, according to Louis Lavoie, legislative
assistant in the science and
technology ministry. The committee will take the form of other
Parliamentary committees, with
between 12 and 24 MPs, he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1985
Hop on the bus for less
Post-secondary students deserve a break from
British Columbia's transit system.
High school students get reduced cost bus travel
but University students, who often have to travel more
with fewer resources, are charged the full adult fare.
This ignores the economic plight of most post secondary students. If bus-travelling students had money to
throw around, they would be taking cars to school.
Young people at university are busy working to pay
for fees, books, food and other expenses, most of
which are rising. But, student wages stay about the
same while unemployment is very high here. (Youth
unemployment was over 18 per cent this summer and
B.C.'s minimum wage, at $3.65 per hour is the lowest
in Canada). In many cases, high school students have
more time to earn money and they don't have fees et
al.
Now students are finally making their demands
heard through an appeal to the Greater Vancouver
Regional District transit board. There is a glimmer of
hope that a $25 per month post-secondary farecard
will be approved at a meeting of the GVRD committee
Nov. 8.
But, the decision is being made by politicians. The
only solution is to make them realize low cost post
secondary student farecards are a popular idea, and
therefore worthy of their support. Several lower
mainland mayors are on the committee - call them and
tell them you want to see this plan be implemented.
Students are spending money studying and learning. There is no justice in having them pay the same
amount for public transit as people who have already
entered the workforce and are earning a proper living.
People on welfare already get a supplement for bus
travel from the ministry of Human Resources.
Students use the buses on a nearly daily basis and it's
time they were given a fair fare reduction.
Besides, expanding B-lot is expensive.
Holocaust serves warning
Perspectives by Daniel Siegel
UBC Jewish Chaplin
For the second time, the Jewish
Students Association/Hillel, the
Jewish Students Network, and the
UBC Chaplains Association are
preparing a "Holocaust Awareness
Day" for the UBC campus.
Scheduled for the 7th of November,
the day's programme will include
speakers, films and workshops on
topics including the Keegstra and
Zundel trials, teaching the
Holocaust in schools, and the effects of the Holocaust on survivors
and their children.
perspectives!
Why do we feel we have to do
this? Why is it necessary for us to
bring this subject back up, to review
yet again this horrible moment in
history? Haven't we had enough
already? Can't we be left alone to
go on about out business? Isn't it
the future that counts?
It is still necessary to review the
Holocaust of 1939-45, to see the
films and relive the horror, that we
not cheapen it through overuse. For'
example, there have been the
careless, even malicious, comparisons made recently in the pages
of the Ubyssey between various
countries and Nazi Germany. The
horror that was Germany of the
1930's and 40's bears no relation at
all to these countries' actions, no
matter how much people may
disagree with them. The effort
made by the Germans of that
generation to eliminate whole
peoples through systematic murder
has only a very few parallels, yet the
word "genocide" is used so often in
diatribes against both sides in current international disputes.
Nor are we safe from its aftereffects in our own lives. There are
among us those who would attempt
to deny and, even worse, to justify
the Holocaust. It is important for
all of us to recognize these tendencies, not only in the Keegstra and
Zundels, but also in ourselves. By
learning more about how anti-
semitism continues to poison people's minds, we will also learn how
to recognize and combat racism and
bigotry of all types, in others and in
ourselves.
It is indeed the future that
counts, and for that very reason we
are planning this event. We must
face the Holocaust of the previous
generation in order to prevent the
nuclear holocaust in our own. By
understanding the anti-world
created by the Nazis, by appreciating the meaning of
Auschwitz as a factory of death, by
trying to make that experience our
own, we can become aware of the
true value of life and receive it as
the gift it truly is.
The Nazi Holocaust marks the
end of an era when war might be
fought away from civilians. It
marks the beginning of wars fought
primarily to gain access to civilian
populations earmarked for death.
For just as the Jews and other
defenceless peoples were the true
targets of the Nazi war effort, so
are we all the ultimate victims of
nuclear war, should it ever happen.
It is for these reasons that we invite all members of the campus
community to participate in
Holocaust Awareness Day. Our
lives may depend on it.
LetteiCS
March protests intervention
Letters
India home to fierce rivalry
An important meeting on the
situation in India will be held this
Sunday, October 27, at 1:00 p.m. at
the Desh Baghat Temple, 5880
Main Street, Vancouver.
The Indian sub-continent is a
focal point of fierce rivalry between
the U.S. and the Soviet Union. The
reactionary ruling classes of India,
led by Rajiv Gandhi, are participating in these murderous plans
for their own aims.
This situation could lead to a
world war. The struggle of the more
than 800 million people of India to
emancipate themselves from poverty, backwardness, neo-colonial oppression and imperialist domination
has the support of all of progressive
mankind.
The Indian ruling classes are continuing the British imperialist policy
of "divide and rule," trying to incite communal violence with the
aim of dividing the people on the
basis of religion. Then they hold the
people responsible for the communal violence as a pretext to
unleash fascist violence against
them, as in the case of Amritsar.
The Canadian government aligns
itself with the Indian bourgeoisie
and tries to incite communal divisions here in Canada. It has been
naming Sikhs "terrorists", and has
been trying to intimidate and divide
Canadian-Indians, as well as trying
to isolate them from the rest of the
Canadians. Stereotyping the Indian
community as fanatical and violent,
the government along with its agencies like the RCMP, the CSIS and
the media, are trying to generate a
climate of hysteria. Furthermore,
the monopoly-controlled media is
trying to suppress the views of
anyone who is against this racism
and communalism.
The    Marxist-Leninist    Study
Group calls on everyone to come
and hear the enlightened views on
the situation in India this Sunday.
Barb Waldern
unclassified
As the anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Grenada draws near,
many of your readers may be reflecting on the continued U.S. intervention in the Caribbean and in Central
America.
Perhaps you are disturbed by the
presence of U.S. arms and CIA personnel and military trainers in Central America, or by the U.S. funding of military operations in Central America, or by the presence in
Central America of weapons
marketed and/or manufactured by
U.S. allies such as Canada or Israel.
Perhaps you are disturbed by the
media distortion of popular struggles in Central America, or by the
use of Central Arnerica controlled
labor and cheap uncontrolled
resources.
Perhaps you are disturbed by the
role U.S. aid programs have played
in promoting militarism and agribusiness, the latter resulting in
massive deforestation, toxic levels
of pesticides (such as parathion and
DDT), and the sacrifice of food
crops to the growth of animal feed
crops, used to feed livestock destined for North American markets.
If any of these things disturb you,
you are warmly invited to express
your concern publicly by gathering
in Robson Square on Saturday October 26 at 12:00 p.m. and walking
with others to the U.S. Consulate (a
walk of about eight blocks). This
demonstration is organized by the
Emergency Coalition on Central
America. It is part of an international day of protest. There will be
demonstrations against U.S. intervention   in   Central   America   in
Toronto,  Seattle,  San  Francisco,
and Washington, D.C.
Communicate your opposition.
Make a poster or a sign and come
down to Robson Square October
26.
Suzanne Rose
rhme 3
latin arnerica solidarity committee
emergency coalition on cental arnerica
U.S. military complex
dazzled by ''pot of gold"
THE UBYSSEY
October 25, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
David Ferman OD'd and diad. Liaa Magaa freaked. Mac Ginthar burnt out. Charlie Fidalman
tripped. John Edgar fall. Stave Engler buzzed. Debbie Lo got high. Qordana Raaic amoked.
Ruth crashed. Stella Wong apaced. Svatozer Kontic gloaaed over. Jennifer Lyall amilad.
Eileen Lee got atoned. Shelley Butler giggled. Michael Grobarman anortad. Michelle Teaaler
cavorted. Laura Buaheikin blistered. Roaanna Ditmars mellowed. Peggy Wright wronged.
Gordon Clark bought a tea strainer. And Stephen not so Wise-and-tall was lete.
At first glance, many people will
shy away from a talk on "Software
Constraints on Star Wars" thinking
that it will be too technical and dry.
However, when asked who the talk
on Friday will be intended for,
University of Victoria Professor
David Parnas said "Anyone who is
uncertain about the issues and is
willing to think logically and objectively about them should attend the
talk. It will not be filled with computer programmer jargon. I believe
that one does not have to be a computer scientist to understand why
the SDI software cannot free us
from the fear of nuclear weapons or
make them impotent."
David Parnas a leading expert in
software engineering with over 14
years of experience serving as a consultant to the U.S. Department of
Defence and their contractors is
considered the "father" of
"specification of system design"
which probably led to his appointment to the SDIO Advisory Panel
from which he resigned. He is also
in a position to know why some
people are supporting the program.
In his letter of resignation to James
Offut, the Assistant Director of the
SDIO, Parnas said "I could see the
dollar figures dazzling everyone involved. Almost everyone that I
know within the military industrial
complex sees in the SDI a new 'pot
of gold' just waiting to be tapped."
The talk will explain the reasons
why it is not possible to build a software system that is right the first
time it is used (and why that is
necessary for SDI), the aspects of
the "Star Wars" problem that
make it especially difficult from a
software point of view, and why
certain new software technologies,
commonly claimed to be the hope
for success, will not make it possible to build a trustworthy software
system for SDI.
David Parnas testified before the
Special Joint Parliamentary Committee on Canada's International
Relations regarding Canadian participation in Star Wars. He has
testified before the U.S. Congress.
Finally, he has a keen sense of
humour making him an entertaining and interesting, as well as informative, speaker.
Brock Rhone, Grad Studies
UBC Students For Peace and
Mutual Disarmament
We want your wonderfully wise
words of wovely wit written (typed
triple space on a 70 character line).
Please, no racist sexist or
homophobic stuff. The Ubyssey
maintains the right to edit for brevity and libel. Deadlines for letters
are noon on press day and are extremely painful. Friday, October 25, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC daycare gerbils abducted
By EILEEN LEE
Two youths were charged with
stealing cheddar cheese, sleeping
mats and a family of gerbils
Wednesday night.
On either Oct. 12 or 13 burglars
broke into three UBC daycare centres. Two more wer hit last
weekend.
A daycare staff member had
noticed activity in one of the empty
family housing units and notified
the RCMP.
The RCMP broke into the house
and found two teenagers with a majority of the evidence.
"They're looking at four people
(suspects)    right    now,    possibly
more," said corporal Williams of
the RCMP. "Two (suspects) appear
to live just off the Endowment
Lands."
"Not everything has been found
but it's being looked into," said
Williams.
Daycare co-ordinator Mab
Oloman said, "$2,000 worth of
equipment was stolen," including
drinking glasses, metal bowls, boxes
of crackers, cans of beans,
telephones, three or four turntables
and a ghetto blaster.
The situation involved "more
theft than vandalism," said
Oloman.
"It looked as if people were set
ting up house."
Oloman said vandalism has been
an on-going problem for the
daycares, but although young people have occasionally broken into
the buildings there has not been a
theft this big in at least the last three
years.
Oloman described the attacks on
the daycares as "not break and
damage but take" adding the
culprits took "dumb stuff and stuff
the kids need."
On the weekend of Oct. 13 the
Pentacare, Canada Goose, and
Summer of '73 daycares were hit.
Last weekend the Unit One daycare
which houses 12 children under
three years of age and the Tillicum
daycare which cares for 21 children
between the ages of three and five
years were robbed.
Oloman said all the centres and
parents have co-operated in replac
ing the stolen items and helping out.
"The parents are irritated," said
one daycare staffer. "It's a fear of
the place where their children stay
being violated. The lack of control,
or not knowing what's going on."
The children at the daycares are
not as concerned over the thefts
said another staff member.
"They're interested that their stuff
has been stolen, but there isn't really any reaction."
AMS tuition lottery
extended a month
By JENNIFER LV ALL
If you bought a ticket in the AMS
student aid tuition lottery, don't
throw it away yet. Due to lack of
ticket sales the draw date of the lottery has been postponed from Oct.
26 to Nov. 22.
The lottery will have two prizes
of $1500 each, equal to the average
tuition fees paid by a student at
UBC. Money raised by the lottery
will provide bursaries for UBC
students.
"The student aid tuition lottery is
definitely going to be held over until
the third week of November. We
were granted an extension by the
Lotteries Office and will be making
a statement at the (Thunderbird
football) game on Saturday," said
AMS vice-president Jonathan
Mercer.
The AMS was hoping to sell
6,000 tickets, but so far have sold
less than a 1,000.
Martin Cocking, student ad-
ministative commission secretary,
said poor ticket sales are due to inadequate advertising.
"The key to success is advertising" which "probably could have
been better" said Cocking. He said
it is "up to the undergraduate
societies" to sell the tickets.
Rich Fitzpatrick, treasurer of the
Engineering undergraduate society,
said members didn't have time to
sell lottery tickets because they were
busy promoting EUS-sponsored
events. They hope to be able to sell
more lottery tickets in November
because then it won't conflict with
other events.
Mercer said, "we have not sold
enough tickets because not enough
students have heard about (the lottery) or been approached by
undergraduate societies which were
supposed to be the main sellers."
He said the AMS has not had
time to push the lottery either,
because of the demands of
Homecoming Week. In November,
with Homecoming Week out of the
way, the AMS will launch a new
campaign to sell tickets, he said.
"Starting Monday we will have
volunteers" to staff a ticket booth
in the main concourse of the SUB,
said Mercer.
He said the AMS plans to boost
ticket sales by "really coming down
on the undergraduate societies to
sell more." He hopes to sell 6,000
tickets by the new draw date in
November.
Cocking is also optimistic about
the future of the lottery.
"If they really get out and push I
think it can be a good success."
— dan andrews photo
DR. ALEXANDER ROMAN of alumni heritage committee rededicates AMS cairn in front of Brock Hall. Plaques
on cairn commemorate money raised by students to construct buildings on campus. Ceremony was part of national universities week festivities. Several assembled crowd people commented AMS cairm has Geer cairn beat
hands down.
Today's youth aren't as excited about
sex as they were in past survey
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quantitatively, sex is not what it used to
be.
The sexual attitudes of youth
have become rapidly more conservative within only the last few years,
according to a study just completed
by sexologist Joseph Levy of the
Universie du Quebec a Montreal
(UQAM).
EPF cuts will probably hit universities
By MAC GINTHER
If the federal government made
cuts to the Established Programs
Financing package, the Socreds
would cut more from university
budgets than health care budgets
because they believe they would lose
fewer votes in the move, a member
of the B.C. Economic Policy Institute said Thursday.
Gideon Rosenbluth, a UBC
economics professor, said "they
would cut more (from programs)
which cost them less in votes."
Reports from a meeting between
federal and provincial finance
ministers in Halifax Sept. 24 - 27 in-
dcates the Tories will begin cutting
EPF payments federal government
grants to the provinces paying for
People should be wary of AIDS
Gay men should assume they have been exposed to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome virus, but AIDS is not a gay disease, said
Bob Tivey of AIDS Vancouver.
He told about 30 people in SUB 215 Thursday to presume danger
of exposure to the virus and to act accordingly.
"Look after yourselves," said Tivey, recommending a switch over
to safe sex which includes the use of condoms and personal hygiene.
However, Tivey was not in favor of the HTLV-III antibody test
which has been considered a test for AIDS. "In the states where the
test has been available for about five months, a lot of people took the
test thinking they could handle a positive result but they fell apart,"
he said.
"The stress around it can make you sick," said Tivey.
The HTLV-III tests for antibodies to AIDS and not the syndrome
itself, he said. "This is not a test for AIDS." Vancouver is the first
Canadian city to make use of the HTLV-III test, he added.
There is a possibility insurance companies may discriminate in
future against people who show up positive on the test, Tivey said.
Several insurance companies are asking about blood test results
and requesting the right to go to your doctor," he said.
Doctors are obliged to tell the companies about the results of the
tests including the one for HTLV-III, said Tivey.
He said anyone considering taking the test should "think about it
first."
AIDS Vancouver provides support services and information to
high risk groups.
V
health    care,    education   and
transportation — in 1986.
"The Tories have made deficit
cutting a high priority, said
Rosenbluth adding the provinces
have no obligation to the federal
government in the allocation of
funds.
AMS external affairs coordinator
Duncan Stewart said any future
EPF cuts may be preliminary Conservative efforts to implement MacDonald Commission of inquiry proposals.
He said the Conservatives have
anticipated the problems which will
occur when they renegotiate
transfer payments with the provincial government in 1987.
The EPF agreement to fund post-
secondary education and health was
first negotiated in 1977. It provided
for equal cost sharing between the
federal and provincial governments. The provinces have since
reduced their funding share, while
federal payments have increased
each year.
"By reducing overall funding
level increases, (the Conservatives)
are creating a financial and
psychological climate that is conducive to certain changes in the current post-secondary financing,"
said Stewart.
He said the changes would pro-„
bably include a direct-to-school
voucher scheme, as well as a
redirection of funds from the
university operating budget to
overhead costs.
There are significant differences
between what young adults thought
in 1978 and 1982 (the last date for
complete figures). In 1978, 54 per
cent of young men said they would
have sex if they are in love. Fifty-
only 46 per cent said the same. If
love was not present, 33.5 per cent
said, in 1978 they would be glad to
have sex, where only 15 per cent
said they would do so in 1982.
Similarly, in 1978, 35 per cent of
young women thought it was fine to
have sex if they weren't in love.
However, in 1982 only 16 per cent
thought so. The only statistic which
has not changed much is for women
having sex they are in love. Fifty-
four per cent thought it was fine in
1978 and almost the same number
thought so in 1982.
Levy said this trend towards
more conservative sexual relations
contradicts previous studies during
the late 1970s. One study by two
researchers at UQAM predicted
that by the year 1994, 95 per cent of
young people will be having
premarital sex.
"Now we have new conditions
and a return to sexual
conservatism," said Levy.
"The problem of sexually
transmitted diseases and AIDS in
particular has brought more care to
the sexual dimension," he said.
Levy attributed the changes to
several interrelated factors including the mass media, a high
divorce rate, and the economy.
"When there are such economic
problems as now, people want to
limit their instability," he said. "It
is the same for children from
divorced families. They look for
security, both men and women, in
monogomous relationships."
However, he added, this does not
mean they will not have several relationships, but that they won't sleep
with more than one person at the
same time.
Levy said society isn't moving
back to "the old days". Only a
small minority of youth view sex
through religious values, while most
know much more about sex, birth
control and sexually transmitted
diseases than any other generation,
he said.
Guilt, however, is also a byproduct of conservatism in sex.
"The more restrictive attitudes
towards sex also breed more anxiety towards sex itself and towards using contraceptives," he said.
The problems students face with
sex haven't changed significantly,
according to Giselle Godin, a sexologist and sex therapist at a Montreal health clinic for young people.
Godin counsels young men and
women with problems in their sexual relations. Most of the women
that come to her don't enjoy sex
and rarely if ever have an orgasm,
she said. Godin says women won't
let sexual relations recede to what
they once were.
"It is very rare I encounter
women who are upset about losing
their virginity," she said. "Women
want to have sex and have pleasure
from sex. It is finally becoming part
of their identity."
The most frequent problem
among men is premature ejaculation, she said. "These men have to
change their way of looking at sex,
she said. "They are not capable of
getting much pleasure from
touching, even though in their head
they may think they are."
Many "young men" do want a
stable relationship now more than
before, she said. However, because
the economy leaves many without
stable jobs, they feel they can't have
a relationship.
"Many men still believe they
must somehow be able to support a
woman. In their head, they still see
women as dependent," she said.
Students at the University of
Waterloo recently attended a
workshop about sexuality, "Can
We  Talk". Sylvia unremarkable
By SHELLEY BUTLER
Sylvia Ashton-Warner, renowned
world-wide for her innovative
teaching methods which she
developed during her nine years of
teaching Maori children in rural
New Zealand, is probably more impressive and inspiring in her books
than in this film by New Zealand
director and teacher, Michael Firth
(Off the Edge).
Perhaps Firth was afraid a film
about educational methods would
be too boring or too specialized for
a general audience. So instead Firth
extends his scenario in Walt Disney
style in an attempt to include glimpses of other apects of her life as a
mother, lover, and artist living in a
New Zealand rural society riddled
with poverty, racism, sexism,
violence, and bureaucracy.
Sylvia
directed by Michael Firth
at the Ridge Theatre
Sylvia walks into a depressing,
nineteen-forties classroom. She
finds the children like sullen puppets, having been disciplined by her
British colonial predecessors armed with canes, who leave her with
advice not to "spoil the child."
Sylvia, then recovering from a nervous breakdown, is immediately
sensitive to the destructiveness of
this rigid, authoritarian classroom,
and is literally sickened by the
hopelessness of her situation. When
she gives the children freedom to
express themselves the result is
anarchy, and they still cannot read.
The school inspector's visit to
this chaos seems to spell doom. But
Sylvia rescues herself from the
disaster by having the children sing
"Now I know my A.B.C."
Such sudden, pat answers which
suddenly turn the inspector's head,
and change his whole perception,
persist throughout the film. Later
we see her discovery of her techniques of "key vocabularly," when
she gives each child the words they
are interested in knife, canoe,
drunk instead of the artificial
language of the official reading
text.
By the time of the next inspection
the children are reading from then-
own books which they have written
and illustrated. Qne of the children
reads from his story written in his
Maori language, a long way from
the cultural imperialism of their
American Dick and Jane type
readers.
Unfortunately, Firth's film does
not adequately show the real effort
and intelligence of the woman who
is courageous in battling the restrictions of the educational system.
The film digresses to show
Sylvia's search for herself, her
refurbishing of a derelict cabin as
her ownpersonal retreat from her
children and her understanding
headmaster-husband. We see her
blossoming into an accomplished
artist, and always there is a piano to
soothe her tortured feelings. The
film proceeds in a series of vignettes
which do not really convey the
development of sympathy and trust
between the teacher and her pupils.
The film tries very hard to bring
in many other issues — there are
hints of a latent lesbianism in
Sylvia's friendship with the District
Nurse.
We see the struggles of the artist
in a philistine society. We see
cultural imperialism of the British
influence. But above all there is the
struggle of the free spirit against ignorance and power or, as Sylvia
puts it, "creativity against destruction".   Unfortunately,   even   this
worthwhile issue becomes trivialized and lost to melodramatics. For
instance, in one scene we see
Sylvia, (the creative, independent
woman), protesting to the school
board the "nil" grading which she
has been given for teaching. Predictably, the schoolboard members,
with the exception of one powerless
man who is captivated by Sylvia,
are mean, silly men who seem only
interested in their cookies and tea.
Where • Sylvia is dramatic and
very rewarding to watch, is in the
scenes with the children. Firth has
escaped the trap of making the
children appear precious and has
captured a very natural,
uninhibitied behaviour. It is
fascinating to watch the lively,
seemingly unaware Maori children
interacting with Sylvia. Eleanor
David, playing Sylvia, with much
lip pursing and darting of clear
eyes, captures a sense of Sylvia as
being a responsive, energetic
woman.
The classroom scenes are so
fluent and natural that the audience
has a real feeling of spying on the
classroom. For the scenes of the
children with Sylvia, as well as for
the success in recreating the wartime period in rural New Zealand,
the film is a visual success.
It is too bad that Firth did not
have more faith in showing more of
Sylvia as a teacher at work, interacting with the children. Instead, he
spends too much time searching for
stories and suggestions of affairs
and unusual friendships in Sylvia's
personal life. To gain a feeling for
who Sylvia really was, he should
have left out these trivialities .and
touched upon the fact that Sylvia
Ashton-Warner, one of our most
influential educators, hated school
as a child.
New directors enthusiastic
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Young directors. Creative, enthusiastic, and opinionated.
Richard Slauson and Sharolyn Lee
are the two first year MFA directing
students who are making their
B.C. directoral debuts. Blind
Dancers and The Dumb Waiter will
be playing next Wednesday through
Friday at Dorothy Somerset studio
on campus.
Always a theatre lover, Sharolyn
has found her niche in directing:
"The thing I don't like about acting, besides my not being good at
it, is that there's not enough.
Everyone gets to do their little bit;
the director gets to do everything."
She enjoys the position of control,
but points out theatre's collective
nature, "I think the director's job is
to bring a lot of creative people
together ... If you clash with an actor, you find a way of melding it all
together."
Richard agrees, ". . . a good
director uses the talents, he doesn't
work against his actors, but with
them. I usually have something I'm
shooting for, but I'm always willing
to experiment."
Sharolyn and Richard agree that
theatre should address a broader
public than it currently does. "As
theatre people," says Richard, "I
feel we have to get away from the
radical art for art's sake feeling . . .
Sophocles wrote plays not only to
explain life as a philosopher, but to
win a prize. Shakespeare wrote
plays to bring people into the Globe
theatre."
Sharolyn insists that she does
"not want to do theatre for the intellectual elite, for people who go
see their Shakespeare once a year
like taking medicine.
Theatre is in a very difficult
period    because    we    have   these
jmfip,
*<$*?$
polarized groups, the avant-garde
and the bourgeois, and they leave
out the great majority of people."
As she directs a play, Sharolyn is
constantly concerned with an unsophisticated imaginary couple
named Marge and Harry will react
to what she is doing. "If my play
doesn't-say something to Marge and
Harry, I'm doing something
wrong."
Their expressed theatre
philosophies are reflected in their
play choices. Richard is doing an
absurdist piece, Harold Pinter's
The Dumb Waiter. "I'm trying to
emphasize the theatricality of it,"
he says, "I'm more concerned with
the action and the character than
the playwright's thoughts."
The play is about two assassins
awaiting the arrival of their victim.
The characters, Ben and Gus, are
thugs at the bottom of a powerful
organization. They are ignorant
cogs in a complex machine. This is a
theme to which Richard believes his
audience can readily relate. "There
are times in our own lives when we
must reel like Ben and Gus," says
Richard, describing is own experience of moving to Vancouver
with a wife and son, "It sometimes
feels like there are forces you can't
control." When he first read the
play, he was struck by the "fear,
dramatic tension, and surprise ending." It is his initial, emotional
response that he wants to share with
his audience.
Sharolyn has chosen a Canadian
play, a romance by Charles Tidier.
"Blind Dancers is in many ways
what I have to say about the
world." It is unabashedly, perhaps
typical, love story. "The play is
about the letting down of defences,
and how a miracle can only happen
if you let it."
Sharolyn's enthusiasm for life,
and her play, is both irrepressible
and infectious.
PflGEF
Colonel Redl tells
of fear and loal
By MICHELLE TESSLER
The mysterious suicide of Colonel Alfred Redl in Vienna in 1913
prompted journalists to ask many
questions: Did espionage lie behind
his death? Was Redl blackmailed
into divulging confidential information for fear of being publicly denounced as a homosexual? Or was
this suicide a sort of divine retribution fitting for an ambitious man
given to betraying others in order to
attain success?
Colonel Redl
directed by Istvan Szabo
starring Klaus Maria Brandauer
at The Bay Theatre
The movie is set in Austria-
Hungary before the outbreak of
World War I (the scenery is exquisite throughout), and relatives
Istvan Szabo's version of Colonel
Redl's life, using history as the basis
for the biography.
Redl, who comes from a lower-
class family, is granted the privilege
to enter an elite military academy,
where his loyalty to the Emperor
and his ambition to join the world
of power and aristocracy are
fostered.
Being both talented and diligent,
the young cadet quickly learns the
secret to rising in the military ranks:
stepping on others is one of the
prices which must be paid for success. The more entrenched Redl
becomes in the military environment, the more he feels he must
subordinate both his origins and his
personality to the "new image", to
be accepted in this world.
Redl seems to succeed in forging
a new personality, the authoritarian
colonel dedicated to the empire,
whose loyalty will be given
regardless of the price. Yet, little by
little, Redl realizes that he is the
price, his essence which must be
masked at all times.
Every so often the mask slips to
reveal insecurity and inner anxiety.
This feeling is recreated symbolically in a short scene in the movie
when Redl is walking alone at night
being pursued by dogs. He walks
faster, they follow. He runs, they
run  after  him.   Redl  panics and
Page Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Oci RIDflY
V.O.A/s Fidelio bleak
psychological tale
hing in Vienna
shoots one of the dogs. He then
stands and shudders at the horror
of his deed, suddenly running away
to rid himself of the guilt and
shame.
Redl's career fits this pattern: he
acts, realizing the implications of
his action but moving on nevertheless. His small eyes are typically
suspicious, always wondering who
knows the truth about him. He
marries to mask his sexual
preference, he fabricates stories
about his family, and when his peasant sister comes to visit him he
sends her away angrily - he does not
want his new reality invaded.
Unfortunately, Redl has made
some fatal errors. One cannot successfully sustain such a mask
without incurring any psychological
debts. Furthermore, the cause to
which Redl has so unswervingly
dedicated himself is a dying one.
The empire is crumbling; it is an
outmoded institution whose last
breath is near. Redl must feel a
similar sensation within himself.
As a psychological account of
ambition, betrayal, and confusion
of self-identity, Colonel Redl is
fascinating. Klaus Maria Brandauer
is well cast: his facial expressions,
especially near the end of the
movie, are brilliant.
As an imaginative/historical picture of the times and as a
biography, Colonel Redl could
stand to be sped up, though it can
hold one's interest most of the time.
The movie is long and, at points, if
feels long. It needs a push of excitement to pick it up.
The subtitles do not help this
situation: they don't detract from
the movie, but they make character
identification confusing at times.
One tends to concentrate more on
the words than on who is saying
them.
Still, Colonel Redl is worth seeing
if you have the patience to endure
some "long" moments, and are
more interested in psychology than
in hard-core excitement. Just wear
comfortable clothes and bring
enough money for a large popcorn.
By ROSANNA DITMARS
As a political and social allegory
Vancouver's Opera's rendition of
Beethoven's only opera, Fidelio,
was a success.
Unfortunately the production
was so uncompromisingly bleak
and unappealing that it verged
dangerously close to being "non-
entertainment". With the exception
of the final scene there was virtually
no emotional appeal during the entire three-hour opera.
Fidelio
at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
October 26th
Excessive emotion is not always
desirable in theatre, but the almost
total lack of emotion in Fidelio left
the audience feeling detached from
the story and made the opera come
across as a boring, intellectual exercise.
Beethoven's two dimensional,
allegorical characters and his linear
plot do not allow for much display
of emotion, but the extreme
minimalism of Artistic Director
Harry Kupfer's interpretation made
an inherantly bleak production even
starker.
Kupfer's decision to emphasize
this starkness was certainly an attempt to powerfully convey the
grey, minimal existence of prison
life, as well as to provide a
significant contrast to the last, colourful scene which takes place in
the minds Of the leading characters
Leonore and Florestan.
However, asking the audience to
sit through two and a half hours of
bleak, depressing prison life in exchange for less than thirty minutes
of illusory joy, is a bit much.
Emotional appeal not withstanding, Fideliowas technically and intellectually effective. The sets and
the costumes (both designed by
Wilfried Werz) gave a sense of
timelessness to the production,
which was appropriate to the
universal ideas of love and freedom
that it expressed. H.
The set and costumes for the last
scene in which Florestam and
Leonore imagine the triumph of
liberty over oppression were particularly successful.
Approximately fifty chorus
members and supers dressed as
freedom fighters from around the
world and from throughout history
(I swear I saw Che Guevera) stood
on a huge riser amidst red and gold
banners while symbols of freedom
and oppression (a sword, chain, a
hand and a torch) dangled in front
of them. This extravagance was a
welcome change from the misery
and monotony of the prison set and
it effectively expressed the themes
of liberty versus tyranny and the
strength and joy of the human spirit
in which Beethoven so fervently
believed.
Musically, Fidelio was a little
disappointing. There were no spectacular voices, although they were
all pleasant enough and the or
chestra (conducted by Stefan
Ninde) alternated between
mediocrity (there were some very
flat horn solos at the beginning) and
solid musicianship.
Notable performers were: Irena
Welhasch, Marzelline the jailor's
daughter who aspires to greater
things; Lyn Vernon (Leonore) who
overcame a technical faltering in
her aria at the end of act one to
deliver a credible performance as
the faithful wife; and Frederick
Donaldson (Florestan) who, as the
Oppressed prisoner, was particularly
good in his duet with Leonore in the
last scene.
Ronald Hedlund (Rocco) was
also of note in his portrayal of the
jailor who must weigh his personal
conscience against his duties to the
villainous governor and Richard
Margison as "Jaguino" provided
some much needed comic relief as
well as technical skill.
Victor Braun, as the evil
"Piarro" was an especially compelling villain whose presence
always commanded attention.
So, Beethoven's Fidelio successfully raised the basic, linear
story of a prisoner being rescued by
his loving wife to a universal level of
love for mankind and the fight
against tyranny and oppression.
However, unlike the opera most of
us know and some of us have learned to appreciate Vancouver Opera's
rendition was hardly enjoyable.
*  &n
•ober25, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October25, 1985
Unidentified morsels anger eaters f
We have lived in Totem Park
Residence for more than two years
and in the past have had little
reason to complain about the food
services.
From the beginning of this fall
term however, the quality of the
food has been decreasing steadily,
both in terms of flavor and selection.
On Saturday, Oct. 19th the din-
Letters
ner menu read lambchops and
vegetables. Upon arriving at dinner
45 minutes before the scheduled
closing time, the cafeteria had run
out of chops and we were served 3
X remedies majority
James Baugh claims a Socred majority no longer exists in B.C.
("Socred majority shrinks" Oct.
16). It would appear that the
pressures of Law school and Friday
beer ups have caused his mind to
erode severely, inducing a state of
"unfitness to write letters."
Mr. Baugh claims the Socreds
beat the NDP by only 5<% of the
popular vote. That alone gives the
Socreds a majority. In addition,
though, the Canadian political
system is actually not based on the
popular vote, it is based on the
number of seats each party gets in
the Legislature. In that respect, the
Socreds have a large majority in the
Legislature.
Mr. Baugh would also have us
think if "X" does not vote in the
election, it implies a vote against the
Socreds. Logic flies out the window
at this statement. If X does not
vote, there is no rationale for concluding that X is voting against one
party or for another party. X can
just as easily be "voting" against
the NDP.
To arrive at the conclusion that
the majority of voters in the province do not support the Socreds (at
least at the time of the election) is
unsubstantiated,   illogical,   and
unbefitting a law student.
The common law should rise up
and provide a remedy for this situation — possibly the tort of stupid
statements.     Raymond Winestock
unclassified
breakfast sausages and 2 strips of
bacon as the entree.
Two dinners later we had a choice
between a single slice of breakfast
ham or a seafood platter consisting
of two oysters, a piece of fish, and
two unidentifiable items which
tasted like something unmentionable. The two morsels in question were immediately brought to
the attention of the dietician who
could not identify either and was
heard to say, "I don't know what it
is, it comes as a frozen product."
Our intentions are not to create
problems but to ensure that acceptable standards are maintained.
D. DeRosa
science 2
T. Fast
english 4
MUM INSTANT PASSPORT PICTURESHWlSlil
PHOTO GREETING CARDS
pi  ♦ .
WHITE DOVE
,CLEANERS LTD.
20%   OFF
DRY CLEANING
10%  OFF
SHIRTS
(with AMS Student Card)
4545 W. 10th Ave.
224-4377
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
at
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
10 CARDS  $6.00
20 CARDS  $11.00
50 CARDS  $25.00
100 CARDS  $45.00
K •  From 135, 126, 110, Disc, or 120-12 Size Negatives
4 •  Vertical or Horizontal Greetings Available
d *  Includes mailing envelopes
J Order Early for Fast Delivery
l JL&6 RUSHANT
p 4Mjm CAMERAS
i        ff    4538 West 10th Ave.
jj 224-9112 - 224-5858 a
&
m f'\
BLv»V'i
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o
and
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two
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fashion names in town
"ROM     T-SHIH1S    TO   MOST    LUXURIOUS
LEATH-HEB
BRING THIS AD AND GET
10% OFF
ANY REGULAR PRICE ITEMS
-ONE PER CUSTOMER-
offer EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30th, 1985
552 SEYMOUR STREET,  VANCOUVER.  B.C. V6B 3J5  '
Public Service Commission      Commission de la Fonction
of Canada publique du Canada
To the Class of 1986
We are recruiting university graduates with degrees in the following
areas:
Administration
Commerce
Computer Science
Consumer Studies
Criminology *
Economics
Engineering
Library Science
Mathematics/Statistics
Pick up your copy of the "Employment Opportunities for University Graduates - 1986"
publication at your campus placement office or at an office of the Public Service
Commission of Canada.
* Criminology graduates are invited to apply, using the "ES" ■ Economics and Statistics
group choice.
Competition 86-4000
Closing date:  Friday, November 1, 1985
Date of Financial Administration Test of Technical Knowledge:
Thursday, November 7, 1985 at 19:00 hours.
Please ask your placement office about the exam location.
PLEASE NOTE:
The Public Service Commission and the Department of External Aflairs wish to announce
that there will be no Foreign Service Officer recruitment competition in 1985. The next
competition is scheduled for the fall of 1986.
The Public Service of Canada is
n\ equal opportunity empioser
Canada Friday, October 25, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Intramural  sports keep  on  running
Turkey Trot Road Run
Peter Holsworth, winner of the
Halley's Vi Marathon, officially
started the Turkey Trot Road Run
on October 11th, sending energetic
runners gobbling down Salish Trail
and Acadia Road in sunny conditions.
Intense competition was found
on the men's side with Brian
Nemethy (P.E.) inching over the
finish line 2 seconds ahead of Bob
McGraw (Medicine) with a time of
8:54 in the 3 km distance. In the 5
km run, J. Jackson (Pharmacy)
with a time of 15:04 edged out Paul
Rapp (Georox) who's time was
15:05.
In the women's 3 km, Carolyn
Daubeny (P.E.) had a strong finish
with a time of 11:24 and in the 5 km
distance, Janice Toneffe (EUS)
floated in with an 18:04 time. Gift
certificates for turkeys were awarded to all top finishers.
WOMEN'S CROSS VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
(As of Friday. October 25, 1986)
LEAGUE A
GP      W      L
1. Phrateresl 9     9     0
2. Japan exchange 9     6     3
A.  Nursing
4. Delta Gamma 2
5. Aggies
6. Forestry 2
7. Gamma Phi
12 6 6
12 6 6
9 3 6
9 3 6
6 0 6
Commerce
Phys Ed. 1
Education
EUS1
Delta Gamma 3
Phrateres 3
Nursing 1
16 15
15 12
15 12
12 6
8. K.K. Gamma
LEAGUE C
1. Alpha Gamma
2. Forestry
3. Recreation
4. Nursing 2
5. Arts
6. Phrateres 2
7. EUS 2
8. Phys. Ed. 2
Mans - 3 km
1. Paul Rapp, George III
2. Paul Quinn, Beta
3. Paul van Donkelaar, Rowing
4. Brian Nenethy, P.E.
5. Bob McGraw, Medicine
6. Steve Gustavson, Betas
7. Jim Richardson, George IV
8. Bob Downil, Rowing
9. DarleyChan.AP.SC.
10. P. Brand, Can.Emp.Cent.
Mans - B km
1. Seamus Parker, E.U.S.
2. Paul Heintzman, Regent College
3. Reidar Zapf-Gilje, E.U.S.
4. Nick Smith, Forestry
5. J. Northrop, Forestry
6. Andy Zalkow, ZBT
7. S. Withers, Faculty
8. Rob Hasegawa, Science
15
15
12
15
12 11
11  8
12
12
11
12
12
12
9. Chris Armstrong, Georax
10.  Stewart Bell, Rowing
Woi-nen's - 3 km
1. Anita Hildebrandt, Phrateres
2. Mae Jong, Education
3. Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
4. Chris Bjorndal
5. Lindsay Hall, P.E.
6. Kathy Eglit, VST
7. Stojna Tomic, Medicine
8. Sherry Wright, P.E.
9. Irene Strucel, Forestry
10. Jennifer Reed, Medicine
Woman's - 6 km
1. Janine Toneff, E.U.S.
2. Heidi Wippich, Rehab. Med.
3. Marianne Morgan, Rowing
4. Karen Warner, Nursing
5. Liz Robertson, E.U.S.
6. C Molner, Commerce
7. Colleen McCormack, Science II
8. Neesha Brar, Agriculture
9. S. Hughes, Nursing
10. Joanne Smith, Regent College
18:43
18:49
19:00
19:02
19:07
19:07
19:17
19:24
WOMEN-3km.
1. Carolyn Daubeny, P.E.
2. Winona Bishop, EUS
3. Chris Bjornday, Arts
4. Sherry Wright, P.E.
5. Rita Ciammaichella, Science
6. Jennifer Hansen, Nursing
7. Patty Phillip, Alpha Gamma Delta
8. Andrea Stasirk, Nursing
9. Jill Delane, Nursing
10. Nancy Linburg, Phrateres
WOMEN-Bkm.
1. Janine Toneffe, EUS
2. Susan Buchan, P.E. (Grad)
3. Heidi Wippich, Rehab. Med.
 ^	
Eyeglass Boutique
3305 WEST BROADWAY
(at Blenheim)
! VANCOUVER, B.C.
732-0008
■
I
j  Single Vision Glasses...„,
fL Soft Contact Lenses
i  Extended Wear
! Contact Lenses
• 88
complete     \
.50   ot
complete        I
179
.98
$5.00 OFF ON SOFT CONTACT LENSES
WITH THIS COUPON
| STORE HOURS:
j Monday/Thursday 9 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
| Friday 9 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
■ Saturday 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAJOR CREDIT
CARDS ACCEPTED
(Offer Valid Until Nov. 30/86)
19:27
19:37
13:15
15:52
14:03
14:23
14:25
14:32
14:38
14:43
15:01
15.05
21:03
22:24
22:57
23:16
24:19
24:45
24:53
25:29
26:21
26:27
11.24
11:31
11:50
11:50:4
12:27
13:04
13:10
13:12
13:16
13:22
18:04
18:45
19:04
.,
rrtpany
i .-MLos-u andComforiabk
4v
.- Soft fddssicalfpcouz      .    ■
fl-nliyiafe: Dininq ,,
/'».'   (bu Landlelic/ni)
,"*Ocxu.iri-ui:/j prepared ,  <n
V~t    food (reaschdbty priced1.'      t_
to*
V*   Desserts (.ncrriemajdt*;      yf~'
*S%«f 'jer, Ser-Acer ''••>
\$(iu.-?r •MisitriAsi-.e-.'     '^j?
W:
2
-tna;
MtJ
a and receiver /ot
offa.ni/ mead over 'ice _
(Please-presentt/troj '
ordertnaj.  t^'e look.
po-rwardtc oe.ci.nclyou.
^ozVesl u^tdver ,
l^Z-IO/i,
Luncn & Dinner (.
4. Colleen McCormick, Sciences
5. Joan Pilcher, Staff
6. SueCaven, P.E.
7. Joanne Smith, Regent College
8. Deanna Sillars, F.N.S.
9. Jennifer Reed, Medicine
10. M. McManus, Rowing
MEN-3km.
1. Brian Nemethy, P.E.
2. Bob McGraw, Medicine
3. Jim Richardson, Georox IV
4. Steve Gustavson, Betas
P. Nielsen, Rowing
Davey Gin, Medicine
Stewart Bell, Rowing
Cal Merry, M.M.P.E.
Ross Langford, Rowing
Geoff Huenemann, Sigma Chi
MEN-Skm.
J. Jackson, Pharmacy
Paul Rapp, Georox
3. Seamus Parker, E.U.S.
4. Paul Heintzman, Regent College
5. Paul Quinn, Betas
6. James Northrop, Forestry
7. Andy Zalkow, ZBT.
8. Nick Smith, Forestry
9. Chris Armstrong, Georox
10. Rob Hasegawa, Sciences
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
20:19
20:50
22:01
22:07
22:50
23:19
23:19:6
8:54
8:56
9:06
9:12
9:13
9:16
9:20
9:32
9:36
9:39
15:04
15:15
15:51
15:56
15:57
16:08
16:14
16:18
16:19
16:23
RICK HANSEN
MAN IN MOTION
WORLD TOUR
70.4t&,
Sat 0<£ 26ti X jm.
Ilabooclles
the one stop
witch & pirate
shop . . .
Visit with Griselda The Witch
at noon, October 26
Swashbuckle by for:
• noses, ears, hands & other assorted body
parts • bats • spider webbing • coloured
hair spray & lots of face paint • black nail
polish • orange jelly beans • black
balloons and gross grotesqueries • witch
hats & capes  •   pirate hooks & patches
4462 W. 10th Ave.
224-5311
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
684-0066
A SUMMER IN OTTAWA
\\Oh What A Fun III
\\\ PLACE TO BE f/f
■ ■■■■■■■a
CNECKED5
Thru' Oct. 26th-Bruce Tilden
Oct. 21st-Nov. 2nd-Rob Pietrie
(Home of the Frosted Mug)
1.4 oz Burger on a
(Share it with a friend)
10    Bun
$575
Overlooking English Bay
xr   Corner Davie & Denman
(Valet Parking)
UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA 1986 UNDERGRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS
For students who foresee a career in research, the Summer Research Scholarships
will provide research experience with leading Canadian scientific investigators in one
of the fields listed below.
PARTICIPATING DEPARTMENTS
Anatomy
Geography (physical)
Biochemistry
Geology
Biology
Kinanthropology
Chemistry
Mathematics
Computer Science
Microbiology
ENGINEERING
Physics
Chemical
Physiology
Civil
Psychology (experimental
Electrical
Systems Science
Mechanical
VALUE: $1,200 (minimum)/month. Travel allowance
DURATION: 3-4 months (May-August) 1986. Reasonable on-campus accommodation.
REQUIREMENTS: Canadian or permanent resident. Permanent address outside of immediate
Ottawa/Hull area (Ottawa/Hull residents should apply for a summer award, such as NSERC, which is
tenable at the University of Ottawa). Full-time undergraduate students with excellent standing; priority given to 3rd year students (2nd year in the
Province of Quebec)
Forward the required information together with your most recent and complete university transcript before November 15, 1985 to the address below. Also request a reference from one
professor be sent to the same address by November 15, 1985.
1986 Summer Research Scholarships, School of Graduate Studies and Research
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont. K1N 6N5 Tel. (613) 564-6546
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Name Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1985
%tf#ti
TODAY
CIRCLE K
General meeting, noon, Buchanan 351.
ECONOMICS STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden & margaritis nite, 4 p.m., Buchanan
lounge.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden, 3:30 p.m., SUB 205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meeting, noon, International House lounge.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC Women's Blue vs. Gold game, 5:30 p.m..
War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Homecoming game vs Calgary Dinosaurs — battle for first place, UBC students free with AMS
card, 5 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Calgary Dinosaurs, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Copies of the 'Whoseletter', Vancouver's own
Dr. Who fanzine available free to members,
anytime, Rm. 249A.
CO SPONSORED BY UBC STUDENTS FOR
PEACE AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT AND
SCIENCE FOR PEACE
Dr. David Parnas, a former advisor to the
Strategic Defence Initiative speaks on the "Soft
ware Constraints on Star Wars," noon. Woodward IRC 2.
UBYSSEY
CUP48 meeting, 3:30 p.m., SUB 241K.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:  Beverly Hills Cop -  $2, 7 & 9:30 p.m.,
SUB Auditorium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Samosa Night, 6-p.m., SUB 211.
JSA/HILLEL
Oneg Shabbat, 8:30 p.m., 1053 Douglas Crt.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Rock & Roll, noon, SUB party room.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Calgary Dinosarus, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs UBC Old Boys, 2:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Arena.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Beverly Hills Cop, $2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Party, 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., SUB partyroom.
GET THE COMPETITIVE EDGE!
UBC
TRIATHLON CLINICS
A series of clinics are being offered prior to
the UBC Triathlon IV, Saturday, March 8,1986.
CLINICS:
1 Saturday, November 2nd
Training Strategies: Physiological Preparation.
Mr. Len Goodman, PHD candidate.
2 Saturday, November 16
Cycling, Swimming Clinic:
Kori Sinclair, Canadian National Cycling Team
Jean   Paul   Saindon,   Canadian   National   Triathlon
Team Member.
3. Saturday, November 30
Diet & Nutrition:
Susan Barr, School of Family & Nutritional
Sciences
All clinics held in Home Economics Bldg.
Room 60—10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Admission to clinics is FREE
OfBC /l<fiwma&... fa, good gpotfs!
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
HALLOWE'EN
PARTYING!
Monsters
Devils
Bunnies
Ghouls
Babies
Bumble Bees
Bums
Masks
Wigs Body Paint
Make-up ^n
Spray Paint
Teeth
SEELS
Lower Level.
Student Union
Building, U.B.C.
Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa ft Mastercharge
Accepted
SUNDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship Service, 10 a.m., UBC Daycare Gym,
2845 Acadia Road.
SUBFILMS
Film: Beverly Hills Cop, $2, 7 & 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon to 5 p.m., SUB partyroom.
MONDAY
OCEANOGRAPHERS Er ENGINEERS
Guest speakers from Int'l Submarine Eng. on
underwater remotely operated vehicle, 11:30
a.m., Macleod 228 (Elec, Eng. Bldg.).
SUBFILMS
Film: Liz Tayior in The Taming of the Shrew,
7:30 p.m., SUB Auditirium.
UBS CANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB partyroom.
TUESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Fellowship,   Bible study  & discussion,   noon.
Brock Hall Rm. 304.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANISATION
Testimony meeting, Bible readings. All invited,
noon, SUB 119.
SIKH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Informal   discussion   on   Sikhism,   12:30  p.m.,
SUB 215, everyone welcome.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Meeting on Tools for Peace campaign, noon,
SUB 237.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in practice, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice,  noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB partyroom.
Since forming in February, 1985
Theatre Peace has performed to
rave reviews. Today will mark their
first appearance in the lower
mainland. Sponsored in part by the
British Columbia Teachers' Federation conference on Peace Education, Theatre Peace will be offering
one public performance in the SUB
Auditorium at 3:30 p.m. Admission
is $3 which with help both to cover
the cost of their Vancouver debut
and finance future performances.
We urge everyone who is working
for peace to come and see this
remarkable young theatre group.
NEITHER COLD SLEET, HAIL OR SNOW
SHOULD KEEP YOU FROM RIDING THIS
WINTER
COMPLETE WINTER CLOTHING AND
RAIN GEAR IN STOCK
WEST POINT CYCLES
Sales & Service Since 1930
3771 W. 10th Ave. 224-3536
*10% Discount on Parts & Accessories for Students
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 — Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
85 - TYPING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Oct. 26
Dr. George MacDonald
National Museum of Man
RAVEN'S TREASURE
HOUSE:
Northwest Indian Art
and Culture
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
THE AMS FOOD & BEVERAGE Dept. is
now accepting applications & resumes for
the following positions: waiters/waitresses,
cashiers, doormen & cooks. Pick up applic.
forms at AMS Business Office, Rm. 266.
Return application AND resumes to Rm
266.
35 - LOST
SUIT PANTS, black with fleck, red & black
tie. Thurs., Oct. 17 between Acadia Hi-rise
& Music Bldg. 222-2412, 228-3097.
70 - SERVICES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1969 ALFA COUPE 1750. Beautiful, stereo,
Abarth, $5200 obo. 984-6744.
'80 FIAT X-19. Ex. cond. Metallic black,
gold stripes, Targa roof, fog lights, CIBIE
headlights, new Pirellis, $5800 obo.
921-7388 anytime, 738-7188 days, 734-7188
evs.
HOMEMADE KING SZ. bed, Sealy mattress
very comfy, $100. Framed dresser mirror,
2'x3', $20. Moving Oct. 31st, must sell.
228-2022, 738-7514 (leave message).
25 - INSTRUCTION	
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
38th & Cambie. 321-4809.
SAXAPHONE LESSONS. Beginner to advanced. Reasonable rates. Professional
musician. Ph. John, 687-3003.
30 - JOBS   	
WANTED: Experienced, caring, energetic
babysitter, part-time, 8-4 p.m. for 18 mth.
old. My home Kits. 736-0572.
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
PEOPLE WITH IBM main frame, TSO,
Wylbur, JCL, VSAM files,
IMS/DB/DC/ADF call 294-6158 for contract work starting a.s.a.p.
80 - TUTORING
EXPERT TUTORS in your field will come to
you. Fees negot.
Multi-Learn - 272-1962.
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261-7066
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TYPING & W/P: Term papers, theses,
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write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,  letters,
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5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
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Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER —Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
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IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
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734-0650 (24 hrs.). Friday, October 25, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Blind    Dancers,    and    The    Dumb    Waiter,
presented by the M.F.A. directing program, at the
Dorothy Somerset Studio (228-2678), Ocfcber 30,
31, November 1, at 8:0O p.m., matinees at 12:30 p.m.
Arms and the Man, a comedy by G.B. Shaw, at
the Arts Club Granville Island (687-5315), until
November 9th, at 8:30 p.m.
Dear Liar, A dramatic reading of G.B. Shaw's correspondence, at the Arts Club Revue Theatre
(687-5315), October 27th, at 8:00 p.m.
One More for the Road, a new George Ryga
play, at the Firehall Theatre (250 E. Cordova,
687-1644), until October 26th, at 8:30 p.m.
The Bat, a whodunit thriller, at Studio 58
(Langara, 324-5227), until November 10th, at 8:00
p.m.
Tales at the Naam (2724 West 4th, 738-7151),
starting October 26th for seven weeks, every Saturday, at 8:45 p.m.
Talking Dirty, a record-breaking hit comedy, at
the Surrey Arts Centre Theatre, tickets at V.T.C.,
October 29th to November 9th, Tuesday to Friday,
8:00 p.m., Saturday, 6:00 and 9:00 p.m. Sunday,
2:00 p.m.
Can You See Me Yet?, by Timothy Findley, at the
SFU Theatre (291-3514), until November 2nd, 8:00
p.m.
Stuff as Dreams are Made on, one actor inter
pretation of The Tempest, at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (251-9578), October 31st-November
9th, Fridays and Saturdays, 8:00 p.m., Sundays, 2:00
and 7:00 p.m.
Take the Fire, presented by Women in Focus,
Women-only audience requested, at 204-456 W.
Broadway (872-2250), October 28th, 8:00 p.m.
The Latest Mr. Adams, a comedy mystery, at
Deep Cove Community Hall (929-5247), October
30th to November 2nd.
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, with William
Hutt and Janet Wright, at the Vancouver
Playhouse (873-3311), opens October 26th, 8:00
p.m.
Watte
Fidelio, Beethoven's opera produced by the Vancouver Opera at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
(682-2871, October 26th, 8:00 p.m.
Rita MacNeil, folk singer sings of life and love, at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (254-9578),
until October 26th, at 8:00 p.m.
Eckart Seeber, Organ Recital, at St. James
Anglican Church, Gore and Cordova, October 26th,
at 8:00 p.m.
Redemption, and Bob's Your Uncle, a benefit
for the Nanoose Conversion Campaign, at the Ukrainian Hall, 805 East Pender, tickets at Ariel Books and
Octopus Books, October 25th, 8:00 p.m.
Wild root Orchestra, at the Landmark Jazz Bar
(687-9312), October 30th to November 2nd.
The Roches, a little Halloween fun, at the New
York Theatre (639 Commercial Drive, tickets
through VTC), October 31st, 9:00 p.m.
Purcell String Quartet, presented by Masterpiece Music, at the Vancouver East Cultural Cen-
tru (1895 Venables, 254-9578), October 27th, at 2:30
and 8:00 p.m.
Cantatas and Concertos of the High Baroque,
prssented by the Vancouver Society for Early Music,
at the Recital Hall in the UBC Music Building
(732-1610), October 27th, at 8:00 p.m.
ExrUbtfc
The   Expressive   Hand:   Images  of   Buddha,
presented by the Canadian Society for Asian Arts, at
the Asian Centre on campus, October 29th through
November 15th, noon to 5:00 p.m.
Arthur Erickson: Selected Projects, an exhibit
o" architectural drawings and models, at the Vancouver Art Gallery (682-5621). until January 12th.
Dance, an audio visual installation by Violet and
Catherine Colste Costello of their "classical" rendition of Swan Lake, at the Pitt International Gallery
(36 Powell, 681-6740), until November 2nd, at 8:00
p m.
COFFEES
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The Co-op's 1st Fall Outdoor
Gear Swap is the answer. Call
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When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a new
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Flown, paintings universale by Nicholas Fiwchuk,
at Pots, Stews and Fondues (1221 Thurlow,
681-9812).
Sally Michener: Ceramic Sculpture, a bizarre
tableau vivant, at the Surrey Art Gallery
(13750-88th Avenue Surrey, 596-7461) until
November 24th.
The Age of Paradox and Passion: Prints of the
Eighteenth Century, at the Burnaby Art Gallery
(6344 Gilpin Street, 291-9441), until December 1st.
Hidden Identities, Masks by Robert Tokarz, at
the Burnaby Art Gallery, October 31st to December
1st.
Elspeth Pratt, an architectural textual sculpture,
exhibit, at the Contemporary Art Gallery (556
Hamilton, 687-1345) October 29th to November 23rd.
Vancouver: Six by Six by Six, The First Annual
National Exhibition of Small Scale Fine Crafts, at the
Cartwright Gallery (1411 Cartwright, 687-8266),
October 31st to December 8th.
A New Arch, new work by Wayne Ngan, at the
Gallery of B.C. Ceramics (1359 Cartwright,
669-5645), October 29th to November 10th.
Photoperspectives, a national juried
photography exhibition, at the Presentation House
gallery (333 Chesterfield, 986-1351), October 31st to
December 1st.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Sn,org,isbord
Authentic Chinese Cuismt
228-9114
10' - DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICtNSED PREMISES
\1.... F-r   11 30 ^ 00 j   .■
CLOSED SATURDAYS
2142 Western  Pdrkv
UBC Village
NOTICE TO HOLDERS OF
B.C. STUDENT LOANS
If you negotiated a B.C. Student Loan in 1984-85, your interest free status may expire November 4, 1985. If you are
registered in a full program in 1985-86 you are eligible to
maintain interest free status, however, you must ensure that
your lending institution has informed the Ministry of Education.
For further information contact your lending institution or
the awards office.
Sale of Brazilian Art & Quality Crafts
Ideal Xmas, Wedding & Baby Gifts
naive painting (framed) contemp. primitivists
$25-$200
elegant baby clothes embroidered cotton & lace incl. christening
gowns, $8-$30
semi-precious stone jewelry & carvings
crochet bedspreads, satin pillowcases, table linen, embroidered
sheets, $10-$200
traditional toys • ceramics • 4 inch quartz crystal ball
SUNDAY, OCT. 27-12 NOON-4 P.M.
3012 S.W. MARINE DR.
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Specializing in
STUDENT MEDICAL
INSURANCE
SHIOW CHONG, M.Sc.
Consultant, Insurance Agent
MONDAY-FRIDAY
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
294-9694
or call
437-0924
for 24 hour recording service
ATTENTION
SKIERS! I
UBC SKI CLUB offers:
Whistler lift passes at $17
(regularly $23)
AMS Cabin Overnight Tickets at $5
(UBC Student regularly at $10-$12)
And many, many more discounts!!
FIND OUT MORE AT SUB 210
M-F       12:30-1:30
(except Thursday) Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 25, 1985
Arts '20 relay damp but fun
All participants will remember
the 66th Annual Arts '20 Relay
Race as one of the wettest in years
but it didn't stop 180 teams from
participating.
"We can't let a little rain stop a
race like this. Rain is nothing," said
Mechanical   Engineering   student
Steven Rogak.
Jim Richardson, EUS Ringer
team captain, wasn't worried about
the rain either. His team led
throughout the race and crossed the
finish line with a time of 31:39:5.
The victors were Paul Rapp, Chris
Armstrong, Steve Chu, Tony Pur-
don, Reider Zapf-gilje, Danley
Chan, Seamus Parker and Jim
Richardson.
The Rowing team (32:02:8) placed second, providing tough competition for the engineers but they
could not break the Ringers' lead.
"We wanted to win but there was
also an element of fun in it," said
Richardson.
Many teams came prepared to
have fun. A Fiji team, decked out in
chef's hats, carried a live lobster to
the finish line. One member of the
Geology team ran with a pink flamingo on his head while a Science
team raced in their labcoats.
The good organization by the Intramural staff helped to make the
race enjoyable for its many participants, in spite of the weather.
The police cooperated by controlling traffic, Metro Transit provided
convenient transportation to and
from all relay points, and students
assisted in directing runners along
the route.
The 1985 Arts '20 Relay Race,
the largest in UBC's history, was a
success. However, racers hope that
it will be drier in future years.
Arts '20 Relay Results
Overall Results:
1. EUS Ringer Team 31:39:5
2. Rowers (Graham Wright) 32:02:8
3. Medicine  "A" 32:49:5
4. Chariots Of Manure 32:59:5
5.  Beta Quick
Category Results:
Faculty: (Men)
Faculty:
(Women)
Fraternity:
Sorority:
Varsity: (Men)
Varsity:
(Women)
Faculty/Staff:
Independent:
(Men)
Independent:
(Women)
Residence:
(Men)
Residence:
(Women)
Community:
EUS Ringer
Medicine "A"
4th Year P.E.
P.E. Fast
EUS1
Nursing Rabbits
Beta Quick
Phi Delt Sloth
Fiji Fast
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Gamma Phi Delta
Alpha Gamma Delta
Rowers (Graham Wright)
Rowing B
Rowing C
Rowing
Swim Team
Ski Team
UBC Aquatic
Corec Staff
B.C. Sports Medicine
Geology
Mawd Squad
EUS Georox
Chariots of Manure
Orienteering
V.0.C
Phrateres I
Phrateres II
SUB Bound
Sherwood Lett Vanier
VST I
3rd Salish Alumni
VST I
Vanier Hamber "B"
Vanier Hamber "A"
Van., Fire Dept, (Terry)
Van., Fire Dept. (Ken)
Pit and Friends
32:59:7
31:39:5
32:49:6
33:55:2
40:26:1
41:07:0
42:20:9
32:59:7
34:33:0
34:55:7
48:25:6
49:07:3
49:08:4
32:02:8
34:29:5
35:33:9
42:15:7
43:51:3
45:19:7
39:45:5
40:06:8
40:58:7
35:02:3
40:04:2
40:56:9
32:59:5
33:40:3
34:15:1
42:30:7
48:42:7
48:44:4
33:28:5
35:00:8
36:18:9
44:23:8
45:25:1
48:45:4
35:31:0
36:45:8
38:14:1
Bears bounce 'Birds
By SVETOZAR KNOTIC
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team lost a pair of games in Alberta
against a strong Golden Bears team
this weekend. The 'Birds were 7-4
lpser^ an Frjgay eight and 8,3 was
ihe score on Saturday evening.
Mike Coflin led the 'Birds with a
hat-trick Friday evening and
followed with another goal on
Saturday night for a total of four.
Coflin, the senior returning forward, scored only one goal all of
last season so this is definitely an
encouraging sign.
"It was one of those times when
absolutely nothing went right.
Everything that could go wrong
really did go wrong and the harder
we tred the worse it got. Too many
individuals were trying to take
charge of the game," said UBC
coach Fred Masuch.
not skate well and when that happens we usually fall apart.
Disorganization and a lethargic
powerplay also caused problems."
Masuch also said the conference
was going to be even this year with
five teams in a constant struggle.
"Some people have underrated this
UBC hockey team but I believe we
will have some surprises for them."
The team has at least seven
players who tip the scales at 200
pounds or more, which will make it
aggressive. "We are a defensively
oriented team that stresses strong
forechecking. Sometimes our size
slows us down but I hope that this
will be a more offensively oriented
team with all round scoring this
year," he said.
The 'Birds will host The University of Calgary Dinosaurs for a pair
of games starting at 7:30 this
weekend. Masuch said "Calgary is
probably the most offensively
talented team in the league. Yet
their defense is somewhat suspect
and they can be physically taken out
of the game."
Other players who performed
well were Mark Trotzuk with three
assists, "tough guy" Steve La-
pointe (57 penalty minutes in seven
games) with two assists and the big
rookie from Powell River Keith Abbott who had two assists.
Despite the losses Masuch was
optimistic about the future.
"Alberta has not lost yet this
season; I mean they have beat
everyone. We did not play as well as
we could have this weekend. We did
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COSTUME CONTEST
$100.00 1st Prize Each Night
Advance Tickets: $6.00       Doors: 7:30
AMS Box Office or EUS Rep.

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