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The Ubyssey Feb 25, 2010

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Array The only country to destroy Russia after defeating Germany SINCE 1918
It ain't darts,
archery or
biathlon...
Shorn me the money!
Mahony & Sons
50 % increase in business
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Story on page 6.
THURSDAY   __^ ^m
2010.02.Z5
WEATHER @ UBC
26 RAIN
27 CLOUDY
28 SHOWERS
CANADA MEDAL COUNT
©      ©      ©
7        6       2
OLYMPIC BRIEFS
FOUR MEDALS FOR CANADA ON
WEDNESDAY
The Canadian Olympic Team
took home four medals on
Wednesday—one gold, two
silver and one bronze.
Canadian Clara Hughes won
a bronze medal in the women's
5000m long-track speed skating
event on Wednesday afternoon,
reported The Province.
The women's team won silver in the 3000m short track
speed skating relay because
the Korean team was disqualified. The women's bobsled
team took home gold and silver in the two-person bobsled
relay.
Canada is now in fourth
place in the medal standings.
HOCKEY GAME HAD MOST
VIEWERS IN SPORTS HISTORY
Last Sunday's Canada vs US
hockey game had a record-
breaking average of 10.6 million
viewers, making it "the most-
watched sports program in
Canadian history," according to
The Globe and Mail.
The number beats the previous record of 10.3 million viewers for the 2002 Salt Lake City
Canada vs US gold medal hockey game.
VANOC CEASES CBC'S
FLAG DISTRIBUTION
CBC was banned by VANOC
from distributing Canadian flags
to passersby, according to CTV.
Although no confirmation
has been made, one possible
breach is against having the
CBC corporate logo at the back
of the flags. The IOC regulations prohibit non-sponsored
"advertising or other publicity"
in Olympic venues and competition areas.
Olympic officials also have
said that the CBC's Canadian
flags may have breached the
"Canadian flag etiquette" that
does not approve putting alterations on the flag.
CBC has agreed to halt the
flag distribution.
CANADA LINE TO BE OPEN 24
HOURS
The Canada Line will be open 24
hours this Sunday, reported The
Vancouver Sun.
TransLink said that this
change is so travelers can
leave Vancouver after the
Olympics are over. Officials are
predicting that YVR will see up
to 39,000 travelers on Monday.
Richmond stations south of
Bridgeport will close at their
normal times.
—Sarah Chung 2/UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.02.25
FEBRUARY 25, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XLIV
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nulti7nedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
The implications of electronic models developed by Keegan Bursaw, Michael Thibault,
Geoff Lister and Anthony Goertz have been
far-reaching and pervasive. The notion that
computational biologists synchronize with
signed technology has generally been well-
received by Kai Green, Sarah Chung, Jonny
Wakefield, Bryce Warnes and Oana Sandhu
A structured obstacle in artificial intelligence
is Aaron Lao. Thus, "smart" archetypes and
constant-time models are never at odds with
Nick Knoop, Cynthia Khoo, Gerald Deo, Trevor Record and Erica Baker. Game-theoretic
systems are particularly importantwhen
it comes to Ben Amundson, Kasha Chang,
Viktoria Lotz, Austin Holm and Brendan
Albano's analysis ofthe UNIVAC computer.
Paul Bucci, Virginie Menard and Katarina
Grgic withhold a more thorough discussion
due to space constraints.
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^10fj%
University     'reeycledpaper
Press \__]Q
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 km. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition, $21,000. Contact calvin.
magic32@gmail. com.
Vansterdam Clothing original
weed t-shirts! Coupon code
20% off: 'UBCTOKES'. For
more info, visit vansterdam-
clothing.com.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm,
SUB 24.
BRIGHT LIGHT TO SHOWCASE ART
AND EVENTS DURING THE 2010
WINTER GAMES • A series of temporary public art works and
events during the Vancouver
2010 Olympics and Paralympics
will feature a collection of 14
commissioned projects during
the 2010 Winter Games. The
project is a joint effort of artists
and arts organizations based in
the Downtown Eastside, who
are collaborating to produce installations and events that will
light up the neighbourhood
and showcase the community's cultural vitality. • Runs until
Sunday, Feb. 28, all day, Carrall
Street Greenway
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC
&MEAL* Like to play music? Just
want to listen? Looking for a
sense of community? This is for all
members of the UBC community who want to have a good meal
and great conversation. All meals
are home-cooked and are vegetarian-friendly • Every Monday,
6:30pm-8:30pm, Chapel of the
Epiphany (6030 Chancellor Blvd),
for more info e-mail revnathan-
wright@mac.com.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run or walk the UBC REC
Noon "Fun" Run, hosted bythe
UBC REC Health Promotions
Department which takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on a
course ranging from 3 to 5km. •
Every Thursday, 12:30pm, meeting outside the doors of the
Student Rec Centre.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT •
Regent College Lookout Gallery
presents Tantramar Gothic,
a collection of work by Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
THE SECRETS OF TRADITIONAL
ITALIAN CUISINE • This course
takes you into the kitchens of Italian regions such
as Lombardy, Piedmont
and Tuscany to sample pasta, pizza, antipasti and risotto made the right way-
fresh fish and shellfish,
hearty treatments of meat
and game and irresistible
gelato. Course materials, a
chef's apron and five multi-
course meals are included
in the course fee. • Runs
from Mar. 3-31, 5:30 pm-
8:30pm, Food, Nutrition and
Health (FNH) Building, $525,
includes course materials and
five multi-course meals.
ENJOY THE OLYMPICS ON BIG
SCREENS AT THE GLOBAL LOUNGE •
Free coffee, tea and hot chocolate provided to help you cheer!
• Every day until Sunday, Feb.
28, 12pm-5pm, Marine Drive
Residence, Tower 1.
MONDAY, MAR. 1
UNDERSTANDING WINE: AN
INTRODUCTION (PART 1) • A wine
instructor provides an introduction to the world of wine.
The instructor will be available for wine consultation for
a half-hour after the end of
each class. Each participant
receives a starter kit, consisting of six wine tasting glasses.
Learn how to shop and read label information, discover how
wines age and learn how to
choose wines to pair with different foods. • Runs until Mar.
29, 6pm-8:30pm, Room 102,
Ponderosa Annex C, $395.
TUESDAY, MAR. 2
EXPLORING CULTURE THROUGH
CULINARY ARTS* Join UBC instructors as they help you explore the history and culture of
their countries through group
restaurant outings and discussions about your dining experiences. These courses are offered in English. The fee includes lectures, four dinners at
various restaurants and all taxes and gratuities. • Runs until Mar. 30, 6:30pm-7:30pm,
first class meets in Buchanan D
Building, $325 and tax.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 3
WEDNESDAY NOON HOURS:
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY STRING
QUARTET WITH DAVID HARDING •
Mendelssohn, String Quintet,
Op. 87, as well as Klezmer and
East European folk music •
12pm-1pm, Recital Hall, UBC
Music Building, $4 at the door.
SELF-TRANSLATION AND OTHER-
TRANSLATION ACROSS ENEMY
LINES: PALESTINIAN AND ISRAELI
VARIATIONS*Carol Bardenstein,
Department of Near Eastern
Studies, University of Michigan
AU student Marc in Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Make it happen with transfer credit from Athabasca University.
■ At Athabasca University, our transfer credits can help you expand your academic options. Just ask
Marc, who is on track to finish his degree at an Ontario university a year early. He's doing this
by taking some AU courses online during the summer while he works full-time, and is applying his AU
course credits towards his degree. ■ AU offers over 700 courses delivered online and at a distance.
And our flexible start times mean you can fit your course work into your schedule. "Transferability.
Another reason why AU stands out as a global leader in distance learning excellence.
standout
www.athabascau.ca/standout
1-800-788-9041
Athabasca University^
will explore the portrays of
Palestinians in literary and
filmic representations (both
Israeli and Palestinian) and
to a more limited degree, the
phenomenon of Jewish characters translated into Arabic/
Palestinian terms in Palestinian
literary and other representations. • 5pm-6pm, Coach
House, Green College, 6201
Cecil Green Park Road, free.
WORK YOUR BA: T0ASTMASTERS •
The ability to communicate effectively gets you noticed in
life and work. Get your public
speaking skills up to speed with
this workshop that focuses on
applying practical strategies to
help you become a more effective and engaging public speaking. Learn the Toastmasters
method and from the experience of veteran speakers. •
lpm-2pm, Angus 426.
THUESDAY, MAR. 4
IDAN RAICHEL PROJECT • The Idan
Raichel Project changed the face
of Israeli popular music. The
blend of African, Latin American,
Caribbean and Middle Eastern
sounds, coupled with a spectacular live show, has enchanted audiences worldwide. • 8pm, Chan
Shun Concert Hall, tickets starting
at $41.
FRIDAY, MAR. 5
THE CAVE SINGERS WITH
DUCHESS AND THE DUKE,
M00ND0GGIES • Come to the
Pit Pub for an evening of folk
music with Seattle's Cave
Singers, and special guests
Duchess and the Duke, and
Moondoggies. • 8pm, the Pit
Pub, $ 16. Tickets can be purchased at The Outpost and
ticketweb.com.
GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN
LATIN AMERICA: READING
& DISCUSSION SESSION ON
"STORIES OF RACE, GENDER AND
CLASS" • The Liu Research
Group on Gender and
Sexuality in Latin America
aims to contribute to ongoing discussions about Latin
American gender relations,
sexual politics and feminist
theories by bringing together
graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and faculty interested in these issues. • 4pm-
6pm, Liu Institute for Global
Issues, 3rd Floor Boardroom,
refreshments provided.
FRIDAY, MAR. 12
A CONCERT FOR HAITI • Come enjoy an evening of live music performed by unique local artists.
Proceeds will go towards supporting the ongoing medical relief efforts in Haiti. • 6pm reception, 7:30pm concert, Graham
House, Green College, $20
tickets.
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 17
IMAGINE YOUR ARTS MAJOR 2010 •
Attend the Imagine Your Arts
Major Fair! Join professors,
department advisors and student leaders for an amazing
opportunity to have all your
academic questions explored
and answered! Workshops
by Go Global, Arts Academic
Advising, Career Services,
and Arts Co-op will be held
from Mar. 8-12. Learn about
potential careerpaths, gaining
work experience before graduation, studying abroad, and-
making sure that all your choices are right for your degree!
Registration is now open. •
11am-2pm, SUB Ballroom, for
more info, go to arts.ubc.ca/
students/iyam. 2010.02.25/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/3
OLYMPICS
POLL: WILL CANADA "OWN THE PODIUM"?
An Ipsos Reid poll has found that expectations for
Canadian athletes have decreased, but the province's
excitement towards the Olympic Games is still high, reported The Vancouver Sun.
Over 1300 British Columbians were polled online
from February 21 to 23.
EDITOR SAM/
> news@ubyssey.ca
Poll results:
• 73 per cent are still
excited about the Olympics
• 57 per cent have been to an Olympic activity in
Downtown Vancouver or an event
• Only 1 per cent feel that Canadians will "Own the
Podium"
• 53 per cent feel that Canada will finish worse than
third overall in the total standings
• 83 per cent think that the death of luger Nodar
Kumaritashvili was a large controversy at this year's
Games
Ashleigh Mclvor once described ski cross, the Olympics' newest event, as "motocross on skis." KEEGAN BURSAW PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Mclvor takes home gold
Former UBC student wins gold in first-ever Olympic ski cross competition
TAGH SIRA
olympicsedi tor® ubyssey.ca
The name Ashleigh Mclvor is
now synonymous with the sport
of ski cross. The former UBC student and Whistler resident won
the first gold medal ever awarded at the Winter Olympics for
the sport in Tuesday's finals.
The Ubyssey spoke with Mclvor
after her race.
UBYSSEY: The pressure must
be intense at the top of the hill
right before you run. How do
you deal with it?
MCIVOR: I just think about a
certain feature on the course
that I feel good about. I think
about stuff that has nothing
to do with the race that makes
me happy. Then I'll do a visualization [ofthe course].
U: How was it competing on
your home mountain with the
home crowd? [Editor's note:
Mclvor grew up in Whistler. She
started skiing—down the stairs
at her house—at the age of 2]
M: I couldn't hear the crowd
up at the top of the run, and
during the run, you're just so
focused.
U: Have government funded programs like "Own the
Podium" helped you?
M: A lot of us have been racing ski cross for years before
it was an Olympic sport. And
it's tough traveling to Europe
by yourself, tuning your own
skis, not having a coach to go
to the coaches' meeting....It's
really nice to [now] be able to
focus on our training and our
competition.
U: How do you feel about competing in a sport that hasn't had
very much exposure, especially
in hockey-crazed Canada?
M: That's the exciting part of it.
Being a part ofthe Olympics is
just going to expose the sport
to so many more people, and
everyone who sees it loves it.
It's pretty exciting to watch.
U: How did you get into ski
cross?
M: I grew up racing alpine
and I broke my leg when I was
16, skied powder for a couple of years and then some
friends encouraged me to get
involved, because the women's field wasn't so deep at
that point. There were some
local races, and it looked fun,
so I just jumped in.
U: Balancing sport with school
must have been a challenge,
correct?
M: It didn't work out very well.
School has been on hold for a
little while because my number one priority has been [ski
cross] now.
U: What are your future plans
in the sport?
M: Go finish the World Cup circuit and hopefully move up a
spot. [Editor's note: Mclvor is
currently ranked second in the
World Cup circuit.]
U: So now that you're all done
for the Games, what Olympic
events do you want to see?
M: I want to watch the slalom
up in Whistler. Hopefully Mike
Janyk does well. tl
SIDE NOTE
Mclvor took an English
Composition class in 2003
with UBC Professor Lindsey
McMaster.
Students had to pick
their own essay topics, and
Mclvor chose to write a letter to the IOC about why ski
cross should be an Olympic
sport.
"Ashleigh made a persuasive argument for her paper
at the time for her sport,"
McMaster said. "This paper
was original; no other student had thought to write a
letter to an official body."
Mclvor told McMaster
about her interest in sports.
However, the professor said
that "at the time, she was
just another student with
student issues."
McMaster has been mostly just following Mclvor during  the Games.
"I don't follow sports."
said McMaster. "Ashleigh
was the only person I was interested in watching...Today I
got to see her live, which was
nice." til
Playing
with the
big boys
TAGH SIRA
olympicsedi tor@u byssey. ca
Over two thousand media personnel converged in Vancouver
two weeks ago from around the
world—writing, photographing
or providing technical support
to help showcase the Olympics.
To put this all into perspective, I have gone from being the
editor of a failing satirical campus publication to rubbing shoulders with the creme de la creme
of media from all over the world
in less than a week.
Who would have thought that a
few high school Japanese courses
would ever come in handy? Due
to that obscure training, I was
able to talk with a Japanese radio
commentator on my way to the
Richmond Speed Skating Oval.
Though the conversation was
muddled and broken, we still
connected.
We went for sushi in
Richmond. He had heard a lot of
positive things about our version
of the Japanese favourite, but the
place in the press food court is
like the Honour Roll in the SUB—
decent, quick and cheap.
I also met two writers, one from
Serbia and the other from the
Ukraine. We talked about the impact our writing was having on our
readers. Both of them write several stories a day that get put in several national papers and get used
for TV reports and radio shows.
In Canada, your work is drowned
out by the sheer volume of other
Canadian media outlets, but having only one source in these countries makes that individual's work
very important.
Another friend I've met is
Phred, a journalist with The Wall
Street Journal. She saved me a
seat at the Pacific Coliseum, as
there were only a limited number of tabled press spots.
Aside from making international connections, I have felt
the sheer joy that comes from
breaking a story. I was able to
find out about the protests filed
against gold medalist luger Amy
Williams' helmet before any media advisories were posted. I
wrote the story and posted it immediately after the announcement was made by the jury
official.
I feel extremely privileged to
have been given the opportunity
to write not only for The Ubyssey
but also to have my stories distributed through the Canadian
University Press to campuses
across the country. I hope I have
been able to provide another
point of view from the one told
by the CTV media consortium.
However, without the help
of my fellow journalists, I
wouldn't have been able to have
this unique perspective on the
Games. Thank you. tl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.02.25
knock their rocks off IA look at curling
CURLING.
BROOMy^SKIP
~~TEE
GENTXEMAN
"PEBBLES*
OANA SANDU
Contributor
Curling has been an Olympic
event since 1998, and for first-
time viewers, the game can be
confusing. Curling is a game
where ends take the place of
periods, small rubber pucks
are replaced with huge granite rocks and the team wields
brooms instead of sticks.
Curling also is more accessible than hockey. Anyone can
play, unlike hockey—from juniors to grey-haired seniors.
There's a code of etiquette, and
it's tradition to take the losing team out for beer after the
game.
HOW IT'S DONE
A curling match has ten
rounds, known as ends.
During each end, teams alternate throwing the rocks—also
known  as  stones—with  each
member throwing two rocks
each for a total of eight rocks
per team. Once all the rocks
are thrown, the end is scored.
The team with the rock closest to the button (located at
the centre of the house, or the
three circles at which points
are scored) is awarded one
point for each of its own stones
that is closer than the opponent's closest rock.
To  deliver a rock towards
the house, a curler will push
ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
against the hacks, or footrests,
to slide along the ice with the
rock in grip, then release it—before passing the hog line—with
a counter- or clockwise spin depending on the way they want
it to 'curl.'
Sweepers evaluate how fast
the stone is going as well as
how it is curling, and use their
brooms to adjust the path and
weight (or force behind the
rock) of the stone. Sweeping
hard to clear the ice in front of
the stone allows the stone to go
faster, but reduces the amount
of curl on it. The 'skip' or captain determines most of the
strategy of placing each rock,
and throws the team's last two
stones of an end. The last rock
of an end is referred to as the
hammer, and possession of the
hammer provides a team with
a strategic advantage throughout the end. The hammer goes
to the team that did not score a
point during the previous end,
unless no points were scored,
in which case the hammer stays
with the team who had it.
STRATEGY
Curling is a game of precision.
For optimal control of each shot,
the ice has to be at the right temperature and the pebbles—which
are water droplets frozen onto
the ice surface—must be evenly distributed. The uneven surface of the pebbles is what allows rocks to curl and also allows
sweeping to change the surface
ofthe ice.
More important than the
sheer physicality of placing the
rocks is the strategy behind the
placement. A talented skip will
treat the house like a chessboard, examining strategies and
counterstrategies for not only
the upcoming turn but the ones
ahead, while retaining the ability to change strategies in case a
draw is missed or a guard is rendered useless. Combining wits,
will and teamwork, it's easy to
see why curling is popular in
Canada and becoming more
popular worldwide, tl
—With files from Aaron Lao
TYPES OF SHOTS
GUARDS: generally a rock placed in front of
the house, used to protect your own rocks.
DRAWS: shots thrown into the house; these
are the ones that score points.
FREEZES: when you draw right up to another
rock, so they are touching. These are really
hard, but very useful, because they're difficult to remove without affecting other rocks,
and they can be used to direct rocks.
TAKE-OUTS: a fast rock used to remove other
rocks from play.
PEELS: a strategic shot used to remove
guards and clear the front of the house; both
the guard and the moving rock should go out
of play.
RUNBACKS: when you hit a guard back in other to take out a rock in the house (also known
as the dramatic circus shots!).
TAP-BACKS: when you hit a rock in the house
back a bit so you are in a better position.
These are useful because you can then use
the stone you knocked back to prevent the
one you threw from being taken out.
RAISES: when your own rock bumps another
so that it enters the house, or becomes closer to the button.
—Aaron Lao
ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/
THE UBYSSEY
Curlers win without funding
OANA SANDU
Contributor
Aaron Lao curls for the
Vancouver Curling Club. The
Ubyssey asked him to recount
his love for the game and
talk about Canada's Olympic
performance.
UBYSSEY: Where do you curl?
AARON LAO: I curl mainly out
ofthe Vancouver Curling Club
(VCC), a small club located
right be side the Vancouver
Olympic Centre (VOC) where
Olympic curling is currently
taking place. Next year, the
old club will be torn down
and I'll be curling out of the
new community centre the
VOC will be converted to. I've
curled at clubs all around the
Lower Mainland, including
Marpole, Richmond, North-
shore, Langley, Pitt Meadows
and Golden Ears, either facing other teams, attending
clinics or helping to teach
people.
U: How did you start curling,
and what do drives you as a
curler?
L: I started curling after watching the Winter Olympics in
Salt Lake (in which we finished
a much-too-low second). It
excited me because it was so
strategic and precise. I think
it also suited me because it's
not so much about brute force
and jostling your way in; there
are strict etiquette rules! I
started with a junior development program at the VCC, and
I really enjoyed it. Curling, like
you mentioned, is very social,
and clubs are always open and
welcoming.
What drives me as a curler is
simply a passion for the game.
I love the strategy, and the dynamics of playing on a team.
I love playing with my teammates—one of them goes to
UBC, actually. Being on a small
team, you form a special dynamic, where you can have fun
together, and push each other
on a competitive level. Curling
is also extremely fascinating
once you understand the game
and its nuances; I love watching the complexities of elite-
level games.
U: How do you feel about Canada's Olympic curlers?
L: I'd like to point out that
Canada's curlers do much,
much better than that other
national on-ice favourites.
[We won] gold in Torino...and
both our teams beat the US
this year, without being paid
tens of millions of dollars per
year, tl 2 0 10. 0 2.2 5/ UBYSSEY.CA/ OLYM PICS/5
Its hard to be an Olympics Scrooge
SAMANTHAJUNG
news@ubyssey.ca
Reverend   Steven    Epperson.
GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
Reverend Steven Epperson
of the Unitarian Church of
Vancouver (UCV) deiivered
a sermon to his congregation fast Sunday caiied "Why
do the Oiympics Drive us
Crazy?"
Now in his eighth year
as parish minister at UCV,
Epperson gave The Ubyssey his
thoughts on the 2010 Winter
Games, how they compare to
the 2002 Games in Salt Lake
City, and what it means to be an
'Olympics Scrooge.'
UBYSSEY: What is an 'Olympics
Scrooge'?
EPPERSON: Think of a piano: an
Olympics Scrooge would play
basically one note, one chord
over and over. And that is, the
Olympics,   for   whatever   the
reason, are a colossal waste of
money. They're totally bad...it's
all about multinational corporations...and on and on it goes.
Olympics, for
whatever the
reason, are a
colossal waste of
money.
U: In your sermon you said that
you felt like a "shuttlecock batted back and forth from one
mental and emotional state
to the next." Can you explain
this?
E: On the one hand, there is
Steve Nash running just outside my office window carrying the Olympic torch...I think
the world would be a flatter,
greyer, poorer place without
top-level sporting events like
the one we're hosting right
now.
[On the other hand,] Pete
McMartin in The Vancouver Sun
said, 'I loathe the Olympics.'
And I do [agree]—it's a colossal waste of money, when you
consider what $6 billion could
have been spent [on]....in our
city and in our province.
Six billion dollars for a 17-
day international sporting
event in the province that has
thousands of people homeless, has the highest poverty
rate in the country, [and has]
the highest rate of children living in poverty, when we need
20,000 units of social housing
in the Vancouver area...when
we could have been spending
money to alleviate homelessness, provide living wages—
that's the kind of thing that
drives me crazy.
We know that the money's
there....The problem is priorities: municipal, provincial,
federal governments are telling us very clearly that their
priorities are not being directed towards living wages,
a strong health system, mass
transit, housing, but instead
are being dedicated to putting up a nice road to a posh
ski resort and building another convention centre [costing]
almost a billion dollars that no
one needs or wants.
$6 billion for a 17-
day international
sporting event in
the province that
...has the highest
poverty rate in the
country
U: Do you think the Olympics
could be put on with less
money?
E: In my ideal world, the summer
Olympics should take place every summer in Greece, and they
should take place every winter
in some place like Lillehammer
in Norway to decommodify it,
and also to take out the whole
bidding war aspect to it. Of
course, if you just identified two
places for Summer and Winter
Games, then there wouldn't be
all of this international glitz
and bidding and inflation and
all of that.
U: Do you feel what you called
in your sermon the "spirit of
the game" has been lost in the
Olympics?
E: A lot of time I think that it
gets obscured....by the treacly hype. It gets obscured by
the commodification of the
Olympics by the multinational
corporations and their government enablers.
What was Canada's "spirit of the game," as identified by the Canadian Olympic
Committee? It was to own the
podium....The ideal has to do
with the joy of the sport, mutual respect amongst competitors. There is a sport out there
that embodies what I think are
the real ideals ofthe Olympics,
and one that always passes under the radar of the media.
U: And you feel that this is ultimate frisbee?
E: There's athleticism, there's
competition, there's athletic prowess. Wonderful people
being able to play a fabulous
competitive game, but without
the kind of win-at-all-costs, aggression, people busting each
other, it's not commodified,
instead it's governed by the
players themselves. There are
no referees, people call themselves on their own infractions
of the rules.
U: Do you feel this is something
feasible to strive towards for
the Olympics?
E: I don't think you'll ever see
ultimate in the Olympics...
because       players       govern
themselves. I don't think ultimate players would even go
that way, because of how corn-
modified the Olympic sports
have become.
U: You lived in Salt Lake City
when they hosted their 2002
Olympics. Can you make
some comparisons between
the Games at Salt Lake and
the Games in Vancouver?
E: I've heard from a couple of
people who took their children Downtown during the
weekend. And their children
just loved it....It is an extraordinary show, an extraordinary production. It makes
their city unusual, like a welcoming and festive place.
That was the experience that
our children had when we
were living in Salt Lake.
The thing that really struck
me, both when the Olympics
were proposed for Salt Lake City
in the early 90s and when the
Olympics were proposed...here
in Vancouver, lots of promises
were made, lots of assurances,
lots of social justice benefit....
Most of those kind of promises
were broken, both in Salt Lake
City and in Vancouver. That's
one of the very disappointing
experiences of deja vu that I
went through.
U: So do you feel thatyou are an
'Olympics Scrooge'?
E: Not a scrooge, because I
keep thinking of scrooge as
a one-note misanthrope. An
Olympics critic? Yes, by all
means. A resident of the city
who thinks that our priorities were misplaced and our
resources were misspent, tl
—With files from Stanley Tromp
<&
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PRESENTS
SPORTandSOCIETY
Join us online or in person for provocative dialogues with Olympic & Paralympic athletes who have used
their celebrity to make a difference in the world—distinguished speakers will join in a panel debate.
<
Z
5
8PM
'•;•.
SPORT AND INCLUSION
Are Major Sporting Events Inclusive of First
Nations and Other Groups?
WANEEK HORN-MILLER - former Olympic athlete,
activist, speaker and television personality
SHARON AND SHIRLEY FIRTH are the first aboriginal
women to be represented at the Olympic Games,
VALERIE JEROME was a membe' of Canada's 1960
Olympic and 1966 Commonwealth Games teams.
OC
<
z
10ePM
SPORT AND CHALLENGE
Is Anything Possible?
RICK HANSEN - CO., O.B.C., President and CbO ofthe
Rick Hansen Foundation.
DR. BRUCE MCMANUS - Professor, Department of
Pathology and baboratory Medicine, at UBC.
PAT JARVIS - former Paralympic athlete and member
of the International Paralympic Committee,
UBC
a place of mind       THE GLOBE AND MAIL«
W
straight
oc
<
Z
iOspm   ___^r
DRT, LEGACY AND A
SPORT, LEGACY AND
SUSTAINABILITY Is it Worth It?
DR. BRUCE KIDD - former Olympic athlete and
Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Physica
Education at the University of Toronto,
DR. JAMES TANSEY is a UBC expert on
sustainability, green business, carbon irading and
corporate social responsibility. He is tracking the
carbon footprint of 2010 Winter Games,
DEREK WYATT - elected Member of Parliament
in the U.K. and Chair of the All Party Parliamentary
bondon 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Group,
TICKETS $10 available through Ticketmaster—www.ticketmaster.ca
ALL EVENTS AT THE CHAN CENTRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
except
Peak Performance, a free event at SFU Harbour Centre. For more
infcrmation on Peal; Performance visit: www.heartancllung.ca/peak
PODCASTS featured at www.theglobeandmail.com/intellectual-muscle
now available:
Sport, Ethics and Technology: Is High Performance Sport Inconsistent
with Ideals and Ethics? (keynote Richard Pound)
Sport, Peace and Development: How Can Sport Contribute to
Positive Social Change? (keynote Stephen Lewis, Johann Clav Koss)
More information:
www.communityaffairs.uac.ca or www.chancentre.com
business.humber.ca
JOIN US, OR ELSE WE'LL HUG YOU. (WE'LL DO THAT EVEN IF YOU JOIN US.)
SUB 24. 6/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/2010.02.25
Moir and Virtue take gold for Canadian supporters
CYNTHIA KHOO
ckhoo@ubyssey.ca
Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir
are Canada's golden couple, as
much for their personalities
and grace in victory as for the
gold medal in ice dance that
they won Monday, with the final of three flawlessly executed
routines.
The pair are the first North
American team to win gold in
Olympic ice dance at ages 20
and 22, respectively.
"Emotionally,
the Canadian
fans really drew
another level of
performance out of
US.
TESSA VIRTUE
OLYMPIC ICE DANCE SKATER
"I feel great," Moir declared
as he sank into an armchair onstage after entering with Virtue
to a roomful of cheers and applause. He was clearly thrilled
about having won, and maintained no pretensions of hiding
Moir and Virtue are the first Canadians to win Olympic gold in ice dance. GERALD DEO PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
it. In response to a question on
Olympic tattoos, he replied, "I
don't need a tattoo, I think this
[medal] might just do. I think
I'm going to wear this around
my neck for at least the next
couple weeks."
In their opening remarks,
both Virtue and Moir emphasized that their  victory was
one for Canada, and one they
look forward to sharing with
all Canadians. Moir gave credit to the "Own the Podium"
program for giving his family financial assistance in support of his ice dancing career. The program has recently come under fire for its underwhelming results.
"This has been absolutely incredible—just the perfect story
for us here in Vancouver to be
competing in Canada at our first
Olympic Games," said Virtue.
"We came in so prepared, but to
lay down three skates like that
is so satisfying [and] special to
share it with Canada." When
asked  if their  free  skate  to
Mahler's Symphony No. 5 was
a personal best, Moir replied,
"Emotionally, the Canadian
fans really drew another level
of performance out of us."
The pair remained confident
despite some criticisms from
their opponents.
According to The Vancouver
Sun, the Russian and Italian teams
said that "they are very technical and don't really 'dance' on the
ice." Moir pointed out that the two
of them, now accused of not being
true dancers, used to be accused
of being simply dancers and weak
technically on the ice.
"I think we're the most pure
dancers in the sport," said Moir.
"We're not really too concerned
with what they say. For our image, we're dancers—there's no
doubt in my mind."
Virtue and Moir concluded
with final words to Canadians
everywhere, citing them as the
driving force behind the ice
dancers' success.
"That's why we do it," said
Moir. "This is for them, this
is for all Canadians, this is for
kids coming up and just getting into sports, and this is for
the 99-year-old grandpa sitting
at home turning off hockey to
watch ice dance."
"This is Canada's medal." tl
The ups and downs
of Olympic business
NICKKN00P
Contributor
With over two million visitors
expected to be in Vancouver
during the 2010 Olympic
Games, one would think that
local businesses would be seeing a dramatic jump in sales.
However, this is not the case
for some shop owners.
Amad Dhanoya, Manager
at the Blenz Coffee and Tea
in the new Wesbrook Village
on 16th and Wesbrook, told
The Ubyssey that in anticipation for the Olympics, he had
hired one more person, just
in case, and stocked up. But
his store has not experienced
much change in sales and instead, saw a decrease in the
number of customers during
the Olympics.
"There is a venue here, but
there is no bus stop here, so
there's not as many people,"
Dhanoya said. Since the beginning of February, all buses have been rerouted away
from the roundabout at 16th
and Wesbrook. Security checkpoints in the area have diverted much traffic from the area
as well.
VANOC has also contributed to hurting business, said
Dhanoya, as the Olympic
Organizing Committee has
disallowed Dhanoya from putting up his signs during the
Games. Without signs, he says
that it's tough for people driving by to know that his store
exists. "[It] just looks like a
construction site," he said.
He thinks the restriction is
because the roundabout at
16th and Wesbrook is so close
to the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre.
Mario's Gelati at 88 East
1st Avenue has also seen a significant drop in sales since
the Olympics have come to
Vancouver, according to The
Georgia Straight. The store has
had to deal with large fences, cement barricades, and a
barrage of security personel
constantly diverting traffic and
the public away.
"I feel like a prisoner in my
own home," Mario Loscerbo,
the shop's owner, told the
Straight. He has threatened to
sue the City of Vancouver and
VANOC over the extreme drop
in business.
On the other hand, Mahoney
& Sons at UBC has felt a positive influence on business.
Manager Graeme Moore said
that it really started the night
that the torch ran through campus, as the path it took could
be seen from inside the bar, as
well as the patio seating lining
the front sidewalk.
"It was really the only place
you could grab a drink and
watch [the torch]," he said.
Since then, the bar has benefited from crowds coming to and
from Games. "We're busy mostly post-game, and mosdy after
the 12 and 2:30 games," Moore
said. Since then, co-owner
Paddy Mahoney said that business is up 50 per cent these two
weeks.
Unlike Blenz, Mahoney's
signs scattered around the corners of their intersection are
still up, notifying Olympic spectators that a cold brew is only
"50 meters away."
As more students return to
campus in the coming days,
however, both establishments
expect to return to steadier
sales and busier tables.
Dhanoya is also hopeful
for the next few weeks as
he thinks that the increase
in games at UBC during the
Paralympics will bring in
more people.
Moore thinks Mahoney's
will continue to stay busy, as
the bar has been at capacity for every Canadian hockey
game to date.
"UBC is sort of a tourist destination, so when people are finished Downtown, they'll want
to come and see campus," he
said. U
Does a home advantage mean
more medals?
SARAH CHUNG
schung@ubyssey.ca
Playing at home may not be
advantageous for Canadian
Olympians, suggests Doug
Clement, a UBC professor
Emeritus and BC Sports Hall
of Fame Inductee.
Expectations were high for
Canadians five years ago when
Canada initiated a $110 million "Own the Podium" program to pursue the "top medal-winning nation" for hosting the 2010 Winter Games.
But as of Wednesday evening,
with only four more days left
in the Games, Canada is fourth
in the medal count with seven
gold, six silver and two bronze
medals.
"I don't think they are doing as well as they may have in
Torino at this point," Clement
told The Ubyssey on Monday.
The 2006 Games in Torino
Olympics saw Canada take
home 24 medals, just one medal away from placing second in
the world ranking with the US.
According to Clement, the
overwhelming pressure from
the home crowd may have
caused Canadian athletes to do
worse in their Games. "I think
it's part of the game," he said.
"I think it's inherent in playing
for the home crowd that there is
a greater interest and sort of intent on their part to have their
favorites win...that puts pressure on them."
Clement also said the home
team no longer has that advantage of using home facilities
as many athletes around the
world try to duplicate the conditions that exist at competition sites. "[Athletes are doing]
all sorts of maneuvers trying to
improve their performance in
the site where the competition
will occur," Clement explained.
"Sleeping in controlled-altitude
tents that reduce the air pressure and oxygen content while
they are sleeping, for example."
Many athletes try
to duplicate the
conditions that
exist at competition
sites.
DOUG CLEMENT
UBC PROFESSOR EMERITUS
However, head coach of
UBC's women's ice hockey
team, Nancy Wilson, said it all
depends on the athlete. "There
are athletes that don't play as
well in front of their family
and friends, but there are other
athletes that really don't play
well if their family and friends
aren't in the stands," she said.
Wilson said most of the athletes she's worked with prefer
playing at home where family
and friends can "cheer on."
Canadian Olympic snow-
boarder and UBC alumna
Alexa Loo falls into that category. "I am proud and excited to be competing in front of
a home crowd. It is great to be
able to share my sport and the
experience of the Games with
all of my friends and family
here at home," she said. The
2008/2009 North American
champion for parallel slalom
will be the first Canadian women athlete to compete in the
parallel giant slalom event on
Friday.
"It is a huge advantage having a home game. I have more
people than ever sharing my
Olympic journey with me as
well as more resources to help
me to achieve the best performance that I can," Loo said.
But Loo accepts that there is
a lot of pressure involved. "With
more support comes more expectations for performance. I
would prefer to have more support and I accept the greater
expectations."
"Olympics: there is no greater pressure in sport!" tl
NEWS BRIEFS
TWO PROFESSORS EARN
$50,000 FELLOWSHIP
Two UBC researchers have
earned 2010 Sloan Research
Fellowships, the US award
that honours emerging North
American scientists, mathematicians and economists.
Joshua Folk, an assistant
professor in the Department
of Physics and Astronomy, and
Omer Angel, an assistant professor in the Department of
Math, were among the seven Canadians out of 118 North
American researchers awarded with $50,000.
Folk is an expert in the
physics of nano structures
and Angel is an expert in
probability.
J-SCH00L STUDENTS
GET OLYMPIC JOBS
The Olympic Games have
strongly benefitted several of
UBC's Journalism students,
who have found Olympic jobs
and interships working at renowned   media   organizations
from around the world, according to the School of Journalism
website.
At NBC, CTV and CBC, students are discovering new
skills to survive in the fast-
paced working environment.
Five UBC Journalism students are working with BC's
radio station, CKNW 980
FM, while several others
are working for CTV News
and CTV Olympics, the official Canadian Olympics
broadcaster.
—Katarina Grgic 2010.02.2 5/UBYSSEY.CA/OLYMPICS/7
Yukon ho!
We re here to dispel the myth that we only have two seasons: winter and bugs."
RIGHT: Can-can dancers show
off their lovely legs
inside Whitehorse
International Airport.
FAR RIGHT: The Mount Sima
Ski Resort boasts an ice tower
for hiking, climbing with picks,
or—as our photo editor
preferred—admiring from afar.
GERALD DEO PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
■
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The SourToe Club is a Dawson City institution, and entry is gained only one way: putting a preserved human toe in your drink and letting it touch your lips. GERALD DEO photos/the ubyssey 8/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/2010.02.25
GAMES
SUSC0MIC.COM, BY MICHAEL BROUND
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DEMOCRATICALLY DISASTROUS DIETS
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tlT lEUBYSSEYc 2010.02.25/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/9
1
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "CHAN DEFENDS HIMSELF FROM CHAMPION'S CRITIQUE [FEB. 22, 2010]":
Plushenko is an over-masculated bitch-figure skating     Even if you can do the quad, if you skate like a donkey
is not about the quad. It was never about the quad,     on skates, you are no figure skater.
and even now the quad is just the sprinkles on top of
the sundae.                                                                            —Tyler [Feb. 23]
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WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
BRENDAN ALBANO PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
SECURITY DOES NOT MAKE US FEEL SECURE
Vancouverites are particularly wary of police. We're not used to
seeing them, and when they are around, it usually doesn't mean
good things. There is no illusion about the friendly, neighbourhood policeman here.
Maybe everyone remembers APEC, the Robson Riot or even the
Gastown riots. Maybe people are wary of being busted for drinking
on the beach again. Maybe people are angry about the Downtown
Eastside. Maybe people simply don't like cops.
There has been a marked increase inpolice and security personnel
in the last few years. A lot of this has been build-up to the Olympics.
We get that. We need to guard the city from terrorist threats, guard
tourists from Vancouver criminals and guard Vancouver businesses from tourist threats. Or something like that.
Does anybody remember 2007 when the Downtown Vancouver
Business Improvement Association (DVBIA) and Genesis Security
Group created the "Downtown Ambassadors" program? There was
a pretty big outcry against the increased surveillance on the streets.
People were afraid of having their civil liberties encroached upon.
Those defending the ambassadors argued that only those who
were doing something reprehensible needed to be worried. The
idea seemed to be to "clean up" the streets, removing unsavory elements from our sidewalks and sending them back to where they
belong.
Now, people hardly notice those security guards. People hardly
even remember that there was any controversy. We've gotten used
to them. And that's just the danger with having so much security in
town—we might start to get used to it.
We at The Ubyssey believe that an increased number of security
personnel does not equal an increase in safety, especially not when
they start to become irrelevant.
So, while all ofthe extra Olympic security personnel has been fine
for the duration ofthe Olympics, when it's over, go home, get a new
job, downsize, whatever. We don't want to get used to constant surveillance, vl
THE VPD GETS NERVOUS WHERE THERE'S TOO MUCH FUN
Last Saturday, the VPD asked the General Manager of the Liquor
Control Bureau to close all Downtown booze retailers at 7pm.
Since then, the VPD has been deciding whether or not to close liquor stores early on a daily basis—they ended the party early on
Sunday, but did not on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.
That's right: Your ability to buy liquor after work now hinges on
the whims of the VPD for the remainder of the Olympics.
The police have claimed that they made the decision based on
the high number of people drinking in public. However, since bars
and other social venues have not had their permits affected, this
doesn't really stop public drunkeness—it just curbs the amount of
drinking on the street that is occurring. In the end, the liquor store
closures really only hurt the people who want to escape the madness
Downtown to watch the Games in a low-key private environment.
Is it really too much to ask that, if the police must regulate fun,
they do it by continuing to get people to pour out their liquor when
in public? There are thousands of extra police, military personnel
and security guards in our city. Further, the CBC reported last week
that the rate of crime has actually plummeted since the Olympics began. Why does a city that has spent close to a billion dollars on security for a two-week party need to close liquor stores early to keep
some revelry in check? vl
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
DISCERNING READERSHIP,
Too Sexy here with yet another
adventure into the maelstrom
of the heart that is UBC. This
week's letter is a premature
eulogy for a post-secondary sex
life that is coming to a close.
Today's correspondent hears
the ticking of their biological
(or social) clock, and fears an
end to the cock, pussy and ass
buffet that is life at university.
But fear not, gentle readership:
Too Sexy will make it all better.
DEAR TOO SEXY,
I'm in my fourth and final year.
Yes, two months until that's it-
no more UBC. Problem is, I've
never dated anyone I didn't
meet through a campus club
or bar.
I'm whoring myself out on
campus because of it. I'm afraid
of my spigot closing, and loins
drying up. Have you ever met
people from off campus? It's so
much harder to find quality because of the [same] age and education range [as you]. Frankly,
Vancouver is a dump for quality people.
What should I do? What do
you do?
Sincerely,
—Getting Ready and Daring
HELLO GRAD,
Ah, the pains of age. In times
past, people usually waited until marriage to mourn their sex
lives. It's nice to know that cultural acceleration has bumped
spigot-closing and loins-drying up a of couple milestones.
Yes, GRAD, we've met people
from off campus. Some of them
are boorish, some are charming
and some regularly stay over at
the Too Sexy house. On average, sure, it can be harder to
find someone off campus. Like
you say, demographic factors
such as age, education, income
level and willingness to get naked and paint other people with
chocolate all make it easier to
find people with whom we have
things in common on campus.
But the thing you need to realize, GRAD, is that your demographic is changing.
Once you graduate,
do you really want
to tie that aging
guy or girl who still
dates freshmen?
Right now, as a university-aged person in the midst
of completing a degree, one
would expect you to be looking for someone of similar age
with a similar life. This pretty much limits your options to
undergrads at UBC, SFU, or a
college student. Of these three,
you probably feel like UBC is
the only one that provides you
with the stream of booty you so
desperately need, but only because that's the one where you
spend all your time and energy.
Once you graduate, do you really want to be that aging guy or
girl who still dates freshmen?
You'll be a fully fledged, workplace-bound young adult. You'll
probably want to find other
people of similar age and lifestyle, and that changes everything. People in your age range
with educations will not be on
campus anymore, they'll be out
making money in companies,
spending it in annoyingly hip
nightclubs and cavorting about
in yoga classes, pottery studios
and on Craigslist.
Don't think of this as leaving the happy hunting ground,
GRAD. Think of this as a fresh
start.
The good spots should be
pretty similar to what they are
on campus. Bars, common interest groups, entertainment
events and pretty much any
place where people can share a
common experience will offer
plenty of opportunity to get to
know people.
It may feel like the numbers
are overwhelmingly against
you, but if you choose your social out goings wisely, you
should end up meeting at least
a few likable people in your preferred demographic. Plenty of
young people, also fresh out of
university, will also be looking
for people to meet and screw
senseless. You'll do just fine.
Don't think of this
as leaving the happy
hunting ground,
GRAD. Think of
this as a fresh start.
As far as Vancouver being
a dump for 'quality' people,
we're really at a loss for words.
We suggest that it is a matter of taste, that yours is sorely lacking.
The only fitting punishment
would be for karma, God or
the flying spaghetti monster to
someday bend your fate to a terrible, dark place. One where everyone has fake tans and stupid accents, you're constantly
being watched by a judgmental
audience and you can't escape
seeing one group of incredibly
shallow people over and over
again.* UBC probably seems
so good because the majority of people tend to have a lot
of things in common with you,
such as age, education, social
class and interests. Those people exist in greater Vancouver
too; they're just mixed in with a
whole mess of other people, tl
Well, we're afraid that's it for
this week. Questions sent to
toosexy@ubyssey.ca or the
form at ubyssey.ca/ideas will
be answered in column form, e-
mail response or, ifyou're lucky,
a series of haiku.
*Members of the Too Sexy
house have gad nightmares like
this ever since seeing Jersey
Shore.
STREETERS
HAVE YOU CHANGED YOUR
SCHEDULE FOR THE OLYMPICS?
BEN KING Maple Ridge
"I've been [Downtown] a couple times before with friends
and family, but haven't taken
time off."
EMILY ZAVALETA Maple Ridge
"Everybody just comes united to cheer for our team....
Everyone's so happy, friendly
and cheerful, and so that's the
environment I'd like to be in.
Like one time, everybody started singing 'Oh Canada,' and it
was so cool."
DAN MEI Vancouver
"I haven't been able to. It's too
busy and we have customers
everyday..! have  30 people
line up, and there's a line up
all day. I work 15 hours every
day."
JEWELL FRIESEN Langley
"I've actually been watching as much as I can on TV. I
haven't been to any of the actual events, but just hanging
out down here in Vancouver
and watching all the free
stuff."
SUSAN 0STER Connecticut, USA
"[My son Jack an I] went to
Whistler and skied all day. It
was the most beautiful thing
we've done all our lives...
We've taken off time from
work and [Jack] has taken off
time from school, but it's a
small sacrifice." va
Coordinated by Krittana Khurana
and Alicia Woodside 10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.02.25
A daytrip to the UBC Dairy Education and Research Centre
VIKTORIA LOTZ
Contributor
Do you think you know all of
UBC's academic secrets? I can
prove you wrong.
The UBC Dairy Research
and Education Centre is located 130km east of campus in
Agassiz, BC. It is a self-sufficient dairy farm where nearly 300 cows are milked twice
a day. The centre plays a key
role in the success of the UBC's
Animal Welfare Program located in the MacMillan Building
on campus.
Around 25 Students of
Biology, Veterinary Medicine,
Animal Science and other fields
are living on the farm to carry
out their research. Two houses
and one trailer are shared between the students and a skunk
family.
The students research ways
to improve the lives of animals through studying cattle
feeding behavior, feed intake,
health status and social behaviour through the various stages
of life.
The farm's equipment has
made it attractive to scientists from all over the world.
Insentec electronic feed bins,
which have a barrier that lowers automatically allow a cow,
recognized by a transmitter in
her ear, to feed. The cow's feed
intake can be controlled and recorded in this way.
Lori, a Master's of Animal
Science student from Ontario,
has been testing the effects of
different pre-calving diets for
dairy cows on their post-calving
health as part of her research.
She has been living on the
farm for almost two years and
wouldn't have stayed if she
didn't enjoy the way of life at
the farm.
"There are a bunch of students from different nationalities," said Lori. "It's a very
rich cultural experience. And
in the summertime, there are
lots of nice lakes for those hot
afternoons."
Surrounded by Fraser
Valley's picturesque scenery, it's not hard to believe.
However, this way of life requires hard work to find out
how the treatment of cows on
commercial dairy farms can be
improved.
On a typical day, Lori is in the
barn at seven in the morning,
doing milk and feed samples
and helping the six farm workers with milking, a responsibility all students share. Then she
takes blood samples, before she
compiles data or moves cows
around in the barn while cleaning out feed bins. "It is a 100
per cent full-time job—very time
consuming," she admitted.
The students are motivated by
their affection for the animals.
"Usually everybody has their favourite cow," Lori told me. Hers
is number 8093, which the students named Hermonie. tl
TOP LEFT: Cows feeding. TOP RIGHT: Lori with Hermonie.
BOTTOM: The Dairy Research and Education Center in Agassiz.
VIKTORIA LOTZ PH0T0S/THE UBYSSEY
PERSPECTIVES
TOTEM PARK IS AN
OLYMPIC GHOST TOWN
ERICA BAKER
Contributor
I filled out surveys and submitted special requests to have
guests stay in my room. I was
as ready as anyone living in residence could be for the Games.
But it turns out hype leading up to reading week 2010 in
Totem Park was meaningless.
Since September, UBC Student
Housing and residents have suspected that my residence would
be over capacity. Just the opposite happened. I have walked
into the dining hall some afternoons when not a soul was to be
seen.
The upside of the missing
residents of Totem Park is that
I get to enjoy uneaten baked
goods from UBC Food Services
because of the unexpected lack
of visitors. Free rice crispy
squares is one of the highlights
of my Olympic experience—it's
between that and seeing grown
men in Canadian hockey jerseys
trying to rip young trees out of
the ground Downtown.
Where has everyone gone?
Did everyone decide to go home
to Burnaby to study Economics
or did Granville swallow them
up in a whirlwind of drunken
shenanigans?
My personal theories on
where the residents of Totem
Park disappeared to includes but is not limited to the
following:
1. Volunteer positions that
have sucked them in for
the entire Olympic period, so much so that they
only surface on UBC
campus between midnight and 5 am.
2. An impromptu trip to
visit our brothers and
sisters at UBC-O seemed
absolutely necessary.
3. A home-cooked meal is
all the pressure students
living in residence needed to be convinced going home was a good
idea.
4. A few of them might
have been lost in the
crowds on a Canada
Line skytrain and were
never able to climb their
way to the door to get
off.
After the sudden and unexpected drop in people staying over
for reading weeks, I feel responsible for populating Totem
Park with the friends I had invited. So when the rest of the
world is paying top dollar for
the Vancouver 2010 experience, why do we want to leave?
Yes, it is a five-hour wait for
a zip line ride across Robson
Square, which is almost comparable to the waits for the Canada
Line. So why bother waiting in
line when the easiest thing to
do is to go home and enjoy a
home cooked meal or two?
But I keep thinking of how
UBC is a world-class university
and going home should not be
the thing we want to do while
the world is hanging out on
Robson waiting to meet us.
I would like to think that as
a student body, we would take
more interest in a global celebration of cultures. It doesn't
matter if it's a first trip to the
Museum of Anthropology taken by a fifth year student or if
it's seeing a UBC Ski and Board
Club T-shirt in Heineken House.
Either way, I'd say you should
be proud to be a UBC student
embracing the world, va
WHY I CHOSE TO BE
A LEGAL OBSERVER
BEN AMUNDSON
Contributor
Tllkickyour asses, righthere!"
I looked at the man who was
threatening to fight. He was antagonizing a small crowd at
the gate of the tent city on 48
West Hastings. It was 2am on
Thursday, February 18, and the
cautious squatters did not want
trouble at their camp.
A petite woman standing outside met the man's challenge,
"I'll fight you!" The two jawed
back and forth shordy.
"Imma box ya, you wanna
box?" yelled the woman. The man
brought up his fists, but the crowd
stepped in between the two.
As a Legal Observer (LO), I
advised, "The cops will be here
in no time. Don't hit her."
The man whipped off his belt
and snapped it in the air. The
woman readily took off her belt.
They spat insults back and forth
before the crowd helped calm
them down. Five minutes later, the two stood side-by-side,
joking.
I chose to be a LO for moments just like this—an opportune moment when my presence played an important role
in preventing violence. The LO
positions are part of a 2010 program managed by the BC Civil
Liberties Association. LOs are
responsible for documenting
the actions of the 7000 police
officers, 5000 private security
guards and 4500 members of
the Canadian armed forces currendy in Vancouver for the 2010
Olympics. These volunteers are
intended to protect civil liberties like freedom of speech, the
right to assemble and the right
to not be subject to unreasonable search and seizure.
"Imma box ya, you
wanna box?' yelled
the woman. The
man brought up his
fists, but the crowd
stepped in between
the two.
UBC student Ed Durgan
claims he had his possessions
seized by VPD after intervening
when he saw police confronting
a homeless person. In an interview with the Vancouver Media
Co-op, Durgan said that no eyewitnesses were present when
police arrested him. A LO's testimony and recorded evidence
would have been a powerful
tool for Durgan to defend himself with, had they been there
and able to verify his story.
LOs have been present at
the tent city housing squat
24-hours a day. Residents and
allies of the DTES are tenting
for an end to gentrification,
criminalization of poverty and
homelessness. All three goals
have been actualized—at least,
temporarily. By setting up on
the property of a major condo developer, gentrification
is paused and the trespassing
poor have not yet been charged
for creating temporary homes
for the community.
City officials and police have
promised not to break-up tent
city with violent tactics. The LOs
will be there to bear witness to
the validity of their promise, va
LETTER
IN DEFENCE OF ARTS DEGREES
A few weeks ago, while doing
my business in a washroom
in Woodward library I noticed
something written above the
toilet paper dispenser: "Arts
degree dispenser." The sentiment behind the joke is one I
find everywhere, even among
fellow Arts students. And at
major universities in North
America, Arts enrolment is on
the decline. In light of this, I
want to say something in defence of the Arts degree.
For some, a university degree
is not about quantifiable results
such as outward success or
monetary profit. Instead, it can
be about exploring questions of
life and how to live. Arts programs, in one way or another,
tend to address these types of
pursuits. In my opinion, the nature of the world is so wonderful that when we are afforded
the liberty to explore life, such
exploration naturally tends to
be its own reward.
Also, what Arts majors do is
more difficult than many would
imagine, for to grapple with
those fundamental questions
and feelings of life, to learn to
question systems and not just
learn system management (hello Commerce students), is often
a maddening and gut wrenching endeavor. But in a world
where corporations have more
and more influence over political, economic, educational and
social liberties (especially in regard to the poor and working
class), I think the university educated must have the skills to
question whether such a trend
is a good thing (not to mention
the skill to ask what is good).
The critical thinking abilities
fostered in Arts programs are
vital in developing such skills.
So please don't joke about my
BA, because there is more to life
than a job.
—Cody Kolenchuk 2010.02.25/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/ll
CULTURE
The Ubyssey talks with activists, tourists and athletes
taking road trips to Cypress, and licks public art installations. See our videos at the redesigned ubyssey.ca!
EDITOR KATE BARBARIA»culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE JONNY WAKEFIELD» iwakefield@ubyssey.ca
New Amsterdam Cafe is a pavilion for BC's cash crop
BRYCE WARNES
bwarnes@ubyssey.ca
You can't smoke cigarettes
at the New Amsterdam Cafe
(NAC). But if you enter the establishment on any given evening, the first thing you will
notice is the thick haze filling
the air.
The front entrance is guarded by a knight in plate armour
painted with hemp leaves. The
left wall is dedicated to display
cases packed with smoking implements, from humble wooden pipes to towering works
of art in glass. Cypress Hill is
bumping on the sound system.
And on the average night, most
seats are occupied.
Much has been made of the
2010 Olympic Winter Games'
positive impact on local venues. The cafe, however, caters
to a demographic slighdy off
the beaten path and hasn't felt
the economic windfall predicted by supporters of the Games.
"We're not making any extra [money] from this," says
an employee. While larger venues in the city, he claims, have
felt the full economic benefits of the Games, places like
the NAC have been left by the
wayside. They don't cater to
the mainstream Olympic-going
community.
That's because the NAC is
different from other coffee
shops in the city. It bills itself
as    "smoke-friendly."    Minors
The Vancouver institution has proved a popular attraction for tourists. ANTHONY GOERTZ GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
are forbidden from entering,
and there is a strictly enforced
spark-up time set for no earlier than 5 p.m. every day. The
establishment stricdy enforces
rules against the sale of illegal
substances within or around
the cafe. Despite these restrictions—or because of them—
New Amsterdam Cafe is a widely recognized haven for BC's
bud culture.
"Most of these people are regulars," says the NAC employee,
gesturing around the cafe. But
surely, in a city buckling under
an influx of tourists and foreign
interests, there must be some
visitors in the crowd.
A man sitting near us says
it's his fourth time visiting the
cafe. He lives in the US, but
stops by NAC any time he's in
the city so he can enjoy a blunt
in a friendly atmosphere.
At the other end of the table, several Liverpudlians
claim they hadn't heard of the
NAC until they visited the city.
They're all here for the Games,
but the cafe caters to a pastime
that is not endorsed by Olympic
sponsors.
NAC's niche market isn't
quite so niche as it seems.
BC    Bud    has    become    an
internationally recognized
brand, and with shout-outs in
the likes of High Times magazine, the cafe is bound to draw
a few THC tourists. As a result,
NAC can profit alongside more
mainstream forms of tourism.
One fan of the Games says
he has travelled from Windsor,
Ontario, and that he's visiting the city with his wife, who
works for the government and
is involved with some of the
Olympic events. Passing out
Canada flag pins, he is eager
to sing the praises of the New
Amsterdam Cafe.
"It's a very comfortable and
social environment," he says.
It's an atmosphere that isn't
anthithetical to the tastes of
Olympic visitors. As long as
they enjoy BC's cash crop, the
NAC is as attractive a venue
to tourists as any club on the
Granville strip — with the benefits that come with having no
line-ups, no bouncers, and no
expensive drinks.
"Everyone is here doing
something that they love,"
says the Ontarian, who has become a link in a circle—mostly
of strangers—lounging at the
table. The people he's visiting
the city with don't smoke. But
as an enthusiast, the cafe is for
him a sort of safe haven and
pilgrimage site—and one he
definitely plans to visit again
next time he's in Vancouver.
"Something like this," he
says. "Only in the West." tl
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news@ubysseyca
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U THEUBYSSEYc 12/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT72010.02.25
what's on your mind?
UBC CELEBRATE RESEARCH WEEK - MARCH 5-I4, 2010
JOIN US FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA'S ANNUAL CELEBRATE RESEARCH WEEK.
From artistic interventions, critical dialogues on forestry policy and practices, and the science and ethics behind
elite athletic performance to CBC's Award winning Quirks &Quarks Annual Question show, UBC's Celebrate Research Week
welcomes the community to participate. Most events are FREE and open to the public, students, faculty, staff and schools.
For a complete listing of all events visit www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca @UBCComAff
FRIDAY MARCH 5
Sport and Inclusion: Are Major Sporting Events Inclusive of
First Nations and Other Groups?
8:00pm-9:30pm
Former Olympic athlete, activist from the Kahnawake Mohawk
Territory Waneek Horn-Miller shares her journey to the Olympics and
how she helps others achieve their dreams. She is joined in a panel by
former Olympians Shirley and Sharon Firth from the Gwich'in Nation
and Valerie Jerome.
Tickets $10. www.chancentre.com
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road
CRIME and ALYSSA: An Evening of Provocative Cinema
7:30pm-10:30pm
These two films provide a powerful showcase of arts-based research
that manages to be both thought provoking and deeply moving.
Filmmakers in attendance. Free. Everybody welcome.
More information at www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca.
Royal Bank Cinema, 6265 Crescent Rd
2010 Most Exceptional Escapades In Science High School
Student Conference
9:00am-3:00pm
The Michael Smith Laboratories annual Scientific Conference designed
for high school students. This event showcases various scientific
pursuits, including the opportunity to engage in hands-on activities, as
well as interact with prominent scientists.
Dr. Joanne Fox, 604-827-3911, www.bioteach.ubc.ca/highschool-
conference-2010
Michael Smith Laboratories, 2185 East Mall
SATURDAY MARCH 6
Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conference (MURC)
9:30am-5:30pm
This 9th annual conference showcases the exemplary contributions of
undergraduate research to the UBC community and beyond.
To register www.uro.ubc.ca/share/murc
Jubilee Room, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall
MONDAY MARCH 8
Small (Mining) Is Beautiful - Engineering to Alleviate Global Poverty
6:30pm-8:00pm
How can engineering help alleviate global poverty? Learn how from Professor
Marcello Veiga as he presents "Small (mining) is Beautiful." The findings are
a result of a six-year project sponsored by the United Nations. Free.
www.apsc.ubc.ca/celebrateresearch,
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Forestry in Society: Comparing the UK & BC Experiences
2:00pm-7:30pm Open House/Poster Competition/Lecture in
Sustainability
Mr. Tim Rollinson, Director General of the UK Forestry Commission will
look back at the UK experience in responding to the changing needs of
society and our responses- as well as look forward to the challenges
coming over the horizon. Free. Everyone welcome.
2424 Main Mall
Quirks & Quarks Question Show
7:30pm-9:00pm
Each year, Quirks & Quarks solicits questions from you, the listeners,
and the community. Ten of the best questions have been pre-selected
and will be answered on the show by UBC experts in each area. Join
host Bob McDonald live at the Chan Centre. Tickets are free.
Tessa Vanderkop, 604.822.5675, www.chancentre.com
Telus Theatre, Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Rd
UBC
a place of mind
w
TUESDAY MARCH 9
Mental Health Research Matters: Free Public Talk
7:00pm-9:00pm
A free public forum on the latest directions and discoveries in mental
health research with three of the Lower Mainland's leading experts.
Featuring Drs. Jehannine Austin, Raymond Lam and Christian Schutz.
Registration is free but space is limited.
Ashley Biggerstaff, reseduc@cw.bc.ca, www.cfri-training.ca
Chan Centre for Family Health Education, 950 West 28th Avenue
Four Ways to Combat Climate Change - Making a Difference
Lecture Series
6:30pm-8:00pm
Energy use, and its impact on the environment, is one of the most
important technical, social and public-policy issues facing humanity
today. Learn from Professor Evans the "Four Ways to Combat Climate
Change." Everyone welcome. Free.
www.apsc.ubc.ca/celebrateresearch
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
The Killam Discussion - Can Environmental Science Save the Earth?
5:00pm-6:00pm
The inaugural Killam Conversation focuses on the capacity of
environmental science to effect robust change among those setting
policy. Is there a Two Solitudes existing between the scientific community
and those tasked with decision-making? Everyone welcome. Free.
Dr. Rhodri Windsor-Liscombe, rhodri@interchange.ubc.ca,
www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
WEDNESDAY MARCH 10
Peak Performance: The Path to Exceptional Athletic Achievement
11:00am-5:30pm
Join leading experts from around the world for an afternoon focused
on hot topics in the scientific, ethical and psychosocial complexities
underlying competitive sports and the challenges athletes face in
reaching peak performance. Everyone welcome. Free.
Leah Lockhart, 604-806-9853, Leah.Lockhart@hli.ubc.ca,
www.heartandlung.ca/peak
Segal Centre, SFU Harbour Centre, 515 W. Hastings St
New Ways to Communicate Climate Change
- Speaker Panel & Public Dialogue
5:30pm-7:30pm
Distinguished speakers with unique expertise in climate change
communications and behaviour change, will focus presentations
on perceptions of climate change and community-based solutions.
Everyone welcome. Free.
www.calp.forestry.ubc.ca, picswrkshp@gmail.com
Rm 1500, SFU Segal Graduate School of Business, 500 Granville St.
Amazing Paper: The History and Art of Papermaking
12:00pm-l:00pm
Most people take paper for granted. Learn paper's rich history and its
impact on society and understand the manufacturing process with
emphasis on sustainability. Free. Everyone welcome.
Kaiser 2020/2030, 2332 Main Mall
Sport and Challenge: Is Anything Possible?
8:00pm-9:30pm
Rick Hansen delivers a keynote address on where we have come and
what the future holds for people with disabilities in sport. He is joined
by Dr. Bruce McManus and Pat Jarvis (former Paralympic athlete and
member of the International Paralympic Committee).
Tessa Vanderkop, 604 822-5675 — Tickets $10, www.chancentre.com
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road
CELEBRATE   SSS  RESEARCH
From Toy Trains to Airplanes: Are We Serious About Safety-
Applied Science Making a Difference Lecture Series
6:30pm-7:30pm
From the onset of the industrial revolution until a few decades ago,
safety was a topic of great importance. But in recent years, we have
become complacent—until a tragedy occurs that is. Explore with
Professor Poursartip. Everyone welcome. Free.
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
THURSDAY MARCH 11
Celebrating the Image
All Day - March 11 to March 14
UBC Visual Art students showcase a series of works produced in our
digital courses. Using various media the works attempt a response
to the question: What is an image today? Come and be a part of the
artistic intervention at Robson Square!
www.celebrateresearch.ca
Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
Let's Talk about Marijuana and Teens (a CIHR Cafe Scientifique)
7:00pm-9:00pm
Why do more youth in British Columbia use marijuana than anywhere
else in Canada? What are the health and social effects? Join in the
discussion at the CIHR Cafe Scientifique. This event is free, but space
is limited.
Stephanie Coen, 604-827-4058
RSVP to Stephanie.coen@nursing.ubc.ca
Juliet's Cafe, 1905 Cornwall Avenue
Inhuman Conditions: On Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights
12:00pm-l:30pm
This is one of two public lectures (also see March 12th) on the
very idea, as well as the social, cultural and political elements, of
cosmopolitanism and human rights, by noted political theorist,
Professor Pheng Cheah. Free lunch with RSVP.
Carmen Radut, ccfi@interchange.ubc.ca
604-822-8638
UBC Green College Coach House,
6323 Cecil Green Park Road
Patient -Centred Care is More than Medicine
5:00pm-6:00pm Reception in foyer
6:00pm-7:30pm Presentation, Q&A
Together with health system professionals, Sauder School of Business
researchers are developing innovative approaches to improve the
patient experience. This is a free event. Pre-registration is required by
March 8, 2010.
Jessie Lam, 604.822.8399, www.sauder.ubc.ca
Robson Square Theatre, 800 Robson Street
FRIDAY MARCH 12
Global Health & Community - Based Involvement
6:00pm-8:00pm
Please join us for several thought provoking presentations focusing
on the ethics and impacts of global health and community-based
involvement. Full refreshments will be provided. Free.
Please RSVP to ghealth@interchnage.ubc.ca.
More information at www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
Room C225, Robson Square, 800 Robson Street
SUNDAY MARCH 14
Time Being - A Speculative Documentary on Time
2:30pm-4:00pm
This new film by Chris Gallagher is an epic journey that takes one
gently down the stream of consciousness to reveal the puzzle that is
time. Everyone welcome.
Tickets will be available in advance online and at the door. For more
information: www.vifc.org/home
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street
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