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The Ubyssey Sep 22, 2014

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Array  // Page 2
EVENTS        V THIS WEEK, CHECK '
MONDAY
TRIVIA NIGHT
8:00-10:00P.M. ©THEGALLERYLOUNGE
Bring your friends and compete for
pride and prizes at the third Gallery
trivia night oftheyear. Show up early
to make sure you get a seat!
Free (drinks cost money)
WEDNESDAY ' 24
UBC YOGA FEST
11:00 A.M. -3:00 P.M. @ UBC MAIN MALL
NEARTHE EARTH SCIENCES BUILDING
With sponsorships and instruction from UBC Recreation, MEC
and Hot Box Yoga, this is a great
time to try out yoga in a low-stress
(but highly public) environment.
By donation to Shinerama. Bring
a towel & register day of.
WEDNESDAY  ' 24
TWELFTH NIGHT
PREVIEW
7:30 P.M. @ FREDERICKWOOD THEATRE
The precursor to today's mass-produced rom-coms (though infinitely
better), thisUBCShakespeare
production runs from September 24
through October 11, and is considerably cheaper on preview night,
September 24.
$7
ON
THE
COVER
Thanks to CITR for lending us a
microphone. Nice and simple
cover for this issue.
-Mackenzie Walker
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
SEPTEMBER 22, 2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUE IX
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Natalie Scadden, CJPentland,
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Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
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604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
:opy@ubyssey.cs
Sorer) Elsay, Olamide Olaniyar.
fpereira@ubyssey.cs
Business Office: SUB 23
Design Editor
Distribution Coordinator
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ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
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3dvertising@ubyssey.es
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Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editors
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JovanaVranic +
VeronikaBondarenko
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OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE1
OPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
Andrew Lai has become internet-famous (at least at UBC) for his UBC Confessions comments.
Andrew Lai of UBC Confessions has
commented his way to internet fame
Jack Hauen
Sports & Rec Editor
Andrew Lai is internet famous.
And if you're one ofthe 16,500 or
so people who like the Facebook
page "UBC Confessions", you
almost definitely know his name.
His hobby began on UBC
Connect, where students in his
TA course, CPSC 310, didn't
quite understand the material.
He had to remain professional
in order to address the students'
concerns, but found some of
their questions to be "kind of
hilarious," so he began to slip
in small nuggets of sarcasm
when he could pass them off as
helpful advice.
I just thought the
confessions were
really stupid in general
and they're getting
worse and worse... so
I thought, 'You know
what'd be really cool?
//If I made even stupider
comments on them.'"
Andrew Lai
UBC student, computer sciences TA
/. and UBC Confessions commenter.
Internet sarcasm is a slippery slope, and before long, Lai
found something more entertaining than computer science
students struggling to understand software development:
UBC Confessions — a place for
students to anonymously confess
their innermost secrets, or just
complain about campus.
"I just thought the confessions
were really stupid in general and
they're getting worse and worse
... so I thought, 'You know what'd
be really cool? If I made even
stupider comments on them,'"
Lai said.
It's that attitude that has —
perhaps ironically — kept him a
fan favourite amongst the users
ofthe page. What's more intriguing, though, is that through
his biting sarcasm, Lai hopes
to convey some meaning to the
people reading his comments.
Though he still views his Face-
book endevavours "primarily as
a joke," he holds strong beliefs
about morality that he expresses
in his own, rather unorthodox
Sometimes I see really
intolerant stuff on
[the page] that's filled
with so much hatred.
I'm like, 'How can you
live a happy life when
you're like that?' I don't
believe that any two
people should have
conflict.'"
The Confessions page is often
an outlet for students to vent
their frustration, from complaining about construction,
to cyclists, to bus etiquette.
According to Lai, conflict arises
from misunderstanding, and it
could all be avoided with kinder
human interaction.
"Sometimes I see really intolerant stuff on [the page] that's
filled with so much hatred. I'm
like, 'How can you live a happy
life when you're like that?' I
don't believe that any two people
should have conflict," he said. "I
can pretty comfortably say that I
don't have any conflict in my life
... I really feel like it's important
for people to connect to each
other, to view each other on
good terms by default."
Lai is striving to make the
world a better place, in his
own unique way. He hopes that
some ofthe angry commenters
will take his advice, even if it is
shrouded in sarcasm.
I don't expect to be
received positively, but
if that happens, I'm
going to try to use my
lame influence on this
lame page to influence
people."
"I don't expect to be received
positively, but if that happens,
I'm going to try to use my lame
influence on this lame page to
influence people," he said.
For all his humanistic views,
Lai views his comments as
mostly a source of entertainment
for himself — if others happen
to enjoy his work, that's their
prerogative, but he's most definitely not doing it for the online
recognition.
If you'd like to hear what Lai
has to say in real life, you can
often find him playing the piano
outside the UBC bookstore.
Don't be afraid to approach him,
you'll likely be met with open
arms and far less sarcasm than
you might expect — especially if
you share his musical tastes.
"If you like trance music you
should start partying with me.
I'll be anyone's friend, I don't
care." tJ
If you know someone on campus you
think people should know about, let us
know. You could even interview them
and write an article yourself. Email us
at ourcampus@ubyssey.ca
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC + VERONIKABONDARENKO
LAW»
UBC law professor welcomes bill to change Canada's prostitution laws
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
After striking down Canada's old
prostitution laws, the government
is currently working to put in place
a new law to regulate sex work in
the country.
Bill C-36, which cracks down
on those who are purchasing and
trafficking sex work, has been
proposed by Justice Minister Peter
Mackay in May. While the bill also
makes it illegal for sex workers to
advertise their services, it is intended to primarily go after buyers
and traffickers by making both
offences punishable by fines and
time in prison.
The Senate has recently held a
pre-study of Bill C-36, but it still
needs to be passed by the House
of Commons.
Janine Benedet, a UBC law professor specializing in criminal and
labour laws, has been advocating
for changes to Canada's prostitution laws for over a decade. Benedet was also one ofthe experts
who testified on the bill at a hearing in Ottawa on September 10.
As part of her testimony, Benedet said that while Canada's old
prostitution laws were meant to be
applied to both traffickers and sex
workers, they would mostly go after sex workers who, for the most
part, already came from marginalized positions. As such, Benedet
argued that any new law needs
to instead go after those who are
buying and trafficking sex work.
"[The old laws] were really
designed just to target the women,
to move them around, to get them
into places that were less visible
and ultimately, I do think that
was unfair," said Benedet. "It was
focusing on the wrong end ofthe
transaction and saddling these
women with criminal records,
The Canadian government is expected to come to a decision on Bill C-36 by December.
which made leaving prostitution
even harder."
As a result, Benedet is largely satisfied with the proposed
Bill C-36, which focuses on
putting an end to the practices
that support exploitation and
inequality by fueling the demand
for prostitution.
"It is not especially fruitful to
criminalize prostitutes for their
own exploitation, but we do need
to target the demand for prostitution and those who exploit prostitutes by profiteering off the money
they make," said Benedet.
While Benedet disagrees with the
section ofthe bill that criminalizes
sex workers who are offering their
services near a public place such as a
school or a church, she feels that Bill
C-36 is still a very important step in
the right direction for the country.
"For the first time, we have a provision that says it's an act of exploitation to buy another human being
for sex and you should stop because
ultimately, you're fueling inequality
and exploitation and trafficking,"
said Benedet.
Benedet also said that while
Bill C-36 has been subject to a
number of criticisms, she believes
that those who are speaking
against the bill are largely dissatisfied with the fact that prostitution is not legalized in Canada.
"I think, overall, the approach
on the new legislation is very positive and that those who are criticizing it are really not criticizing
the actual terms ofthe legislation,"
said Benedet.
"They want a system in which
prostitution is not criminalized,
in which prostitution is legal and
prostitution businesses can set up
and operate."
=HOTO IAN MCKENZIE/FLICKR
Benedet, however, argues that
prostitution is more than just a
simple commercial transaction
between two consenting parties, as it pits people who are in
very different positions of power
against each other.
"I am someone who understands
prostitution to be, fundamentally, a
practice of sex inequality that preys
on the vulnerability and lack of
power of women and, in particular, racialized women, aboriginal
women, poor women," said Benedet. "And it seems to me that that's
who the laws need to focus on." Xi
AMS»
AMS businesses to implement
customer loyalty app
Kelley Lin
Contributor
The AMS has joined forces with
RTown, a Vancouver startup
supplying local businesses with a
mobile loyalty app.
With the RTown app, customers will be able to use digital
stamp cards to get discounts at
select AMS businesses. Some
deals include getting a free
cookie from Blue Chip or free
bagel from Bernoulli's for every
10 bought.
Businesses implementing
the app's loyalty reward system
include Bernoulli's Bagels, Blue
Chip Cookies, The Honour Roll,
The Moon, The Pit Burger Bar
and many more off-campus.
The electronic stamp system will be replacing old paper
stamp cards.
"It's the same premise,"
said Jennifer Ryan, Marketing
Manager for the AMS. "It's just
digital, versus carrying around a
little card that you can lose [and]
it helps to allow faster transactions."
According to Ryan, the AMS
saw RTown as the fastest and
easiest technology for both staff
and customers to use. Customers
just download the app, tap an
option to find businesses in their
area, choose the store and offer
that interests them and present
the store cashier with the digita
stamp at the time of purchase.
Last year, the AMS approached the Strategy Consulting Initiative, a student-run
non-profit service.
"They were engaged to do a
marketing plan for the AMS, and
one of their recommendations
was to have a digital loyalty program," said Ryan.
According to their website,
RTown's team of marketing experts aims to help local businesses increase their revenue, which
is a value that Ryan says the AMS
shares with RTown.
"Essentially, the loyalty program is about increasing sales
and driving traffic in pertaining
customers," said Ryan. "But more
importantly, it's a reminder to
students that we're here, we're
open during construction, and
that in AMS-run businesses, all
profits go back to fund programs
that the AMS runs."
Due to the AMS's privacy
policy, Ryan declined to disclose
the overall cost ofthe program.
The AMS is currently working on integrating the RTown
app into their recently released
OohlalaAMSapp.tl
Want to write for news?
EMAIL NEWS@UL NEWS    I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2014
HOUSING »
UBC pushes back residence construction
,g   MEMORIAL
;fl 1 I I I I B I   M
UBC has delayed the construction of a housing unit on University Boulevard.
Dave Nixon
Staff Writer
Planning delays have
pushed back the construction of 125 residential units on
University Boulevard.
The Site B housing project
was originally set to go ahead
with a public consultation on
September 18, but UBC Properties Trust is now rethinking the
building plans.
"We're guessing that it might
set the project back a couple
months to improve the building
design and come forward with a
project that we were fully comfortable with," said Paul Young,
Director of Planning and Design
for UBC Properties Trust.
The current building plans
are to have a ground floor with
retail outlets such as a restaurant
and cafe, and five floors above
that for residential living. It will
border the War Memorial Gym
and University Boulevard, near
the bus loop. Most units will be
studios, one bedrooms and two
bedrooms. The retail floor is to
help bring some activity to one
ofthe gateway streets ofthe university while the retail units are
to help with the high demand for
rentals on campus.
This year, over 700 first year
students were placed in upper
year residences like Walter Gage,
forcing more upper year students
to contend for fewer spots on
campus. Rental apartment units
like Site B appeal to upper years,
and the demand for the units
will continue to grow yearly.
The units won't relieve too much
pressure although they are
open to professors and staff, not
just students.
The delay, according to Young,
was prompted by comments at
an Urban Design Panel around
concerns of building size in the
spaces allotted. Young said he
believes the project would have
been approved in its current
form, but they felt that taking
the time to improve the plans
was important.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUWHE UBYSSEY
Young's changes may include
splitting the building into two.
Current plans have Site B as a
larger building, while another
area called Site D would host one
smaller building. They are now
looking at the possibility of reducing Site B's building's size and
increasing that of Site D, which
would make the two similar
in scope.
Young says the project was to
be completed in early 2017. His
estimate of a two month delay is
tentative at this point, though,
and according to Joe Stott, Director of Planning and Development Services for Campus and
Community Planning, they have
no knowledge of why the project
was withdrawn.
"We've not received any
indication of whether this is a
postponement or a cancellation
or anything," said Stott. "They
haven't asked for a new date."
Neither UBC Housing nor the
Urban Design Panel were available for comment. Xi
AMS»
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR 19 BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
and create a green, ^\
zero waste campus: (^x-^
USE RECYCLING STATIONS TO I
SORT YOUR FOOD SCRAPS AND ST
RECYCLABLES INTO THE PROPER BINS. V"-
RECYCLABLE
CONTAINERS
The AMS will be making a few changes
to its Safewalk and tutoring services
Laurie Baxter
Contributor
Improvements and additions to
the AMS Safewalk and tutoring
services are starting to come into
effect for the upcoming term.
Safewalk, which allows
students to call for a co-ed
pair of students to accompany
them to any place on campus,
will be installing a new system
for managing dispatch calls as
well as getting an additional
company car.
AMS Service Manager Ron
Gorodetsky said that, in light
of the string of sexual assaults
that took place on campus last
year, these additions come at an
important time for UBC.
"In response to [the sexual
assaults] there's much more request and demand for the service
that at one point surpassed our
capacities," said Gorodetsky.
Gorodetsky also noted that as
the number of Safewalk users
tends to increase in the fall, the
dispatch system and extra car
will allow their team to provide their services more quickly
and efficiently.
"This year we're anticipating
high levels of demand as well
and we're increasing efficiency
by using two vehicles instead of
one," said Gorodetsky.
However, the scope for the
Safewalk services is still limited
SCIENCE »
to the UBC area, with Blanca
street marking the cut-off point
between UBC and Vancouver.
According to Gorodetsky, the
AMS plans to continue their outreach efforts in order to encourage more students to use their
newly updated services.
Other AMS service improvements include a revamp of AMS
Tutoring Services, which will
be launching a new website at
ams.helphub.me. It will replace
the current website, which
Gorodetsky described as "antiquated."
As with previous years,
students will be able to choose
tutoring services online or in
person for a selection of price
points depending on the education level ofthe tutor. But as the
new site will make it easier for
students to search through tutors
and include more courses for students to choose from, Gorodetsky
expects it to nearly triple the
number of students using the
one-on-one tutoring service.
"In the past two weeks we've
already imported over 123 subjects worth of tutors, so we're
very close to full implementation
on our end," said Gorodetsky.
The AMS will also continue
to provide free group tutoring
services, which are being held at
several residences and buildings
on campus. tJ
UBC receives funding for more
spaces in speech therapy education
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERfTHE UBYSSEY
UBC's Master's of Science in Speech Language Pathology program has received
increased funding from the B.C. government.
Sort it Out.
;ustaij
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
UBC will be offering more spots
for students who want to study
speech therapy.
With increased funding from
the B.C. government, UBC's
Master's of Science in Speech
Language Pathology program
will be expanded to include 36
student spots by 2016. As the program currently receives over 150
applications for just 23 available
slots, the additional spaces are
expected to respond to a growing
demand for speech therapists in
the province.
Through graduate courses,
several clinical internships and
a final thesis, the program will
teach students to recognize and
address a number of different
speech problems, including
difficulties with articulation,
stuttering, language delays and
swallowing disorders.
"Most of us take the ability to
communicate for granted, but for
the thousands of British Columbians who have problems with
speech, language or swallowing,
speech therapists provide a
bridge to the rest ofthe world,"
said Advanced Education Minister Amrik Virk.
The program will be receiving an initial $2,475 million in funding, as well as an
additional $932,000 in yearly
operating funds.
According to UBC, the increased number of students who
are graduating from the speech
therapy program will help fill the
need for therapists in northern
and rural B.C., where speech
therapists positions have been
rare in the past.
"Adding 13 first-year spaces to
the training program at UBC will
help meet the growing demand
for qualified speech-language
pathologists," said Virk.
Julia Hodder, vice president ofthe B.C. Association of
Speech-Language Pathologists
and Audiologists, is also excited
to see increased space for speech
therapists at UBC in the days
to come.
"The increase in funding
supports BCASLPA's efforts to
provide access to highly trained,
certified professionals across
this province who can help
support and provide services to
those of all ages with communication needs. Lives are changed
by improved communication,"
said Hodder. tJ II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
THEATRE»
FASHION »
UBC Theatres Twelfth
Night a hilarious rendition
of the Shakespeare classic
=HOTO COURTESY TIM MATHESON
Charlotte Wright in UBC Theatre's rendition of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.
Connie McKimm
Contributor
Cakes and ale are everywhere to
be seen in UBC's upcoming production of Shakespeare's Twelfth
Night. Audiences will look forward
to the production's impressive
interpretation of one of Shakespeare's most popular comedies.
"This particular project is
devised for the graduating class of
the BA. So we're looking for a play
that will suit whatever the demographic is for the students in that
class. It's really difficult to find a
play where all the gender roles fit,"
said Stephen Heatley, Director of
the production.
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night is
the first in this year's UBC Theatre
and Opera season, opening on September 25. Heatley hopes to bring
a new twist to this year's season
opener by setting it in modern day
New Orleans at the time of Mardi
Gras. "I've always maintained
that surprise is a big element in
theatre," he said.
Heatley has successfully set up
many surprises for his audience —
his production is full of live music,
stunts and general hilarity. The actors worked with a specialist team
to perfect their stage fights and
original music has been composed
specifically for the production.
One ofthe production's surprises comes from the traditional
role of Malvolio being played by a
woman, and changing the character from male to female. Malvolio
becomes Malvolia. "We looked at
what roles made potential sense
so that they could be other than
male," said Heatley.
Allyce Kranabetter, who plays
the role of Malvolia, is a part of
a whole production team who is
proud of how the show has come
together. "It is absolutely stunning
visually and musically," she said.
"Theatre is spectacle and visual
beauty and I feel that the production team have really done that
justice in this play."
The production team praised by
Kranabetter is made up entirely
of students. This season opener is
very much a student run production, a reflection upon UBC's
Theatre program as a whole. "It's
all student designers, all student
actors, all student stage managers,
all student production staff," said
Heatley. "We really are featuring
all aspects of what student theatre
does here."
The actors performing in
Twelfth Night are all final year
students from B A Acting and have
enjoyed rehearsing. Jenna Mair,
who plays Olivia, emphasized that
the rehearsal process has been a
collaborative effort between cast
and director.
"I really like working with
Stephen and he has been very
forthcoming to our own interpretations," said Mair. The cast used
innovative methods of rehearsing.
"It was really creative and
unique," emphasized Kranabetter.
The cast have particularly
enjoyed performing Shakespeare
and have relished the challenge of
mastering his language. "I really
love Shakespeare," said Mair. "I
think it's beautiful language and
has really rich characters and
stories."
Twelfth Night is one of Shakespeare's greatest comedies, and
the cast believe that the story will
appeal to everyone on campus.
"Everyone who comes to see
this play will identify with at least
one character, because we've all
been in love," Mair said. "It's a
universal human experience and
Shakespeare shows that in all different shapes and colours."
Mair was first introduced to
Shakespeare by local Vancouver
theatre company Bard on the
Beach. "I went to see the Merchant
of Venice as a child, and I've been
hooked ever since," she said.
Heatley hopes that his production will help spread this kind of
love for Shakespeare and theatre
across UBC. "Shakespeare is a
great thing for the campus. The
fact is that there is a lot of support
for some of these major classics
with the English department and
some other departments. Part of
our role at Theatre UBC is to animate the campus," said Heatley.
Judging by the quality of this
production, it's hard to disagree
with him.
Twelfth Night is showing from
September 25 to October 11 at the
Frederic Wood Theatre. Tickets are
available at the Frederick Wood
Theatre box office. Xi
Fashion Week takes over Vancouver
Olivia Law
Contributor
London, Milan, New York, Paris,
Tokyo, even Toronto. All these
cities are renowned worldwide
for their seasonal fashion weeks,
with hoards of photographers,
designers, models and bloggers
converging on the streets to celebrate what is to some, a means of
expressing yourself to the highest
degree, a form of art, if you will.
The Vancouver fashion world is
one which is yet to break into the
mainstream, enviable, glamorous
scene portrayed in magazines and
movies. This is not a problem —
but Vancouverites do not seem to
be aware ofthe lack of fashionable
reputation surrounding the city.
In the past, Vancouver Fashion
Week has come under fire for an
unprofessional running ofthe
event, with huge proportions of
the staff made up of volunteers.
This year, efforts were made to
ensure a structure of teams on
each station to maximize control
and efficiency. This being said,
much ofthe event relies upon the
work of volunteers. This year, volunteers ranged from students, to
aspiring designers and stylists, to
people who are simply passionate
about fashion.
Avast majority of those
involved in Vancouver Fashion
Week are — indeed — from Vancouver, pushing those involved to
make the show more professional
and prevalent in Vancouver's
eyes. For example, Ana Badila,
a makeup artist assisting with
the looks for Oscar Mendoza
and Laura Laval, was spotted
at a department store makeup
counter shortly after moving to
Vancouver. Badila aims to become
a sought-after makeup artist
worldwide, and sees Vancouver's
young fashion scene as an ideal
stepping-stone.
WORLD
GRADSCHOOL
TOUR~
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KOSTAPRODANOVIC/THE UBYSSEY
Vancouver's Fashion Week took over Queen Elizabeth Plaza this past week.
It is difficult to know what to
make of Vancouver Fashion Week.
The chaos, the over-confident
fashionistas and the crazy after
parties were as expected, but the
sense of support and teamwork
between designers, volunteers and
managers was something which one
might not expect to see in the brutal
world of fashion. At the end of each
evening, designers and presenters
approached volunteers express
their gratidude, and photographers
from the press, from magazines and
from blogs were keen to photograph
everyone for their 'street-style'
spreads.
Although Vancouver Fashion
Week is not New York, it could be
the ideal place for people waiting
to break into the fashion industry
to begin their journey. Everyone's
individual style seemed to be appreciated and accepted, regardless of
whether the skirt comes from Pro-
enza Schouler or Salvation Army. Xi
Aside from the inevitable
delays in beginning shows (where
else can we use the phrase 'fashionably late' to such an honest degree), for the hundreds of people
passing through the shows at the
Queen Elizabeth Plaza throughout the week, Vancouver Fashion
Week appeared to be running
smoothly and to perfection.
Evidently this prowess does
not come with no effort. Although none ofthe catwalk
shows began before 4 p.m.,
models, designers and MC's
were rehearsing each and every
morning, right up until their
call times for the stage. Even
backstage, one could see confident-seeming MCs rehearsing,
pacing back and forth, makeup
artists applying cat-eye after
cat-eye, and designers working
alongside stylists and dressers to
make sure each and every item of
clothing was fitted to perfection.
INTERNATIONAL
MASTERS & PHD FAIR
September 25th
Vancouver - 3:30pm - 8:00 pm
Convention Centre East, BC V6C 3C1
Why attend?
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> Apply for US $1.7 million worth of scholarships
(For fair attendees only)
For Free Entry Register Online at:
TopUniversities.com/UbYsseY
and quote 'Ubyssey promo' at the door
Attending universities and b-schools: UCLA, King's College
London, Ivey Business School, Queen's School of Business,
University of San Francisco, HEC Paris, EDHEC, IE Business School
and many more local and international grad schools!
MagSfcsh    6)B»     fco.
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*prize draw taking place at the event
SCHOLHRSHIPS france^^       EHMESftfM CULTURE    I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2014
A tale of two scenes
Vancouver's underground music
by Lawrence Neal Garcia
Take a walk up Granville Street in downtown Vancouver
and you'll get a picture of the city's music scene. Within about a one-block radius lie the Orpheum, the Vogue
Theatre, the Commodore Ballroom and Venue Nightclub,
some of the most well-known concert venues which frequently play host to touring international talent.
The area provides an
image that meshes
well with Vancouver's politely placid
exterior — clean,
tame and decidedly un-offensive — the one you
would most likely see in a tourist
brochure.
Venture a bit further east,
however, and a radically different
scene emerges. Away from the
near-unlivable housing prices of
the downtown core, the Downtown Eastside provides a stark
counterpoint to Vancouver's
sanitized image. Long besot by
negative stigma from Vancouver-
ites and tourists alike, the area
possesses a seedy, oppressive
mystique that permeates the rain-
soaked streets. But for anyone
who is truly willing to look, it's
also home to a daring, vibrant and
experimental local music scene.
Get Me To the
Emergency Room!
In 2006, out ofthe underground
parking lot ofthe Emily Carr
Institute of Art and Design, the
Emergency Room was created.
Originally started by Keith Wecker
ofthe V. Vecker Ensemble, the ER
was conceived of as a modest practice and performance space for
local bands. But, thrust into a restless music scene frustrated with
a lack of suitable music venues,
hyper-vigilant policing of such
venues, and regulatory problems
related to both, it became much
more than intended.
The Emergency Room became a
focal point ofthe weird punk scene
that emerged during that period
and peaked in 2007. Featuring an
extreme mix of genre-bending
noise rock, punk and experimental, the scene grew out of
events like the Cobalt's Fake Jazz
Wednesdays -- a weekly experimental night -- and a general
commitment to no-holds-barred
musical innovation. Although the
scene grew to include bands from
increasingly disparate genres, it
was characterized by a unifying
current of energy.
"They would really go crazy,"
said Sarah Cordingley, who
previously played with Channels
3 & 4 and is currently the music
coordinator of CiTR. "It was always really high energy and pretty
aggressive."
The music was there; the space
came next.
After relocating to a former
fish-processing warehouse in
Strathcona, the ER quickly grew,
simultaneously serving as a recording studio, practice space andl
performance venue. As catalogued
in its eponymous, manifesto-lik^H
compilation, Emergency Room^
Vol. 1 ("This record is to document
a year of one ofthe best alternative spaces currently operating
in Canada," reads the forward, ■
written by co-founder Justin   '
Gradin) the space saw artists like
Twin Crystals, Nii Sensae, Sick 1
Buildings, Vapid, The Petroleum ^
By-Products, Defektors, Mutators,'
and White Lung.
"There was some amazing stuff
there," said Cordingley, who recalled practicing in its jam rooms
with Ice Cream, her band at the
time.
"It just had a really good
collective feel and really allowed
people to get a lot done and make
a lot of interesting stuff, because
there was finally a venue that
people were actually coming to."
Inevitably, the growing crowds
became a double-edged sword, attracting the unwanted attention of
the local police and law-enforcers.
It got shut down with increasing
frequency and eventually became
Heading
East Going
Underground
too costly to maintain. By late
2008, the space had been closed.
Although the whole weird
punk scene emerged from a literal
underground, it is also — ironically — one ofthe Vancouver scene's
most notable exports, particularly
during its apotheosis in 2007. But
since then, and even before that,
the local music scene has remained
largely underground. Much of that
has to do with the city's music
venues — or lack thereof.
It s just the cultural ties of the
city, cultural
lines of the city,"
said Kew. "Ultimately working
as an artist, you
won t be living
in the downtown core. You'll
be living where
the rent is more
affordable.
Unsustainable finance models
and the threat of being priced
out by larger development projects has, and continues to cull
many local venues. But perhaps
the larger and more intractable
causes are Vancouver's convoluted
regulations, legal restrictions, and
zoning laws, which make locations
across town near-uniformly shortlived.
Ref lexively, the music scene had
to adapt.
"It became more underground,
less accessible," said Ryan McCormick, formerly ofthe band They
Shoot Horses Don't They? who likened the city's regulation of local
shows to the policing of illegal activity. "It has almost criminalized
local music, which might sound a
bit extreme."
B-side reactions
Since first moving to Vancouver
from the Okanagan in 2003, Cordingley has seen a definite shift to
the East Side in terms of where
fcjaows actually happen, away from
pubs and clubs to more unconventional -- and largely illegal
-- venues. At the same time, the
Granville Entertainment District
in the downtown core has gravitated to more mainstream music,
eschewing local, alternative music
in favor of Top 40 hits.
It's a dichotomy that, for
Jonathan Kew, Vice President of
the CiTR student executive team,
comes from Vancouver's geographic and economic divisions.
"It's just the cultural ties ofthe
city, cultural lines ofthe city," said
Kew. "Ultimately working as an
BPtist, you won't be living in the
downtown core. You'll be living
where the rent is more affordable
... But that's not where a lot of Vancouver goes for entertainment, so
those two worlds will often remain
separate for that reason."
But the divergence ofthe
local scene from Vancouver's
entertainment district has also
had a positive, flipside reaction.
Local musicians have largely
abandoned corporate and legal
structures in favour of a DIY
mentality: recording albums in
basements or garages, burning
and distributing self-produced
CD's, hosting their own shows
-- practices that recall early punk
and garage rock scenes.
"[The situation] has driven people to be a little more
independent. The fact that the
corporate music world is so out
of reach has led people to develop
things on their own ... more for MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,2014    |    CULTURE    |   7
GRANVILLE STREET
said McCormick.
Arguably, the
conditions surrounding the local independent scene have also
affected the kind of music
produced: harsh, grungy,
experimental — ostensibly
opposed to Vancouver's sanitized
image. But whether reactionary
or just coincidental, as some
would argue, it's no doubt that
the music is a very real, if also
more hidden, part ofthe city.
Less debatable is that local artists, along with the music they
produce, are more politically
minded than in other cities.
"It's not necessarily extremely
politically engaged, but there's a
political mentality ofthe collective. There's a big feminist movement, and more social leanings
think is
cool of
the scene,"
said Erik
Coates, president of CiTR.
''The music scene
embraces lots of
aspects that are maybe
marginalized in mainstream society."
There are events like Shout
Back! Fest, a feminist music f^H
tival complete with an anarchist
book fair, organizations like  I
Girls Rock Camp Vancouver -H
which provides music workshops
-- training and opportunities for
female youth, and non-profits
like the Safe Amplification So
ety, a group dedicated to filling
the void of all-ages venues in BC.
Officially incorporated in
spring of 2009, the Safe Amplification Society, of which Ryan
McCormick is also a founding
director, currently operates a
temporary, all-ages space called
Astorino's, which opened just
over a year ago. Recently, Safe
Amp launched a letter-writing campaign calling for a
permanent all-ages venue to
be included in the forthcoming city budget for the coming
November election.
Unfortunately, because of
regulatory and liquor laws
in Vancouver, all-ages shows
are still something of a white
elephant: with costs often outweighing feasibility. Consequently, young people either turn to
illegal — and less accessible —
"It's not necessarily extremely politically
engaged, but
there s a political mentality of
the collective.
There's a big
feminist movement, and more
social leanings
that I think is
cool of the scene
what the justification is," said
Cordingley, who noted the importance of getting kids creatively engaged. "Young people do a
lot of creative and interesting
stuff and it's important that they
have a place they can do that and
get involved."
As with any other city, getting
involved in the music scene can
be difficult; and the underground
nature of Vancouver's local scene .
can make it seem even more so.  i
"Within the city I think there^
a lot of great music, but it's kin^f
of a club," said McCormick, who
has been involved in the sceneH
for about ten years now. "I don't
want to say [it's] insular, but it's
kind of 'if you know what you're
ooking for, you'll find it' sort of
thing."
For Gina Loes, a UBC grad
who has played with the Ruffled
Feathers since 2008, getting into^
the scene is just a matter of going
to shows, meeting more people,
and putting yourself out there,
fcrom first playing at local cafes
to larger venues like the Biltmore
and eventually festivals like
Rifflmidia and Sled Island, the
Ruffled Feathers have definitely broken into the local scene.
Breaking out is another matter.
"We're still very much a band
that's still stuck in Vancouver. We
need to get out of this city," said
Loes, who cited distance as the
largest obstacle for the band.
Compared to other cities like
Toronto or Montreal, Vancouver is
relatively isolated, which makes it
hard for local musicians to branch
out. Victoria is separated by ferry
while Portland, Seattle and the rest
ofthe U.S. are across the border.
"Vancouver is a really hard place
to tour from," observed Loes, who
has toured down to San Francisco
and through Alberta. "Canada is a
hard place to tour from in general.
It's huge and the towns are small
and bands do it but the payoff is not
necessarily that good."
Although some local artists like
Japandroids and The New Pornog-
raphers, have gained wide, even
international recognition; for every
one that does, there are hundreds
that don't. Some of this canbe attributed to the underground nature
of Vancouver's scene, but mostly it
has to do with what gets heard, and
what doesn't.
There's nothing
based on the
music that's being played that
limits it to being
underground. *
Still happening
"The music that's played in
the Vancouver music scene and
underground music in general
... is only not popular because
it isn't getting played for everyone, not because it's necessarily
worse," said Coates, who cited
White Lung as an example of an
underground sound that gained
currency elsewhere. "There's
nothing based on the music that's
being played that limits it to being
underground."
Peace. Lie. Cosmetics. Dead
Ghosts. Bobby Draino. K ban.
Purple Hearts Social Club. These
are just a handful of local artists
that came up during interviews,
and a tiny fraction ofthe greater
music scene that, while diffuse in
location and exposure, remains
potent in its offerings.
"It's still happening," said
Cordingley, who recalls the influx
of creativity and talent during the
height ofthe weird punk scene.
"There's still a lot of new energy
and new creativity coming into
the town."
It may not be the best of times,
but it's certainly not the worst.
And whether recognized or not,
the local music scene will continue
to exist, thriving under the radar,
pushing boundaries, and offering
its music up for anyone willing to
venture out a little further. tJ // Opinions
Club member is photographed spotting an elusive avian while performing an ollie.
ILLU^RATION JULIAN YU /THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
VANCOUVER'S "INDIE"
MUSIC SCENE ISN'T INDIE
ENOUGH
Vancouver is a difficult place for
local musicians to break into the
music industry — this should come
as no surprise. For those who are
nsanely passionate about creat-
ng good music, it seems almost
mpossible to get your voice — and
your music — heard. This shouldn't
be the case.
Rather than focusing on well-
known "indie" bands, local music
venues should be branching out
and promoting local musicians. The
popular music scene in Vancouver is
largely unviable for unknown musicians, unless you're already part of a
widely unavailable and out of reach
underground music scene. Even in
that case, it's difficult to break out
ofthe underground scene and move
into the public's eye. The only way
to combat this is by getting the well-
known music venues to band together and promote local, underground
— and unknown — musicians.
EXTREME BIRDWATCHING
Birdwatching is pretty rad. Yes, your
grandma is probably super into it,
which doesn't sound like a thrilling
argument for radness, but keep in
mind how many things she's tried in
her decades on this earth — out of all
of them, this is what gets her out of
bed in the morning.
In the same vein as knitting
and soap operas, birdwatching is
popular among our elders due to the
long hours of relaxation punctuated by small points of adrenaline
it provides. Forget yoga — this is
where it's at.
The UBC Birding Club knows
this, and it's doing its part to spread
the good word. For a five dollar fee,
you too can experience the unadulterated joy that birdwatching provides, and there's a lot of joy. Those
five dollars are your admission to a
world only a few people can see —
one that's right in your backyard.
And that includes binocular rentals
as well.
AMS SERVICES
IMPROVEMENTS ARE
LACKLUSTRE
The AMS recently announced that
it'll be expanding its Safewalk and
tutoring services in the upcoming
months. While the idea of improving student services is definitely a
good one, we are also holding back
from throwing confetti at them
just yet. In fact, the decision to
get an extra vehicle for Safewalk
only leads to more questions. Is
Safewalk going to evolve into a
mostly driving-based service in
the future?
And then there's the whole
dispatch call system. This will
definitely make it easier for the
Safewalk team to juggle calls and
send people out on calls faster, but
it still feels like the AMS should be
doing more to promote a system that
is seeing increased demand and is
so important to so many students.
Some possibilities could include
keeping it running later than 2 a.m.
have a great idea to
build community on campus?
need some funding
to make it happen?
$1000 Community Grants available to be won!
Apply for a UTown@UBC Community Grant, and you could be awarded
up to $1000 to create a fun and inspiring community-building project on campus!
All students, faculty, staff, and other residents who live on campus
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IUBCI      a place of mind
Application deadline is October 20th, 2014.
it utown.ubc.ca/grants
UTOWN@UBC
live work learn together
and increasing its pickup locations
beyond campus.
But, in the end, it was the changes
to AMS Tutoringthat really failed to
impress. While it's great that they'll
be updating their website, it just
feels like common sense to let go of a
site that looks like it's come straight
from 2004. It also wouldn't hurt
to improve the tutoring services to
include more free tutoring sessions
and recruit additional tutors from
all walks of their university career
for the paid ones. After all, will a
snappier website really triple the
number of students who sign up for
tutoring, as Ron Gorodetsky claims
it will? That we'd like to see.
UBC HAS A HOUSING
PROBLEM
There's a serious lack of student
housing on campus, and quite
frankly, we're a little ticked off
about it — and most of us don't
even live on campus!
Thousands of students are basically paying to be on waiting lists
while residences are filled up with
straight-from-highschool or newly
admitted first- and second-year
international students who have
guaranteed spots. Over 700 beds
from formerly upper-year residences were given to freshmen this
year, displacing an absurd number
of upper-years wanting to live in rez.
Of course, UBC Housing is planning to solve this issue by building
more residences with the money
they get from the poor saps eagerly
checking to see if they've gone up a
spot on the waitlist.
Overall, the whole situation probably isn't all that terrible. No one's
forcing you to pay to be on a waitlist,
or to be in res at all, for that matter.
But the fact that housing developments are being postponed isn't a
very good sign.
Housing is being given to the
students who really do need it most,
but what's going to happen as UBC
continues to admit more and more
international students, and the
number of guaranteed spots rises?
New residences may not solve the
issue of upper-years being left to
fend for themselves in the wild
housing market of Vancouver.
At least The Ubyssey has office
couches to sleep on when the going
gets tough. If you're really desperate, we rent them for $20 a night or
three proofs. Bring Lysol. Xi
Letter: Keep
the "E" classy
UBC ENGINEERS
Letter
Dear UBC Community,
I write to you today to express
my disappointment and frustration. I, the Engineering Cairn, am
deeply saddened by the current
state of affairs at UBC.
Since before you were born, I
have stood proudly on the centre
of Main Mall not only as a symbol
of engineering pride, but also as a
challenge for those of you non-engineers to destroy. I have survived
burning, bludgeoning, and even a
memorable encounter with a front
end loader.
Over the decades, I have been
defaced by faculties, fraternities,
and just about every other campus
group. I have had Forestry paint
me with a green F, Arts coat me
with purple and glitter, and Sauder
give me a bow-tie. LFS has even
erected scarecrows in front of me.
However, no matter how often I
get defaced, whether it be everyday
or every month, the loyal engineers promptly paint me back to my
proper red and white.
"So," you ask. "why are you
disappointed?" Well recently the
quality of effort that has been put
into defacing me has been... well...
lacklustre.
This year, I have noticed a
steady decline in the quality of my
"redecoration". I am not impressed
by profanity scribbled on my sides
- come on, I want something better than what you find in the SUB
bathrooms! Putting a chair on top
of me is weak. Decorate me with
glitter, cover me with feathers, use
me to show off your faculty pride.
Think bigger. Do better.
Sincerely,
The Engineering Cairn. '3
The Engineering Cairn is a
25-year-old permanent resident of
UBC and is actively involved in the
UBC engineering community.
DO NOT
KEEP
CALM
SEE TWELFTH NIGHT FREE
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night Sept. 25 - Oct 11,2014
FREE theatre tickets at room 023 in SUB llam-2pm
Sex ■ Romance ■ Mystery ■ Comedy // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDAY
rEMBER22,2C
BIRDWATCHING »
UBC Birding Club opens up a hidden world
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
Members ofthe UBC Birding Club
probably see more than you do
when you look up.
"Whenever I ask people who
may not be really into birds,
'What kind of birds have you seen
[around campus]?' it's, 'Oh, crows,
seagulls, pigeons,'" said President
Vivian Hui.
The campus, according to
the club execs, is a hotspot for a
staggering variety of birds, due to
the triple threat location of forest,
land and sea. Club photographer Louis Almario has personally documented more than 80
species, the majority of which
are within transit distance from
Point Grey.
"I joined because my hobby
is photography, and I got my
first long lens and photographed
hummingbirds in Richmond.
I saw the club and [I thought]
'Might as well try it,'" he said.
You might have seen their
advertising: a cartoon bird on a
homemade bird feeder outside
the Student Rec Centre is all that
promotes the UBC Birding Club,
and it's all they need.
"The goal is not to grow more
popular in terms of members, it's
to grow more popular in terms
of members being engaged," said
Hui. "I think that's probably more
important."
The club is open to everyone
with an interest in the avian, regardless of experience. "We cater
to beginners," said Hui. "In fact,
most of our members, aside from
having a general interest in birds
or thinking birds are cute, prob-
=HOTOCOURTESYUBC BIRDING CLUB
Members ofthe UBC Birding Club take part in birdwatching expeditions close to UBC and around the Lower Mainland.
ably don't have much experience.
We also offer beginner classes for
bird identification."
The club frequently ventures
out to practice their passion.
This year, they plan to stay local
by taking advantage of UBC's
outdoor attractions: mainly the
Botanical Garden, Pacific Spirit
Park and the UBC Farm. The cost
to join is a measly five dollars,
and included in that fee is a UBC
Birding Club Membership Card,
access to their birdwatching field
trips — including discounted
admission fees if applicable — and
free rentals of binoculars during
those trips.
The Birding Club offers access
to a world that exists in plain
view, but that few rarely notice.
"It's a very nice place that we
live in for birding here at UBC,
because we have the land, the
ocean and the forest," said Hui.
"[We're] really there to enjoy
nature, because that's what birdwatching is about." Xi
FIELD HOCKEY »
Thunderbirds settle for a draw
Hard-fought home opener against UVic ends 1-1
The UBC women's field hockey team struck first, but a UVic equalizer meant they wouldn't walk away with a win.
Soren Elsav
Staff Writer
Coming off three straight National Championships, the Thunderbirds opened the season with a
new look squad following the
departure of several key components, including captain Miranda
Mann, as well as reigning CIS
Championship MVP Abigail Raye
and longtime coach Hash Kanjee.
Kanjee was replaced by Robin
D'Abreo, who is fresh off his stint
as the assistant coach for the
Canadian senior women's national
team. In the past, D'Abreo has
competed at the Olympic Games
(2000), World Cup (1998), and
Commonwealth Games (1998,
2002, 2006). He and his new
group faced an early season test
as they kicked off their campaign
at home against their longtime
rivals, the University of Victoria.
The first half was rather
cautious, and scoring chances
were hard to come by. Midfield-
=ILE PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE /THE UBYSSEY
ers Gabby Jayme and Hannah
Haughn created a handful of
half-chances that were foiled by
the UVic defence. At the other
end, UBC goalie Lauren Logush
was forced to make a fantastic reflex save from five yards
out late in the half to keep the
game scoreless.
The second half opened up
with UBC seeing the majority of
ball possession for the first ten
minutes. The Thunderbird's pressure finally paid off ten minutes
into the half as last year's Canada
West leading goal scorer, Haughn,
banged in a rebound off ofthe
team's third penalty corner ofthe
game to give her team the lead.
The Vikes mounted considerable pressure for the last portion
ofthe second half as they looked
for the equalizer. They finally
broke through with less than
three minutes remaining from
their own penalty corner as Annie
Walters-Shumka found Marin
Davidson for a back door tap in to
finish off a well designed set play.
UBC's bids for a late winner were
denied and the teams settled for a
1-1 draw.
Although his debut as UBC
head coach did not end in victory,
D'Abreo was very pleased with
the effort. "Given how much I've
actually asked [the team] to do
differently in the last four weeks,
I was really really happy with the
performance ... a lot ofthe things
that we've been working on in
practice I was able to see on the
field, and I was really excited by
that," he said.
D'Abreo is excited about the
direction his new team is heading.
"For this team to pick up as much
as they did that quickly, I'm very
impressed and very excited for
what is to come." tJ 10    I   SPORTS   |    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,2014
SWIMMING »
UBC swimmer Luke Reilly looks to Rio
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
When you speak to Luke Reilly,
there is almost nothing that
betrays his enormous talent. If it
weren't for other people's praise,
you'd never know that he competes at the world's premier level
of swimming.
He was tired the day I met
with him, but he mustered
enough strength to be engaging
and quite inspiring when
speaking about his training and
competition.
"I don't really enjoy the training that much," he said, "but it's
when you line up for the final 50
metres of a race, when you put
in everything you've got, that
makes it all worth it, all the early
mornings and the hard work."
Reilly has competed at an international level of swimming, and
earlier this summer he competed
for Canada in the Commonwealth
games in Glasgow. In terms of a
multi-sport event, this was the biggest meet he has been to; but Reilly
said that, "in terms of standard, the
Pan Pacs [Pan Pacific Swimming
Championships] I went to were
faster."
While he spoke fondly of
the atmosphere in Glasgow, he
described the pressure ofthe big
stage as something to overcome.
He voiced his disappointment at
his own performances this summer
— in Glasgow he dropped three
seconds from his best time.
"I didn't go as fast as I would
like at the Pan Pacs," said Reilly.
At age 19, finishing seventh in the
Commonwealth games is a huge
achievement in itself, but it was not
enough to satisfy Reilly.
It is often the nature of elite athletes to place enormous pressure on
themselves, and to always strive for
better, no matter how well they do
— that mentality will surely drive
him to success in the future.
He'll get a chance to prove it,
as the Olympic games in Rio 2016
are on Reilly's agenda. "That's the
plan. I'll focus on the 400IM [400m
Individual Medley], I want to make
the final and then just see what I
can do there."
Reilly's competition, the
gruelling 400IM, consists of 100
metres of each different type of
stroke: first is butterfly, followed
by backstroke, then breaststroke,
before a final leg of front crawl.
To prepare for the challenges
ahead, Reilly gets up at 5:40 a.m.
each morning to do a morning
session of two and a half hours in
the pool. Later in the day he will
do another three hour session in
the water.
Like many swimmers, his diet
is also a fascinating part of his
routine: "Before my morning
practice I'll usually have a banana
and a bowl of oatmeal, then when
I get back I have an egg scramble,
some toast and some veg. At lunch
I have maybe three bowls of pasta
and leftovers and at dinner I have
roast veg, chicken breasts and I
really love quinoa, I know that's
really stereotypical of me being in
Vancouver, but it's really great."
His diet is always a work in
progress as he and his nutritionist are constantly tweaking
it to improve his performance;
he says they focus on complex
carbs, low gluten and low lactose
so that he never feels unwell
during training.
Alongside his nutritionist, he
has four coaches to keep him
training right; one of them, Brian
Johns, holds the Canadian national record for Reilly's event.
"I'd love to take that record
of four minutes and 10 seconds,"
said Reilly.
Right now his personal best is
four minutes and 15 seconds, but
Reilly is only 19 and feels he can
get a lot faster as he gets older.
With a schedule as busy as
Reilly's, it can be tough to fit
everything in. He studies Arts
and is aiming at an English
major.
"It can be hard, with school,
practice, sleep and also trying
to socialize a bit," he said. In his
free time, Reilly mostly enjoys
sleeping; considering his routine,
it's hard to argue with that.
As Luke Reilly looks forward
to his next big meet, the Pan
Americas in Toronto, UBC can
feel lucky to have such a talent to
cheer for — surely the Canadian
home crowd in Ontario will give
him a hair-raising welcome. Xi
Reilly works hard to strike a balance between school, friends and swimming.
PHOTO CHERIHANHASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
=HOTOCOURTESYLUKE REILLY
Donations to AMS Shinerama
#UBCyogafest
In partnership with MEC, UBC Recreation,
the AMS, Hot Box Yoga and the UBC Bookstore MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
RUGBY»
Women's rugby team disposes of Dinos
Thunderbirds take their home opener against Calgary
Soren Elsay
Staff Writer
The women's rugby team kicked
off their season with a 24-19 victory over the visiting University
of Calgary Dinos at Lord Rugby
field on Friday night.
The Thunderbirds looked
focused and determined early in
Friday's matchup, grinding down
the Dino defence and spending
the majority of their time on the
offensive. The game remained
tight, however, a testament to
the solid defensive play ofthe
visiting team. 21 minutes into the
first half, the Thunderbirds were
finally able to capitalize when
inside center Mackenzie Lee ran
the ball in for the game's first try.
After a successful convert, the
score was 7-0 Thunderbirds.
UBC closed the first half with
an impressive defensive stance.
Thanks in part to a ferocious hit
by Lee, the Thunderbirds shut
the door on a Calgary team that
fell just inches short of tying the
game, but after dominating most
of the half and only leading by
seven, the Thunderbirds left the
hometown crowd feeling uneasy.
"We talked in the change room
about our mindset," said head
coach Maria Gallo. "The next ten
minutes in the second half really
sets the pace for the rest ofthe
game. You really have to come in
and get a try under your belt."
Unfortunately, the opposite
happened. After misreading the
bounce off an early Dino kick in
the second half, Ciara Malone
watched them stroll into the
THUNDERBIRDS »
The women's rugby team opened their season with a solid outing against their Alberta rivals.
PHOTO CHERIHANHASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
end zone uncontested to tie the
game at seven. This proved to
be the sole blemish on Malone's
otherwise flawless perform
ance. The third year from Delta,
B.C displayed a speed that was
unmatched on the field — the
Thunderbirds' most dangerous
offensive weapon; a thorn in the
side ofthe Dinos' defence.
On the following possession,
redemption ensued. Malone,
after catching a pass from Megan
Hamm, dashed past a diving Dino
defender for the game's longest
try, throwing the Thunderbirds
back in front by a score of 14-7.
This seemed to spark the rest of
the team, leading to a successful
penalty kick, and an impressive
try by Shawnee Monchalin, who
picked off an errant Calgary pass
and put the Thunderbirds up 24-7.
Complacency was the
Thunderbirds' biggest threat, as
they fell into a defensive shell for
the rest ofthe game that allowed
the Dinos to make a contest out
of what should've been a blowout.
After two Calgary tries, the game
ended 24-19. Gallo blamed early
season nerves for the Thunder-
bird's late game mishaps.
"You want play from whistle to
whistle. That's the big one. The
girls got kind of anxious, thought
they had the win under their belt,
and took their foot off the gas,
which is the wrong mindset. But
they'll learn from that. We'll go
back to that lull in the game and
talk about how to prevent that in
the future," she said.
Revenge will be on the mind
next week as the Thunderbirds
host the University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns. The Pronghorns ended the Thunderbirds' season last
year after defeating them in the
conference's bronze medal game.
"Revenge is always sweet,
right?" said Gallo. "But we're really just focusing on our team right
now. We're going to keep doing
what's right for us. We're going to
focus on our strengths." tJ
ZOEFETTIG-WINN   ■ARIFVIRJEE
TERAVANBEILEN      ■ SCOTT SECORD
MARIA BERNARD
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
SUMMER STARS
Rowing
Field Hockey
fa
Swimming
jUG
Golf
Trackand
Cross-Country
1. What was the (athletic) highlight of your
summer?
2. What 'summer' activity do you really want to
do in September while it's still nice outside?
3. Which UBC football player do you secretly
have a crush on/want to be like?
4. What advice do you have for new UBC students who are looking to avoid the freshman
15?
Training 2-3 times a day
with some great athletes...
at the London Training
Centre in a very focused
and exciting environment
was the definite highlight.
So far I've been very
committed to continuing
the high degree of ice
cream consumption that
got started in Italy. I have no
plans to go lightweightthis
season.
If I was more like Bryan
Rideout, I'd probably be
a better person... He is
extremely knowledgable
about Ashtanga yoga and
the paleo diet.
Join crew. Especially if
you're tall and strong.
Playing [pro]forthe
Auckland NHL (National Hockey League)
team. It is made up of
most New Zealand
national team players.
Myfavouritesummer
activity is having a beer on
the patio at Mahony and
Sons UBC.
Probablydon'twantto
be like any UBC football
players at the moment
afterthey got crushed by
Calgary.
Trynottoendupat
either Fresh Slice or
McDonald's after every
Pit night.
Winning a bronze medal in the 4x100 medley
relaywith myamazing
teammates at the Commonwealth Games.
Go to my cottage in northern Ontario.
The one guy that scored
thetouchdown at homecoming. Good onya
whoeveryou are.
Stay away from
Chubbard's. Also eat
some veggies.
Myhighlightofthe
summerwas shooting 61
(-11) at my home course
in Calgary.
Swim in the ocean!
Former QB Billy Greene.
Everyone liked the guy.
Stick with an exercise
routine and follow it
throughout the semester.
Running a personal best
at NACAC Championships
where I represented Canada.
Run in shorts!
Thunder #1. So dreamy.
Avoid Magda's/Hub-
bard's and make time for
exercise.
5. What does the acronym UBC really stand
for?
Oh man I wish I knew.
UBC: University on a
Beautiful Campus.
Ultimate Bird Champs?
University of Building
Construction.
Undoubtedly Beautiful
Campus! 12    I    GAMES    I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,2014
_
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ACROSS
1-AOL, e.g.
4- Antipasto morsel
9- Parsley-family herb, used for
flavoring
14- Dawn Chong
15-Birth-related
16-Little pie
17- Remove the moisture from
19-Author Zola
20- Dame
21- Female fox
23- Slaughter of basebal
24- Israeli desert region
27- Like grass in the morning
30- Namesake
32-Caviar
33-Forepart of the skull 65-
37-Brightly colored lizard 66-
39-Roman Catholic shrine 67-
40-Governing bodies 68-
42-Free laces, say 69-
43- Employment seekers may
pound it   ' 	
44-Round Table title DOWN
45-Walks with long steps
48- "Aguarius" musical 1-
50- Devoured 2
51-Perlman of "Cheers" 3
55- Prongs 4
57-Sylvan 5
58-Nitrogen compound 6
60-Shire, Breton, or Irish 7-
Draught 8
64-Fowl pole 9
Threepio's buddy
Sun. talk
Musical sounds
City in West Yorkshire
Golfer Ernie
"Goodnight" girl
Word after Anglo
Basil-based sauce
■ Asingletime
■Fond du	
■Call day
Large container
Cricket team
■Acme
Study and s
Gp abroads
STUDY    TRAVEL • WORK • VOLUNTEER
SATURDAY
SEPTEMBER
VANCOUVER
CONVENTION
CENTRE
EXPO
1pm-5pm
SEMINARS
startat12noon
www.studyandgoabroad.com
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10-Titled
11- Go from place to place
12- Letters on a Cardinal's cap
13- Observe, viewing organ
18-Apr. addressee
22-Climbing vine
24-Uh-uh
25-Big birds
26-Obtained
28-What girls will be
29- Brewer's need
30-Conceals
31- Horse locks
33- Partly melted snow
34- Ancient Greek colony
35-Food
36- Dernier	
38-Leg
40- "Smooth Operator" singer
41- Balanced
43- Cavity
46- Peg used on the first in golf
47- Mischievous person
49-Washer cycle
51-Aussie hopper
52-Stallion, e.g.
53-Ford flop
54- Australia's Rock
56-Takes home
57- on first?
58- This was produced by Van
Gogh, for example
59-Cattle call
61- Exist
62- Road with a no.
63- Director Browning;guilty

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