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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1987

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Array THE UBYSSEY!
Join The Ubyssey
be published
be cool
be in SUB 241K
All talk no jock
Students demand say in
athletic decisions
By Katherine Monk
A group of UBC students will
meet today to voice their concern
about the possible decrease in
student representation in athletics at UBC.
The meeting is a response to
the release of the report of the
president's   task force to review
athletics and sport services.
"Students want a voice, and
we are capable of doing a good job,"
said Linda Diano, Women's Big
Block president and chief organizer of today's meeting.
"If we just sit around while
this report goes through, we run
the risk of losing everything we've
worked for and it may be impossible to get it back," said Diano in
an interview yesterday.
Diano said the report suggests the University Athletic
Council absorb the powers of the
men's and women's athletic
committees in order to make the
entire system more coherent.
As it is now, students have the
opportunity to make suggestions
through the Men's and Women's
Athletic Committees where they
have a big enough voice to make
themselves heard in the
president's office.
But with the possible dissolution of the MAC and WAC, Diano
fears that students will be smothered by the faculty, staff, and
alumni which makes up the proposed University Athletic Council.
According to the report, the
UAC would only have five students to be nominatedby the AMS.
" I'm not putting down the AMS,
but there's also the problem that
the students who sit on the Council may not be athletes either,"
said Diano.
Sanitation strike leaves big mess at UBC (see story page 9)
MantM X photo
Expo style passports
move into high school
By R.D. Shore
Premier Vander Zalm announced his "Passports for Excellence" plan to financially reward
high school students for good
grades Wednesday.
High school students will
soon be rewarded financially for
good grades under a new program
announced by the premier Wednesday.
The "Passports for Excellence" program will issue students
in grades nine through 12 booklets
to be stamped for academic excellence. Upon graduation the booklets would be redeemable toward
tuition at any BC post-secondary
institution.
NDP education critic Barry
Jones is happy the new program
will target younger students, but
said it fails to get to the root of BC's
accessibility problem.
The program may be beneficial in motivating younger stu-
Volume 70, Number 8
dents, he said, but "it's materialistic and gimmicky."
Jones said what the advanced
education system needs most now
is not financial incentives for students but enough funding to the
institutions to enable them to accept more registrations.
"While this move introduces
funding at the student level there
won't be space available unless
there is more funding at the university level," he said.
UBC financial aid director
Byron Hender sat on the
minister's advisory committee
that hatched the plan last spring.
He said the program was developed in an attempt to encourage
more BC students to seek a post-
secondary education.
"This is not a financial aid
plan, we want to find those students with potential and change
their attitudes toward higher education? said Hender.
Fewer BC high school students carry on into advanced education than in other provinces, he
said.
"We felt students should be
thinking of post-secondary education earlier because if they wait
until grade 12, they may find it's
too late to plan financially for university," said Hender.
Jones is pleased that more
money is going into education, although he still wants to see more.
"Any time this government,
with its record on education, releases money we should be happy,
but we still have nothing to brag
about? said Jones.
"Last year at this time B.C.
was tenth out of ten provinces in
education funding and I don't
think that has changed."
Advanced education minister
Stan Hagen said redemption values between $500 and $750 per
year of achievement are being
considered.
"Any member of a committee
is only as good as the information
they get? said Diano?and we have
to make sure that the people who
sit on these committees actually
know what's going on, and are
involved in the athletics at UBC."
"The more you hang around
the Athletic Department the more
you realize how uninformed everybody is, and how little communication actually takes place. I don't
see anything wrong in making the
UAC more accountable - but I hope
to God student participation won't
be forgotten," said Diano.
The meeting will take place
today from 12:30 to 1:30 in WMG
rm. 211-213, and is open to the
entire campus.
Harcourt wants
new universities
By Deanne Fisher
"We can't afford Social
Credit? Mike Harcourt, the "next
premier of BC? told UBC students
Wednesday.
The provincial opposition
leader's half hour speech dealt
with advanced education funding,
NDP campaign promises and
premier Vander Zalm's "vision" of
a county system for British Columbia.
Harcourt said the Social
Credit party's ''continual mistreatment of education" has
evolved "from restraint to educational anorexia." He said BC has
the country's lowest per capita
funding for post secondary education.
Harcourt blames advanced
education minister Stan Hagen
for students being turned away
this year at both the university
and college levels. Some of the
student aid funding taken away
five years ago was returned but
the minister "didn't think of the
impact? said Harcourt.
"The picture for education is
still grim."
He said the NDP hopes to
improve the picture by creating a
university in Prince George and
possibly in the interior, "so you
have a choice for education in your
communities."
Encouraging students to pursue liberal arts degrees, Harcourt
said "we still need people to be able
to write, to articulate and to communicate."
Harcourt promised that when
he becomes premier "in 822 days"
Bill 19 would be abolished and a
model labour relations act created
in its place.
The NDP will also design a
pay equity bill for women to "make
sure women have the opportunity
to be hired and trained."
Achildcare program proposed
by the NDP will pay for itself by
allowing for "more women out
working, paying taxes? he said.
But he said we cannot humanly afford not to fund NDP
promised centres for battered
women and abused children.
In his criticism of Vander
Zalm's proposed decentralization
of government, Harcourt said that
"Vander Zalm's own caucus
doesn't even know what it's all
about."
Harcourt said that Vander
Zalm's plan in effect would put
more bureaucrats and politicians
on top of those existing and centralize more power in the
premier's office.
NDP leader Mike Harcourt was at the SUB yesterday
Doanna Fisher photo
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 2,1987 HTTHir
CLASSES
TODAY
MUSSOC
The Musical Theatre Society is
holding auditions for its Feb. production of "MERRILY WE ROLL
ALONG" - Oct. 2-3. Times: Fr. 5-
10 p.m. St. James' Church on 10th
Ave.; Sat. 1-4 p.m. St. James'
Church. A general meeting for
Club's Days volunteers will be
held Oct. 7,12:30 -1:20 p.m. Buch
D310.
U.B.C. SKI CLUB
General Meeting / Bzzr Garden,
12:30 - 8:00 p.m., SUB 212. "The
door prize will be our social coordinator." More info: Warren Fong,
SUB 210, 228-6185.
DISABLED STUDENTS'
SOCIETY
General Meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
215. More info: Lee Grenon, 222-
2208.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENTS
UNION
Annual Salmon Barbeque, 4:00
p.m., Scarfe ounge.
BAHA'I CLUB
Video/Social, 7:30 p.m. 5957
Chancellor Blvd., UBC. More information: call Stephen Gergly,
222-2985.
ECONOMICS STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Bzzr Garden, 4:30-7:30,
Buchanan Lounge.
SATURDAY
ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Vespers, 5 p.m., St. Andrew's Hall,
6040 Iona Dr.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Caemmerer Lecture Series: "Art,
Faith, and Foolishness." 7:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SUNDAY
ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Divine Liturgy, 9:30 a.m., St.
Andrew's Hall, 6040 Iona Drive.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Caemmerer Lecture Series: "Art,
Faith and Foolishness." 7:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Lutheran Student Movement
Communion Service, 10:00 a.m.,
Lutheran   Campus  Centre,  Ray
Schultz 224-1614.
MONDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Mali Summer Seminar 1988: Information meeting. Noon, SUB
211.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Free noon-hour films, Japan Film
Series: "Japanese Architecture —
The Living Heritage" (23 mins.,
1983), and "Japanese Gardens"
(14 mins., 1974).
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Annual General Meeting - all welcome. 7:00 p.m., SUB 211.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Classic SubFilms: "American
Graffiti," starring Richard
Dreyfuss. 7:00and9:30p.m.,SUB
Theatre.
HOT
FLASHES
END THE ARMS RACE
Move It For Peace"! Join in this
annual fund raising event on Saturday, October 3rd, beginning 11
a.m. at Robson Square. A walk
through downtown and around
the Stanley Park seawall accompanied by hundreds of bright blue
"peace balloons." Collect pledges
or donate on the spot; whatever
you choose, wear your favorite
blue and white clothes and "Move
It" with EAR. More info 736-2366.
OPPORTUNITY
KNOCKS
Get involved in Vancouver's most
dynamic women's organization —
and make a difference in
someone's life. Share your talents
and expertise and develop new
skills. Information Sessions for
volunteers held Wednesday, October 7 at 1 p.m. or 5:15 p.m. Vancouver YWCA, 580 Burrard; call
683-2531 for more information.
SANTA SAC,
Clubs and Undergraduate Societies, if your office needs:
i) a TV or, -x
ii) a message board or,
iii) a mirror or,
iv) a large counter/shelf unit.
Contact Tim Bird at 228-3961. The
AMS has these items in storage
and wishes to distribute them to
club offices. The supplies are very
limited, so the first few requests
will be taken.
TUITION FEE
LOTTERY
Clubs and Undergraduate Societies can raise funds by selling
Tuition Fee Lottery tickets. The
tickets are $1.00 each and the
organization keeps 20 cents per
ticket. Pick up books of tickets at
the AMS business office soon, because the deadline for returning
the sold tickets is November 5.
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Mon.-Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays   *
4:00 p.m.-9 p m.
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Opposite Chevron Station
OPEN EARLY.
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and ends late so we're here when
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THE CLASSIFIEDS
85-TYPING
5 - COMING EVENTS
50 - RENTALS
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INVITES YOU TO JOIN US IN
WORSHIP
IN THE CHAPEL OF THE EPIPHANY
VANCOUVER SCHOOLOFTHEOLOG Y
6050 CHANCELLOR BLVD
SUNDAYS - 10:30 A.M.
MINISTER: REV. ALAN REYNOLDS
CHURCH OFFICE PHONE: 224-7011
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS ■
255-7342. We rent IBM, PC and
compatibles. All types of printers,
daily, weekly, or monthly rentals.
75 - WANTED
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
PERFECT STUDENT CAR! '76
Toyota Corolla SR5 New Carb. &
Brakes, No rust, exc. Running cond.
$1795 OBO Phone 434-1900.
LANDROVER 1969 MODEL 88
Series HA. $1000.00 and you put it
back together. Phone Michael
321-8556.	
1973 BLUE VW BUG, stereo, snows,
$1200. Phone 736-3274.	
Men's five-speed bike, $70, and
Ladies' Ten Speed Bike, $35.
Call 733-8407.
20 - HOUSING	
1 BR SUITE, S/C, FP, bright, avail.
now$350/mo. Util. incl. Call 263-
9204 (H), 261-7275 (W) - Jeanette.
30 - JOBS	
SAMTs is looking for delivery people
who understand the hospitality business & have their own trans.
Apply at 2200 Cornwall Ave.
737-7777.
35 - LOST	
LOST - $100 REWARD. Gold ring, 3
bands, small diamonds - very
sentimental - please phone Danielle
263-9001.
CURLING - New in town or just
looking for a young, fun, mixed
league? Sat. 1 pm. Starts Oct. 3rd.
Call David 732-7645, if no ans, 733-
8969 to leave message.
Women only pis.
HAIR IS HAIR DESIGN requires
models for hairstyling colour, perm
workshops (Hair must be in good
cond.) Please call Rebecca 879-5435.
10 HEALTHY Caucasian Male (20-
45 years) Smokers needed for a
Pharmacokinetic study involving
drug intake and blood sampling. An
honorarium of $210 will be paid for
the complete study. For detailed info
contact Grace Chan,
228-6772.
WANTED: TUTOR for 4th year
genetics course. Please phone
222-1243 (leave message).
80 - TUTORING	
PARISIAN FRENCH
Teacher-Tutor
Program conformed to individual
Reasonable Rates.
Serious students only.
Jill 684-7479.
WANT A FIRST CLASS GRADE?
An articulate and well organized
essay, report, or thesis earns a top
mark. Have your work edited and
learn essential writing techniques to
meet highest academic standards.
An experienced Writer-Editor-Tutor,
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counselling. Full range of academic
services available from research and
proof reading to typing and creative
writing instruction.
CALL A&A TUTORIAL SERVICE
687-5277
JEEVA'S Word Processing, 201-636
W. Broadway (Micom & IBM PC),
$1.50/pg. (1.75/pg. for Laser print)
dble. spaced text.  Equations &
Tables: $14/hr. Photocopying 876-
5333. Visa/Master.
WP TERM PAPERS, theses,
mscrpts, essays, incl. reports, tech.
equa., letters, resumes.  Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING Specialists -
U Write, We Type.  Theses, resumes,
letters, essays. Days, Eves, Wknds.
736-1208.
WORDPOWER - Word processing -
I.B.M. & Macintosh laser printouts.
Student discounts. 222-2661.
NEED ESSAYS TYPED? Need
Resumes Typed? For all typing
needs call Paula at 274-0108.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST AVAILABLE.  Quality, accurate work.  Fast
Service.  Reasonable rates, 734-1302.
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of essays, term papers, thesis.  $1.25
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Ave., 263-0351.  Experienced and
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PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 yrs.
exp. word proc. & IBM typewriter.
Student rates. Dorothy Martinson
228-8346.
ACCURATE REPORTS.
Broadway & Granville. 732-4426.
Student rates available.
TYPING? Experienced & reasonable. Spelling & grammar no
problem, APA a specialty!  Discount
rates, min. notice. Kits area - June -
738-1378.	
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM
NOTICE SERVICE, essays &
resumes, scripts, proofreading,
writing/research help.   327-0425.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING:
Student discounts.  Laser & letter
quality printers.  10th & Discovery
222-2122.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
FREE GERBILS!! 6 weeks old.
Great pets.  Phone Philip 228-0677.
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Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 2,1987 Doctrine plays
game with life
By Elynn Richter
"Superpower strategic doctrine is a political game that has
nothing to do with reality," UBC
professor Michael Wallace said
Monday.
Speaking at a Science for
Peace lecture, Wallace said military strategy "is a huge game of
let's pretend? that ignores the
prospect of mass execution.
Wallace said many scientists
approach strategic doctrine as a
scientific theory and don't consider morality a factor in its development.
"Morality in doctrine (to scientists) is...sort of like farting in
church. It's something you don't
do," said Wallace.
But morality must be a consideration when talking about
who or how many people should
die, said Wallace. "The separation of strategy and morality is
impossible."
"If we ignore explicit debate
over morality we ignore the history of moral philosophy. The
ultimate unit of analysis comes
down to individiual conscience?
Wallace went on to discuss
the weaponry involved in the
arms race.
He said American forces
were a "terrible mess" with vulnerable missile silos and "penetration bombers that don't penetrate."
"If I were the Russians I
wouldn't be worried," he said.
On Canada's position in the
arms race, Wallace said "Canadians are the suckers of the world"
for buying the F-18 bomber.
Since there is no conventional threat to Canada, Wallace
said the CF-18 bomber is only
good for "breaking the sound
barrier at the Abbotsford air
show."
He said our dilemma is that
"there is no military solution for
Canada," in the arms race.
Problems abound
B-lot counting system not counting
By Tony W. Wong
Widespread abuse of the
parking gates installed in B-Lot
last year is still causing students
problems.
"The B-Lot system only
works if people are honest and
courteous," said Km Cordingley,
arts 3. "Stupid people are sneaking in and out of lots," and fouling
up the system, she said.
Because cars come in
through the exit gates, or sneak
out withoug paying, the counter
system continues to admit cars
into full lots, where they may be
ticketed for parking illegally.
"People are entering full lots.
They have a choice of either parking (illegally) and risking a $15
dollar fine or leaving and wasting
a quarter," said Cordingley.
She thinks it is time students
Hospitals study merger
demanded the problem be addressed. "Students shouldn't be
so complacent about (the parking
problem), she said. "They should
speak up and make student council hear."
Kent Toy, arts 2, also wants
to see the system improved.
"They should re-adjust the system so that people can't enter
illegally. The counter system
should be reset daily."
Traffic and security director
John Smithman said he is aware
of the problem and his department is "doing everything we can
to make the system work."
To counter the abuse and
prevent lots from overflowing the
lot indicators are now set so that
the "Full" signs will flash before
the lot reaches capacity, he said.
UBC Health Sciences Centre
Hospital and Shaughnessy
Hospital's Board of Trustees have
set up a committee to do a detailed study of the advantages of
an administrative merger between the two hospitals.
A working committee set up
this summer came up with two or
three pages of possible advantages, said Dr. George Price, acting president of Health Sciences.
Price said the main advantage would be a savings in admin
istrative costs, although the
amount couldn't be determined
until after the merger took place.
The major disadvantage would be
the distance between the sites of
the two hospitals, he said.
The committee will discuss
the list with hospital staff in order to receive their comments and
suggestions.
The report will be tabled by
the committee to the Board of
Trustees of both hospitals by November 30.
POSITION AVAILABLE
PROGRAMMES ASSISTANT (1/2 TIME)
To plan for, advertise, & implement programmes.
To promote the UBC Grad Centre. To distribute
and post advertisements.
PREFER experience in graduate work, volunteer
work, publications and promotions work, supervisory experience, and one's own independent
transportation. PC experience essential. Must be
able to work independently.
APPLY: House Director, UBC Graduate
Student Society, 6371 Crescent Rd.,
Vancouver, V6T1W5. Closing date:
OCT 7/87.
first Diachem Bowl victory
Soccer teams split in Diachem Bowl
Wednesday night's Diachem
Bowl at Thunderbird Stadium
proved sweet for the UBC
women's soccer team, but sour for
the men's side.
The women's team crushed
their SFU opponents 4-0 in the
evening's opener, while the men's
team was dominated by a well
disciplined SFU squad in the
feature game, 2-1.
Keeper Sandra Neill recorded the shutout for the 'Birds
in a game that UBC dominated.
The two goals in the first half
were scored by midfielders Mitch
Ring and Wendy Brown. Ring,
who was also selected as the
game's most valuable player, said
the team played super.
"We're a lot stronger this
year than we were last year? said
Ring.
Brown also notched the third
goal for the 'Birds in the second
half; her second that night.
Tiny Zabeen Janmohamed
closed the scoring for the 'Birds in
the second half with an opposite
foot blast from 18 yards out that
found the top left corner of the
SFU net.
"We played a good strong
game," said head coach Brian
Thomson. "We had one goal given
to us, but worked hard for the
other three."
In men's action someone
blew a hole into UBC's heralded
back wall and let SFU carry off
the Diachem Bowl.
The Bowl wasn't the only
thing SFU carried; they also carried the play for most of the game.
UBC's back line played
sloppy and careless defense, giving up the ball to the Clansmen
numerous times in 'Bird territory.
Game MVP Rob Cirjak, who
scored SFU's first goal off of a
corner kick, was left unmarked
when he headed in the ball.
"I was surprised to see that
no one marked Rob," said Clansmen head coach Kieth Watts.
The second SFU goal was
also scored by Cirjak.
UBC's only goal was scored
by Mike Mosher off of a cross. The
goal was the result of UBC's only
shot in the second half.
"The game could easily have
been 3-1 or 4-1? said Watts.
And well it could have been
were it not for the defensive prowess of centre back, Gregor Young
and keeper, Rob Zambrano.
Young was the lone bright
spot for the UBC side. On two
identical plays he shotgunned
from halfway across the field, like
Superman saving the woman tied
to the train tracks, to make goal
saving tackles on SFU forwards.
The UBC men's team has the
weekend off, while the women's
team will be in Saskatchewan in
the first of two Canada West tournaments.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1987 AUTUMN LECTURES
SIR OWEN CHADWICK, O.M.
Recently retired Regius Professor of Modern History, Master of Selwyn College,
Cambridge, and President of theBritish Academy, Sir Owen Chadwick is one of
Britian's most distinguished historians, especially of church and society during the last
three   centuries. Currently, he is Chancellor of the University of East Anglia.
THE MIND OF THE EVANGELICAL MOVEMENT
Tuesday, October 6 At University Chapel, 5375 University Blvd. at 1:00 PM
(A Regent College Lecture)
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION
Wednescay, October 7 Epiphany Chapel, Vancouver School of Theology, at7:00 PM
MUSSOLINI AND THE POPE DURING WORLD WAR II
Thursday, October 8 In Room A-100, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 PM
RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN HISTORY AND TODAY
Saturday, October 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 8:15 PM
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
October 2, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 .    w^ «. S FROM *   _ ^
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UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
WEST COASTS BEST
Driving Range Facility
SPECIAL
1/2 price on a
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I I
Images of Industry
INDUSTRIAL IMAGES / INDUSTRIAL
IMAGINATION is a collection of work by various
artists across the country which show a period of
Canadian social history seldom explored or seen in
the artistic medium.
These pieces created in the years encompassed
by the two World Wars (1910's to 1950's) celebrate
industry as an instrument of growth and prosperity. The worker is depicted as a heroic figure,
labouring to forge a new world. This is a romantic,
idealistic vision contrast to contemporary views.
All this is evident in the two large panel
pieces, "The Romance of Nickel" by Charles
INDUSTRIAL IMAGES / INDUSTRIAL IMAGINATION
Vancouver Art Gallery, 3rd Floor
Sept 18 to Nov 8. Free admission Tuesdays
Comfort and "Railroads and Shipping" by
Fisher, Goranson & Huges. The former, commissioned by Energy, Mines and Resources Canada,
gives a wide overview of the metal industry. In
shades of brown and copper, two massive figures
work amongst images of a bridge, a train, airplanes, a radio tower and a casket of molten metal.
It is symbolic and expressionistic.
The latter, commissioned for the B.C. Pavil-
lion in the Exposition of 1939, show the docks of
Vancouver with the cityscape in the background
and the rail and dock workers in the foreground.
Originally meant to inspire, these works like
many others in the collection, show men subservi
ent to their work. In many of the paintings and
prints, the worker's face is unseen, much less
individual facial expressions. The figures represent a collective rather than an individual. The
strong thematic nature of the exhibit and its often
dramatic presentation, considerations of artistic
skill and method are secondary to the strong
artistic skill and method.
Yet examples of artistic achievement are
present. The sharp precise lines of Lawerence
Hyde's black and white wood engravings are
striking and atmospheric. Silhouettes of workers
are dwarfed by towering factory   himneys and
grain elevators. The radiant colors and sweeping
brush strokes of Frederick Tavlr
"Drill
er,
Teamwork" abound with energy and motion.
There are also works which balance the
prevailent tone of optimism and progress. H.G.
Glyde's painting of "Imperial Wildcat No. 3 —"
shows a cold, desolate landscape, grey buildings
and weary workers. The foreground is devastated
by vehical tracks filled with snow and mud.
Hutchinson's linocuts entitled "Protest", "Canadian Home and Garden" and "Lockout" reveal the
hardship and poverty of the worker.
Historical photographs of the B.C. Canneries
in Steveston, a Labour Day Parade and auto
worker strikes in Ontario add an element of
sobering reality to the show.
This collection of Canadian works displays
both our artistic and social development. It is an
enlightening exhibit.
By KATHY CHUNG
Early music pleases
Audience goes home beaming of Bach
Vancouver's distinguished Early Music Society
successfully opened their 1987-88 concert series
with an exciting program completely dedicated to
"good old" Johann Sebastian Bach. The audience
was treated to a choice selection of well known and
contrasting works from different periods of Bach's
musical life and despite a couple of awkward
moments in the first half, the evening blossomed
into a stimulating and pleasurable experience.
MUSIC
Vancouver Early Music Society
September 26
Point Grey Auditorium
First on the program we heard the Motet; Jesu
meine Freude (Jesus my great Joy). With this work,
the audience immediatelly became aware of
performers. The choir (a quintet) and the instrumental ensemble were very much alive from the
opening moments right up to the end of the concert.
Their blending and articulation was exceptionally
good and obviously well attended.
Of particular note in this work was the fugue
movement that strengthened the momentum of the
evening so much that an unfortunate mis-cue in the
following movement practically went unnoticed.
Apart from this, an excellent performance prevailed.
Next on the program we heard the Branden-
berg Concerto No.5. With the choir now absent
from the stage the skills of the instrumentalists
were even more noticable. Particularly remarkable
was the harpsichord cadenza in the third move
ment played by Doreen Oke. Although the ensemble took an unexpected pau^e just prior to her
solo cadenza, which would have p* _de musicians of
a lesser degree crumble, Doreen proceeded to stun
the audience with a commandit
.lerformance.
be choir and the
' -"age for a
mtafa;Gottes
"ie is best).This
'•itet were
•".ices. Fortu-
rter life as being
■■> "he exciting
''e Point Grey
■1 as the audience
Following intermission, bot.li
intrumental ensemble returned ■■.
delightful performance of Bach ; !
zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit(Goti ;
kantata, as well as the opening \
originally intended for funeral =e
nately however, their view of th
joyful and rewarding only add<*rl
energy that had accumulated in •
Auditorium that evening.
This energy continued to bin
eventually heard solos from some of the choir. The
first soloist was the tenor Ray Harris. His voice
had a delicate tone that quite intimately portrayed
the mournful fact that "we all must die".
Ray Nurse followed with a convincing bass
solo that seriously reminded us that "before we die,
we had better make sure all things are in order-Or
Else!" Also excellent was baritone Gary Dahl. He
rose from his chair and took full command of the
stage. He sang so convincingly and so confidently
that he most definitely was the highlight of the
evening.
With this stimulating evening coming to a end,
the performers received the audiences' rapturous
app uise knowing the; had indeed done very well.
By BOB SNOWDON
Gftoovy,
4>N'T it?
Page 4
THE U3YSSEY
October 2, 1987 Heritage inspires art
11 *5J weatlodge Etchings", currently on display at the UBC Museum of Anthropology,
li^ is an expression of Native heritage through a highly individualistic filter.
Jane Ash Poitras describes herself as an artist who happens to be an Indian. This
does not imply that the one is secondary to the other, but simply means that as an
artist her primary concern is to articulate her experience in the fullest sense. Her
work, therefore, is a focal point for tension between the cultures.
Born in northern Alberta, Poitras grew up in an Edmonton foster home. Like
many native Indians, she first embraced her heritage as an adult. "Sweatlodge
Etchings" speaks of that return.
The sweatlodge, we learn, is a low, domelike structure where sweatbaths are
taken for purposes of healing and purification. In this darkened space, the subconscious mind is free. The artist describes the experience as "incredible. [It was] a crisis
time in my life...I went in for healing purposes."
Powerfully evocative, Poitras' sweatlodge visions flicker against blackness. We
share her intensely personal journey into the past, recent and ancient.
"Shaking Tent Shaman" is the haunting image of a mask suspended in the night,
its lines softly glowing.
"Constitutional Rights" is a shift to the here and now: a news photo of a Native
Rights march is smoothly integrated into the shifting dark-
Particularly strong is "Sweatlodge", the image of a woman and an abstracted sunlike shape coming together, like two slides under a microscope. It is an image of
resolution.
Poitras acknowledges varied areas of influence in her work. "I don't just live with
Cree images," she says. She cites Picasso as a main "motivator", and describes two
years spent in an MFA program at New York's
Columbia University as pivotal in her career.
Poitras expresses diverse aesthetic interests in
her work- notably, a concern with line and texture.
Her surfaces are varied, her forms verge on the
abstract.
My only regret was that the theatre setting
made viewing awkward: these are prints which
should be seen from as many angles as possible.
By JUSTINE BROWN
IT'S OCTOBER
The Party's Over!
Except of course at...
Monday:
Tuesday:
Wednesday:
Thursday:
Friday:
Saturday:
Hospitality Night
Draft Night
Get Schnapped
Animal Night
Beat the Clock
2 Fer Night
PS. Bring your Student Card and
some Valid ID and Tommy Africa's
will give you free admission any
day of the week during September
& October.
Mon. - Sat. 9 p.m. - 2 a.m.
1010 Beach Avenue
Vancouver, B.C
HILLEL'S FAMOUS HOT LUNCH
TUESDAY'S SPECIAL
MEXICAN FOOD            a
Dessert Too!            V
Tuesday Oct. 6. 12:20-2:00          / ■
at Hillel House (behind Brock Hall)  /  \
BE THERE !                   **- -
t
■ ■
FESTIVAL
OF
ANIMATION
Final Week (Seriously!)
Must End Oct. 8th!!
Showtimes: 7 & 9:30 pm
Sat & Sun matinees 2 pm
See all 16 films each performance plus...
The Return of "Snookles!"
Due to overwhelming demand, we advise
purchasing advance tickets:
McNews        Track Records Highiife
UBC Black Swan Ridge
(The mature rated "Lupo The Butcher" will
GENERAL be shown at evening performances.)
^LIKEfc
16th Avenue & Arbutus
738-6311
KAOS
tour is
big hit
The bleeding hearts and artists made their last stand at
Expo Theatre Tuesday night.
Legendary L.A. disc jockey Jim
Ladd, recreating his role on the
album, directed the final show of
the thirty-five city tour of RADIO
K.A.O.S, ex-Pink Floyd bassist
Roger Waters' most recent musical venture.
A technical and musical extravaganza, the show consisted
of a thematically appropriate
blend of Water's solo compositions and vintage Pink Floyd
material.
Waters' intelligent exploration of the themes of information,
communication, and technology
was a welcome change from the
usual "blast their ears and fry
their brains" philosophy of most
rock concerts.
Waters focusses on the manipulation of the individual by
"The Powers That Be" through
control of channels of information. RADIO K.A.O.S. turns
away from the pessimistic
outlook of the cataclysmic
FINAL CUT and the nightmarish PROS AND CONS OF
HITCH-HIKING, to display a
fresh, new optimistic attitude
about the future of the planet.
One of the high points of the
concert was Waters' version of
"Mother", during which the audience responded to the lyrics
"Mother, should I run for president?" with a resounding "YES!",
and "Mother, should I trust the
government?" with a veheme-
nent "NO!"
The set closed off with "Me
or Him" and a forceful version of
"The Powers That Be", which
was made particularly effective
by the judicious use of video clips
alternating between the Powers
— Reagan, Thatcher, Gorbachev,
et al. — and those suffering the
effects of their impersonal
policies — the casualties of
military and economic warfare.
"Home" and "Four Minutes",
from the new album, created
electric tension in the Theatre,
as Billy, the central character of
RADIO K.A.O.S., explains how
he has 'hacked' his way into the
defense computers of the superpowers and programmed them to
attack. The End is nigh. Clocks
tick from every corner. Suddenly
the thirty foot circular screen
flashes white, and a message
from Billy appears: "I wanted
you to know what it felt like..."
And the Bleeding Hearts break
into "The Tide Is Turning".
Waters works at educating
his audience, occasionally showering them with information —
that 25% of research and development spending in the world is
spent on military projects;   that
spy satellites have the capability
of allowing their operators to
read newspapers from altitudes
of 500 miles ...500 miles, eh?
Well, then ..."Fuck Y-i
Mikhail!"... "Fuck yoo. Ronnie!'
By CHRIS WiESINGER
October 2, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 The politics
of popularity
NDP leader Mike Harcourt wants to be
premier. "Mayor" Mike is confident he will
beat Big Bill Vander Zalm. Harcourt says
in 822 days he will be premier.
And why shouldn't Harcourt be confident? His record as mayor was excellent.
Mike led Vancouver through years of exceptional growth. Rapid transit, Expo, the
Cambie bridge (25 per cent under budget
according to Mike), and the necessity of
dealing with a provincial government opposed to Harcourt and co. were handled
well by Harcourt.
Harcourt also has the advantgae of attracting the centre in B.C. politics. Harcourt never was a radical, and to hear him
boast of Vancouver's triple A credit rating
from New York money markets one would
think he was a potential Socred cabinet
minister.
That and his commitment to higher
education — he promises to build universi-
tities in Prince George and the Interior —
makes Mikey number one. Or does it?
Harcourt looks confident and says all
the right things, but there is no substance
in what he says. Harcourt says the NDP
has model labor legislation but provides no
details; Harcourt says the deficit is too
high but he doesn't say what programs
will be cut to pay for the new universities.
Again and again in Harcourt's speech
at UBC he promised the good things: child
care centers, extensive tree planting, and
centers tor battered women and abused
children. The list goes on but the details
are non-existent. Harcourt's promises are
like the pitch of a condo time-sharing
salesman, vague but full of promise.
Harcourt it seems wants to engage in a
popularity contest with Vander Zalm. In
the past it has been Bill Bennett or Vander Zalm whose elections consisted of
popularity contests with no discussion of
issues.
The NDP's integrity as a party is
stronger than the Socreds and so they
don't have to stoop to tactics like popularity contests. The NDP is a party of substance. Harcourt should discuss his policies clearly and not fear losing votes.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 25, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
memberof Canadian University Press. The editorial office
is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-
3977.
Corinne Bjorge was drinking in the Pit much to the
chagrin of the AMS hacks who watched with tongues
hanging out. Meanwhile in the office, Ross Mclaren, Victor
Wong, Roger Kanno, and Laura Busheikin were busily
working hard not much to the chagrin of Corinne Bjorge.
Meanwhile down in the Gallery lounge, Jennifer Lyall was
flirting with the universitie's philosophers as Elynn Richter, Deanne Mould, Deanne Fishcer, Katherine Monk
watched from the corner trying to pick up tips on catching
a man. Meanwhile inthe mens washroom John Richmond,
Barry Davis, Bob Harris, Tony Wong, Tom Bode and Jeremy
Fraser were trying to figure out how the condom machine
worked. Meanwhile down in the Pit Corinne Bjorge was
now into her sixth beer and busily explaining how a
newspaper worked to Peter Langcaster, Justine Brown,
Kathy Chung, Bob Snoweden, Chris Wiesinger, Lydia
Schymansky, Pat Kirkwood, and Adam Jones.
LETTERS
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters should be as
short as possible and may be edited for brevity as well as for sexism,
racism and homophobia. Bring them In person with your ID to the Ubyssey
Office, SUB 241k.
Jobs plus
Student employment is
an issue central to all students.      The Student Alliance hopes to help students
in this regard. We are a
committee of British Columbia   students   from   UBC,
SFU, and UVIC seeking to
create better linkages between   students   and   the
community.   By   linkages,
the   Student   Alliance   attempts to bridge the gap
between the student populations of British Columbia
and the different sections of
our  society,  from  government to business to local
community groups.
If you are interested in
helping, please call me evenings at 224-7869.
Tim Pettit
Student Alliance
A very
unhappy
person
To Bernard Reich, who
wished me killed:
"...all the ensuing problems could have been
avoided if only the Shah
had killed all the people
behind Khomeini." -
Unlike what Bernard
Reich portrays, United
States has been involved in
the Iran-Iraq war from the
beginning and has profited
from it. In the last seven
years, the U.S. has fanned
the flames of this war in
order to gain military-strategic advantage in the region on one hand, and to sell
scandalous arms to Iran on
the other hand. The Reagan
Administration and its allies have strengthened
their military presence and
political influence in the
Persian Gulf and Indian
Ocean leading to increased
tensions and destabliza-
tion.
Under the pretext of
safeguarding the West's
"vital interests", the former
U.S. Rapid Deployment
Force has evolved into the
300,000 strong U.S. central
command (CENTCOM) coordinating  the   numerous
installations in the region-
arsenals with nuclear capabilities. All indications are
that U.S. has been the main
beneficiary of the war and
the fear of Soviet Union is
just an excuse that U.S.
experts insist on, in order to
justify Reagan's foreign
policies.
The Iran-Iraq war has
had a principal role in accelerating the Islamic
Republic's policy of closer
relations with the U.S.
which has been secretly expanded.
The U.S. purpose in encouraging Iraq to start the
war was to plunder the
region's resources and to
expoit its  people.  This is
becuase three fourths of the
world's oil resources are in
this region and fifty per-
scent of the capitalist countries' oil is produced here. It
is therfore for pure military
and economical profits that
the U.S. insists on its presence in   the Persian Gulf
and  Mr.   Reich  politicizes
such strategies. If the West
would arm the Islamic Republic, the war would not
last this long.  The "Iran-
gate",   scandle  once  again
clearly   demonstrated   the
U.S. responsibility in the
arms race among the nations and in the catastrophic
results of the Iran-Iraq war.
Mojdeh Shahri
arts 2
Another very unhappy person
Throughout the week of
the Commonwealth Conference being held in Vancouver from October 13 to 17,
there will be demonstrations against Rajiv Gandhi,
the butcher of the Indian
people, and Margaret
Thatcher, the champion of
South African apartheid,
and against Brian Mulroney
for welcoming these two
hated politicians here.
The Indian government
is far from democratic. On a
daily basis, the Indian army
and Central Reserve police
murder workers, youths,
students, farmers, etc. Rajiv
Gandhi is directly responsible for this violence. His
only response to the people's
demands for solutions to the
deplorable economic and
social conditions they suffer
is terror and these brutal
attacks on the people by
saying the police and army
are "fighting terrorists" or
maintaining law and order". Other reactionaries
follow Gandhi's politics of
terror and assassination for
their own "reasons".
The Canadian people
must have no illusions
about Rajiv Gandhi. Brian
Mulroney says he opposes
terrorism, but he embraces
the biggest terrorist in India
in order to protect the profits of Canadian companies
there.
Margaret Thatcher is a
champion of the slave system of apartheid in South
Africa. The Azanian people
are waging the self-sacrificing struggle to win national
liberation. These herioc
people demand the international community to impose
comprehensive and mandatory sanctions against
South Africa. However,
Margaret Thatcher stands
in the way. Why? —because
the British financial oligarchy owns 40% of all foreign
investments in South Africa.
Brian Mulroney only
pretends to oppose apartheid and defend "human
rights". He has not broken
diplomatic relations nor
stopped trade with South
Africa because Canadian
monopolies make huge profits from investments there.
Thatcher, Gandhi, and
Mulroney do not care about
justice and democracy. They
compromise democratic
principles and humanitari-
anism for economic and political gain.
I urge the students and
others at UBC who support
the world's people fighting
for their national and social
liberation to join demonstrations against this trio.
Barb Waldern
An almost
perfect story
John   Richmond's   article on white South African
Michael Boon's talk in last
Friday's paper was a fairly
accurate account of Boon's
stance. One misquote at the
end of the article, however,
did not make much sense:
"Boon...said      everyone
should stand up and *be bigger than themselves' when
it comes to questions of politics." More accurately, Boon
said it is necessary to "be
bigger than one's political
beliefs" if genuine integration is to be experienced.
Toshido Hyodo
president
integrity in action club
Baha'i
happiness
I would like to share a
letter written by nine par-
ticpants who worked
through the night in an effort to capture the spirit of
the Baha'i International
Peace Conference.
"Like drops of water
forming one ocean, we, the
youth of the world, representing diverse religious
and ethnic groups, have
come to realize the great
task before us— a task to
unite together as one. For
this reason, the concerned
youth, representing all five
continents, converged to
take action in promoting
world peace.
Throughout the world,
people from different social
backgrounds are collectively becoming aware of the
need for world peace. Recognizing the rapidly deteriorating world situation,
youth attending this conference feel that it is imperative to strive towards a
united world community.
Having discovered that
war is not a solution, we
have attained a certainty
that the peoples of the world
are searching for a different
method of resolution: Oneness of mankind...
Stephen Gergely
education 4
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 2, 1987 PERSPECTIVES
Condoms: the
real SUB story
The Trojan Horse condom
caper on September 11 was a brilliant publicity stunt, keeping alive
the issues of Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and
safe sex. The $1,450 cost of this
reminder is peanuts compared to
the cost of caring for people with
AIDS: between $50,000 and
$100,000 per patient. As the disease spreads, i t will cause skyrocketing medicare premiums and
increased taxation.
But money is not the real issue. Preventing the spread of the
disease is. The sad irony is that
while sex with a condom may be
safer than without, it still can not
absolutely guarantee safe sex.
Therefore, familiarization with
their limitations as well as with
some safer alternatives is very
important.
If you choose to use condoms,
buy them in a box, not individually. AIDS Vancouver does not
recommend using any type,
whether ribbed, licorice flavoured
or otherwise, that is sold in vending machines as in the SUB washrooms. Generally speaking the
product is of inferior quality. What
is more, because condoms only last
about five years, (a reference to
shelf life rather than user prowess, incidentally) one must be able
"AIDS Vancouver does
not recommend using any-
type, whether ribbed,
licorice flavoured or otherwise, that is sold in
vending machines as in
the SUB washrooms."
to confirm the expiry date, which
is printed on boxes, but not on
individual packets. Similarly, in
the event of a manufacturer's recall, there is no lot number to refer
to. There are no instructions for
correct usage. Finally, only one
size is available in what is clearly
not a "one size fits all" situation.
Some condoms are bound to
contain flaws, as with all mass
produced, popularly priced goods.
Recently, thousands of the two
best sellers, Ramses and Shieks,
were recalled by their manufacturer. Since some of them had already been purchased, the incident received widespread coverage in the news media. In addition to the producers' testing, the
Canadian government monitors
quality by filling test samples with
water, then swinging them around
over a blotter! If water spots can be
detected on the blotter, the failed
lotis destroyed, otherwise they are
approved for use. Because Human
Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is
much smaller than sperm, its
leakage potential is far greater,
and such a simplistic test can not
be effective. In contrast, a Belgian
research scientist recently conducted tests that simulated the
rigors of actual usage. She found
HIV leakage in about one quarter
of latex condoms tested, and 100
per cent of all animal gut condoms.
The latter type should not be used.
Even the most carefully
manufactured product is subject
to accidental damage by the user.
For example, the envelope must be
opened down one edge without
tearing the condom, which then
must be removed without touching any of the sharp edges. Since
petroleum products such as vaseline cause latex to break down,
only a sterile water soluble lubricant should be used to reduce
strain during use.
Further damage to the condom may arise during intercourse
in the form of breakage or slippage. Breakage can be caused by
using a condom that is too small,
leaving a reservoir that is inadequate, or leaving air in the reservoir or in bubbles along the shaft.
Unwanted air heats up from friction, expands, and blows holes in
the condom. Slippage can be
caused by using a size that is too
large, getting lubricant, vaginal
fluid or pre-seminal fluid on the
inside walls, or failing to withdraw
the penis while still erect. In its
most distressing form, slippage
results in the condom coming off
during intercourse, unnoticed in
the passion of the moment, until,
alas, it is too late. Lastly, a troublesome variation on the theme of
slippage which one might call roll
and pop syndrome, concerns gentlemen who are endowed with a
cone-shaped penis that is very
broad at the base, but narrows
steadily toward the tip. Condoms
will generally not stay in place on
such a configuration, having the
tendency to roll back up and pop
right off. A simple bracelet-like
device which is sold in sex shops
might prove helpful.
Damage aside, perhaps the
greatest complaint against condoms is their tendency to detract
from spontaneity and physical
pleasure. Eroticize condom use by
incorporating its ritual into foreplay. Additional sensitivity can be
obtained by putting a small drop of
sterile lubricant in the inside tip
without getting it on the shaft, by
leaving an extra large reservoir
with the air removed, and by using
the correct size. If you ejaculate
prematurely, reduced sensitivity
may actually benefit you.
For the benefit of people who
choose to use condoms, whether to
reduce the risk of contracting
AIDS or for any other reason, the
AMS should replace the present
vending system with over-the-
counter sales, like cigarettes, in
the SUB bars and business outlets, or with the type of multi-
choice vending machine that is
used to sell a variety of different
food items. The product should be
sold only in boxes, and a representative range of sizes and other
qualities should be made available, along with a number of spermicides and proper lubricants.
Information comparing the
products sold should be made accessible to consumers so that they
can make the purchase that is
safest for them. Condoms with
poor service records should not be
stocked. If any cost accrues to the
AMS in implementing these suggestions, the amount would be
negligible. The benefits to UBC
students would be immeasurable.
Bob Harris is a sexually sophisticated mature student who prefers
extra-large reservoirs.
The perspectives column is open to all members of the UBC
community who wish to express an opinion. Articles will be
edited for sexism, racism and homophobia. Drop off at SUB
24U<.
Got those Sedgewick blues?
Do you only use The Ubyssey as a blanket while you snooze on the couches?
Wake up and come keep warm with the gang at The Ubyssey. SUB 241k*
We've got coffee and the most comfortable couches on campus.
We know that
a cheap calculator can
cost you blood, sweat
and time.
Investing in a
Hewlett-Packard calculator, on the other
hand, can save you
time and again.
HP calculators not
only have better
functions. They function better. Without
sticking keys and bad
connections.
Through October
31, you can get the
cream of the calculators at a non-fat price.
We're cutting $15
off the HP-12C. That
buys you more built-
in functions than
anyone else's financial calculator.
And we're giving
away a free Advantage
Module, a $84.95
value, with every HP-41
Advanced Scientific
calculator you buy.
This 12K-byte plug-
in, menu-driven ROM
was designed specially
for students.
So drop by your
campus bookstore or
local dealer and compare HP calculators
with the rest By midterm, you'll see what
a deal this is.
m
HEWLETT
PACKARD
The
'Chronicles^
Gordon thanked -Hie S+* Bernard for
his trouble ~and sent him on his way.
October 2,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 fUTSi
Vancouver's specialty
movie store with the
finest selection of
CLASSICS, FOREIGN
& THE LATEST TITLES
Has Grown!
SALES     ^ss**^ RENTALS
1855 WEST 4th AVENUE    734-0411
We've moved 4 doors up 4th Ave.
& now we're 3 times as big!
OPEN 7 DAYS   10 TIL 10
OLIVETTI
TOSHIBA
TOSHIBA T1000 Laptop computer
AMS.
IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE AN EXCLUSIVE
AGREEMENT OFFERING THIS FRONT RUNNER
AT
$1430.00
PROCESSOR
80C88, running at 4.77MHz
IBM PC compatable
Real time clock/calendar
MEMORY
512KB RAM, expandable to
640KB user memory plus
640KB Of LIME MS
256KB of ROM for MS-DOS
2.11
DISK DRIVE
Built-in 720KB 372" diskette
drive
DISPLAY
Toshiba supertwist LCD
display
80characters x 25 lines
640 x 200 bit-mapped
graphics
Position adjustable to 180
degrees
IBM Colour Graphics
Adapter (CGA) compatable
KEYBOARD
Full-function 82-key
keyboard
Integrated numeric key
pad
Special Fn key for
extended functions
STANDARD INTERFACES
Parallel printer port
RS-232C serial port
Expansion slot for 300/
1200 bps modem
External 574" diskette drive
port
CONTACT ERIC ALLAN
TEL: 684-5363
RGB colour monitor port
Monochrome composite
monitor port
External key pad port
SOFTWARE
MS-DOS 2.11 in ROM
STANDARD ACCESSORIES
AC adapter/battery charger
DIMENSIONS
12.2"Wx2.05"Hx11.0"D;
fits in desk drawer. 6.4 lbs.
POWER
Runs up to 5 hours on
internal rechargable
batteries. AC adapter 108-
132VAC, 9 VDC output.
Low battery warning light.
..* JUST IN CASE
WE MISSED YOU ON THE BEACH-NOW
PIZZA, PASTA, APPCTI2J-RS, SALADS, DESSERTS.JfftESH TJAILY ENTREES^
PIZ7A,PASTA, APPfifcERS^ALADS,DESSERTS, FRESH DAMY ENTREES,
P.S. ELECTED PARKS BOARD
OFFICIALS GET FREE COFFEE!
2200 CORNWALL AVE. (AT YEW)
'Fatal Attraction' stuns
Excellent movie marred with stock ending
Watching director Adrian
Lyne's new movie, Fatal
Attraction, is like
experiencing slow torture. The
tension and undercurrent of fear
created by this film become
almost unbearable. Only
filmmaking bordering on brillant
could produce such an intense
effect.
Fatal Attraction is the story
of Dan Gallagher (Michael
Douglas), a successful, happily
married lawyer who, one weekend when his wife is out of town,
surrenders to the charms of
seductress Alex Forrest (Glenn
Close).
Once Alex gets Dan into her
bed she won't let him out of her
life. She's driven by an obsessive, predatory desire which she
calls love, and her tactics are
ruthless. She begins by destroying his peace of mind and soon
makes his life a living night-
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
.... presents ....
AN EXPLORTATION
OF TAMBURLAINE
by Christopher Marlowe
Adapted and Directed by
Charles Siegel
Designed by Blanka Jurenka
OCTOBER 7 - 10
8:30 pm
No Admission Charge
Limited Seating (Warning -
Most Seating On Cushions
On The Floor)
Reservations:  228-2678
The repercussions of this
one night stand—meant to be an
ephemeral fling between "two
adults"—almost makes AIDS
look preferable. All the condoms
in the world won't protect
against Alex Fraser.
The first two-thirds of the
film are the best. The film
captures perfectly the complex
manoeuvers of psychological
warfare. Alex's emotional
manipulation of Dan, and his
response—a confused helplessness as he tries to be fair to
her—are absolutely, and
frighteningly, beleivable.
Alex is a master manipulator and part of the film's horror
lies in its exposure of how such a
warped mind can control others
by making the irrational seem
rational.
Both Close and Douglas are
outstanding in two very complex
roles. Douglas expresses a whole
range of emotion in the set of his
eyebrows or jaw; he is at his best
when he's most subtle.
Close has perfected a smile
that, while pretty, has an unset-
tlingly creepy edge to it. She is
inspired as a madwoman and yet
her portrayal of Alex remains
three-dimensional; we aren't
■ LOW LOW PRICES
■ SUPER COPIES
■ FAST SERVICE
2nd Floor, 2174 Western Parkway
(at U.B.C, across from Chavron),
Vancouver, B.C.    Tsl: 224-6225
Mon -Th 8-9 Fri 8-6 Sat-Sun 11-6
allowed to forget that the emotions she initially feels—desire,
frustration, loneliness, jealousy—are the same emotions
that we all feel, and for much the
same reasons that she's feeling
them. This adds another element
to the disturbing effect of the
movie: to an extent we can see a
bit of ourselves in Alex.
Fatal Attraction is successful on two levels: as a frightening, suspenseful sitting-on-the-
edge-of-your-seat thriller, and as
a thought-provoking, intelligent
exploration of psychological and
moral issues. However, in the
last ten minutes this second,
deeper level is lost as the first
takes over.
The final scene just follows
the well-worn formula of all
those Hallowe'en and Friday the
13th movies. The action is
overblown and unrealistic. The
movie's credibility disintegrates
along with its sensitivity. And
much of the tension is lost once
the physical violence begins: the
psychological edge disappears;
what we're watching becomes
recognizable—a formula.
The movie loses its integrity
in order to conform to a genre,
and no doubt to make more
money. The sad thing is that the
lurid ending isn't necessary. The
movie would have been successful without it. It's a shame to see
such an abundance of talent
marred by a lack of integrity.
By Laura Busheikin
Break away...
and come on down to UBC's closest
off-campus neighborhood pub! The
atmosphere is casual, the service
excellent and friendly. Enjoy a
round of darts or a pinball game
or simply relax in front of our
TSN screens.
Serving UBC students for
the last decade and still
going strong. *
3681 West Fourth Avenue at Alma
Vancouver, B.C.
734-1205
Escape From Fantasy
Gardens, a political satire
about...well you figure it
out...has moved from its
twice-a-week late night slot to
theatre's prime time. It's now
playing at 8:00 PM, Monday
to Saturday, at The Firehall
Theatre till October 17th.
The play is written by former
UBC student Mark Leiren-
Young.
PageS
THE UBYSSEY
October 2,1987

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