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The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1967

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Array GEE, WHO'S STRINGING WHO ALONG?
-">
By BO HANSEN
Pardon me, does anyone here have a G-string ?
Or an obviously pregnant cat ? Or a fisherman's
net — or a key from Hotel Vancouver ?
And you in the bikini, come with me to Fort
Camp, 'cause you're worth 3 points in our scavenger
hunt.
This was the scene Sunday as eight teams of
15 Fort Campers each braved pouring rain from 6:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. to bring back gall stones and toilet
plungers; and valentines and UBC firemen; avcados
and parking tickets.
The hunt, the idea of Fort Camp women's
eoti|cil president Sue Mitchell, was organized toy the
#bnien's council as a frosh orientation "get acquainted" event.
Each item on the list was rated at one, three,
five or ten points. "Most teams got over 200 points,"
reported Miss Mitchell.
Teams came in with last week's program from the
Unitarian Church (5 points), cowboy boots (1 point),
a waitress from Dean's cafe (10 points) and a quart
bottle of water from the Courthouse Fountain (3
points).
One team which tried unsuccessfully to flag down
a Jaguar for points, ferreted the driver from his girl
friends's house and signed him in at Fort Camp.
"Some of the guys visited strip joints to try to
get G-strings but most just came in with guitar
strings," Miss Mitchell said.
Housing head 'Les Rohringer allowed his shoes
to ibe shined many times over in exchange for a signed
statement that his shoes had been shined.
A sailor (10 points), being signed in at Fort Camp,
read the list of hunt items and promptly pulled from
his pocket another find for the team that brought
him in: an athletic support (one point)..
St .Mark's and^sSt. "Andrew's fwe/?e Raided for
library carc*s of! theology students. \
Just a^out everyone came in _yith the required
dirty diaper in a plastic ibagi    ,. £j ..■
A team j|jrralled"a~doctor outside the> Woodward
Library difm^nding a gall stone (fivft^ppfnts). The
doctor piclte^^^a^ pebble.ffon| 4lie/§round and
signed a note* saying it quaaffifeji.
Residents came in with a toll ticket from the
Lion's Gate Bridge, the recording "Zen Meditation",
a copy of last year's Ubyssey, a hippy with a tambourine, some "plum incense", and a go-go girl in
costume.
"That's Fort Camp spirit!" said Miss Mitchell.
But no one found an obviously pregnant cat.
— george hollo photo
AND THERE IT IS . . . the eternal masterpiece produced by
the Totem Park paint-in. Ubyssey art critic Irving Fetish was
so astounded by its complexities and its . . . er . . . uh . . .
he   is   still   speechless.  The  anonymous   creators   claim   it
mirrors their souls.
Politics is computer game,
architect   tells   symposium
By MIKE FINLAY
Politics is a game that should be run by computers, says
architect Arthur Erickson.
Speaking before an overflow crowd in the Buchanan building Wednesday, the designer of Simon Fraser University said
computers are wasted in their present capacity.
"They should be used to replace city councils and eliminate
the irrational and emotional elements in decision making," he
told the second symposium on arts and politics sponsored by
* the arts undergraduate society.
The relationship between art and politics is non-existent,
he said."The artist is an outcast."
Patronage of the arts by government is all right as long as
political influences are kept to a minimum, he said.
Speaking about SFU, Erickson said the empty spaces and
gathering places are more important than the university buildings.
"The most imporant part of university is the interaction
among students."
Throughout his speech Erickson stressed the importance of
art to everyone and regretted art and building appear to have
become separated.
"Today the plumbing goes into a building before the art;
it should be the other way around."
Vol. XLIX, No. 8
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5,  1967
224-3916
Governors drown
pueblos on cliffside
The UBC board of governors has scratched an
avant-garde plan for a cliffside dwelling below
Fort Camp.
Architect Vladimir Plavsic's plan, made in
MSarch, includes either a bridge over or a tunnel
under Marine Drive, a sea view from all rooms,
Rooms in SUB
decorated free?
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
City businessmen will get a chance to engrave
their names on doors of the Student Union Building.
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
Wednesday announced a "soft, sell' campaign
which will ask businessmen to furnish specific
rooms in SUB.
Their reward will be seeing their names in
bronze plaques on .the door of the room they
helped furnish.
The plan is part of a program to finance the
$280,000 needed for SUB interior decorating and
furnishing.
It would cover all rooms except club room
and AMS offices, Sullivan said.
Past AMS presidents will be asked to make a
small donation toward beautifying the current
president's office and also will be rewarded with
their names on a large plaque, he said.
"There are already several applicants for the
plaques."
Other financing plans include turning SUB
into a convention centre during the summer or
any other time students aren't using it.
Sullivan hopes the money earned by this will
cover much of the funds for AMS administrative
costs and salaries.
The money saved would be diverted to student activities and paying off the $2.6 million
loan on SUB.
Meanwhile, all SUB construction deadlines
will be met — barring a strike, Sullivan said.
Straight talk tonight
A meeting to rally opposition against the
business licence suspension of the newspaper
Georgia Straight has been announced for tonight.
Speakers include Shaun Sullivan, president
of the Alma Mater Society, Aid. Harry Rankin,
and Sidney Simons, head of the B.C. Civil
Liberties Union, who will be chairman.
Professors from UBC and Simon Fraser University are also expected to attend the rally, at
8 p.m. in the Fishermen's Hall, 138 East Cordova.
and cable cars from the beach to lounges and
kitchens on top of the cliff.
Arnie Myers, UBC director of information,
gave two main reasons for the board's rejection
of the plan.
"There were grave engineering difficulties to
be encountered," Myers said Wednesday.
Also, the Vancouver park board, which has a
lease on the beach below Fort Camp, objected,
he said. The proposed residences would utilize
the beach.
Original planning was for new residence construction either in Fort Camp or on a site behind
Brock, near the campus traffic offices.
Preliminary drawings are now being made for
the latter.
George Puil, park board chairman, said Wednesday that his department "didn't object to
anything."
But such a project would contravene the
university's lease on the beach, he said. "It must
be used for recreational purposes."
"We were presented with an architect's hypothetical proposal on which we did not pass judgment," Puil said.
If anything definite has been presented, he
said, "we would have had to ask the provincial
government whether it would be permitted."
Meanwhile, the board of governors is reviewing the concept of Fort Camp.
Council   demands
Acadia   allowance
A demand for reimbursement to Acadia
Park residents delayed in occupying their
suites was presented Wednesday to acting
university president Walter Gage.
Signed by Alma Mater Society vice-president Don Munton, chairman of the AMS
housing committee, it quoted a decision of
the student council meeting Monday.
The motion demanded reimbursement of
prospective residents of Acadia Park who
were left out by delays.
They should be reimbursed, said council, either by "direct grants or by temporarily reduced rents" once they move in.
The minute expressed "the deep concern of student's council" for the inconvenienced families.
Because insufficient notice was given
these families, said Munton's letter, "the
University must accept some financial responsibility."
The delay in announcing late completion
of the residences, said the letter, was
'inexcusable." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5,  1967
ARTS DANCE
BEST BUY OF THE
SEASON
2 Bands* MY ,ND0LE RING
——■■ FRENCH HAND LAUNDRY
Brock, Fri., Oct. 6, 9-1 75c
— bob brown photo
IT'S FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE in the lead, as the race continues in the fall inter faculty blood
drive. To date only 12 per cent of the campus population have rolled up their sleeves to
help the Red Cross. Drive continues till 4:30 p.m. Friday in the armory. Give a little.
400 frosh here from nowhere
study will be made to determine where in \B.C.
these students come from.
One reason for the increase in freshmen
registration, Parnall said, may be the new grading system in high schools.
Students can make a 60 per cent grade by
an average of exam marks and class work and
may qualify without being capable.
Director named
UBC's school of social work has a new
director.
He is Vancouver-born Dr. George Hougham,
acting director of the school for the past seven
months. Hougham succeeds Prof. William Dixon,
who resigned in February for health reasons.
Hougham's appointment was finalized Tuesday by the board of governors.
By JANE KENNON
There are 400 more freshman on the campus
this year, and the registrar wants to know why.
Statistics released Wednesday show a total
UBC enrolment of 18,359, as compared to 17,219
last year.
Arts is the largest faculty with 5,649 students
followed by science with 3,422 students and education with an enrollment of 3,281.
Smallest faculty on campus is dentistry, with
39.
UBC registrar's office is puzzled by the increase of first year students in arts, science and
education.
The number of potential freshmen in grade 12
last June was almost identical with the 1966
number, but 400 additional students turned up
and paid fees.
Registrar  J.   E.   Parnall  said  Wednesday  a
OUTerwear
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PURCHASE ONE AT
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For all your clothing requirements. Thursday, October 5,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
^W"""' '^■fcl/*i]
— goorge holla photo
"DO NOT MUTILATE, SPINDLE or fold us. Georgia Straight
may be injurious to your health but, only if you read it."
As Straight case carries on in court hippies circumvent the
law by giving away the rag downtown.
Nine Japanese visitors
startled by UBC's size
By HEW GWYNNE
It's a bit big, isn't it?
Roughly translated, this was the reaction Wednesday of
nine Japanese businessmen and teachers visiting UBC.
Kunimatsu Kamakura, president of a rope manufacturing
company and spokesman for the group, said the visitors were
startled by the size and large population of UBC.
Another member of the group, S. Oyama, a high school
principal from Takasaki, was impressed by the modern facilities
here.
The whirlwind tour, partly pleasure, will visit many Canadian businesses and schools. Information gathered will be passed
on to Japanese intending to emigrate to Canada.
During their one-day glimpse of UBC, the party visited the
president's office to gather UBC calendars and other printed
data about the university.
Although there are 800 campuses within Greater Toyko,
Oyama said, none of them is large and most of their buildings
and equipment are much older than here.
Because so many people want to attend university in Japan,
entrance requirements are very high, Oyama said.
*       Before returning home, the nine will spend 10 days in the
U.S., particularly Honolulu.
Is Straight bust legal?
—Justice Dohm ponders
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Mr. Justice Thomas Dohn of the B.C. supreme
court Wednesday deferred judgment on an application by the publishers of the Georgia Straight
to have the suspension of their business licence
declared unlawful.
The newspaper's licence was suspended
Thursday by city licence inspector Milt Harrell
acting on the recommendation of Mayor Tom
Campbell.
John Laxton, lawyer for publishers Dan McLeod and Peter Hlookoff, said the main issue
of the hearing was the power of municipal authorities to put people out of business, determine
public morality and determine freedom of the
press.
"Surely it cannot be possible that our laws
allow businesses to be closed down without
warning or an opportunity for the plaintiff to
come before court and explain his case," said
Laxton.
"A trial could not be held until April or May
of next year," he said. "In the meantime the
Straight would be unable to publish."
Laxton's argument in support of the injunction was that section 277 (c) of the city charter
was invalid.
"It is only the federal government which can
legislate morality under criminal law," he said.
Even granting that the province had the
authority, he said, the arbitarary fashion of the
licencing inspector was contrary to natural law.
Laxton told the court the publishers of the
newspaper had not been told why their licence
was suspended and had not been given an opportunity to state their case.
Corporation counsel Russell Baker said if the
newspaper's appeal was upheld it would mean
every licence inspector in B.C. would not be
sure what his powers were.
Vancouver city council Tuesday endorsed
seven to three the suspension of the Georgia
Straight newspaper's business licence.
Campbell claimed the paper was a "filthy
rag" and had seen sold to school children.
Under city by-law, the licence inspector has
the right to suspend a business licence, but only
city council may revoke it.
Alderman Harry Rankin, Ernie Broome and
Peter Graham voted against the suspension.
Endorsing it were Aid. Halford Wilson, Marianne Linnell, Ed Sweeney, Tom Alsbury, Earle
Adams, Hugh Bird and Campbell.
The council debate on whether to uphold
Nobel prize winner
appointed at UBC
The first Nobel prize winner to hold a continuing post at UBC was appointed Tuesday.
Australian Sir John Eccles was named as
distinguished visiting professor in neurophysiology.
The position entails several week's studying,
teaching and working each year in the psychiatric department's Kinsmen laboratory of neurological research.
Eccles was granted an honorary doctor of
science degree at UBC in 1966.
He has also accepted a position as professor
of neurophysiology at the University of Buffalo,
and will be dividing his time between Buffalo
and UBC.
Eccles and two British researchers were
awarded the 1963 Nobel prize in medicine for
their work in recording electrical currents
generated in brain cells.
the suspension was preceded by three delegations of indignant citizens.
The first speaker, Rev. Donald Halliday,
said he was a "square John", standing for truth,
honesty, purity and freedom.
Halliday decried the "abysmal failure of
the press" to support the mayor.
"Mayor Campbell champions freedom," he
said. "We must be protected from programs
extolling the wierdest assortment of hippies,
commies, criminals and pot-smokers who are
taking the hearts and minds of our children."
Halliday said that although Campbell's program for snipping off the ears of rats was not
too productive, he hoped the mayor succeeded
in snipping the ears from "those two-legged
rats."
"I do not want my children to become filthy
stinking hippies," he said. "These flower children
turn flowers into stinkweed.
"We must war against all that is indecent."
Campbell interjected that it is horrifying
that there can be dissemination of vicious trash,
which glorifies drug adiction and homosexuality.
"And then we have other papers, like The
Ubyssey, which states in its editorial of Sept.
29, 'Anyone who doubts the obscenity of this
society need only watch its leaders in action any
Tuesday in city hall's council chambers," said
Campbell.
Mrs. O. V. Spaetgens of the Vancouver
paretn-teachers' association and Mrs. Helen
Boyce of the Vancouver local council of women
congratulated the mayor on the suspension.
"Yes," said Rankin, "it is no longer safe to
walk in Kitsilano. It might have something to
do with the miserable housing conditions and
slums, and the landlords who are making a fat
profit by packing 20 people into a house.
"This is the kind of issue council should be
debating. Leave obscenity to the criminal
courts."
Alderman Ernie Broome asked Campbell
why the obscenity charge was not dealt within
criminal court.
"We didn't feel there was enough ground for
an obscenity charge," said Campbell.
Co-op bookbin
now being eyed
The university bookstore should be replaced
by a student co-operative store, says the chairman of the student academic activities committee.
Blaine Kennedy, commerce 3, said the bookstore's five per cent rebate is merely a form
of eliminating off-campus competition.
Kennedy said an ad hoc committee is now
being formed to study the possibility of the
co-op.
Because campus prices for books equal off-
campus prices, he said, they must be making
the same profit margin.
The student bookstore would operate on a
cost price and operations profit. This margin
would not exceed 10 per cent, Kennedy said.
Space for the bookstore could be in the
student union building now under construction,
which still has some unallocated space, he said.
He called for a separate committee to organize and administer the student bookstore.
Under a proposed plan, all participating students would buy a membership for $2 a year
or a $20 lifetime membership. Annual profits
would be then either rebated or put into expansion. rmUBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press service*
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pago
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242,- editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
OCTOBER 5, 1967
CUS and money
There are many reasons why UBC students should
vote on Nov. 1 to retain their membership in the Canadian Union of Students.
The most immediate of these is pure self-interest —
in the form of money.
CUS maintains a lobby in Ottawa where national
money decisions are made. CUS lobbyists pressure
government to think of students when they make those
decisions.
Our Ottawa representatives, as Alma Mater Society
treasurer Dave Hoye and other money-men have pointed out, have been highly successful.
Perhaps- their most important coup is the present
system of student loans, under which students get
money and pay no interest until they graduate. Approximately 50 per cent of UBC students have taken advantage of these loans.
CUS Ottawa lobbyists were instrumental in wrenching the system out of a reluctant Liberal government.
A second money advantage to students prompted by
CUS lobbyists was the decision to allow deduction of
tuition fees from students' summer earnings.
And CUS people in Ottawa are currently explaining
to MPs and civil servants why legislation emanating
from the Carter Report should contain clauses favorable to students.
In a recent brief to the minister of finance, CUS
pointed out how the Carter recommendations will affect
students. CUS is trying to ensure that the new tax
system provides tax credits for students in four categories based on financial dependence or independence
and residence at home or away from home.
Such distinctions were not made in the original
Carter report. Only an independent student pressure
group could have pointed them out.
There are more important things than money and
mote important reasons for our membership in CUS.
But the Ottawa lobby alone is worth CUS's 65 cents
a student cost.
GUERRILLA  GOVERNMENT
Spare us
Hardly anyone goes bowling anymore.
Old theatres that were converted into bowling
alleys during the early fifties are being reconverted
into theatres.
A lavish bowling alley at Park Royal — fully equipped down to a cocktail lounge — folded for lack of
bowlers.
So did two large, formerly thriving, alleys on Seymour Street in downtown Vancouver.
Hardly anyone, we repeat, goes bowling anymore.
So no one builds bowling alleys anymore.
Except the Alma Mater Society.
Our Alma Mater Society, deeply concerned with
improving the quality of the university experience, is
building eight bowling alleys in the centre of the campus.
The alleys, we have been assured, will contain all the
latest equipment. They will be housed in the new Student Union Building, for which each of us pay $15 a
yeaT.
Timidly, The Ubyssey suggests student money could
be used for better purposes than to subsidize a dying
sport.
We realize the student need for recreation, but suggest the AMS spare a moment and look for a more
intellectually stimulating sport.
How about eight crap tables ?
.^Hwrw HQ
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City Stuart Gray
News      Susan Gransby
Managing Murray   McMillan
Photo      Kurt Hilger
Associate    Al  Birnie,   Kirsten   Emmott
Senior     .    _   Pat  Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire      Charlotte  Hairo
Page Friday Judy Bing
Ass't. Chy Boni   Ue
Poor Irving Fetish. Brows knitted, the home economics types kept
needling him, and then agriculture
wags talked about him hoarsely,
although with sheepish expressions.
Norm Gidney played assistant city
ogre. Ravi Shankar drifted about,
incensed. Between lightning stabs
Jane Kennon, Laurie Dunbar and
darted Steve Jackson, Mike Finlay,
Marianne A. Beichel, Paul Knox,
Alexandrea Volkoff, Richard Baer,
Udo Eramus, and Mark De Coursey.
Jade Eden, Scott MacRae, Wendy
Carter, Hew Gwynne, Luanne Armstrong and Irene Wasilewski glared
at Ann Arky, who was struggling
with 599  tubes of toothpaste.
In the red were Chris Blake I,
Lawrence Woodd, George Hollo and
Bob Brown, all of whom sang madrigals.
English profs can't read
By STAN PERSKY
I hear tell that the Good
Grey Ghost of the English department is stalking the Groves
of Academe.
Tape recordings of recent
English department meetings
(provided by student information center) feature Geoffrey
Durrant's rampage on the subject of the arts anti-calendar,
wherein he charges arts students with being uncivilized
and barbarous. Elliott Gose, in
a public letter, says we picked
victims.
SCREAMING
Scholars Durrant and Gose
are not only averaging about
C-minus in reading comprehension, they're being humorless and uptight.
Let's take a look at the anti-
calendar's review of the English department and see if we
can figure out what all the
screaming is about.
Twenty-six profs received
reports ranging from good to
suiperb, five were panned,
seven received mixed reviews
and a half dozen came in for
minor suggestions. SJixty per
cent of the department was
described as excellent, which
is three times the quota of
first-classes professors are allowed to give their students.
I think these figures back
up our statement in the introduction: "One thing that
came out clearly in the survey was the respect which
most students have for their
teachers, both as individuals
and as professionals."
I wonder if Durrant and
Gose have read the introduction? If so, they would have
read, "The anti-calendar contains a lot of commentary
about teachers and this receives a great deal of attention.
It would be a mistake to think
this is the important part.
What's important, it seems to
us, is to determine what the
university is and isn't doing
in education."
ERROR
We then go on to offer a
structural criticism of the
learning situation, not an individual attack. Mr. Gose is
in error when he suggests we
picked victims or favorites.
The students did single out
cretain teachers; surprisingly
enough,   the  kudos  were   ex-
«yur
"Damn it. Three weeks already and not even a sign of a
march."
"... sr^'v v <<r>\
LETTERS
Uptight
Dosydoe
Editor, The Ubyssey:
One of the bizarre notes
shaping the frosh retreat at
Rosaria beach last weekend
was the constant roar of airplanes day and night destroying the escape mood that Ros-
ario generally produces.
The planes that took off and
flew overhead were navy
planes from Ault field, an air
base two or three miles from
Rosario.
Enquiries of locals showed
that the planes were training
and some were always leaving
for Vietnam.
The effect of this constant
interruption was beneficial in
some respects in that it made
the participants shape their
theories to the -world that was
right there over our heads.
But mostly it just made us
feel rather uptight and frustrated over the whole bloody
mess in Vietnam.
BERT HILL
arte 4
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In the Sept. 29 edition there
was an article on clubs day by
Jade Eden in which there was
a reference to the "Circle K
dosy-doed". I should like to
inform Jade Eden and the rest
of the campus that the circle
K club is not a square-dancing
club or a dude ranch as most
students believe but a men's
service club (Campus Kiwanis).
MICHAEL ORAM
president, circle K
Letters to the editor should
be delivered or mailed to
Editor, The Ubyssey, Brock
Hall, UBC. Letters nfar be
edited for brevity. Preference
will be given to letters that are
short. Special preference will
be given lo letters that are
typewritten.
Letters must contain the
writer's name and address,
although pseudonyms will be
used if requested.
tended to the sound old vol- 4- *
uminous scholars as well as
to the unorthodox young instructors. We reported on their
qualities as teachers, not on
political stodginess or social
hipness.
Rather than simply assault
the computer mess) at every
phase in the production of the
evaluation (from questionnaire
to write-ups in printing) we
constructively sought to create
humane situations among ourselves.
CARE
It isn't enough to attack the
establishment, you've got to
come up with alternatives that
work. I think we exhibited
care for people. The one unforeseen policy that we adopted was a modification of harsh
criticism in the belief that the
reviews of praise would make ,
clear the nature of the response. We didn't plan to do
this, it simply developed in
the course of the activity.
Gose falls into the trap of
using the words "impartiality"
and "objectivity" in a way that
debases their meanings, reducing them to cliches. In the
introduction we point out that
semi-technical terms like "reliability, scientific accuracy
objectivity and a great many
other words you hear in introductory social science aren't
very reliable, accurate or objective themselves." Objectivity is a Fool-killer, Mr.
Gose; everything is selected
and categorized out of the experimental stream by the man
who comes to do the job, bearing his own experience and a
sense of fairness.
DONT KNOW
Just as we seldom know
what's happening inside the
departments (possibly because
students and reporters are
seldom invited to sit on curriculum committees,) we can
hardly expect you to know
that student government isn't
a  homogeneous  substance.
That is, we can't expect you
to know if you haven't read
the introduction. There, we detail our struggle with the student government to produce
the evaluation, the constraints
and limitations their bureaucracy created.
I also hear Durrant is bugged iby our anonymity. Should
we have signed a name to every
paragraph? Is it thought that
anonymity is really just the
absence of individual names?
PEOPLE
The anti-calender had an
author — the arts council. And
the way the council is structured, Durrant and Gose could
be members. They could even
do some of the evaluations for
next year's calendar.
My point is the importance
of groups of people. During
the days we produced the anti-.
calendar, I was moved by the
effort and spirit of the people
who worked on it.
Writing the introduction in
the basement of Brock while .
the mimeographs sputtered out
the pages and the sound of
rock music rode over the machines, I said: "This weekend
we're camping in here; when
this kind of camping in gets
to be permanent we become a%
community." I'm still engaged
in the proposition.
(Note: At the request of my
friend, Warren Tallman, I've
refrained from commenting on
the sanctimoniouness of Gose's
remarks on promotion.) Thursday, October 5,  1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 5
EDUCATION
COULD IMPROVE
Some profs show promise
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Ubyssey Associate Editor
The suggestion that education at UBC is a laughingstock has caused a variety of
reactions.
One was that of Dr. Tony
Warren of the microbiology
department, a man who does
well within the existing conditions, but has the wrong ideas
about improving them.
Warren suggests that since
the major problems are due
to topheavy student - faculty
ratios, the thing to do is get
rid of great crowds of students.
This is best done, he says,
by instituting entrance exams
and cutting the freshman class
by a third. Then overburdened
profs would be free of the
mediocre students.
Well, keeping the loafers out
is all very well, but upper
year microbiology classes are
not crowded with loafers. They
are crowded with good students. The same is true of
upper year classes. There are
just not enough profs.
Everybody knows that exams are no measure of a person's ability. Entrance exams
are not a good idea except as
a measure of desperation.
Well, says Warren, it's that
or pay for more profs: which
means   a   fee   raise.   Here  his
Tyranny of science
subject of lecture
British   science   writer   and
journalist  Sir   Ritchie   Calder
'   speaks at UBC tonight on "The
Tyranny of Science".
Calder, author of 25 books
on science, a professor of international relations and active in
the World Health Organization, will speak at 8 p.m. in
Hebb theater.
argument falls down. Why
should students have to pay
for more profs?
Universities
exist first to
serve the people, and second, to serve
the student:
the B.C. government and
the federal
government
EMMOTT have   decided
to support higher education
because it is good for the
country.
As such it is the government's responsibility to see
that its people are properly
educated. If you're going to
pay for few profs, you must
pay for enough to be effective.
Money for correction of the
faculty - student ratio must
come from Victoria, not from
students, a low-income group
if there ever was one. The
number of students can be
regulated by the usual admission procedures — exams
would change nothing except
to deny education to another
sector of the people.
However bad the situation at
UBC, some profs will always
succeed in making their
courses anything but a laughingstock.
One such man is zoologist
D. H. Chitty, who in the course
outlines and plans for zoology
400 reveals a blueprint for the
genuine educational experience. No reciter of textbooks,
Chitty announces the following
plans:
Six students will prepare
abstracts of each lecture. The
best will be mimeographed
and handed out, making it unnecessary for anyone else to
take notes.
All exams are open book,
including the final. All term
work is judged on a pass-fail
system. All students will be
given   an   individual   tutorial
HEAR DR. HENRY MAYER
"The Medical Crisis in Vietnam"
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6-8 P.M.
Unitarian Church, 949 W 49th
COLOR SLIDES AND MOVIES WILL BE SHOWN
(Dr. Mayer, a Redwood City internist, recently returned from South
Vietnam as a member of a three man team of physicians that investigated the medical treatment of civilian war casualties.)
Sponsored by Canadian Aid For Vietnam Civilian* Com.
CAMPUS
A GO-GO sat oct 7
WILDEST  DANCE  OF  THE  YEAR
3 BANDSthe best in r°ck
the best in psychedelic
after   Christmas   to   have  his
progress assessed.
Film loops of course topics
will be made: other visual aids
will be introduced; students
will be shown how to program
a computer for their term
exams: faculty members will
make visiting lectures and join
in discussions.
Not only that, but Chitty
has subscribed to the periodical "Science" and will assign
groups to tell the class about
the new research in its pages.
And he hands out useful
monographs, including one on
the philosophy of examinations. His exams, he states,
are intended to test understanding, not detailed knowledge; his students will have a
minimum of formal lectures, a
maximum of outside reading
and discussion.
This type of thing is the very
approach we have been pleading with teachers for years to
use. If only more would use
it, fewer students would fail.
And fewer professors would
complain about the burden of
teaching large, apathetic masses of morons.
We cannot praise it too
highly.
and the sexiest GO-GO GIRLS on campus!
UBC ARMOURIES °"ZS™pron
International House
IS FOR CANADIAN AND FOREIGN
STUDENTS
WHY?
COME TO THE
OPEN MEETING
Tomorrow Noon, Lower Lounge,
International   House
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra-
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a rare lung disease. You won't
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Take the word time. In addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, you'll find 48 clear definitions of the different meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of one's life.
In sum, everything you want to
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This dictionary is approved
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THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5,  1967
STILL NOT   STARTED
Haggling besets college
By AL DONALD
Special lo The Ubyssey
PENTICTON — After more than two years of
squabbling among Okanagan valley communities,
the Okanagan Regional College is still an 18-
member council and a small staff in an office
above a Kelowna furniture store.
And in spite of recent backing by many
valley groups, the chances of the college progressing beyond this point in the near future are slim.
If plans for the institution fail, Okanagan
students will continue to face the education problem they have confronted for years: spend vast
amounts of money living on the coast while
attending university or the B.C. Institute of
Technology; or go directly into employment without post-secondary education.
The two-year college, first suggested by former UBC president John Macdonald in his 1962 Report on Higher Education, would provide
vocational and employ ment
directed training as well as the
equivalent of two years of university.
It was part of Macdonald's
plan that the Okanagan college
should be the first in a network
of such institutions throughout       DONALD
the interior and Vancouver Island.
The provincial government later passed legislation providing for the construction of the
colleges under the Public Schools Act and in
1965 plebiscites were presented to 10 Okanagan
school districts asking voters if they approved the
concept and financing of the college.
Of the 10 districts, covering the valley from
Osoyoos in the south to Salmon Arm and Revel-
stoke in the north, only Penticton, led by the city
council turned down the plebiscite.
PENTICTON OBJECTS TO FINANCING
The basis of Penticton's objection was the
financing method, under which Kelowna, the
tentative site of the college, would pay only
slightly more for the $8 million capital and undetermined operating costs of the institution.
More than 50 per cent of these costs would
come from the provincial and federal governments. The rest would be left to local taxpayers.
Penticton has never rejoined the college
region.
While the regional college council, consisting
of representatives of the nine remaining school
boards arid government appointees representing
community and business interests, selected sites,
appointed staff and a college president and held
a unuccessful valley-wide referendum on the
issue, Penticton remained an observer.
LOCAL REFERENDUM FAILS
The referendum, which in December, 1966
asked ratepayers if they approved the college
concept and tentative site, failed because voters
in the northern Okanagan were interested in the
college only if it were situated in or near Vernon, 40 miles north of the Kelowna central point.
In an effort to get the Penticton school board
to hold a successful plebiscite on the issue, the
college council began to plan a B.C. Research
Council study on methods of cost sharing among
valley communities.
The study would attempt to determine the
the financial value of the college to its host city
and base the cost sharing on the distance each
community lay from the college.
Penticton school trustees agreed late this summer to hold a plebiscite this month but included
the condition that council must agree to defer
a valley-wide referendum until March, 1963.
Reason for the condition was to avoid a
possible clash of the college referendum with a
Penticton $1.3 million school referendum to go
before taxpayers Dec. 9.
The college council then faced the problem
of losing its president, Norman Walker, whose
contract expires Dec. 31.
Walker earlier agreed with the council to
terminate the contract if no progress had been
made by that date.
The council never gave Penticton any definite
decision on its plebiscite proposal and no plebiscite was planned.
Faced with hostile reaction from valley community interests, civic officials and school iboards,
the college council made a bid in September to
draw support by holding a mass meeting with
representatives from the community groups.
The meeting resulted in the council sending
a questionnaire to all the city and municipal
councils, school iboards and chambers of commerce in the valley asking for their support on
the college concept, site and the cost sharing
scheme the BCRC would be commissioned to
develop.
OTHERS IN FAVOR
Most of the answering organizations supported all three points.
The main opposition to the BCRC cost-sharing
scheme came from the Penticton school board
which did a sudden shift and called for complete
senior government financing of the college.
Several organizations, including the Penticton
chamber of commerce, backed this proposal.
On the other hand, Penticton city council,
which two years before had opposed the college
now gave it complete approval.
But because the school boards hold the power
of organizing a plebiscite, the council's approval
proves useless.
Realizing this, the college council made an
attempt to meet with the Penticton school board
to talk it into holding the plebiscite.
The school board refused the meeting, saying
it would not meet with the council unless some
new proposals were brought up.
On Monday night, the council made its new
proposal.
KAMLOOPS APPROACHED
In a move aimed directly at finishing its
weak connection with Penticton, it made plans to
approach the Kamloops school board to discuss
the possibility of the northern city's entry into
the college region.
The site committee of the college region was
at the same time instructed to change the basis
of its study so that Penticton was out and Kamloops was in.
If the move goes through the focus of the
college region would shift north from Kelowna
probably to Vernon thus satisfying the northern
groups who want the college there.
But the absence of the Penticton school district, which includes most of the area on the
south shore of Lake Okanagan, will mean a large
group of students will have to do without a
college.
Penticton students applying to a college without Penticton support would likely be either refused admission or charged double tuition fees.
There would be little demand for a second
college being constructed in the south Okanagan
within the next 20 years because students in
school districts surrounding Penticton would be
able to live in at the college at the Vernon site.
If the bid to include Kamloops fails, the
college region will include a population of only
97,000 and according to president Walker that
will be enough to establish the comprehensive
college envisioned in the Macdonald Report.
Attempts at establishing such a college without the Penticton district 20,000 population will
lead to failure, he warned the council Monday.
(Because most of the college council members
are also on school boards, a meeting between the
council and the Kamloops trustees will be
arranged this week at the B.C. School Trustees
Association convention in Vancouver.
TIME
CONSUMPTION
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4445 West 10th Avenue
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FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretory
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18, 1967.
Elections for the Positions
of Student Senator
The following are eligible to be elected to the office
of Student Senator:
1. One student registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to be elected by the students registered in the
Faculty of Graduate Studies only. To be eligible for
election to this position, a student in the academic year
most recently taken prior to the election shall have
taken a full winter session programme of studies at
this University and satisfied the academic requirements of the Faculty of Graduate Studies; he shall
also have been granted clear admission to, and be
enrolled in, the Faculty of Graduate Studies of this
University as a full-time student.
2. Three students from the student body at large (including the Faculty of Graduate Studies) to be elected
by the student body at large. To be eligible for election to one of these positions, a student in the academic
year most recently taken prior to the election shall
have taken a full winter session programme of studies
at this University and attained at least a second class
standing; he shall also be registered as a full time
student at this University.
Terms of Office:
1. The student elected by the faculty of Graduate
Studies shall hold office for two years.
2. Of the students elected by the student body at
large, the candidate receiving the highest number of
votes shall hold office for 2 years, the candidates receiving the second and third highest number of votes
shall hold office for one year.
Nominations:
Nominations are open immediately.
Nominations will close on Wednesday, October 4, 1967
at 4:00 p.m.
Voting will take place on Wedesday, Oct. 18, 1967.
Nomination forms and copies of election rules and procedures are available at the AMS office, in Brock
Hall. Completed nomination forms should be deposited in AMS mailbox number 53. For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd vice-president,
224-3242. Local  47.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student administration advisory committees:
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Appointments will be made at a meeting of
Student Council, Tuesday, October 10, 1967, at which
applicants should appear.
Letters of application and further questions should be
addressed to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, A.M.S.
Mailbox No. 53.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant
will work with the interim returning officer during
the October 18th elections, after which he will assume
responsibility for running all referenda and AMS elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications
and questions should be addressed to Kim Campbell.
2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53, or
224-3242, Local 47. Appointment will be made at a
meeting of Student Council, Monday, October 2, 1967.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Student Union Building
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Student Union Building applications should be addressed
to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, 'AMS mailbox
number 53.
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51. Thursday, October 5,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Track and fielders
set for big season
^      By  MIKE FITZGERALD
"I would say we had a better
quality of athlete who honestly doesn't know his capabilities," said UBC track and field
coach Lionel Pugh Wednesday.
UBC's track and field and
cross country teams are in
1 training now for their upcoming season.
"We have to get the cross
country men off the ground
first    because    their    season
WALT HAZZARD, who is
six feet, two inches tall, will
be the smallest man on the
Seattle Supersonics when
they play the St. Louis
Hawks in a National Basketball Association game in
War Memorial Gym on Saturday. Hazzard scored 2,109
points in the last three seasons with the Los Angeles
Lakers. Proceeds from the
game, starting at 8 p.m., will
go to the John Owen Memorial Bursary fund.
100 in 9.7, Mike Evans, outstanding half-miler, Gordon
Dong, former member of the
B.C. International team, and
Sam Vandermeulen, third-
ranked Canadian high jumper
are among the members of
what Pugh thinks is one of his
strongest teams ever.
"What we need is a three-
pronged season," says Pugh.
"We need competition from
the local scene, from the rest
of Canada and from the southwestern states. That way we
would get the best of competition  at all times.
"It's just the lack of funds
that keeps us from that kind
of schedule.
"However, the prairies will
offer strong competition with
Manitoba expected to be the
strongest. We'll even run
against Simon Fraser sometime next year."
Last year's team was good.
Only time will tell how much
better this year's team is.
starts first. We have up to
twenty runners of varying
abilities at the moment, what
we would call a good volume."
Among that good volume
who will be running in the
Seattle Pacific College invitational race on Saturday are
Gerry Glyde, a fine long distance runner from the U.S.,
Jack Burnett, Bob Tapping,
veteran of the team, and Ken
French.
Pugh also praised highly his
women's track team, which
will be the next to get off the
ground.
Competing for him will be
Linda Schaumleffel, a high
ranking shot putter who has
put the shot more than 40 feet,
Leona Sparrow, and Betsy
George, a long jumper from
Trail.
The men's team will start
their season in December at
the Jubilee Games Invitational
in Saskatoon.
Peter Victor, who runs the
Four rugger teams
play this weekend
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds, new and old edition,
will take on the B.C. All Stars at the opening of the new
stadium on Saturday afternoon.
Four former Birds, Brian Cornwall, Rae Wickland,
Dave Milne and Bill McLachlan will help the present team
against a strong opponent.
"We have the smallest forward line in the city league,
so naturally we picked four former forwards," says coach
Donn Spence.
"But apart from that our team is quite outstanding.
Tommy Fraine is possibly our best player.
"He's represented Canada in international competition
and will play for them against New Zealand."
Three other UBC rugby teams will see atcion this
Saturday, all on Wolfson field and all beginning at 1:15
I The Braves take on Western Washington State College,
I   the Tomahawks play Trojans II and the Teepees will trade
I   knocks with the B.C. Institute of Technology squad.
Coach betting on frosh swimmers
The UBC swim team suffers the same affliction of some of
the other Bird teams this year — frosh.
Swimming coach Jack Pomret is looking to the frosh to
help fill the gap left by the absence of last year's stars Bill
Gillespie and Martin McLaren.
The addition of Chris Stevenson, Phil Dockerill, Ken Campbell, Terry Lyons, Ted Dorchester, Bob McKay, Tom MacDonald
and Lyle Mackosky should make the team much tougher this
year.
Pomfret is also looking for record performances from last
year's accomplished stars: Bob Walker, Ricardo Mansell, Phil
Winch, Keith MacDonald, Frank Dorchester, Bruce Melton and
Jim Maddin.
Friday Night Social
I. House and U. N. Club
New Members Free
I. House Lounge — 8:30 p.m.
Friday, October 6th
"The Experiment
rjn International Living'
MRS. M. LOVICK
NOON TODAY
UPPER LOUNGE-I. HOUSE
COFFEE
IS
CO
here tBre   (Pea?\e C£?ko
(/V.CLV   VeT o     "These  <**e -+**.«
people ojWo Vm->e*i»T c\ .scoue^e©* "+^e
uWt>/t-t^e   Kh+oV>e  ^a.^e^s *ov C Ls\
• * o
is
0-+1 i   u> e*i~ -re*+U .
They need help!
UBC rugby coach Donn Spence is almost desparate in his
need for more players.
Enough rugger men to stock one complete team are needed.
If these players don't materialize, one team will have to
withdraw from league competition.
• •       •
Anyone wishing to become the manager of the UBC Thunderbirds ice hockey team is requested to see coach Bob Hindmarch.
His office is in memorial gym, room 212.
• •       *
UBC football coach Frank Gnup is appealing to anyone who
has played football, to come and try out for either the Thunderbirds or the Jayvees.
Sign up at his office in memorial gym.
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO
Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21    —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to.2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 10, 11, 24, 25.
December 1, 2.
January 12, 13, 26, 27.
February- 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
HARVARD BUSINESS
SCHOOL VISITOR
Assistant Dean Woodford L. Flowers, Director of College Relations and a member of the Admissions Board of the
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, will
visit the University of British Columbia on-Tuesday, October
10 to talk to students interested in business as a career of
excitement and creative opportunity.
Requirements for admission to the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Administration
(MBA), include a college degree in any field of concentration,
a standing in at least the top third of the class, and a record
of progressive achievement in campus activities, business,
the military, or elsewhere.
The MBA Program at the Harvard Business School is
based on the experience-oriented case method, pioneered at
the Harvard Business School to develop the practical, analytical, and decision-making capacities that are the key to
managerial effectiveness.
For outstanding students in each first-year class (of
roughly 690) there are 70 fellowships available. Approximately, 40 per cent of the Harvard Business School student
body also makes use of the Deferred Payment or Loan Program which enables all students admitted to the Harvard
MBA Program to attend even though their sources of funds
are inadequate.
Seniors, or others, wishing to talk to Mr. Flowers should
contact the office of Mr. J. C. Craik, Office of Student Services, for an appointment. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, Octooer 5,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Folk singing series slated
EXTENSION DEPT.
Folk Songs of Canada — the
first in a series of eight evening programs combining lectures, recordings, live performances and audience involvement. Today, 8 p.m., Bu. 100.
Special student rate $6 (regular rate $12).
DANCE CLUB
General    meeting    for    all
dance   club   members,   dance
club  lounge, noon today.
DEBATING UNION
Organizational meeting   Friday noon, Bu.  102. Everyone
welcome.
VOC
Last   day  today  to   submit
applications. Come to the club,
behind Brock.
ARTS US
Wowie! Big arts dance, Friday night. Two bands, light
show, and strobe. Brock, 9
p.m. to 1 a.m., 75 cents. Blow
your mind baby.
RAMBLERS
ATHLETIC CLUB
Meeting   Friday   noon,   Bu.
217.
PHRATERES
All-Phi   pledge   fireside   tonight, 7:30 p.m., IH.
IH
New members to IH and UN
club admitted free to the Friday night dance at IH, 8:30.
VOLLEYBALL TEAM
First practice for UBC women's volleyball team, today,
1  p.m.,  in the women's gym.
Come and try out.
SCIENCE US
Science general meeting noon
today,   Henn.   200.  First   year
especially welcome.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
First    general    membership
meeting noon today, Bu. 216.
All welcome.
EDUCATION US
Help us choose our education
homecoming   queen,  noon  today, ed. 100.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
First regular meeting  noon
today in hut L5 near the field-
house.
VOC
Long hike tickets  available
at   clubhouse   at   noon   today
and Friday.
WAD
Figure skating: first team
practice tonight, 6 p.m., Thunderbird Arena. All new members attend.
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails white dinner jackets, morning
coats. Formal and informal business wear—complete size range.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
«,.  /-TTTCXI    FORMAL WEAR
McGUISH LTD.
Mon.-Sat. 9:30 to 5:30
_04« W. 41st -  Ph. 263-3610
PERMA
PRESS
RAIN
COATS
JT^*^    MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
ROD AND GUN
Meeting   today   noon,    Bu.
218. All new members required to attend.
IH
Fall   fair   program   meeting
noon today, IH 400.
THEATER DEPT.
Volpone — student showing,
Freddy   Wood   Theater,  noon,
today, 75 cents.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting   Friday   noon,   Bu.
204.
IH
Mrs. M. Lovick speaks today
on the government in international living; noon, IH upper
lounge. Free coffee. First of
four lectures.
ACADEMIC  ACTIVITIES
Fall Symposium: Arts and
Politics. Free lectures in Bu.
106 at noon: today, Bill Willmott on China; Friday, Robin
Blaser on poetry.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish conversation group
meets today, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.,
at IH. Class members take
note, everybody welcome.
Come and go as you wish.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, noon today, Bu. penthouse. Friday
noon, film Reinforcement
Therapy plus Dr. Craig speaking, Ang. 207.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Meeting   for   those   wishing
to help work on the Wayfarer
today noon, Ang. 406.
ECONOMICS SOC
Annual faculty-student football game, Saturday at 10 a.m.
Players    and   spectators   welcome.
COMMERCE US
Campus-A-Go-Go at the armory, Saturday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Three   big   bands   and   sexy
girls.
VCF
Ban Haden, associate evangelist to Billy Graham, speaking Friday noon, Ang. 110.
GERMAN CLUB
Folk-singing in Bu. 203 noon,
Friday. Coffee party at IH
Tuesday noon.
Terry Turner [above] of San Jose,
Calif., working in a castle
Jobs in Europe
Luxembourg—American Student Information Service is celebrating its
10th year of successful operation
placing students in jobs and arranging tours. Any student may now
choose from thousands of jobs such
as resort, office, sales, factory, hospital, etc. in 15 countries with wages
up to $400 a month. ASIS maintains
placement offices throughout Europe
insuring you of on the spot help at
all times. For a booklet listing all
jobs with application forms and discount tours send $2 (job application,
overseas handling & air mail reply) to:
Dept. O, American Student Information Service, 22 Ave. de la Liberte,
Luxembourg City, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Organizational meeting noon
today, IH 400.
CIASP
A meeting for all those
interested in doing community
development work in Mexico
next summer, noon today,
Brock extension 350.
FALL SPECIAL!!
BRING THIS AD AND  GET
10% DISCOUNT
ON ALL TUNEUP WORK, PARTS AND LABOUR
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 234-0828
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days $24)0.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
THK    "UNDERCUT"    WITH HANK
and    The    Hoboes    at    the P.N.E.
Showmart Building. Friday, Oct. 13.
Hard Times.
BACK FROM THE BUSH BASH.
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30-1:00. Hallmark
Hall, 5550 Fraser Street. Tickets
$3.00  couple.   Room   112  G&G.
TURN ON AT THE ARTS DANCE
Friday in Brock, 9-1. 2 Bands—My
Indole Ring and the French Hand
Laundry. Only 75c.
Greetings
 12
NEW MEMBERS TO I. HOUSE AND
U.N. Club dance tomorrow night,
Lower Lounge of I. House. 8:30 p.m.
HI ROBERT! WELCOME TO UBC.
See you at Cultus Lake this weekend.   —   "College-Lifers"
WHY IS THERE AN INTERNA-
tional House. Discuss our objectives  tomorrow noon,  there.
13
Lost & Found
LOST. HOME KNIT IRISH CARDI-
gan sweater. Last seen Reserve
books Tuesday. Phone Susan Burns
732-6684.
LOST BROWN WALLET FOURTH
and Blenheim, Oct. 1. Reward,
j^hone LA 2-1761.
LOST BLACK BRIEF CASE IN
either Henry Angus Bldg. or Education Lounge. Phone Barry 224-
4904.   Reward.
FOUND — JOHN H. TAYLOR —
Please claim wallet at Publications
Office,  Brock Hall.
LOST LADIES BEIGE RAINCOAT
& Scarf outside Wes: 103, Fri. afternoon. Please return to Dept. Mi-
crobi. Wes. 127 or leave outside
Wes.   103.
LOST: BRIEF CASE AND CON-
tents. Contents irreplaceable to
owner. Reward Is offered to person
who returns contents and/or briefcase to Ubyssey Publications Office. Owner's name Peter B. Llnley.
FOUND WALLET IN BUCHANAN
washroom. Phone 738-0295 after
5:00.
SAVE A DAUGHTER'S LIFE DAD-
dy wants his staple gun lost on
Club's Day. Return to Dance Club
Lounge. Please!
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE" FOR 8:30's FROM VIC-
Inity    of    Main   ana    S.E.    Marine.
325-2433.	
THREE    DRIVERS    NEEDED    FOR
Carpool—Vicinity of 49th and  Oak.
Phone Andy at 321-2851.
RIDE WANTED VICINITY 19TH
& Oak. 8:30's Monday to Friday.
5:30 Monday. Wednesday, Thursday.
Phone 879-1807.
CAR POOL TO KAMLOOPS LEAV-
ing Friday noon and returning Monday.   Phone  Bob McGinn,   434-6548.
CARPOOL NEEDED FOR 9:30*s AT
Renfrew-Broadway area. Call 255-
0319  after 6  p.m. 	
CARPOOL   WANTED   FROM-CORN-
wall   &  Maple.   Arriving  by  9   a.m.
and   leaving   at   5    p.m.    Mon.-Fri.
Phone   after   six—731-9432.
RIDE   NEEDED   FROM" RICHMOND
No. 5 Road and  Cambie. 278-8274.
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST VAN.
23rd St. Mon.-Fri. For 8:30's. Please
phone 926-4170 after 7 p.m.
RIDE DESPARATELY NEEDED
from and to Richmond. 8:30 classes
to 5:30 in afternoon. Phone Bob
277-0624.   (Near   hospital).
HELP! I STILL NEED A CARPOOL
from Caulfeild, West Vancouver.
Soon!  Phone Pete 926-1581.
GIRL NEEDS RIDE FOR 8730's
from Cardero and Beach. Phone 685-
4990  after  6:00,  ask  for Norma.
ZORBA THE GREEK WILL PER-
form in the Aud. Thurs. Oct. 5.
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30.
UNDERCUT TICKETS NOW AVAIL-
able from A.M.S. office and the
Forestry  Undergrad   Society.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS ASSOCIA-
tion organizational meeting Thurs.
noon.   I.H.   Room  400.
GEOLOGY'S BIG BASH FRIDAY",
Oct. 13. 8:30 - 1:00. Everyone welcome.   Hard   Times.
FILMS FROM CHINA—"VICTORY
of Chairman Mao's Thought" (The
Three Atomic Tests) and' "Chairman Mao is the Red Sun in Our
Hearts" (National Day Celebration
in Peking, 1966). Sunday, October
8, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Olympia Theater, Hastings at Nanaimo. Ad-
mission,  $1.00.
ROBERT ANDREWS IS IN CAN-
ada! Hear him speak at Campus
Crusade *or Christ Conference at
Cultus Lake during Thanksgiving
weekend. Call 732-6433 for full details.
Travel Opportunities 16
GREATLY"- REDUCED ~ RATES-ON
Chartered bus to Okanagan. Leaves
Friday, returns Monday. Phone
Dawn, 224-5742.
SPEND THANKSGIVING AT CULl
tus Lake. Phone Campus Crusade
for Christ Office, 732-6433, for Information.
GO TO MEXICO NEXT SUMMER!
CIASP does Community Development there. Information in Brock
Extension  350.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: USED HAMMOND OR-
gan M. or L. Series. Perferably with
drawbars and double keyboard.
Phone  Harry   733-8694.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1930 FORD EXCELLENT CONDI-
tion.  AM 6-6315 after 6 p.m,
1959 FORD, 4-DOOR" SEDAN.~PRIC-
ed  for fast  sale.   $295.00.  988-1928.
Automobile Parts
23
WRECKING 1957 AUSTIN HEALY.
Good motor, top, Tonneau, other
parts. Andy 688-4052.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles  -  Cars
Generators  -  Utility Units
New   and Used
SPORT CARS
N        Motors        T
O S
R IS
T       W
145 Robson H 688-1284
SUZUKI 80 MODEL K-10, VERY
good condition, $175.00. Firm, 224-
3853   after   6  p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
 32
WHOLESALE  PRICES TO ALL UBC
students on trans, radios, tape recorders, record players, watches,
jewelery, etc., at THE DISCOUNT
HOUSE,   3235  West  Broadway,  Tel.
732-6811.
Rentals - Misc.
36
Scandals
37
THE GREEK NAMED ZORBA IN
Aud. Thurs. Oct. 5. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30. Adm. 50c.
THE YEAR'S BEST BASH. FRIDAY
Oct. 13. 8:30-1:00. Tickets $3.00 cple.
Room  112, Geology Bldg.
Special Notices
15
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W  10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   298-5966.
CBC SKYDIVERS  DON'T JUMP TO
conclusions.
38
Sewing - Alterations
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
Typing
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST
trie.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-6129,
 45
ELEdS"
WILL  TYPE  TERM ESSAYS
RE  1-2664 — MRS.  SHARP	
ESSAY TYPING. REASONABLE
Rates. Phone 683-2859 between 9
a.m.  and 3 p.m.   Monday to Friday.
TYPING AT HOME~VIC._PNEr25c
per page. Supply own paper. No
phone calls if •sufficient time is not
given to complete. Phone 255-8853.
Ask for Rosie. i
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female 51
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
To exchange light duties for room
with industrious 2nd yr. frosh. Call
R.   Dosman.   HE4-9844  after  six.
Help Wanted—Male~ 52
MEN NEEDED TO DELIVER FOR
the Friar. Must have own car. 4423
W. 10th. 224-0833.
Male or Female
53
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday.	
VIANCOUVER-CENTRAL RECREA-"
tion Project of the Vancouver Parks
Board requires part-time staff to
lead adult and teen activities—Judo,
wrestling, gym; badminton; floor
hockey; gym; games; tumbling and
squscre dancing. Youth workers are
also needed. Phone 879-6011.
54
Work Wanted
RETIRED NURSE—GIVE ALL DAY
care my home, 5 days week. Small
babies   especially,   UBC   area.   224-
7141.
PAYING    PLAYMATE    WANTED
for our two-year-old. Campus Area.
228-8930.
INSTRUCTION
Music 82
ORGANIST AVAILABLE WITH
equipment for dance group. Ph.
John 224-3112.  Rm.   241.
Special Classes
      63
LEARN TO SKYDIVE FILMS
demonstrations. Licenced Instructors. Tues., Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. Buchanan   102.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTY-.INQ
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block  from   gates.
FOR SALE
Hurry Girls to
"THE CAMPUS SHOPPE"
Retirement Sale, 5732 University Blvd.
(in   the   Village).   Prices   slashed   on
everything. Do your Christmas shopping now.	
LOOKING
For   clean,    used,    guar,    appliances.
Also   complete   repair  service  for  all
makes  and models.
McIVER Appliances Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181	
GOLF CLUBS. 1964 WILSON STAFF.
2-9  Irons.  $75.   266-6503  after 6.
COMFORTABLE    STUDIO    LOUNGE
—Chesterfield   good   condition.   $25.
521-8114.	
BIRD CALLS .'j,
Your student telephone directory is
available at end of month. Buy pre-
sale tickets now for 75 cents from
Bookstore or Publications Office. After   publication   price   will   be   $1.00.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
 81
ROOM ON CAMPUS TO RENT.
Girl  grad.   student.   Ph.  224-6357 af-
ter 4:00.	
SELF-CONTAINED SUITE — ONE
bedroom-twin beds $100.00/mo. including utilities. Near 4th and
Alma.   733-5573.	
FEMALE STUDENT REQUIRES
roommate to share s.c. ste. 733-768\
Room & Board
           82
NEAR UBC. TWO MALE STUDENTS
to share Very large nice room.
Good   meals,   table   tennis.   738-2305.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
 _83
NEEDED MALE STUDENT TO
stare apartment in Marpole area.
Phone Dennis 261-0085 after six.

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