UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Aug 13, 1985

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127693.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127693.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127693-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127693-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127693-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127693-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127693-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127693-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127693-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127693.ris

Full Text

Array THE
■4.   ■- %
9k  "%       .-. *
"V V%i
/*.
Vol. IV, No. 6
UBYSSEY
August 7-13, 1985
228-2301
, WHAT WE aH T
v€ CAN DO
Unemployed help each other
By ELENA MILLER
Unemployment: opinion polls show that most Canadians consider it our most urgent
national problem, but what is being done about it by all levels of government, business
and labor? The problem, especially in our own province, does not seem to be going away
— particularly for the young and for those looking for work in professional, technical
or "white-collar" fields.
Combine youth and would-be professionals and you have the average university
graduate. Aspiring teachers, lawyers, engineers, scientists and business majors —just
about any career you care to think of — are having a tough time finding work in their
field. Some period of unemployment or underemployment seems the destiny of most of
us these days.
What does this mean in human terms? A 1983 report by the Canadian Mental Health
Association entitled Unemployment Its Impact on body and Soul concluded that
increases in the rates of almost every imaginable personal and social ill: depression,
anxiety, spouse and child abuse, suicide, mental hospital admissions, homicides and
rapes, drug and alcohol abuse, infant mortality and heart disease, to name but a few.
In the face of these grim facts, and given the unwillingness or inability of others to
help, unemployed people are getting together to try help alleviate some of the stress and
isolation of being unemployed. A number of these groups of unemployed are helping
themselves by helping each other exist in Vancouver.
Their newsletter is called "The New Minority" and they call themselves the "non-traditional unemployed".
They are unemployed technical, professional
and white-collar workers, and they belong to a
non-profit society run for and by themselves,
the Centre for the Non-Traditional Unemployed.
Joan Vincent, present director and founder
of the C.N.T.U., explains the idea for the Centre came when she began noticing unemployed professionals showing up in the Food
Bank lines, where she worked as a volunteer.
That was two and a half years ago, and "the
problem is still with us," she says.
They are "non-traditional" because most of
the unemployed have been non-professional
"blue-collar" workers in the past They call
themselves a minority, but Vincent estimates
there are presently 20,000 unemployed professionals in Metro Vancouver alone, 36,000 in
the province.
Only 120 belong to the C.N.T.U., which has
no budget to publicize its existence beyond its
newsletter. Still, Vincent says a fair cross-
section of professions are represented in the
membership — including, engineers, architects, computer operators, graphic artists,
accountants, librarians, nurses and journalists.
All members, including Vincent, work as
volunteers. Office space at 609 Terminal
Avenue is donated by the company which
owns the building. Anyone can drop in on
their Thursday morning meetings which begin
at 10a.m. But, Vincent warns, the C.N.T.U. is
not really a drop-in centre, a place for drinking coffee and airing grievances.
Members are expected to contribute their
skills to the organization by helping out with
projects like the news letter and a planned
conference for the fall. This is a way of keeping people sharp and "alive", Vincent says,
and of keeping their professional skills intact
while they are not using them for paid work.
"We have a philosophy of helping yourself
in an environment of ideas and energy," she
adds.
Laurence Lyse is a civil engineer and technician who belongs to the C.N.T.U. He joined
six months ago and says he finds it "helpful
and interesting.
"It's better than sitting around the house
and moping all day," he says.
The Centre operates on a cooperative model, with every member having equal input.
"It's the old story of you get out of it what
you put in," Vincent says.
The multi-disciplined nature of the Centre
allows professionals to "tap into each other"
and test out ideas. In addition, recent University graduates can "plug into the profession"
by meeting and talking with people in the
field.
Presently, more male than female professionals belong to the C.N.T.U. Vincent puts
this down to more professional women choosing or being forced to take non-professional
' jbs as a way out of unemployment. She calls
.his phenomon "underemployment" (an example would be an engineer working as a taxi
driver or a teacher working as a waitress).
That women are more likely to end up
underemployed than men is a "product of tradition", Vincent says, adding underemployment can be as serious a problem for the professional worker as unemployment.
"It's not an elitist or snob thing," she says.
"Professionals working a 'joe-job' may tend to
overwork and be perceived as a threat by
other workers."
The C.N.T.U. is not the only support centre
for unemployed people. The B.C. Teacher's
Federation sponsors an Unemployed Teachers
Action Centre from its offices at 2235 Burrard
Street, and the B.C. Federation of Labor
sponsors 28 Unemployed Action Centres
throughout the province.
The Unemployed Teacher Action Centre
opened in April 1983 in response to the
increasing number of unemployed teachers in
the province, explains Terry Kellington, a
volunteer at the Centre.
Kellington helped organize a hiring fair last
month, bringing up representatives from
school districts in Texas and California. 3,000
B.C. teachers came to be interviewed at the
fair. Over 4500 unemployed teachers are registered with UTAC, and estimates of total
number of unemployed teachers in the province run as high as 10,000.
"The people from the States said they had
never seen such high quality professionals
lined up for work," says Kellington, adding
many B.C. teachers were hired.
As well as organizing hiring fairs, UTAC
keeps up a regular job board, holds work-
snops to upgrade teachers' skills, and offers a
number of counselling and other services to
teachers. Kellington says "it is usually very
alive down here," with up to 12 volunteers
working on a given-day.
One of these volunteers is Les Gallus, an
artist and would-be art teacher. He says
UTAC provides a "supportive work environment" which will make the transition to
employment, when it comes, smoother. But he
says prospects are grim for most teachers, and
some are looking as far away as Africa to find
work.
The Unemployed Action Centres', although
sponsored largely by the B.C. Federation of
Labor, are open to "anybody who is unemployed, or who anticipates being unemployed," says Gerry Miner, coordinator for the
Burnaby UAC.
The UACs have a general assistance program which provides debt counselling, life-
skills counselling, referrals and other services.
In addition, volunteers will act as advocates
for people having to appear before tribunals
in order to receive unemployment insurance
or Guaranteed Annual Income for Need
money.
Miner estimates almost half his Centre's
work is spent in the advocacy role, while the
rest is counselling. He is somewhat critical of
the counselling offered at Canada Employment Centres, calling it "inadequate".
Since opening in October, 1983, the Burnaby UAC has tripled its clientele volume
from 60 per month to 200 recently. Miner feels
that with proper advertising this number
could easily triple or quadruple. Yet in February of this year the federal Tory government
withdrew its funding of UAC coordinators
which it and the previous liberal government
had undertaken up to that time. Since then the
provincial labor movement has vowed to keep
the UACs going.
Whether sponsored, as in the case of the
Unemployed Teacher Action Centre and the
Unemployed Action Centre, or independent,
as in the case of the Centre for the Non-
Traditional Unemployed no one seems to
doubt that these support centres provide a
valuable service for the unemployed. Page 2
The Summer Ubyssey
August 7-13, 1985
Wuec
The Return of Hot Spit Dancers
with special guests Slow, NG3 and
the Little Ratskulls, at Mason's Hall
(4306 Victoria and Kingsway), Aug.
9 at 8:30.
Mazaico Flamenco at the Classical
Joint Coffee House (231 Carrall St.
689-0667) Aug. 9 and 10 at 8:30,
Dave Quarin Jazz Quartet Aug.
11th.
Summer Relief Beat 85, Poisoned,
Brilliant Orange and Redemption at
the Commodore Ballroom (870 Granville 681-7838)
Tape release party for Celebrity
Drunks and the Dilletantes at John
Barley's (23 W. Cordova) Aug. 8th.
H0UU6
AMS Summer Film Series(SUB
Auditorium 228-3679), Oxford Blues
Aug. 8 - 10, 7:30 and 9:45.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and
Commercial Drive 253-5455), two
films by Margarethe Von Trotta,
Aug. 5-11; Sheer Madness and The
Second Awakening of Christa Klages,
7:30 and 9:30.
The Ridge (16th and Arbutus 738-
6311), Cold Feet, 7:30 and 9:30.
Pacific Cinematheque at Robson
Square (800 Robson 732-6119),
Mozart on film series, The Abduction From the Seraglio Aug. 9 at
7:30 and The Marriage of Figaro
Aug. 10 at 7:30.
City Stage (751 Thurlow 688-1436),
noon hour theatre, Village Wooing
by Shaw, Aug. 7, 14, 21 and 28. The
Lover by Pinter, Aug. 9, 16, 23 and
ExUbtfc
AMS Art Gallery Summer Exhibitions (main concourse SUB) Fabric
Design Aug. 5-9.
Vancouver Museum (1100 Chestnut
St.) Judy's Chicago's Birth Project,
until Sept. 28.
The Contemporary Art Gallery (555
Hamilton St. 687-1345) The photos
of Jayce Salloum, until Aug. 17.
Arts, Science & Technology Centre
(600 Granville St. 687-8414), Tom
Noddy and his Bubble Magic, Aug.
8 - 11 at 8:00 pm.
Burnaby Art Gallery (6344 Gilpin
St. 291-9441), Art and the Computer, over thirty international works
that were made with the aid of computers, Aug. 8 - Sept. 8.
Brigadoon, alternating with Damn
Yankees, Theatre Under the Stars,
Malkin Bowl (Stanley Park 280-
4411), until Aug. 16th.
Much Ado About Nothing, Open
Theatres Shakespeare is alive and
well and playing in Kits. (732-7888
7th and Vine) Aug. 8 - 31.
Arts Club Theatres (687-5315) Granville Island, Barnum, until Aug, 10;
Seymour St. Theatre, Sex Tips for
Modern Girls, until Aug. 10; Revue
Theatre (280-4444) Ain't Misbehavin',
until Aug. 10.
James Cowan Theatre (6450 Gilpin
St. Burnaby), The Actor's Guild
presents The Private Ear and the
Public Eye, until Aug. 17. (291-6864)
Vancouver's Third International
Beer Festival, Firehall Theatre (280
E. Cordova St.) Aug. 9 and 10, 7 - 10
pm. 689-0926.
Gordon Southam Observatory (738-
2855), an invitation to see the Per-
seid Meteor Shower at Cypress Bowl
Aug. 11 from 9pm Sunday to 5 am
Monday.
Festival of Strings Society (535-0676
in White Rock), Aug. 9 - 11 at 8:00
pm.
The Fort Gallery (9048 Glover Rd.
in Fort Langley 888-3994), opening
exhibition presents Salo, Doris and
Nelson until August 11.
Clare Cunningham Dance Foundation (333 Chesterfield N. Van. 985-
2215) Dance Instructor's Course Aug.
6- 16.
Volunteer Help Line
For more information on these
and other volunteer opportunities, drop into Brock Hall 200 or
phone228-381 1 for an appointment.
RED LEAF   tf
RESTAURANTf
LUNCHEON SM0RGAS60HD* AUTHENTIC CHINESE CUISINE 5
228-9114      LICENSES PREMISES £
70% DISCOUNT ON PICK UP ORDERS «
FRI 11:30      9:00 r>r^ SUNDA-S b HOL DAYS ■
CLOSED SATURDAYS
2142 WESTfcRN FARKWAY UBC
(opposite Chevron Station)
A Touch of Greece
2930 W. 4th Ave 733-6611
"The advantage to being small, besides being cozy, is
that we can guarantee consistency." We have selected
all the Greek delicacies that one associates with our
"heritage."
SOUVLAKI APPETIZERS
SEAFOOD SPECIALITIES
CASSEROLES PASTA
ESPRESSO BAR
Open 7 days, 5-11
FULLY LICENSED
Backstage Aides
People to assist with set decoration, stage props and lighting.
Behavior Therapy Aid
People to help teach life and play
skills to children with  behavior
disorders.
Consumer Help
People needed to answer consumer inquiries.
Aid/fri end to Visually Impaired
People to drive, read to, visit a
visually handicapped person.
Exhibits Explainer
People to explain arts and sciences-
related exhibits..
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: 5 lines or less. 1 day $4.50
Job offers half price.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is noon on the
Friday before publication.
The Ubyssey, Room 241k. SUB., OBC. Van.. B.C. V6T 2A5
85 —TYPING
ipoc
DOC
DOC
DttC
ONLY AT
FELUNI'S
WILD
ELEPHANT'S
FOOT SOUP
(When available)
i!
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word
processing. Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del. 9 a.m.
-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251 -2064.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING
Student rates. Ideal for students
on the North Shore. Days, eves.,
weekends. 985-8890.	
PROFESSIONAL  TYPIST    30
years experience. Student rates.
Photocopier. Dorothy Martinson.
228-8346.
TYPING MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Also research and editing. Call 732-0529, 4 - 6 pm.
WORDPOWER
at Alma & W. 10th
First Class
* Word Processing
* Editing, Proofing
* Xerox Copies
3737 W. 10th Ave.
 222-2661	
"EXPERT TYPING  Essays, term"
papers, factums, letters, mscrpts.,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reas. rates. Rose 224-7351.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING
Student Discounts
10th & Discovery
222-2122
"We hop to it!"
i-iPQpr
• GREAT SANDWICHES
• FABULOUS CHEESECAKES
• CAPPUCCINOS • ESPRESSOS
• NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back ot the Village
on Campus
j   Loc
one
DOC
S
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
• passport pictures
• specialty papers
• volume discounts
kinko's copras
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th 8-9   Fri 8-6   Sat 9-4   Sun 11-4 i
1
i
4
6
95
basic cut
3621 W. 4th Avenue, Van.,
733-3831 August 7-13, 1985
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 3
Unions oppose efficiency review
By DEBBIE LO
UBC administration has ordered
a professional efficiency review of
the university's non-academic areas
but campus unions are skeptical
about the usefulness of the firm's
recommendations.
"I don't think highly of it," said
Ted Byrne, a member of the Association of University and College Employees.
Byrne said Ritchie and associates,
the firm hired by the university to
conduct the study does not "understand" the work on which they are
making recommendations.
"They don't specialize in the area
they are studying," he said. "They
are only looking at the length of time
and not at the kind of work."
He said the firm was conducting a
"time and motion" study as part of
their process, which includes timing
washroom trips to improve efficiency.
"Maay members are worried and
don't feel they've been able to participate fully in the review," he added.
Byrne said the improved mail service two weeks ago was due to the
Anti-apartheid
group protests
return of the mail routine to its original method after a two week trial
period of the efficiency recommendations.
"It is an expensive review," he
added.
Byrne believes the money the university has spent on hiring the outside firm would have been better
spent on increasing worker wages.
"We could have used our own resources to conduct the review," he
said.
Bill Kadey, business agent for the
International Union of Operating
Engineers, said they have been "left
in the dark" about the results of
many of the efficiency recommendations.
"We consider ourselves already
shorthanded," said Kadey.
He said his department's work
was limited to "breakdown maintenance" at the present time and there
was no specific routine within the
department on which to make efficiency recommendations.
Kadey added the money could be
well used in other areas such as
wages.
George McLaughlin, vice-president of local 116 of the Canadian
Union of Public Employees, said
workers "can only do so much work."
"Buildings are not getting cleaned
to the standards as they used to be,"
he said.
"New full-time workers have not
been hired for the past three years
because of the university's hiring
freeze despite the new buildings
which have gone up on campus,"
said McLaughlin.
• The firm was asked by the administration to conduct tests to discover
more efficent ways of doing non-
academic work on campus and has
been at UBC since the spring.
Bruce Gellatly, UBC vice-president
administration and finance refused
to reveal the cost of hiring the efficiency experts.
"We don't have the particular skill
to do the tests in a proper fashion,"
he said.
The other campus unions could
not be reached for comment.
By IAN WENIGER
A newly formed anti-apartheid
group began their action in support
of Black South Africans Friday with
a protest march in front of the Royal
Bank's B.C. headquarters on West
Georgia.
The Friends of Winnie Mandela,
named after the black South African
activist and wife of jailed activist
Nelson Mandela, was formed by two
Vancouver women, Suzanne Hawkins and Deidre Maultsaid, on July
27.
Maultsaid told the audience of 50
people at the protest that her group
would heed the call of Black South
Africans to encourage through action the imposition of international
economic sanctions against the apartheid regime.
She said the Royal Bank and
many other large Canadian firms
have massive investments in South
Africa, and it is their duty to "keep
the responsibility to the Black citi-'
zens of South Africa and make reparations to them."
Zayed Gamiet of the South African Action Committee was pleased
to see the protesters because "it is no
longer enough to condemn apartheid
as immoral and unjust."
"The South African government
is immune to that kind of appeal.
This activity is the kind of language
that they understand." He stated
that the efforts of anti-apartheid
groups around the world were working and cited the Bank of Nova Scotia's withdrawal as the official distributor for Krugerrands (South
African gold coins) in Canada as a
local example.
"The purchase of Krugerrands is
the purchase of South African gold
in the most direct way. Once they are
purchased, the money earned serves
as very useful foreign exchange for
South African industries. Now the
sales of the Maple Leaf coin (Canadian gold coins) are for the first time
in excess of the sale of Krugerrands.
This is the effect we are having."
Gamiet concluded that the actions
must continue to "state unequivocally what side of the struggle we are
on so that the white minority will be
forced to see that their apartheid
comes with a price that the world is
no longer prepared to pay."
National Black Coalition of Canada president Delicia Crump also
spoke of the need for concrete action
on the issue of apartheid. "Canada
supports the policy of multicultural
ism, a policy entrenched in our constitution. External Affairs minister
Joe Clark has often condemned the
fascist regime in South Africa but he
will not support meaningful measures to bring the apartheid system
down," she said.
Crump questioned the effectiveness of "constructive negotiations"
with the white minority and called
for the immediate recall of the Canadian ambassador to South Africa.
She also committed her group to the
endorsement of the proposal for
action put forth by religious leader
Desmond Tutu which calls for serious international pressure to be
applied to the regime in Johannesburg to force reforms in their race
laws.
The protesters then marched in
front of the entrance to the Royal
Tower and the doors of the Royal
Bank branch. Protesters were encouraged to continue their support
for black South Africans and were
reminded of upcoming rallies including a protest at a Vancouver
radio station at which Krugerrands
will be sold on the air.
The Friends of Winnie Mandela
can be reached at 872-8212.
-robert chown photo
Man shows off muscles while trying to block out
the sun with his foot's shadow. But local tree is
unimpressed, after all, what are trees here for but
to produce shade.
B. C. students unite against gov t
by DEBBIE LO
B.C. students from Victoria, Burnaby and Vancouver are meeting
today to discuss a protest against the
provincial government's decision to
remove visa students' Medical Service Plan coverage.
"We think it is discrimination for
other students who have much to
offer B.C.," said Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students pacific
region chair.
Profs lobby for wage hike
Faculty salary negotiations for the upcoming academic year are
continuing. Both faculty association president Sidney Mindess and
acting vice-president academic Don Russel were quietly noncommittal on the negotiations' progress.
"We asked for a total (increase) of about five percent," said
Mindess.
The increase would include increases in career progress, equity,
anomaly, merit allowances, and an adjustment for faculty at the lower
end of the scale, he said. "We are trying to negotiate the magnitude of
the increase is any, and the manner of distribution."
At Simon Fraser University the board of governors has approved
the administration's proposal for a faculty salary freeze next year. The
SFU faculty association withdrew from negotiations when the administration insisted on a faculty salary freeze, Mindess said.
Mindess said he couldn't see the same thing happening at UBC.
"We'd go through arbitration rather than walk out," he said.
Another difference between the two universities is the faculty at
UBC has faced a salary freeze for the past two years, he said.
"The mood is not great. Faculty are getting upset over the freeze.
The past is beginning to hurt; it's not just this year.**
Economics professor Gideon Rosenbluth said faculty are losing
ground.
"If we don't get anything we're worse off than ever. There should be
money even if it's only career progress increments. Our actual salaries
have been decreasing over the past three years."
When asked what another year of frozen salaries would mean to
UBC Rosenbluth said, "The quality of faculty is always reflected by
salary scale. People who have opportunities to go elsewhere go
elsewhere."
Hunt said students from all the
institutions will collectively review
their individual protest work to date
and then they will "see where we
want to go working together."
The provincial health ministry cut
MSP funding for visa students and
workers on August 1 and only officially notified Simon Fraser University administration last Thursday,
said Lisa Price, an organizer for the
SFU Teaching and Support Staff
Union.
She said the provincial government refused to officially notify the
TSSU of the government's sudden
decision because it said the union
"had no interest in the subject."
The TSSU has filed a petition to
get a court injunction on the ministry's decision and a court date has
been set for August 29.
Rory McBlaine, president of UBC
International House, said he will be
"participating in trying to get things
off the ground," to protest the government's decision.
Phil Bennett, UBC graduate studies society president, said the decision is especially bad for students
who have medical conditions, such
as pregnancies, and are left without
medical coverage because private
firms are not willing to carry people
with pre-existing conditions.
Carlos Schrezor, a UBC visa student from Argentina in metallurgical engineering, has MSP coverage
which will run out September 30.
His wife is pregnant and is due in
October; because of her condition
she is deemed ineligible for medical
coverage by all of the private companies they have contacted so far, he
said.
"I have the choice of taking my
family home or paying for complete
coverage," he said. "None of them I
have money for," said Schrezor.
The minimum one day hospital
stay costs $700 if the procedure is
"normal" but if there are complications the cost rises to $5000. A flight
back to Argentina is a minimum of
$2800 for their family, he said.
Schrezor believes the ministry's
decision is "unjust completely."
He said the provincial government's policies are inconsistent when
defining a B.C. resident because he is
considered a resident when he pays
taxes but is told he is not a citizen
when applying for MSP coverage.
"I won't tell Argentinians to come
here any more," said Schrezor.
He also believes he is being unfairly
treated because he is helping the
province doing research for the B.C.
economy as part of his job.
Duncan Stewart, Alma Mater society external affairs coordinator,
said the provincial government is
"picking on one of the poorer segments of our society."
"At this time in B.C., there is a
great deal of prejudice against foreign students," he said. "It makes it
easier for the Socreds to take away
the basic right to quality medical
care."
Stewart said there is a public perception that foreign students do not
contribute anything to the province
and are a drain on B.C.'s economy.
About 4,000 students and workers
have been forced to seek coverage
under private plans by the ministry's
decision.
Provincial health minister Jim
Nielsen said they were "cleaning up"
the system by changing the ministry's policy for visa students and
workers. Page 4
The Summer Ubyssey
August 7-13, 1985
..,#' %,
t
TEXTLINER
REG. $2.25
49
each
1
XF202-0.5mm
CUSfflON POINT
MECHANICAL PENCIL
REG. $2.98
1
99
each
B55X-SW84
BALL PEN
REG. $3.49
95
1
each
UHU
StlC
Glue
Stick
B&ton
de colle
REG. $1.39
7.5 grams
89
each
y v.
^1
c
£%:      v.--
CI
-*w...'
*
WinssJ
POSTER ART PRINTS
&:
POSTERS
*
*
•
Belt Bi
Coppe
Glasse
Grea
Decorate your home or office!
•
STATIONERY
«J
&
GIFTJTEMS
ENTERTAINMENT
Rfif
Genui
TONIGHT
MENS
Board Game
Wt
REG. $19.95
sale jj5Q
Grefi
\*J each
31
Take one home to your family!'
V
m
\ fi
-°.-co , i i A,\.! J^&tai
0.-&7   / / V V -<
:i«
KNIRPS
All Ladies Umbrellas
assorted colors
•
SUMMER
COTTON BAGS
&
KEN\AN SISAL BAGS
strong & durable!
*
PANTYHOSE by
Phantom
21%-35%OFF
control top • regular • knee-hi's
TOU
SPOR]
Assoc
.^fev  sm
comfortal
SOC
Hansor
3
RES
5Q
EAR
REG. $4.95
fashion co
RAINBi
V. August 7-13, 1985
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 5
UBC
lESTED
[atafe
ckles
■ Tankards
1 Souvenirs!
0%
WICK
\e Leather
LLADIES
■lETS
Savings!
5%
OFF
r
CHROMATIC
2 Color Pen
REG. $7.95
SALE
3
95
eaen
*
ELYSEE
Gold Mini Pens
REG. $21.00
SALE
*
UNIBALL
UBC Crested
Rolling Ball Pens
i%
OFF
40
A
CALHCWN
^f!&BHrafflS!SSTw,SHfi
SPORTSWEAR
SUPRA
RUNNING
SUITS
TOPS & BOTTOMS
0
OFF
V^
40
TOP
REG. $39.95
SALE
$23*f
BOTTOMS
REG. $27.95
SALE
New
Bailey-
Striped
RUGBY
SHIRT
30
%
OFF
REG. $23.95
SALE
$16*
UBC
NEON
FLEECE TOPS
50
'C
OFF
REG. $19.95
SALE
$ iA17
10
ea
BEACH
TOP
50
REG. $15.95
SALE
%
$799
/ ea
UBC CRESTED
Infants
3-Piece Sets
PANTS
REG. $6.95
SALE
$485
T'ea
CREW
NECKTOP
REG. $8.95
SALE
%f2S
Vf ea
HOODED TOP
REG. $13.95
SALE
$Q75
yea
r^t^^^A-
m
■■IE cOTMIlIiili
•*»••••••••••••••••^ ••••■•••••■••••••■•••••■••••••••■••••••••••••■J
&>J»ADM/|,
'NfclS V*
ACTIONWEAR
BACKPACKS
REG. $13.45
SALE
Q95
^J each
SHORTS
REG. 12.50
95
eadJh
FOOTBALL
SHIRTS
REG. $17.95
10
95
each
Hooded
SWEAT TOPS
REG. $15.45
9
95
each
RUGBY SHIRT
Size: Medium Only
REG. $19.95
11
95
each
FOOTBALL
SHIRT
REG. $17.95
10
95
each
Engineer Stripe
RUGBY SHIRT
REG. $23.95
1395
m % J each
Ladies'
STRIPE TOPS
REG. $23.50
13
95
each-
OURS
SWEAR
sdjtems
OFF
%
€
e & casual!
^Sby
Mohawk
6"
$&50
OFF
c
JNGS
SALE $248
rs & styles!
k
>WBAGS
r
3
SHORTS by
Chets Tri-Ocean
OFF
REG. $31.95   SALE $22.39
*
BACK-TO-SCHOOL
FUN PACKS
Value over $17.00
,95
9
each
ODDS
n'
ENDS
20%-50%OPT
SPEED©MARINE
COLLECTION^ 8.
all SPORTSWEAR &. SWIMWEftR
OFF
I
f^J "rprATT'T'TfflS COUPON & SAVE!
V vl jM MA W\J X   (DuringSale Time Only)
Coupon must be presented in order to receive discount! Page 6
The Summer Ubyssey
August 7-13, 1985
AIDS  (t&L):l."tj* Ups (k
aids, she aids, etc.); 2- n.p.  devices for
Self-Kelp (learning aids);  3.    " ""
Grads need jobs
Unemployment in B.C. presently
stands at between 14 and 15 per cent
of the workforce. Some people believe
the real rate of unemployment (including those who have given up
looking for work) stands close to 20
per cent. This number includes an
estimated 36,000 professional workers, including 10,000 unemployed
teachers.
Many of these teachers — and
engineers and nurses and accountants and others — are recent university graduates. According to a 1984
Student Services survey, of the UBC
Arts graduates of that year, 36 per
cent continued their education, 53.2
per cent sought employment, and 8.8
per cent were unemployed.
On the surface, that doesn't sound
too bad. But statistics can be deceiving. How many of those 36 per cent
who continued studying did so only
because they knew job prospects
were so bad "out there"? And of the
53.2 per cent who sought employment, how many found work in their
field?
The fact that organizations now
exist such as the Centre for the Non-
Traditional Unemployed, the Unemployed Teacher Action Centre, and
the Unemployed Action Centres are
cold comfort to the unemployed UBC
graduate. They merely point out how
bad the problem is. The solution is
not more support centres, but suitable employment for the unemployed.
LtQ v u©rs
=*5^  Are visa students "non-residents?"
The cursed ECT
If Science or Applied Science students fail any of their academic
courses, within any year of their
program, they face the incontrovertible possibility of denial to continue
their progressive year of study. Of
course, most students from these
faculties are capable of passing their
"core-courses." But there is, however, one unappealing elective which,
unfortunately, hinders many students' program continuum — English 100.
I use the words "unappealing" and
"unfortunately" loosely. Now don't
get me wrong. English 100 is an
extremely useful course to prepare
students in writing their theses, but
when they have to continually repeat
the course, its validity tends to
attenuate.
It is not just English 100 that pulls
many student marks down to a fail,
but, rather, the dreaded ECT. That's
right! The cursed exam that stops
students from either continuing in
their program denies them entrance
into a higher academic faculty.
I am not inferring that all students
fail the ECT, but those with "border
line" marks in English 100, do get, in
a sense, "shafted!" So a word of
advice to you English 100 students
out there, do not get caught in this
dilemma; and, take it from an "expert" English 100 veteran, pass it!
Richard Wong
Science 2
I am shocked by the action of the
Bennett regime severing the medical
services plan of B.C. for visa students. I have lived in B.C. for the
past four years with valid student
and employment authorization.
I have worked hard and my research work is definitely more valuable to B.C. than the meager R.A. I
get. I pay taxes to both the federal
and provincial governments...increasing amounts every year. What do I
get?
IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIII1
limilllllllHIHIINIIIIIIIIIIIIII
We want your wonderfully wise and
wuvly witty words written (typed)
triple spaced on a seventy space line.
Love something? Hate something?
Hate everything? Tell us about it.
Letters may be edited for brevity and
style. No racist, sexist, homophobic,
or libelous stuff, or else. Deadlines
are very painful and are at Friday
noon.
IIIIIIIUIIIIIIIHIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHHIIIU
THE UBYSSEY
■^
August 7-13, 1985
The Summer Ubyssey is published Wednesdays throughout
the summer session by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia, with additional funding from the
Walter H. Gage Memorial Fund, the UBC Alumni Association,
and the federal Challenge '85 program. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university
administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241 k of
the Student Union Building. Editorial department, phone 228-
2301 /228-2305; advertising, 228-3977
Lei's play twenty questions." said Adam Quastel "Question Adam, better make it twenty-five."
said Victor Wong, "you always give such hard ones "Pat Qua n wanted desperately to play but he
was busy applying Husky pancakes and other petroleum products to the windshield of his high
performance sportscar. while he secretly dreamed of a brown cow or even better a Datsun
station wagon "Is it Sheky?" offered Debbie Lo. while she sang of trying and trying, to try "Does
it contain chunks of fruit and dextrose, sucrose and glucose?" queried Stephen Wisenthal as he
composed poetic elevator graffiti "That's two questions but they're both right" "Is it orange?"
asked Elena Miller. "Is it edible?", said Betsy Goldberg Etan Vlessing, Mike Dennis, James,-1'
Young, LiseMcGee, and Camille Dionne were all surethey knew what Adam was up to and whg.Ji
Ian Weniger asked "Does it come in a jar?" they knew they had it clinched. David Ferma>fTwas
unsure, but learned that Lethbridge would be a good place to live because the fish m yofor hats
would be most con tent in the irrigation capital of Canada, but he took a stab anyway :''7s it hiqhly
viscous? Oh. well it must be Mar mite" For his stupidity he was punished with ooblast meal, the
Husky Diner in Sudbury
^PS-
t^^^^^f IWM »"¥"»'»i»i»W»^V
EARN
i
>
$12,000
PER MONTH
IN YOU*. WARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELLINI'S
GREAT
SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village!
on Campus
* ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
10% discount on,any hair service
with presentation of this coupon
Expires Aug. 31, '85
5784 University Boulevard Phone 224-1922
224-9116
AMS
COPY CENTRE
HIGH QUALITY SERVICE
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
* Collating * Stapling * Binding
12 COIN-OPS STILL 5$ A COPY
Available 7 days, 7 a.m. -1 a.m.
Student Union Building, 228-4388
Last year's cutbacks have hiked
up the tuition fees tremendously. 1
have endured that. But now...I have
to pay at least $600 - 700 for a private
medical insurance policy because 1
am now suddenly declared "nonresident."
Thank you Mr. Bennett for making my days under your godforsaken
government utterly unforgettable.
Rama Prasad. V. Bommaraju
Graduate Student
Metallurgical Engineering
SAC warm and cuddly
Twice I have had the pleasure of
being quoted in your summer issues.
And twice you have made a small
error which 1 feel should be corrected.
I am not as reported, the secretary
of the student administrative council. I am secretary of the student
administrative commission, commonly known as SAC.
For your information, and for
that of your readers, I'll briefly explain SAC. SAC is the administrative body of the AMS; it is responsible for running student elections,
overseeing the approximately 170
clubs on campus, coordinating the
AMS SUB security team, and generally looking after the student union
building.
S AC's ten members are appointed
by student's council for a period of
one year. "SACees" are friendly fellow students who will listen to any
comments, questions, or criticisms
you may have. (Not until they get
back in September though).
In the meantime, I can be found
around my office from time to time.
Come and visit me in SUB 252; I
don't mind chewing the fat with
other UBC students. If that fails, call
me at 228-5466. Keep the presses rolling, and remember, SAC luvs ya!!
Martin Cocking
Secretary
Student Administrative Commission
T(E • Xj C • E
HE   EAT E
R Y
1 FREE BUK6EE
WITH   THE PURCHASE OF ANY OTHER GREAT
GOURMET   BURGER OF EQUAL OR GREATER
VALUE. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER COUPON.
DINING IN ONLY	
WEST
B     R     O    A     D    W    A
THE
SHOP
SHOP ON CAMPUS
FOR:
• UBC crested T-shirts, Sweatshirts.
Shorts, Caps, Mugs, Spoons.
• Unique Gift Items, Greeting Cards,
Postcards & Souvenirs.
PLUS • Bathing suits. Candy, Magazines,
Tobacco, Sundry Drug ftwros.
& MUCH MUCH MORE!
Lower Level Hours: Wephone: 224-1911
Student Union     Mon. to Fri. 9:30 em - 5:30 pm     Visa end MaaterCarri
Building U.B.C. Saturday 10 em - 5 pm Accepted
Saturday 10 em - S pm August 7-13, 1985
The Summer Ubyssey
Page 7
Mozart film fails
By ETAN VLESSING
The mystique that has lately grown
up around the music of Wolfgang
Amadeus Mozart is sure to fill the
Robson Square Cinema during Pacific Cinematheque's Mozart on Film
series now playing throughout August. But if the screening of Hans
Conrad Fischer's The Life of Mozart
(West Germany, 1967) last Friday
night is an indication of what lovers
of Mozart can look forward to,
many who attend later screenings
will be disappointed.
The Life of Mozart
directed by Hans Condrad Fischer
at Robson Square
Problems with projection, including poor sound quality, plagued this
mediocre documentary about Mozart and his music. Those who came
for the music left early in search of a
refund, while those wishing to learn
more about the origins and influences of Mozart's genius left unenlightened.
It would be unfair, of course, to
compare The Life of Mozart with
the more widely known Amadeus,
the former being only a biographical
account of the famed composer.
And yet, there is no escaping the
disappointing lack of story and character development in Hans Conrad
Fischer's Mozart.
The Life of Mozart opens with a
recreation of young Mozart's triumphant European tour of 17631766.
There are no scenes of any music hall
performances or royal courts. Instead, the audience must content
itself with endless shots of European
splendor, and only occasional cuts
to Mozart's portrait.
Then, Mozart is suddenly seventeen and rebellious. No effort is
made to portray Mozart as the impish fop he is reputed to have been, or
even as multi-dimensional. The narrator only hints at Mozart's "natural
gaiety and love of pleasure", when so
much more could have been said.
During his later and more prolific
Habeus Corpus is silly nonsense
By LISE MAGEE
Habeus Corpus. The term conjures up a variety of images (a courtroom scene fraught with dramatic
tension perhaps?), but certainly nothing even vaguely resembling the play
now on at Frederic Wood Theatre.
Habeus Corpus
by Alan Bennett
at the Frederic Wood Theatre
Alan Bennett's Habeas Corpus is
a Carry On style sex farce that at its
best has moments of dry British wit
but at its worst hovers dangerously
close to Benny Hill. It has all the
necessary accoutrements of a sex
farce: frustrated wives, over-sexed
old men, nubile young girls and
young men who are hot to trot, as
well as dialogue filled with innuendo
and other, less subtle, references to
sex. It is all rather silly.
The plot is predictable and harldy
memorable. It is one of those plots
where everybody runs around wanting to sleep with somebody (anybody?) other than the one they should
be wanting to sleep with, or frustrated because the ony they want to
sleep with wants to sleep with someone else. It does, of course, get a little
more complicated than that, with
the help of a pair of falsies and a few
pregnancies — but not much. The
only character with the good sense
to stay outside of this nonsense is the
cleaning woman Mrs. Swabb.
It does have its moments but this
is more a tribute to the ability of the
cast than to the script. Philip Sped-
ding is remarkably strong in his lead
role as Arthur Wicksteed and Carol
Nesbitt (Mrs. Swabb) illicits some of
the few whole-hearted laughs in the
performance.
Sarah Rodgers plays the wallflower, spinster daughter, Constance,
of the Wicksteed family. Her only
concern is the size of her chest and
that is where the falsies come in
handy. Felicity Rumpers (Laura
White) is the nubile young miss
whose only concern is the growing
size of her belly and finding a father
for it before all is apparent to the
others. She finds a willing mate in
Dennis Wicksteed (Stefan Winfield)
a hypochonriac who will supposedly,
conveniently die in three months.
But then it might be rather amusing
to indulge in a little foolishness with
his father, the rakish doctor (after
all, he has seen 25,000 pairs of private parts and will at least know
what goes where).
Indubitably the most entertaining
part of the performance, besides
Mrs. Swabb's vacuuming sound effects, is the attempted suicide of Dr.
Wicksteed's patient Mr. Purdue
(Michael Fera). He comes on at the
end of the first Act and hangs himself from a chanelier at center stage.
It isn't actually the suicide that is
amusing (except for those of us with
morose sensibilities) but he proceeds
to do card tricks and eat a tomato
during the intermission.
Habeas Corpus is intermittently
amusing and certainly fast paced
and well acted but one would think
that, considering the wealth of good
dramatic material available, that a
better choice could have been made.
If you have a predilection for this
kind of humour, enjoy. Otherwise it
is not recommended.
years, Mozart is portrayed as either
effortlessly composing works of art,
or at his writing table pleading with
his relatives and few friends for
financial help to offset his mounting
debts. The composer's constant pleas
for position and favor in the musical
world, and indeed his talents as a
whole, go first unnoticed, and at
length unpaid.
Unfortunately, we receive few
glimpses in The Life of Mozart of
the courtly circles in which Mozart
found so little success. Absent is the
realization that, although Mozart
was a genius, fa.r ahead of his rivals
in musical talent, he was without the
craftiness and shrewd planning so
necessary to rise in the courtly world.
This clash between genius and worldly wisdom, so well developed in
Amadeus, is entirely lacking in The
Life of Mozart.
Ihe Life of Mozart is weakest
where it should have been most
strong, in the presentation of Mozart's now renowned music, poor
sound quality ruined what would
otherwise have been a pleasing
affair.
Pacific Cinematheque's Mozart on
Film series continues at the Robson
Square Cinema with a selection of
Mozart's major operas until the end
of August. The series is presented in
co-operation with the Goethe Institute.
r
DOA still powerful, political, and angry
^v
By MIKE DENNIS
D.O.A. proved Sunday night at the York Theatre
that they are still the most powerful band in Vancouver's thriving alternative music scene.
The band, which just returned from a lengthy North
American tour, worked the hometown crowd into a
frenzy as they tore through an hour long set of both
new and old songs. Turning-in fine warm-up sets were
7 Seconds and Redemption, a local reggae outfit.
Redemption opened the evening's show, which
attracted people of all ages, even whole families in
some cases. Redemption's music is derivative of traditional reggae, however this band performs it in a
proficient and enthusiastic manner. Look for them on
the local reggae circuit.
There was at least a 45 minute wait before late
arrivals 7 Seconds from Reno, Nevada, appeared.
But it was worth the wait. The young band burst
forth with a level of energy rarely seen, even for hardcore punk bands. Lead singer Kevin Seconds paced
frantically about the stage, while his band thrashed
and bashed around him.
The band only came to a halt momentarily between
songs when Kevin quickly explained the meaning of
the song's lyrics, most of which were railing against
drug abuse or racism. The band's exuberance and
musical appeal evoked an appreciative response from
the audience. D.O.A. had a hard act to follow.
But the hometown boys didn't disappoint. The
good ol' D.O.A. express started off a bit slow but soon
warmed up into the undeniably powerful band they
are.
D.O.A., since their inception 8 years ago, have
matured from a raunchy punk band to a genuine hard
rocking concert act. And their audience seemed just as
pleased with their newer material off their latest LP
Let's Wreck the Party as they were with old hits like
The Prisoner or America the Beautiful.
Lead singer Joey (Shithead) Keighly showed he is
not only a talented guitarist and frontman, but also
doubles as an evangelist as he donned a preacher's
garb and treated the amused crowd to a sermon,
D.O.A. style. All in fun, of course. The band continued to reel off hit after hit, and got a well deserved
encore.
D.O.A. not only have as much punch as they've
always had, but are also extremely tight musically.
But it'll be a while before you can check them out for
yourselves, because D.O.A. will soon be heading off
to do a European tour.
Photograph displays provide insight into lifestyles
By CAMILE DIONNE
The art menu is raw in two photographic displays currently on at the
Presentation House gallery in North
Vancouver.
Encounters by Bill Burke is a display consisting of thirty-four large
black and white photographs taken
in the southern U.S. and Brazil,
which show ordinary people doing
ordinary things. His subjects are not
good-looking or successful, but ordinary people with raw edges still
showing.
Burke's images capture families
and couples, friends and individuals
from all levels of society — a couple
in a greasy-spoon restaurant, doctors at a university hospital, a woman
with her hair in rollers standing by a
spring with her two children, and an
older black man playing the fiddle as
a child looks on in wonder.
The most striking thing about
these images is that they reach out to
the viewer with their eyes. Each one
seems to tell its audience they have a
story to tell, about a life they have
lived.
Burke's art brings each viewer
into contact with the humanity that
we each know is out there, but sometimes intentionally forget.
The second installation called We
Want Moshiach Now! by Paula
Levine also uses black and white
photographs as well as artifacts and a
video presentation about Vancouv
er's Chassidic Jewish community to
give a refreshing look at the ultra-
orthodox Jewish way of life from a
Jewish perspective.
This presentation gives an inside
look at the lives and homes of some
of the members of the community
and looks at both the rituals and
celebrations of these people.
The video is very informative and
tempered my distaste for the orthodox strictness by having some of the
women explaining why they have
chosen this life-style. It explains the
history of the Chassidic movement
as well as giving a practical look at
some of the difficulties of maintaining the life-style. For example the
segment on how to shop for kosher
food in a Vancouver supermarket
was especially interesting.
The video at times lacks a polished professional quality and at
times the life-style it presents can
grate on the beliefs held by non-
Jews, however, the sincerity of the
people involved and their obvious
fulfillment from the Chassidic lifestyle compensates for any lapses in
the film and leaves the viewer with a
positive impression of the life-style.
The presentation raises as many
questions as it answers, but it also
informs and gives the viewer a clearer
understanding of the Jewish community as a whole and of the Chassidic community in particular. Together the two very different displays
make an informative and challenging presentation. Page 8
The Summer Ubyssey
August 7-13, 1985
Hiroshima: not the way they said it was
By JAMES YOUNG
Every so often something happens which radically
alters your life: you travel somewhere, you meet someone, you read a line in a book and "nothing is the way
they said it was."
For me, my visit to Hiroshima in 1981 was such an
experience. I didn't go there with any particular idea in
mind: the city was simply on the tour I was making of
Honshu, the largest of the Japanese islands.
The day I arrived was oppressively hot and after my
usual confusion with Japanese signs, 1 boarded a tram
which went through the city, along the canals towards
the minshuku, or bed-and-breakfast where I stayed.
The minshuku was only a couple of blocks from
both ground zero and Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima's largest central landmark constructed in memory
of the bomb victims.
That evening, when the heat had lessened, I took a
walk around the neighbourhood, where I saw the A-
Bomb Dome, a skeleton of a building symbolizing the
destruction the entire city had felt. I wondered why
they hadn't done the same thing in Europe, leaving a
few bombed acres of London or Berlin as testimony to
the effects of modern war.
The next day I visited the Peace Memorial Museum,
where the history of the bomb is told, illustrated by
photographs and objects which underwent the blast,
and supported by texts in English and Japanese. I
walked through the story of "Little Boy", the first
nuclear bomb to be used against a city, moving from
the Manhattan Project, to the reason Hiroshima was
selected as a target, to the flight of the Enola Gay, the
plane which dropped the bomb. The major part of the
exhibit documented the bomb's effects on human life
and the story of the hibakusha, or survivors.
For me, the exhibits attested to the power of the still
photograph. There were two types which really helped
me understand the nature of nuclear weapons. The
first were the photographs which showed the extent of
the damage to the city, in conjunction with maps as
reference points. These photographs proved a single
bomb could easily destroy an entire city. I tried to
visualize what the same bomb would do to Vancouver,
while reassuring myself that my own city was far more
sprawling.
When I later learned modern bombs can have 1300
times the destructive explosive power of the Hiroshima bomb, I realized that Vancouver could also be
destroyed in a matter of seconds.
The other photographs which moved me were those
of the bomb survivors and the effects suffered by the
. human body.
Although we were required to read John Hersey's
Hiroshima in Grade 10 English, I had not fully
imagined the triple effects of the bomb — the blast
pressure which hurled people through the air and
impaled them on rubble, the heat wave which vaporized those close to ground zero, leaving others with
grotesque fatal burns, and the radiation which left
thousands suffering from the various symptoms of
A-Bomb disease.
Here were images of charred bodies, mass graves,
children who became bald as they died from radiation
sickness, and people who developed keloids, painful
protuberances which formed under scar tissue, requiring surgical removal.
I left the museum feeling stunned.
At the bottom of the steps a group was collecting
money to aid second-generation bomb victims, not
recognized by the Japanese government as authentic
z^HSlLv
sufferers of the bomb's effects.
On the way back to the minshuku, I walked among
the forty monuments which stand in the park, including the Children's Peace Monument, covered with
garlands of folded paper (origami) cranes.
The tradition of decorating these monuments with
origami cranes began when a junior high school student, Sadako Sasaki, developed "A-Bomb disease" ten
years after being exposed to radiation as a small child.
During her illness, Sadako began to fold cranes believing that making one thousand would bring good luck.
According to one version, Sadako died before she was
able to complete the prescribed number, but her
classmates turned to making them in her memory, to
express their desire for peace.
I spent the next few days alternating between sightseeing and reading two books on the bomb. One was
Tale of Gen, an account in comic book form of the war
related with the sincerity and simplicity of a young
dents prepared for the O-bon festival, when the spirits
of dead ancestors are said to return.
I visited the shrine at the,nearby island of Miyajima,
said to be one of the three most beautiful places in
Japan. There the red tori gate rose out of the water at
high tide. Tiny deer walked around, so accustomed to
tourists that I watched one eat a woman's lunch as she
went down to the water to swim. Hiking around the
island, I encountered a group of monkeys who had
also lost their fear of people.
My images of Hiroshima are divided between the
ones of utter annihilation found in the museum and
those so full of life that I experienced myself. And that
divided reality is Hiroshima's message to every other
city in the world in an age when we now have the
destructing power of more than a million Hiroshimas,
yet only 7,000 strategic targets.
A message for a time when military planners go on
speaking of limited nuclear war and dream of outlan-
boy. Gen sees his father persecuted because he refuses
to adopt a posture of militarism and to express racist
views against the Koreans forced to labour in Japanese
factories.
After the bomb is dropped, Gen witnesses his
mother trapped under their burning house, and is
unable to help her.
The other book, Masuji Ibuse's Black Rain, takes its
name from the large sticky pitch-black drops which
fell some hours after the explosion, contaminating
people with radioactive fall-out. Ibuse details the progression of a young woman's illness, which begins
when the bomb is dropped and affects her later plans
for marriage. Her story is set against restorative
images of life in the country. As I read it, I compared
the extent of destruction of various neighbourhoods in
the book with the actual place I was visiting.
I spent my time wandering around the city, trying to
discover what Hiroshima had become years later.
Downtown, I found the typical well-stocked department stores, and a baseball stadium, home of the
Hiroshima Carp. I listened to bluegrass musicians
jamming in a park, talked with the owner of a coffee
shop who visited Vienna to listen to classical music
and watched some teenage boys performing an Elvis
imitation. In other neighbourhoods I found a lush
waterfront park, and Mitsubishi's heavy industry
factories.
The local graveyards were scenes of activity as resi-
dish defense systems that will allow their side to win.
The museum is not about a past event, about something catalogued, classified and preserved for posterity. It is a vision of one possibility for the future, a
future we are choosing now, through our choice of
politicians, through our response to the problem and
the priorities in our lives, through the television we
watch and the toys we give our children to play with.
There are only three possible responses to the message of Hiroshima.
One is to deny the reality or relevance of the Hiroshima bomb, a process which must drain more and
more psychic energy as the commercial media begin to
pay attention to the problem.
Another is to accept the reality of the threat, yet do
nothing: this must surely lead to heightened anxiety
about the future.
The third is to accept that reality and work to
change it.
There are no guarantees; it is a matter of slowing
down, stopping, looking around and asking what the
planet really needs. And that response will determine
whether there really will be "no more Hiroshimas" or
whether the photographs on the museum walls are an
accurate vision of our future.
James Young is a Ubyssey writer involved with peace
and disarmament issues.
***^fciij
"«4rR

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127693/manifest

Comment

Related Items