UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 30, 1966

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0127690.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127690.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0127690-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0127690-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0127690-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0127690-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0127690-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0127690-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0127690-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0127690.ris

Full Text

Array STAG STRIPPER FINED, PART NOT SERIOUS'
A 21-year-old brunette
who stripped down to a pair
of high heeled shoes at a
January science stag was
convicted Tuesday of appearing in an indecent performance.
• • •
Betty Yvonne Jones of
1522 East Third Avenue, was
given the choice of a $100
fine or a 30 day jail term.
She was given until April
12 to pay the fine.
Magistrate Maurice Mulligan said Miss Jones' part in
the performance was not
serious.
• • •
"It was part of an overall
performance," he said, "the
others were much more responsible."
Mulligan did not elaborate.
Miss   Jones   was   arrested
Jan. 18 when police raided
the science stag at Clintojs:
Hall, 2605 East Pencle^^flH
later charged her wi
decent    performan
theatre. ^
"2.
movies shown before Miss
lance were also
she had
prior knowleaifcpMhe particulars -*•"-- -*--  *
M/lfa3..
*%>
BETTY JONES
. . . not serious
Two police officers who
saw Miss Jones at the
stag said she made suggestive
movements while stripping
during her dance before 600
students.
The  magistrate   said   two
he was satisfied Mi§s Jones' a^JT was indecent. ^-^
Miss Jones admitted three
previous convictions for false
pretenses and one for committing vagrancy by being a
common prostitute.
**A
*4
THE UBYSSEY
it-
i»*
y
Vol. XLVIII, No. 66
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1966
46
CA 4-3916
STUDENTS REJECT AMS INCREASE
TORPEDOED
But athletic fee
transfer endorsed
Twenty per cent of UBC students turned out Tuesday
to reject emphatically a $2 AMS fee raise.
The vote was 1,830 to 1,362
IT'S BEEN A GREAT YEAR for referenda and elections, says pretty Laura West, education I,
as she punches another hole in Joe Student's student card. There have been five referenda and two elections so far this year. Vote Tuesday was on athletic fee transfer and
AMS fee raise.
OVER POLL DISPUTE
Campbell resigns—again
BY  PAT HRUSHOWY
Acting returning officer
Chuck Campbell has resigned
over a polling booth dispute
with council.
The dispute arose when AMS
first vice-president Charlie
Boylan moved that council
direct the returning officer to
place additional polls at the
Ponderosa, Physics building
and north Brock, bringing the
total number of polls to nine.
There was concern among
the councillors that the necessary quorum would not be received for the athletic fee and
AMS fee increase referenda.
Campbell said that the placing of polling (booths was at
the discretion of the returning  officer.
"This   is   a  very dangerous
motion," Campbell said. "You
will be setting a very bad precedent."
"The   civil   service   is   subservient to the supreme student
Last  Ubyssey
todayz-really
This is the last Ubyssey
this term.
The last Ubyssey on Friday
was originally ra.oi.__t to be
the last one, tut due to a
printer's error the caption
was left off a larje UBC
alumni ad.
Gallantly, the Ut 'ssey staff
offered to last for another
issue and correct the mistake.
government, the students'
council," Boylan said.
Lome Hudson, treasurer,
asked Campbell if he would
place booths at the places mentioned in the motion but he
refused.
"If you pass the motion, I
will submit my resignation,"
Campbell said.
"It will be a clear indication
of nonconfidence in me."
The motion passed by a
majority.
Campbell said later he would
resign after his duties were
completed with the present
referenda.
"I don't know if they (the
council members) acted within
the bounds of the constitution."
"It doesn't matter."
against raising the $29 activities fee to $31.
The other referendum, to
turn responsibility for $5 AMS
athletic fee over to UBC's administration was overwhelmingly approved 2,476 to 694.
TWO-THIRDS   NEEDED
The fee referendum needed
a 20 percent turnout and a
two-thirds majority.
The athletic fee referendum
was merely an opinion vote,
AMS treasurer-elect Lome
Hudson said Tuesday.
Hulson said the favorable
result would give council
authority to negotiate with
the administration the transfer of the $5 fee.
SUMMER TALKS
'We'll talk with them during
the   summer,"   Hudson   said.
He said that another referendum would be brought before the students next year to
reduce the AMS fee when the
athletics money is transferred.
He said he hoped the change
would be in effect for the
1967-68 year.
NO RESIGNATION
Hudson, although disappointed at the results of the
fee raise vote, denied rumors
he would resien if the increase
did not go through.
"I have no intention of resigning," he said. "I haven't
even heard the rumor."
Hudson said the "no" vote
would mean no expansion of
the AMS program next year.
'TIGHTEN BELTS'
"The scrapping of Totem
will give us about $4,000, but
we'll lose $3,000 from the med
students not paying AMS fees
next year."
"And we won't have the
$15,000 interest from SUB
funds next year either," he
said.
"We're just going to have to
tighten our belts."
Hudson said he had many
projects for extending AMS
programs to reach every student.
LIMITED FUNDS
"But with limited funds I
won't be able to do anything,"
Hudson said.
He said he did not know
when another referendum to
raise the fee would be held.
"I know I won't support another referendum," he said.
Hudson said when the athletic fee is transferred to the
administration, the AMS could
lower its $29 fee by only two
or three dollars instead of the
full $5.
AMS offers monetary aid
to chancellor candidates
AMS council overwhelmingly approved a motion pro-
vidiing a fund of $100 for chancellorship election expenses
Monday night.
The fund will be apportioned to the two candidates by
AMS treasurer-elect Lome Hudson on receipt of their campaign expenditure statements.
The two candidates for this year's chancellorship
are buisness executive John M. Buchanan, and grad student
Randy K. Enomoto. Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Wednesday, March 30, 1966
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Studetn Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1966
"Nothing is so useless as a general maxim."
—Lord Macaulay
Jeff Wall's best, rest his soul.
Counting angels
Monday, council measured the lip service it would
pay to democracy by counting the number of votes cast
at various polls in past referenda.
It decided the Ponderosa was about the limit, and
where there were fewer voters, there would be no poll.
It's as if, in a federal election, the Liberal party
decided not enough people in the Yukon voted, and so
decided to have no polls there.
But the returning officer in Tuesday's refetrendum,
Chuck Campbell, wanted even fewer polls than the
councillors. He claimed all which could be maimed would
be up, and to place more at council's whim would be
placing them where council was sure of yes votes.
When council ordered extra polls Campbell said he
would resign immediately after the referendum.
What was ignored as an essential point of democracy
— everybody has equal opportunity to exercise his
franchise.
You either place polls where everyone can get at
them, which means the full 18 used for council elections,
or you place one poll where everybody can get at it
with about equal difficulty.
We don't care which, but the precise measuring of
how much lip service to pay to motherhood democracy
is a bit like counting angels on a pin head.
All the answers are wrong.
On to October!
The smashing defeat of the AMS's attempt at a
$2 activity fee hike should give new AMS president Peter
Braund and his merry men the required kick in the
head to set them straight on fiscal matters.
As we pointed out earlier, the $2 fee hike could solve
nothing. All it was was a temporary stop-gap method
to avoid the desperately needed re-thinking of the financial crisis resulting from the Great union building
Mistake.
Four minutes of rational thought could have convinced the new AMS excutive that this campus isn't
going to approve any kind of a fee hike.
Especially not when more than half of their AMS
fee is now drained off to build the proposed Brasilia-
in-the-ballpark — the over-elaborate, ill-planned, useless
playpen slated to go up on the stadium site while the
AMS program goes down the tube.
For hard-working AMS treasurer Lome Hudson's
statements about "tightening belts" and "undergraduate
societies feeling the pinch", as a result of the defeat of the
fee hike, are ridiculous.
What is needed is a complete re-evaluation of the
SUB project — including financing arrangements. The
AMS is currently negotiating with the board of governors for an extension of the railroaded 15-year pay off
now in progress, so the time is ripe.
And since Mr. Hudson is the interim SUB chairman, we can think of no better person to begin the
rational examination of the mess.
In October, you will be asked to approve a year's
hiatus in the headlong rush to union building disaster.
Approval of this will ensure the funds needed for
next year's operation of the AMS program, PLUS the
solution of the SUB question as a board of inquiry — as
at Edmonton — carries on from the re-evaluation we
hope Mr. Hudson will begin this summer.
Careful re-assessment is the only hope the Mistake's
supporters can have of salvaging anything from the project which has now become a financial millstone dragging
the AMS into the red.
Meanwhile, on to October.
Well well, Mr. Burton ... did we have a little toe much to drink?
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
'GREAT DISSERVICE'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Few will dispute the fact
that there is an increasing dissatisfaction among university
students everywhere with university administrations in general and among UBC students
with the administration of this
university in particular.
Many persons are concerned with the problem, some are
actively seeking solutions to
it. Randy Enomoto has chosen
to run for chancellor. His apparent objective is to become
part of the establishment from
which he and so many others
feel alienated; and in so doing
open up a channel of communication between those who
formulate the policies, those
who implement them, and
those who are affected by
them — the students. This is
an objective which I and many
other students would endorse.
However, I could never endorse Enomoto's candidacy,
indeed I deplore it, for I think
that the means chosen to realize this legitimate end can
only have the effect of derogating the excellence of the idea,
of putting off its realization
for an indefinite time if not
destroying it completely.
The Ubyssey has done a
great disservice to the student
body on this campus.
I know of two other students who are actively seeking
positions on the UBC senate
as legitimate candidates, motivated by a sincere desire to
position themselves where the
students' voices will be heard
and its impact more effective.
If The Ubyssey .were truly
concerned with having student
participation in university administration then it would be
giving more coverage to the
candidacy of Hugh Swayze
and Mike Hunter.
To date, this paper appears
more concerned with a student subsidized propaganda
sheet for Enomoto than a
champion of legitimate student
objectives.
GREG MORLEY
Law III
'LACK OF INVOLVEMENT'
Editor,   The   Ubyssey,  Sin
The academic symposium
definitely did not receive
enough coverage. I think it
particularly topical at this
time to recap on an important
issue:
There is a definite lack of
involvement in education on
the part of both the student
and the professor. This deficit
can be seen as the inability of
the student to become truly
motivated to learn and as a
result of the professor's inability to truly teach.
LINDSAY   DRACHE
Education V
EDITOR:   John   Kelsey
News    Carol  Wilton
City Dan Stoffman
Managing       Richard  Blair
Photo Powell Hargrave
Sports »__ Dan Mullen
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn
Features       Norm   Belt*
Focus    •.__ George Reamsbottom
Ass't News Pat Hrushowy,
Anne Balf
Ass't  City     Stuart Gray
Ass't Photo Dennis Gans
Kurt Hilger
"Put out an extra," they said.
So we did. The "we" included
cooperative Bert Hill, uncooperative Marilyn Hill who wouldn't
vote more than once, the Ukrainian lecher, duelling Doug Hal-
verson, Fledermausmann, and the
entire photo staff. Anne Balf
did most of the work and Guido
Botto didn't get an assignment.
Nobody knew who the editor
was. Hilger and Betts played
hockey. Hrushowy played. Ex's
Al Donald and Tom Wayman
played too. Also Val Zukers.
PROFESSIONALS TECHNICAL
INFORMATION SECTION
Whiteshell   Nuclear  Research   Establishment
Pinawa, Manitoba
The Technical Information Section provides a comprehensive service
to the Whiteshell staff who are working on research, development,
engineering and administration. The subject field emphasizes nuclear
energy, but has a broad coverage including chemistry, chemical
engineering, metallurgy, medical and biology sciences, and mechanical
and   electrical   engineering.
The section includes a vigorously growing libarry which will develop
into the main reference centre of literature on nuclear sciences for
central   and   western   Canada.
1. This position requires a professional with either an Honors
degree in Science or a branch of engineering. Applicant should have -
10 years experience in technical information work or a closely related
field, a high standard of English and the abilty for dear expression;
must be able to analyze and edit technical writings at all levels.
Responsibilities include the editing and publication of all techncal
reports produced by the establishments, providing information on a
wide range of topics to scientific staff, and, providing a secretariat for
certain    technical    committees.
Salary   up   ot   $10,500   pier   annum.
2. Two Technical Information Officers with a Science or Engineering
degree to assist the Section  Head.  These positions  include:
(a) preparation and interpretation of technical contracts, technical
costing, scheduling charts of experimental work and preparation of
procedures.
(b) Editing   and   publication   of   technical   reports.
(c) Compilation of bibliographies.
(d) Technical  information  surveys.
Several years of relevant experience is preferred but is not
essential.
Salary  for  the  above   postiions  will   be  up   to   $8,600   per  annum.
Please reply in writing giving full details to:
Personnel  Officer,
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited,
Whiteshell  Nuclear Research   Establishment,
Pinawa,   Manitoba. Wednesday, March 30, 1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
S
HOUSING HEAD Malcolm McGregor weighs the pros and
cons of legalized prostitution as he judges a debate on
the subect Tuesday. Acadia Camp, arguing for the negative, won against Zeta Psi.
ONCE AGAIN
Council vetoes Totem
Totem was carved up for the
second time Monday night.
The new AMS council in
its first regular meeting decided to cease publication of
the grad book section of the
UBC annual and to investigate
the feasibility of each faculty
publishing its own grad book.
The previous council scrapped Campus Life three weeks
ago.
Council objected to the
principle of a centralized
yearbook because the demand for such a book did not
justify its publication.
The action, passed at the
council meeting, provided for
reconsideration of publication
only if the graduating class
showed enough interest to subsidize the book.
Totem editor John Tyrrell
pointed out that Campus Life
was the section which had lost
the money.
"The grad book broke even",
he said.
Ubyssey editor John Kelsey
offered to investigate the cost
of. binding a year Of Ubysseys
and selling them instead of
Campus Life.
"We get all the news anyway," he said. "It would just
be a matter of increasing the
press run."
Engineering president Eric
Newell supported the idea that
each faculty produce its own
grad book with pictures of the
graduates.
He said the engineers' Slip-
stick had made nine dollars
last year.
"All the other faculties can
produce their own book," he
said, 'Forestry has done this
as well."
The only councillor voting
against the motion, arts president Don Wise, said the arts
undergraduate society would
not be able to produce such a
book.
"If this motion is passed,
arts will have no yearbook,"
he said.
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
Faculty of Business Administration
and Commerce
A two-year program leading to the Degree of Master
of Business Administration.
The M.B.A. degree program emphasizes education
for general managerial and administrative responsibilities. Its emphasis is upon breadth of training rather than
specialization although functional areas of business such
as finance, marketing and production are important
elements in the program.
Prerequisite for admission is an undergraduate degree
with a B standing.
Fellowships and assistantships are available.
For application forms and information about fellowships write to:
Hu Harries, Dean
Faculty of Business Administration and  Commerce
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta.
Hudson calls
co-op housing
meet today
AMS treasurer-elect Lome
Hudson wants co-operation for
a co-operative residence.
Hudson said Tuseday he will
hold a meeting noon today in
the council chambers for students interested in forming a
co-operative UBC residence.
The council chambers are
above the AMS office in Brock
Hall.
"We hope to set up the nucleus of one house for fall."
Hudson said.
"We want the really keen
people who want to promote
and live in co-operative houses
out to this meeting."
1966
TOTEMS
Available
Next Week
Pro-Sale Tickets
to be exchanged
for books at
Publications Office
Brock Hall.
Cash Sales
at the
BOOK STORE
and
AMS BUSINESS
OFFICE
^
^
^
V
^ &>'*«,,
'*»
^>Q
a*
8o-^°ft
Mexico summers are tailor-made for young
swingers with limited cash. Or for people (of any
age) who can only travel in the summer months.
It's off season (on everything but the fun)
and the living is cheaper.
Air fare? Consider this. From Vancouver to
Mexico City on the 21 day economy round trip
fare, all you need is a down payment of $24. You
can take care of the balance over 12 months
CPA jets non-stop to the bright lights of
Mexico City. From there it's just a short hop
to the sand and surf of Acapulco.
This summer, latch on to a pal or two and make
the scene in Mexico! See a travel agent.
FLyCanaduut Oacfoc a/rumes -f^r
CANADIAN PACIFIC - TRAINS / TRUCKS / SHIPS / PLANES / HOTELS / TELECOMMUNICATIONS / WORLDS MOST COMPLETE TRANSPORTATION SVSTEM Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Wednesday, March 30, 1966
COLP 7£/f?X£Y/"
(AN ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE  ALUMNI ANNUAL GIVING COMMITTEE)

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0127690/manifest

Comment

Related Items