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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 1972

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Array NFTU strike action sought in French dept.
A former president of the
Non-Faculty Teachers' Union will
seek support for strike action
against alleged discriminatory
policies in the French department.
Stephen Anderson, a former
English department teaching
assistant, said Thursday he is
upset over the lack of concern
shown by the union towards
French department policies on
hiring and payment.
He said he has worked with
French teachers for years and was
NFTU president last year.
Anderson said the French
department has hired many grad
students as TAs in previous years
and most of the TAs have studied
abroad, are native French-speakers
and have had previous teaching
experience.
"Yet after last year, when the
NFTU set up an information
picket line around Buchanan, the
grad student centre and the
faculty club to raise the minimum
TA wage to $3,200 yearly, the
French department reduced some
wages from $4,000 to $2,500."
He    said    this    year    the
department employs only five
TAs, all women, whom
department head Larry Bongie
believes are more easily
.dominated.
Anderson said the position of
sessional lecturers is no better,
with most havirig full course loads
and working fbr_j>6,000 a year
with    no    representation    —
departmental administrative
bodies.
"When approached on this
subject all Bongie would say to us
was 'no comment'," Anderson
said.
"Bongie never lets his policies
be known until he comes up with
one: But he has a different one
for every occasion.
"This has never been a problem
Vol. UH, No. 49
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1972
to him because he has the faculty
in his pocket and the grad
students at bay."
He said a lot of people are
upset about the department TA
policy, but very little talking is
done on the outside.
He said last year grad students
were invited by Bongie to sit on a
grad studies committee, but this
year received no such invitation.
Current NFTU president Mark
Madoff said he is unaware of the
situation. Anderson is calling for
the strike vote under a union
clause that allows any member to
call a general meeting for a strike
vote.
The meeting will be held at 4
p.m. Friday, Feb. 18, in the grad
student centre beer garden.
Unions to appear before council
—Barry gruenke photo
EAST COAST BLUES ruled the hour as Vancouver guitarist Lawry Brezer picked the passions of people at noon Thursday in SUB ballroom.
Thorn Roberts, New York and Annie Segal, Toronto, provided the east coast attraction leaving the western performer with the blues.
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Alma Mater Society will
hear two sides of a union
jurisdictional dispute at
Wednesday's council meeting,
where at least one of the unions
will ask for space in SUB.
Representatives of the Office
and Technical Employees union
will seek permission from student
coucil to set up an information
table and rent meeting space in
SUB in order to contact
unorganized university staff about
joining their union.
But the Canadian Union of
Public Employees has said the
OTEU is "raiding" its territory
and is expected to make its own
presentation.
Although CUPE officials
maintain their union is still
interested in organizing the staff,
OTEU organizers have been more
active recently, holding meetings
and soliciting applications from a
staff list they had to draw up
themselves.
Commenting on the coming
council meeting AMS president
Grant Burnyeat said Wednesday
he did not want the AMS to get
caught in a battle between two
rival unions.
"But if we find out there's no
problem, well just let them (the
OTEU) do it. If there is, we'll let
council decide."
Council passed a motion Jan.
26 requiring all requests for
meeting space in SUB from
organized unions to come before
council itself.
Previously SUB management
committee or the AMS
co-ordinator made the decision.
OTEU organizer Bobbi
Gegenberg said Wednesday the
union is seeking space in SUB
because the administration refuses
to grant any in other campus
buildings.
Last fall, the administration let
the union book a room in
Buchanan but suddenly withdrew
its permission two hours before
the meeting. The meeting was
held on the Buchanan plaza but,
Gegenberg said, "the meeting was
effectively broken up."
See page 2: UNION
Irving Fetish has declared
Monday and Tuesday a holiday.
The Ubyssey has acquiesced to his
wishes and will support the days
of degeneracy and debauchery by
not publishing. However, the
students' favorite rag will appear
again on Thursday. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  11,  1972
Applicants eye cut of OFY pie
By SANDI SHREVE
The Opportunities for Youth
program has $34 million just
waiting to be divided up among
industrious Canadians this year.
And the $10 million increase
over last year's budget, coupled
with the need for employment
and success of the first program
last year is attracting a great many
enthusiastic applicants, says
project officer Chris Wootten.
Wootten has been at UBC since
Wednesday, listening to UBC
students' suggestions for summer
projects and requests for financial
backing in the form of OFY
grants.
"I have heard at least 50 ideas
in two days and expect at least
150 before we finish here," he
said Thursday.
Last year 13,000 Canadians
applied for OFY grants and it is
expected some 18,000 to 20,000
will apply this year.
The $24 million OFY budget
last year provided 27,000 jobs
while this year's budget will
provide 29,000 jobs.
He explained the apparent
discrepancy between the financial
increase and the job increase,
saying the additional money is
"more to provide salary increases
and larger grants than to provide a
great many more jobs."
Wootten will be at UBC in SUB
246 until 5 p.m. today and "may
return next week if there is an
overflow of applicants."
Appointments for today are
filled but interested applicants can
phone the 1290 Howe Street
office at 666-3406, 666-3571 or
666-3753.
The main objective of the OFY
program is to have groups plan,
implement and complete projects
which provide a service to the
community and a learning
experience for the individuals
involved, Wootten said.
"We do not accept projects by
one person," he said.
"The standard group is
composed of three to 15 members
because past experience has
shown that a number of persons
work together with the most
success."
Projects receive funds from the
OFY for four months, the amount
depending on the requirements of
the project. Wootten said 90 per
cent of the allocations provide
salaries for the project workers
and 10 per cent is intended to
cover overhead costs such as
renting equipment.
Last year only 17 projects of a
total 2,300 implemented were
terminated.
Wootten said most projects end
after the four-month OFY
funded period but some do
continue.
"All we can do for those who
plan to continue is to advise them
of various possibilities for funding
from the community," he said.
Which projects will be granted
a slice of the OFY pie will be
decided by the end of April.
Wootten said a lot of projects
such as building hiking trails in
the remote parts of B.C. and
making travel movies are the most
common suggestions.
"Unfortunately, there are few
semi    political-social    action
projects being suggested," he said.
An example of this type of
project would be a group going
into the Chinese community to
teach them their civil rights and to
read and write English, he said.
He said many original and good
ideas such as establishing a toy
library and providing dental care
instructions to residents of
poverty areas have been discussed.
He said the OFY officers are in
constant contact with groups such
as the Company of Young
Canadians, which are involved in
projects aiding the poor, the
physically handicapped, minority
groups and so on.
"We get information
concerning the feasibility of
projects proposed to us as well as
some guidance as to how to
approach implementing such
projects," he said.
He said the possibilities of an
increase in the $34 million grant
are high if there are enough
good project proposals to merit it.
"I have no proof that this will
happen but looking at the recent
increase in funds for Canada
Council grants and considering the
fact that last year's OFY grant
was raised from $14 million to
$24 million, I think our chances
for an increase are pretty good."
Union plans to step up organizing drive
From page 1
The administration has also refused to
give the union a list of university office staff
or even the exact number of staff it employs.
Gegenberg, a secretary in the law faculty
and one of a core group of about 40 OTEU
organizers on campus, said the union is
planning to step up its organizing push.
Gegenberg claimed CUPE "backed off
from office organizing on campus after a
meeting was held of office workers late last
year at which both unions made
presentations. The workers opted for the
OTEU, she said.
The main CUPE organizer on campus, Ole
Johnson, was unavailable for comment
Thursday but UBC CUPE president W. J.
Morrison denied CUPE is no longer interested
in organizing office workers.
"That's not true," he said. "We're not
backing off. I have raised this situation with
the Vancouver District Labor Council.
"They (the OTEU) are sending
applications to members of our union. They
even sent one to me.
"I call that raiding."
Bill Lowe, vice-president and regional
manager of the OTEU, speaking Wednesday,
may have given a possible explanation of the
application mistake.
Because of the university's refusal to give
the union a list of campus workers, "we've
worked out a list ourselves," said Lowe.
He said staff members in each faculty or
department made lists in early January of
their co-workers which resulted in a mailing
list of 1,200. Presumably, that list could have
included names of workers already unionized
by CUPE.
As for more general raiding, "there can be
no such thing as raiding when nobody's
organized," he said. "CUPE has members out
there but we're not trying to organize them."
Lowe said the OTEU has so far elicited
applications from almost 50 per cent of the
office workers on its list but would not apply
to the Labor Relations Board for certification
until the number had reached at least 70 per
cent.
Gegenberg said she believed many office
staffers feel CUPE is too mtich an industrial
union and they prefer a whita collar union.
However Morrison pointed to other
universities across Canada, saying workers in
both white and blue collar occupations on
many campuses had joined CUPE.
Lost in the scuffle are the campus
workers themselves. Gegenberg said working
conditions are satisfactory if a worker has a
good boss.
Raises are on a merit system, rather than
automatic with seniority as the union would
like, she said, thus "so much depends on your
boss."
_*S
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<^ERAPHiivTh
^-A    "Angels of the highest order*    A**,
CLASSICAL RECORD SALE!
ENTIRE SERAPHIM CATALOGUE ON SALE!
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S 60037    Mozart    Overtures    —
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S 60043 Fritz wunderlich — Lyric
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S 60063 Brahms: Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 — Symphony
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60112   Songs   of   Carl   Nielsen
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6016S Jussi Bjoerllng; The Art of
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8 60081 Chopin; Etudes, Op. 10
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S 60107 Liszt: Concerto No. 1 In
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Nicolai Gedda Frederick Guthrie,
and Choir of St. Hedwig's Cathedral, Berlin.
IC-6045 — "Age of the Great
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Cortot, Fischer, Gieseking,
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GROC Sugg. List 8.98.
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PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. Friday, February 11, 1972
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Analysis 'ignored the facts'
The following is a reply to Pat
Moan's analysis of Sallye Davis'
speech, in Thursday's Ubyssey.
By MIKE GIDORA
Pat Moan is curiously slick and
unconvincing in her campaign to
destroy the credibility of Sallye
Davis.
Writing in Thursday's Ubyssey,
she first denounced Davis for
being "professionally political",
but then went on to praise the
"solid political and humanitarian
cause," she was advancing.
Davis is the mother of
California political prisoner
Angela Davis.
Her entire "analysis" of Davis'
Tuesday speech was full of similar
contradictions.
On one hand she was trying to
maintain an appearance of
objectivity and disillusioned
radicalism but throughout it all
she only managed to promote an
image of anti-communism,
anti-left and, one may assume,
anti-Angela.
By saying the Communist
Party and by inference, Davis,
"was only too willing to sacrifice
Angela to the revolution," Moan
completely ignored the evidence
to the contrary.
She, nor anyone else present at
Davis' talk never saw fit to ask her
whether or not she. (Sallye) is a
communist.
She ignored the fact that Davis
raised $165.00 towards Angela's
defence and that the money raised
at UBC alone was enough to cover
her expenses in Vancouver,
including transportation.
She also spoke at Simon Fraser
University raising $300.00 and
Vancouver City College where the
total was $130.00 as well as
speaking at a public rally in
Vancouver where $1,500 was
raised towards the Angela Davis
Defence Fund.
Moan didn't see fit to mention
Angela    grew    up    in    a
—daryl tan photo
WALTER GAGE, university's head civil servant, frowns at unpolished shoes belonging to prof Michael
Davies who received the W.H. Gage teaching award for applied science at 53rd annual engineer's ball.
Food
service to go to court
The alternate food service plans to take court
action as a result of continual harrassment this year
regarding its use of business vehicles on campus.
Group spokesman Lyle Osmundson said
Thursday the bus or private cars used in the
transportation of the food have been subject to
more than 50 university traffic tickets so far this
year, although they have held valid parking permits.
"We've had five vehicles towed away already,"
he said.
The permit allows them to use the vehicles for
neighbourhood known as
"Dynamite Hill," so-called
because of the frequent bombings
in the area.
She did not see fit to mention
California law allows bail in even
capital offences such as Angela is
charged with and that Angela has
been denied the democratic right
to bail despite completely
favorable reports from probation
and parole boards.
But then again, maybe facts
like that aren't necessary when
given a dogmatic 'analysis'.
Instead, Moan has turned her
story into a kind of review. She
concentrated on facets of Davis
such as her "slow, well modulated
voice" and her "polished
evasiveness" in a manner that
would have done Sun drama critic
Christopher Dafoe credit.
Moan should have looked for
reasons for Davis speaking in such-
a manner, if it bothered her.
She would have then found she
the loading and unloading of food, but restricts
them from other purposes.
The campus traffic patrol claims the vehicles
were not used strictly for these purposes and
subsequently must suffer the punitive action.
A patrol spokesman was quoted earlier this year
as saying. "We're going to get that bus off campus".
Osmundson plans to appeal the violations this
week to traffic superintendant J. H. Kelly.
He was informed by one of Kelly's assistants,
D. S. Hanna, that "you must first pay your fine
before you can obtain an appeal."
has been teaching school for 28
years and of course learned how
to control her voice.
Moan shouldn't have replied
"bullshit" to Davis' claim that she
doesn't allow herself to feel fear.
Maybe you can't control that
emotion Pat. I personally can't
control whether or not I will be
afraid but still that is no reason to
assume Sallye Davis cannot.
It's that last type of statement
that distressed me the most with
Moan's "analysis".
She apparently had decided
before-hand what Davis' motives
were in coming to UBC and she
then proceeded to either twist
everything Davis said so it would
fit her interpretation or
pre-conceived notions, or else
terms it "bullshit."
The result was a dogmatic
interpretation. But not the dogma
of the left, the dogma of the right.
In the
classroom
By VAUGHN PALMER
Biology 310, human heredity and evolution, provides arts
students looking for a science requirement, with a basic knowledge of
genetic and evolutionary principles and their application to the human
condition.
Background lectures and layout for the one and a half unit
course are provided by Tony Griffiths, while James Miller, head of the
faculty of medicine's division of genetics, lectures on genetic defects
in humans and family couselling.
Miller's lecture at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, for example, dealt with
dominant themes in inherited characteristics.
He first showed examples, with the use of slides, of recurring
genetic defects and their patterns within various family histories. He
then talked about counselling families with a history of genetic flaws
on the possibilities of their recurrence.
Miller did his best to keep his discussion at a reasonably simple
level, in keeping with the course's aim of providing an overview of
genetics rather than a scientific understanding of all its aspects.
In addition to Miller's lectures on medical genetics, and those
of Griffiths on basic principles, UBC geneticist David Zuzuki has made
two appearances to talk about directions in modern genetics.
"We try to devote the three lectures a week to the 'real' aspects,
that is the facts, of the science," Griffiths said.
"Any speculation, or discussion of the morality of various
genetic applications is left to the tutorial-discussion groups."
The discussion groups, which meet once a week for one to two
hours, are set up on a debating format. At the beginning of the year a
list of controversial subjects is provided and members of the group are
assigned to collect information for a debate on one of the issues.
A sample topic is: "The evidence at all strata on IQ indicates
that North American Negroes fare less well than whites. This surely
means that they are genetically inferior."
"Because most of the students taking this course don't have
much factual information the discussion groups would degenerate to
emotional outbursts and 'gee-whizzing' if we didn't provide some sort
of structure," Griffiths said.
"However the response we get from students with this format is
excellent."
Griffiths says he is aware that this can be a slack course: "I
mark liberally on the basis of a take-home exam at the end of the
course, which usually involves asking students to repeat the sort of
discussions they've made during the debates."
"But if students are willing to go along with what work the
course provides they will have a good general knowledge of genetics,
and more important, the ability to look critically at the corny
popularizations of the subject by Time, Readers Digest, such authors
as Konrad Lorenz and Desmond Morris."
The outline for the course suggests 20 books, by authors from
Lorenz and Morris to Julian Huxley's Essays of a Humanist, in
addition to which, Griffiths encourages students to use the Woodward
library to discover how and where most scientists make presentations
of their work.
Biology 310, is one of a growing number"of courses which the
science department is providing solely for arts students.
Not only do they serve as far better alternatives to the old
standard science requirements, Geography 101 and Math 100, but
they can give students who take them at least a basic understanding of
the principles and implications of modern science.
Biology 310, with Griffiths and Miller, meets 2:30 p.m.,
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, in Biology 2000. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  11,  1972
The streets
The Canadian government's Dream Summer
program is gearing up for action again, and a project
officer is currently listening to students' project ideas at
UBC.
Popularly known last summer as Opportunities for
Money, this rather large band-aid scheme is now
entering its second year with an even bigger budget.
According to project officer Chris Wootten,
(today's Ubyssey, page 2) the object of the program is
to have groups initiate and work on projects that
provide a community service and a personal learning
experience.
Sounds like a press release from the secretary of
state's department.
The real reason for the OFY program is, of course,
to keep a sizeable segment of Canadian youth off the
streets while unemployment is high. And hence, to keep
us pacified about the lack of jobs.
There will be many who do not get OFY grants.
But they will at least be kept quiet while they're still
hoping, and according to Wootten, there's always the
chance of another mid-summer carrot in the form of
more OFY money.
As for Wootten's statement that 90 per cent of
each OFY allocation pays salaries and 10 per cent pays
expenses, the groups we've talked to say that's baloney.
Last summer, these groups were told by project
organizers to take expenses out of their salaries, which
makes us wonder if Wootten's tongue might not be
slightly forked.
We begin to wonder about his reasoning ability
when we find him stating: "Unfortunately, there are
few semi-political-social projects being suggested."
This is indeed unfortunate, but Wootten need not
wonder why such suggestions are lacking.
Anybody who read a newspaper last summer
knows that OFY unceremoniously dumped a number of
projects in mid-stream — because they were "political."
(And the winter money hand-out plan, the Local
Initiatives Program — popularly known as LIP Service —
recently set a fine precedent by filing applications from
"political" groups in the garbage can before choosing
which groups would get funds.)
There is really no contradiction here: Funding of
overtiy political groups might mean OFY is fostering
exactly what it is being used to prevent.
Young people might return to the street to fight
for the kind of revolutionary changes that must come
about before the root of the unemployment problem
will be dealt with.
hek hev Hay..
TKWSSIY
FEBRUARY 11, 1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports.
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Helen Hossie hammered it all together with Mike Sasges beating on
Vaughn Palmerdrums. Leslie Plommer hummed away on her Bertoned
Woodwards while Jan O'Brien joined the chorus with a Sandi Shrevephone.
The chorus, consisting of two drunk Mike Gidoras, was helped immensely
by Lesley Krueger who chimed her way into the Dick Betts typing choir.
Betts, needless to say, resigned on the spot leaving Pat Fitzgerald and David
Schmidt to work out the triangles.
Lawrence Leadered the crew along Jim Jolyly with the help of John
Andersen who tried to sing. But Jim Adams and Kent Spencer agreed the
noise was too much and rauciously cornered Gord Gibson into taking over.
But that was too much, too, thought Daryl Tan while Gary Gruenke
reminded everyone of the happenings at the Ho Ho tonight to celebrate
Sandy Kass' twenty-first. £
-The Grape
Letters
Teachers
At a recent meeting in
education, the Vancouver School
Board told students and faculty
that, based upon a survey, the
UBC faculty of education does
not give its students enough
valuable time in the schools.
The report, explained by Dr.
Peter Bullen, stated that
Vancouver professional educators
feel that UBC grads do not have
an adequate foundation of
practice teaching to help them in
the initial few years of actual
teaching.
Despite this, Dr. Bullen stated
that the Vancouver School Board
does not discriminate between
UBC and SFU grads when hiring
new teachers because it bases its
judgment on the personal ability
of the applicant and not his
training background. Certain
questions can now be asked:
1. First, if the Vancouver
School Board only considers the
personality of the applicant and
his personal ability when hiring,
does not the training background
involve the personal ability of the
applicant?
2. Second, if the Vancouver
School Board places particular
emphasis on student teachers who
do practicums in their district,
does this not put those who do
practicums out of Vancouver at a
disadvantage?
3. Third,  if the  Vancouver
School Board feels that UBC's
faculty of education does have
inferior student teaching
practicums and prefers SFU's
system, can this not help but
affect who they hire?
The School Board says it does
not discriminate in its hiring
practice. Still, if it feels our
present teacher training system is
inferior (which I would agree
with), I can not see how it can
disregard this fact.
Kerry Bysouth,
President, EdSA
Resign
TO:       My Colleagues
The Head
The Dean
The President
My Students
FROM: Dr. Howard N. Boughey
Anthrosoc dept.
I am sorry to burden you with
all this reading that will not
advance you in the least in any of
your careers, but the time has
come for me to explain myself in
full, or as fully as I can do at the
present juncture.
What you are reading, you see,
is my official letter of resignation
from this department, this
University, this part of the world,
and I feel the need to explain
what it is I am resigning from,
what it is I am resigned about, and
who it is indeed who is now
leaving your ranks voluntarily.
There are aspects of my self in
relation to this department that
now need explication, aspects that
I would previously have assumed
had no relevance whatsoever to
my employment, my
colleagueship, my scholarship, my
teaching or my membership in an
academic department.
It all started in 1929 in
Philadelphia, when my mother
was orphaned at the age of 14 and
went out in a desperate search for
a job. Her name was Leona Hyde
Brennan, and everywhere she
went that had work also had a
sign on the door that stated,
simply (they were
machine-printed signs, you could
buy them in any business-supply
store) 'NO IRISH NEED APPLY'.
So my mother left the city of
brotherly love and went to New
York, where she got a job in
Corona, at the telephone
company.
Through what incidental chain
of references she found a room
available at Mrs. Erickson's
boarding house I do not know,
but find it she did, and sooner or
later she also found Mrs.
Erickson's eldest son, Howard, to
her liking. You see Mrs. Erickson
was married to one Nathaniel
Boughey, a good stolid English
working-class-type fellow who
coupled trains down at the
railroad yards, but she kept her
maiden name as she kept her
boarding house her own, carrying Friday, February 11,. 1972
THE      U B Y S S.E Y
Page 5
Letters
out  a long  family  tradition of
Swedish matriarchy.
And so when Leona Hyde
Brennan married Howard she
became Mrs. Boughey, and soon
after gave birth to an
Irish-English-Swedish son, who
was named Howard Nathaniel
Boughey, Jr., after his father and
grandfather.
Howard Sr. was quite unhappy
that his son had apparently
inherited his mother's Irish gift of
gab, love of song and laughter,
and general ebullience and
contrariness. He disapproved the
boy's intellectual and artistic
aspirations, but most of all he
hated the fact that his son just
could not 'stay out of trouble',
and his wife seemed to encourage
this trait.
Leona Hyde died much too
young, but her sharp tongue and
love of talk stays ever alive in me.
Such characteristics drove me out
of my own social group of peers
in my teen years, and into groups
of talkative, argumentative,
socially involved and politically
active young people like myself. It
was sheer coincidence that they
all happened to be Jewish. In
college I was the first non-Jewish
member admitted to the Sigma
Alpha Mu fraternity, and
newspaper stories attest to my
breaking down of this 'reverse
discrimination' pattern in the
fraternities at Columbia and
elsewhere.
But a few years later I was _
mooting the whole issue by
converting officially to Judaism.
My certificate of conversion hangs
proudly even now on my office
wall. I am not a religiously
observing Jew, just a Jew in my
heart and soul, and also a Mick, a
Limey and a Bohunk. Only
recently have I discovered that I
am a damn Yankee as well.
There is a theory afoot in this
department that the nation in
which one 'is trained' somehow
determines one's 'style' of being a
sociologist. That word training is
an interesting revelation about the
habits of mind of certain
colleagues. The fact is, I never got
trained anywhere. Oh, they tried,
but they never got so much as my
hair trained to lie in place.
I went to study at Princeton
when I decided to become an
academic sociologist, y'see, and
there I told Wilbert Moore his
theory was defective and he
agreed and gave me high grades;
and I told Marion Levy that his
theory was defective, and he
disagreed and gave me low grades;
and I told Melvin Tumin that his
theory was sheer bull and morally
dangerous to boot, and he agreed
and gave me high grades, a
research assistantship, and an
invitation to be the master of
ceremonies at his son's Bar
Mitzvah.
But I am afraid you could
never trace anything about my
style back to any training I got
anywhere. Which is why I am
doubtful, to say the least, that
refusal to hire American-trained
sociologists is really going to
protect this Department against
the kind of contamination it
dreads. You might get European
♦ Jews in, or maybe even a born and
trained Irishman, or you might
even wind up with an uppity
black from the Carribean, and
" there you are again, noise and
dissension and rabble rousing all
over again.
The irony of it all, of course, is
that by transforming this
department into an intolerant,
restrictive, taxpayer-oriented
school for the suppression of
ideas, you have made it into a
precise replica of the typical
United States department, one of
which each of us 'Americans' left
behind to come here full of hope
for something different.
Vancouver is. not a very
hospitable place for argumentative
Jews from the East. My first year
here felt like a sqjurn in a country
populated entirely by replicas of
my father, dourly disapproving
everything I found enjoyable, but
after a while I discovered a small
circle of people who also loved a
good argument, most of them
unaffiliated with the university.
Those I had thought were my
friends among fellow department
members turned out not to be, in
disastrous ways at times of
terrible need for trust and
friendship on my part, when I was
betrayed by them, one by one.
But this was just a personal
matter, not connected with my
official role as department
member. Nevertheless, I was
disapproved in style, in content of
my work, in terms of the issues I
espoused and the way I argued
them, I was subtly told again and
again, you don't belong here.
People like you don't belong here.
And I am now convinced that that
statement is correct.
Before the issue of nationality
ever seriously came up, I had
thought the department had
already reached some sort of
nadir. In firing Silvers, Speier and
MacDougall, I felt the department
was cutting its own throat in more
ways than one.
It is one thing for a department
to be essentially mediocre in
scholarly terms, as this one is, and
is doomed to be forever. A
mediocre department can be quite
a satisfactory place to be, if there
is an essential kindness and
decency between its members.
But the firing of Speier, Silvers
and MacDougall not only
confirmed the department's
mediocrity of judgment, it was an
act of cruelty, as well.
A department that is both
mediocre and cruel is insufferable,
and I began job-hunting
immediately upon perceiving this.
But now I feel I must resign at
once even though I have not yet
secured a subsequent position
elsewhere. The basic vulgarity,
anti-intellectualism and banal
opportunism revealed in the
recent department decisions
against hiring any more
Americans, piled on top of
mediocrity and cruelty, are
absolutely the last straw.
I will not attend any more
meetings of any kind, since I now
find your collective company
repugnant. Call this
self-righteousness if you will, but I
think it is too late for this
department to wake up to its own
state of degradation and begin to
change direction. If scholars
everywhere knew the true state of
affairs here, it would take 10
years to fill the next 10 positions
in sociology. It is a crying shame,
you know, because this place
really looked like it had some
potential three short years ago.
I hereby officially resign my
position as assistant professor in
the department of anthropology
and sociology, UBC, as of June
30,1972. "■     s
Howard N. Boughey, Jr.
Taxes
With regard to taxation of
teaching assistantships:
If $50 in taxes was taken out
of your $350 teaching
assistantship last month, this is
what you do:
File a new T-l form, filling out
the "seasonal employment" bit at
the bottom. You assume that you
may not get a summer grant or a
teaching assistantship for the fall
and put down as your total
expended earnings for 1972
however much you will get this
term.
W. Hofmeier,
Math department
^^^^        -*      M
_   YOUR PRESCRIPTION . .
f^^^^^^HvP** *^^K?
"■   for that smart leek In glasses...
V                      look to
^^^^^^^K ■* vU^Edl^H
I   PiescUftion Optical
m\M
■ fMHKNMl
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WE HAVE AN OmCI NEAR YOU
Marx
As a former UBC student, I
was pissed off to hear that
psychology prof Carol Marx is
going to be fired from the faculty.
Dr. Marx was one of the best
teachers I ever had and it's a
shame that she won't be there
next year. I was in her psych 206
class last year and her lectures
were interesting, relevant and
educational.
I, of course, was not the only
one to feel this way because
attendance at her lectures was
excellent.
Dr. Marx has a very sharp mind
and a warm, engaging personality.
UBC can't afford to lose an
excellent teacher like her.
Don Gardner,
Southern Methodist
University,
Dallas, Texas.
Bomb
This letter is to refute the
statement by a member of the
engineering undergrad society in
Tuesday's Ubyssey that the
forestry undergraduate society
was responsible for the tear-gas
bomb that went off Friday in the
civil engineering building. It was
not.
Had it been, it is unlikely that,
as a member of the FUS
executive, I would have been in
the building at the time the bomb
went off.
As for EUS spokesman Vern
Gentry's cloak-and-dagger logic
that this was an act of revenge for
disposal of * the forestry car -
there is no motive.
The engineering undergrad
society agreed to get rid of the
wrecked car for us in exchange for
the wheels from it.
A more likely hypothesis is
that the bomb was another
EUS-week prank. When the result
was seen — people barfing outside
the exits and several off to
Wesbrook — even the engineers,
connoisseurs of poor taste, didn't
want to lay claim to this one.
Thus, the attempt to pawn it
off onto the FUS.
Nice try — but you can't fool
all of the people all of the time.
Jim Burbee,
Forestry 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from aU readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
4»SeanConneiy "James Bond007^
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4 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 11, 1972
Senate candidates' statements
Peter Insley
It is not without some hesitation that I Submit my
name as a candidate in this election. I say hesitation,.
because I seriously question the ability of the senate to
^initiate change in the academic community. Be that as it
;.-may, I would still like to see if some effective changes can
occur. My experience is far from extensive in these
matters. I sat on a student-faculty curriculum committee
two years ago and last year I was involved in the
student-faculty workshop as well as being commerce's
AMS representative.
I have no definite programs or promises to put
forward: My interests in the senate would rest in such
areas as accrediting the women's studies program initiated
last fall by the Human Government; pushing for the
development of a native studies program and lastly, (but
not exhaustively) an elimination of the closed policy with
respect  to  first-year students.
In closing, I do have a few innovative ideas and a little
experience — so if you like the combinations — give me a
try — elections are merely legalized gambling anyhow.
dBob Jacobs^
For commerce-law student senator please re-elect
Bob Jacobs, law 2, (former commerce student) on
Wed., Feb. 16. Hell make no empty promises that can't
be kept but will actively work on your behalf as in the
past.
In his time in office, Bob Jacobs has put in many
hours of service on the academic building committee
which recommended a new building for commerce as a
top priority, the admissions committee, the committee
studying student membership in faculties, and a
committee conducting a sociological study of UBC
students.
Bob Jacobs, a liberal candidate in the 1969
provincial election and currently a commerce public
speaking instructor is the voice of experience and action.
He would appreciate your continued support.
Thomas Kennedy
This, like many other student positions, gives an  -
opportunity, however small it may be, for the students to
express their views on issues material to them in the
university community.
I do not wish to make any promises because unkept
promises are so distasteful; but as there are many areas the
senate is concerned with that are in need of improvement,
my efforts would be directed accordingly.
With particular concern to both commerce and law
students is their need for new buildings with more space
and facilities. I would like to see a student senator elected
to the board of governors as better communication
between students and administrators is very essential.
What does senate really do? What do students want? I
hope to be an effective communication link as your
representative oil senate for commerce and law.
Women's hearings to start
The UBC women's action
group is setting up a grievance
board to deal with any issue
involving discrimination towards
women on campus.
Faculty, staff, undergraduate
and graduate women willing to sit
on the board should attend the
group's meeting today at noon in
the blue room of the Arts I
building.
"The board will run along the
lines of a royal commission. We
are asking people to submit briefs
to the committee on issues dealing
with campus women," Shelagh
Day, a member of the group, said
Thursday.
"It will ^consist of equal
representation of faculty, staff,
graduate and undergraduate
women.
"The hearings will either be
public or closed depending on the
request of the person submitting
the brief.
"The commissioners will then
make recommendations to the
faculty association, president's
office or senate depending on the
area they affect," said Day.
Group member Gina Quijano
said they are now working on
really blatant kinds of
discrimination such as
renumeration for services and
staff rank.
"The board will deal with any
issues of discrimination against
campus women and other
problems,     not     directly
discriminatory, such as housing
and day care," said Quijano.
They expect the board to begin
action immediately.
"We already have one brief
submitted on part-time status for
faculty and its implications for
women," said Quijano.
Day said: "The kind of report
we are looking forward to
producing has already been done
at McMaster, Queens, Harvard,
Stanford and Yale, where they are
already dealing with the problems
of education and employment of
women on campuses."
Bomb — 'harmless
The bomb which exploded in the civil engineering building last
Friday was a relatively harmless crowd dispersal device which caused
no permanent damage, an RCMP spokesman said Thursday.
"The bomb was-a model 782 CS grenade, filled with 150 grams
of burning mix producing a heavy concentration of smoke and 115
grams of CS irritant," said sergeant Stan Nowicki of the university
detachment.
"This type of device is used primarily for crowd control," he
said.
SALARIED SALES OPPORTUNITY
The Standard Life Assurance Company will be conducting interviews on
the afternoon of February 18th 1972 for the position of SALARIED sales
representative.
The Standard Life Assurance Company was the FIRST Assurance
Company to operate in Canada (1833) and to-date, had enjoyed an
OUTSTANDING reputation and record with regard to both its
policyholders and staff.
Graduating Students in the FACULTY OF ARTS and the FACULTY OF
COMMERCE who enjoy a challenge and enjoy meeting people are invited
to make appointments now for interviews at the Student Placement Office
on February 18th 1972.
REflEH
'72
MORE THAN 300 NEW STUDENTS
FROM OVER 70 DIFFERENT
COUNTRIES WILL COME TO STUDY
\AT U.B.C. THIS SEPTEMBER.
WANT TO LEARN FIRST-HAND
ABOUT ANOTHER COUNTRY AND
^CULTURE? HELP TO BRIDGE
THE CULTURE GAP.
WRITE TO SOMEONE!
'SIGN UP AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Monday to Friday commencing February 16th.
WHY   IS   IT THAT MOST UNIVERSITY
GRADUATES CHANGE JOBS AT LEAST ONCE DURING
THEIR FIRST TWO YEARS AFTER GRADUATION?
Could it be disillusionment with a fixed income based on a standardized
and rigid promotion schedule — or the often slow and frustrating climb
through corporate bureaucracy resistant to any new ideas.
THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE
1. TO   PROVE   TO   YOURSELF,   ONCE   AND   FOR   ALL,   THAT   YOU   CAN
FUNCTION AS t\N INDIVIDUAL IN A HIGHLY CHALLENGING FIELD.
2. TO  ESTABLISH  YOUR  OWN   INCOME  AND  DEVELOP YOUR  OWN LIFE
STYLE.
We're Talking About Real Estate
and invite you to an informal but frank discussion of the real
estate profession as it applies to the university graduate.
Thursday Evening-Feb. 17th -7-10 p.m.
at the BLOCK BROS. WEST SIDE OFFICE
Corner Dunbar and 19th Ave.
228-9711
ppj     Transportation Can Be Arranged
EjB    BLOCK BROS. REALTY LTD.  In aid of the civil power
In Aid of the Civil Power
is a pamphlet, short and easy
to read, which makes yet
another contribution to
B.C.'s long, turbulent and
seldom honestly told labor
history.
It is written by Jack Scott,
veteran of B.C. labor
struggles, and is available
through Mother Earth
Publishers, 2023 East First
Ave., phone 253-0720.
Scott begins with a brief
recapitulation of the events
surrounding the War Measures
Act asking the proverbial
question, "Can it happen
here?"
Could troops be called out
in B.C. to intervene in any
civil dispute if it was deemed
necessary by the rulers of the
province? The answer is
suggested by the fact that it
has happened here on at least
six different occasions in B.C.
history. All these incidents
had to do with strikes and in
all cases the militia was
ordered in.
Did the militia fight the
battle of the workers? No. It
facilitated the breaking of
strikes and imprisonment of
their leaders.
Scott even points out that
in most cases "the authorities
were compelled to admit,
after the event, that
mobilization was unnecessary
and even, at times, illegally
done...".
Sound familiar in light of
statements by Pelletier and
others about the feds' more
recent actions of Oct., 1970?
Scott offers descriptions of
the six incidents in which the
militia were used against the
people of B.C. throughout
the pamphlet.
If it sounds strange
reveiwing a pamphlet on one
aspect of B.C. labor history it
is probably because the
history department out here
tends to ignore such
documents in favor of the
history of the status quo.
You've got the address
where this pamphlet may be
readily obtained. It will be
interesting to see if the
department which purports
to teach B.C. history will use
it.
Jsck Scott, ri^it, shakes
an oM admirer.
STUDENTS WANTED
to participate in group analysis and research program this summer.
Must be capable of intelligent insight, confident of own opinions,
articulate, have some writing ability. Program is investigations into
social, political, and economic problems agreed upon by the
group; applicants must be prepared to help in publication of
results. Program is designed to be a challenge to society, so expect
to get burned.
APPLICANTS FROM ALL FIELDS CONSIDERED,
5 POSITIONS OPEN
Send application with whatever details you consider relevant to:
HEADSPACE, Box 688-6700 N.W. Marine Drive
Closing Date FEB. 20       (Free Campus Mail)
Going Away
This Summer?
COME
and
SEE US
For    Complete    Travel
I nformation    —    Charters,
Youth Flights, Regular and
Excursion Flights.
For Brochures — Call
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
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the flight Trippcf
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Starring
JANE FONDA
MICHAEL SARRAZIN
SUSANNAH YORK
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UBC    7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
FRI., FEB. 11
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admission 75c
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•
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Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  11,  1972 The saga of John Sample
Football League Sample
found employment and the
wage he knew he was worth
— a three year contract for
$120,000.
His career climaxed on
January 12, 1968 in the
Super Bowl against his former
commercials? Practically
none. Men like Pat
Summerall, Frank Gifford,
Andy Robustelli, Jerry
Kramer, Kyle Rote, and Tom
Brookshire are well taken
care of. It isn't that they're
any   better  or  any  smarter
Out of the 52 starting
cornerbacks in pro football,
not more than a handful are
white.
"If a black man's a good
receiver,   instead   of  letting ^
him be a receiver, nine out of .$
10 coaches will make him try
By KENT SPENCER
Johnny Sample is a
football player with a big
mouth. He also happens to be
black.
On the field or at the
contract table, with football
commissioner Pete Rozelle or
before a national television
audience, Sample always said
what he thought was right —
no matter what the
consequences. During Ms
twelve years as a professional
football player, Sample
became perhaps the most
'controversial' ever to play
the sport.
Sample tells the story in
his new book, Confession of a
Dirty Ballplayer. Although
it's a bit like a 'true
confession' best seller at
times, it does bring out some
of the little known and
covered-up facts of
professional sport. It also
provides a pleasant insight
into the life of a pro athlete.
Northampton when there was
a first-class white school just
a few blocks away. Nobody
ever gave him an answer.
At Maryland State in 1957
Sample made All-America at
running back. In 1958, he
was a seventh round
Baltimore Colt draft choice.
He soon became the starting
cornerback and the top man
on the kickoff and punt
teams. In his first two years
the Colts took consecutive
National League
Championships. It looked
rosy.
But at the start of the
1961 season, Sample refused
to pay what he considered an
unjust fine, and was traded to
the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Thus began Sample's
strange saga with various
teams around the NFL. From
Pittsburgh and all-pro in
1961, he went to Washington
in '63. He was 'controversial'
wherever he went.
team, the Colts. In that game,
he intercepted a pass at the
Jet two yard line in a game
which the Jets won 16-7.
A back injury in the first
game of the '69 season forced
him out of the game for
good. If not, he probably
would have been the first
player to be black-balled
from both leagues.
He was a troublemaker —
by standards that people like
Vince Lombardi or Pete
Rozelle hold. They believe
that a professional football
player should be a nice,
clean-cut guy who always
smiles at the right times and
wears ties on road trips.
than black players.
"The black man doesn't
get the contacts and the go
betweens. The commissioners, owners, and coaches
aren't providing them.
"Once training camp gets
under way, the white coaches
have another way of getting
rid of black ball players. They
put all the black players in
one or two positions and let
them eliminate one another.
out for the cornerback slot.
The problem is that most
teams just don't want too
many' black players. Once a
team gets 10 or 12 black
players, that's about the
saturation point.
"If players say something
about getting a raw deal, then
they have a 'big mouth.'
"If that's the standard
they judge people by, then I
have a 'big mouth.'"
It all began for Sample in
Cape Charles, Virginia, on
June 15, 1937. His dad was a
barber who worked for
"black dollars" and his
mother a secretary.
Consequently, he always ate
well and grew up independent
of the white community.
"My father encouraged me
to stand up for what I
thought was right," he said.
So when Sample found
himself shut out from a
drugstore, gas station, or
movie house, he responded
the only way he knew how —
by throwing a brick through
the window.
Cape Charles Elementary
for blacks was archaic and
grossly underfunded.
Sample's first teacher, Alice
Moses, had taught his father
and his grandfather.
Sample described his school
as "poorly equipped." As he
grew older, Sample began to
wonder why he had to bus 15
miles     to     school     in
He always asked for the
money he thought he was
worth — then presented the
statistics to prove it. On the
field, Sample caused more
'trouble,' for his rough play.
"I blasted receivers when
it was obvious they couldn't
get the ball," he said. In one
game, he came at New York
Giant wide receiver Del
Shofner, "elbows and knees
flying." By the time Shofner
rolled out of bounds, he had
three broken ribs.
That prompted Wellington
Mara, the Giant's owner, to
demand Sample's expulsion
from the league. He was, at
the beginning of the next
season.
In '65, Sample was
black-balled from the league.
He bitched too much at
the contract table; he set an
example for other black
players; he was too
'controversial.'
It was with the New York
Jets of the rival  American
"The black man in
professional football usually
ends up making less money
than the white player of
equal ability," says Sample.
He cites cases throughout the
league.
In '63, when John Henry
Johnson of the Steelers and
John Nisby of the Redskins
started to write a book about
prejudice and injustice
against black players in pro
football, both were 'gotten
rid of.'
"Any black player that has
ever spoken out has been
dealt with in one way or
another," says Sample.
"During the off-season,
many black players work for
$200 a week or less. Not so
for the white players. The
white football establishment
takes care of its own, with
speaking engagements,
publicity positions, and
broadcasting jobs.
"How many black men do
you see on national television
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Friday, February 11,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Ernst Fischer is an Austrian Marxist,
who has been active in left-wing circles
since 1934. He turned to writing after
studying philosophy. Reprinted here is an
excerpt from his book The Necessity of
Art made available by Pat Moan.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau was the first to
use the concept of 'alienation'. His
experiences in Calvinist-Republican
Geneva led him to recognize that when a
people is 'represented' by deputies it
becomes alienated from its own collective
and so ceases to be a people. The
community, he found, could be the
instrument of government but never of
the common will, for then it was bound
to become alienated from itself within
the state.
The people... are not and cannot be
represented by deputies. Sovereignty...
cannot be represented; it lies essentially
in the general will, and does not admit of
representation; it is either the same, or
other; there is no intermediate possibility.
(Contrat Social)
Conditions, however, had become too
complex and states too large; division of
state power and the fiction of 'popular
representation' could not, therefore, be
abandoned, but from this followed
alienation, concentration of power, and
loss of freedom and democracy.
Hegel and the young Marx developed
the concept of alienation philosophically.
Man's alienation begins when he parts
company with nature through work and
production. Through his work man
makes    himself    twofold,    not    only
intellectually, as in the conscience, but in
reality, through his work, and hence
contemplates himself within a world
made by himself . . : (Karl Marx). As
man becomes more and more capable of
mastering and transforming nature and
the entire world around him, so does he
confront himself more and more as a
stranger in his own work, and find
himself surrounded by objects which are
the product of his activity yet which have
a tendency to grow beyond his control
and to become more and more powerful
in their own right.
This alienation, necessary for man's
development, needs to be continually
overcome, so that men can become
conscious of themselves in the process of
work, find themselves again in the
product of their work, and create new
social conditions so as not to be the slaves
of their own production but its masters.
The artisan, who is creative, can feel at
home in his work and can have a personal
feeling for his product. But with the
division of labour in industrial production
this becomes impossible. The wage-earner
can have no sense of unity with his work
or with himself to set against his
'alienation'. His attitude towards the
product of his work is that 'towards an
alien object having power over him'. He is
alienated from the thing he makes and
from his own self, lost in the act of
production. Then, as Marx puts it,
activity appears as suffering, strength as
powerlessness, production as
emasculation, and the worker's own
physical and spiritual energy, his personal
life - for what is life if not acitivity? - as
an activity turned against himself,
independent from himself, and not
belonging to himself.
In primitive social conditions, e.g. in
the natural economy of the early Middle
Ages, the social relationships between
people (landowner to peasant, customer
to artisan, etc.) appear as their own
personal relationships. In a developed
commodity-producing society they are
disguised as social relationships between
objects, i.e. between work products. An
artisan produces a particular object for a
particular customer. But for the
industrialist it is immaterial what his
factory produces and for whom; any
product is, for him, merely the means of
profit. Those engaged in commercial
exchange are totally alienated from one
another, and the product is likewise
totally alienated from the man who puts
it on the market. Bertolt Brecht makes
this point very strikingly in the Trader's
Song' from Die Massnahme:
How should I know what rice is?
How should I know
who knows what it is?
I've no idea what rice is.
I only know its price.
We speak of price trends,
stock-exchange prices, and by so doing
we acknowledge the inhuman,
autonomous movement of objects, a
movement thatt carries human being
along as a stream carries twigs of wood.
In a world governed by commodity
production, the product controls the
producer, and objects are more powerful
than men. Objects become the strange
thing   that   casts   long   shadows,   they
become  'destiny' and  the daemon  ex
machina.
Industrial society is distinguished not
only by this objectification of social
relationships, but also by an increasing
division of labour and specialization. Man
as he works becomes fragmented. His
connexion with the whole is lost; he
becomes a tool, a small accessory to a
huge apparatus. And as this division of
labour makes a man's role more partial,
so his field of vision becomes more
limited; the more ingenious the work
Art and Revolution:
process, the less intelligent is the work
required and the more acute the
individual's alienation from the whole.
The tag from Terence — 'Nihil humanum
mihi alienum est' — is reversed, and the
tremendous expansion of production is
accompanied by a shrinkage of the
personality.
Franz Kafka, who felt the alienation
of human beings moire intensely than any
artist before him, said in a conversation
with Janouch about Taylorism' (a system
which visualized the total transformation
of the worker into a machine part by
conveyor-belt mass production): 'It
defiles and degrades not only the work
but, above all, the human being who is a
component of it. This kind of Taylorized
life is a terrible curse from which only
hunger and misery can grow, instead of
the longed-for wealth and profit. There's
progress for you ...' 'Progress towards
the end of the world,' suggested Janouch.
Kafka shook his head: 'If that, at least,
were certain! It is not certain . . . The
conveyor-belt of life carries you on, no
one knows where. One is more of an
object, a thing, than a living creature.'
Not only is the human being more and
more obliterated by his own special
knowledge and training — by his
existence as a detail — but also the social
relationships and conditions around him
become more and more difficult to
comprehend.
Men's living together has become so
broad and thick (wrote Robert Musil in
The Man Without Qualities) and their
relationships are so endlessly intertwined,
that no eye and no will can any longer
penetrate an area of any size, and every
man outside the narrowest circle of his
activities must remain dependent on
others like a child; never before was the
underling's mind so limited as it is today,
when it rules all.
In a note on Rousseau, Musil wrote:
The great undivided life-force must be
preserved... The culture of social and
psychological division of labour which
smashes   this   unity   into   innumerable
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, February 11, 1972 fragments is the greatest peril for the
squI.
Ulrich, the 'man without qualities',
remarks that in the past 'one had an
easier conscience about being a person
than one has today'. Responsibility
today, he finds, 'has its centre of gravity
not in the human being but in
relationships between objects...'. And
elsewhere he says: The inner drought,
the uncanny mixture of keenness about
details and indifference to the whole, the
human being's immense abandonment in
a desert of detail...'
A ghostly anonymity envelops
everything. The abbreviated names of
large firms and organizations have the
effect of hieroglyphics used by some
mysterious power. The individual is faced
by enormous, incomprehensible,
impersonal machines whose strength and
size fill him with a sense of his own
impotence. Who decides? Who is in
charge? To whom can one turn in search
of justice and help? These are the
questions that recur again and again in
•Kafka's great works The Trial and The
Castle. Enigmatic, unidentifiable holders
of power summon Josef K., try him,
sentence and execute him. The
bureaucracy of Count West-West, the
owner of the inaccessible castle which K.
vainly tries to approach, passes all
understanding. Bureaucracy is an essential
element of man's alienation from society.
There are no human relationships for the
bureaucrat, only files, i.e. objects. Man
himself turns into a file. A dead man is
identified by an index number. Even
when a man is personally summoned he is
not a person but a 'case'.
In The Trial, the Advocate explains to
K. that the first plea is not read in court
but is simply filed. It is supposed to be
examined later, but unluckily even that
. was not quite true in most cases, the first
plea was often mislaid or lost altogether
and, even if it were kept intact until the
end, was hardly ever read; that was, the
Advocate admitted, merely a rumour.
The proceedings were not only kept
secret from the public, but from the
accused as well...
Reality and the Artist
They were also kept secret from the
minor officials, so that these could hardly
ever follow the cases they worked on
through to the end. The most important
thing was the Advocate's personal
connexions; in them lay the chief value of
the Defence.'
A man who has become a 'case' only
comes    into    contact    with    junior
"representatives of the system; the senior
representatives are remote and wrapped
in mystery.  A  senior  official  such as
, Klamm in The Castle is virtually invisible.
Barnabas, who serves under Klamm,, is
never sure whether he is really talking to
Klamm. 'He speaks to Klamm, but is it
Klamm? Isn't it rather someone who is a
little like Klamm?' Barnabas does not
dare to ask 'for fear of offending in
ignorance against some unknown rules
and so losing his job'. The junior
bureaucrats, such as the two 'assistants'
whom the Castle sends to watch the
stranger, are present only within the
limits of their function; otherwise they
are without personality, that is to say
without presence. K. compares their
faces:
'How am I to know one of you from
the other? The only difference between
you is your names, otherwise you 're as
like as.. .'He stopped, and then went on
involuntarily, 'You're as like as two
snakes.'
They are pure function, shadows of a
task, servants of a secret power looming
in the background. The 'case' is decided
upon in impenetrable darkness.
This sense of the riowerlessness of the
individual who, as he confronts the
apparatus of power, is from the start the
accused, the culprit, not knowing what is
the accusation against him nor what is the
nature of his guilt - this feeling, so
characteristic of the ordinary man under
the Hapsburg monarchy, has since spread
over continents. The great decisions are
removed from the elected representatives
of the people and placed in the hands of a
small group of rulers. The state is
alienated from the average citizen, who
generally thinks of it as 'the powers that
be' or 'them up there', never as W. His
alienation is reflected in his poor opinion
of politics and politicians. He is
convinced that the whole business is a
pretty dirty one, yet feels that nothing
much can be done about it — that he
must, in fact, accept it as it is. 'Lie low
and keep quiet' is quickly becoming a
universal social motto. The citoyen, the
active citizen, is disappearing fast. Retreat
into private life is the order of the day.
The contradiction betwen the findings
of modern science and the backwardness
of social understanding also encourages a
sense of alienation. Modern knowledge
about the structure of the atom, the
quantum and relativity theories, the new
science of cybernetics, have made the
world an uneasy place for the man in the
street — far uneasier than the discoveries
of Galileo, Copernicus, and Kepler made
the world for medieval man. The palpable
becomes impalpable, the visible becomes
invisible, behind the reality perceived by
the senses there is a vast reality that
escapes the imagination and can only be
expressed by mathematical formulae.
Vigorous, forceful reality with all its
shapes and colours - the 'nature' Goethe
saw as a scientist as well as a poet — has
become an immense abstraction.
Ordinary men no longer feel at home in
such a world. The icy breath of the
incomprehensible chills them. A world
that can only be understood by scientists
is a world from which they are alienated.
There are moments when technical
achievements - the flight into the
cosmos, which is the realization of an
ancient, magic dream — can enchant men.
But it is precisely this same power over
the forces of nature that also intensifies a
sense of powerlessness and arouses
apocalyptic fears. And indeed the
discrepancy between social consciousness
and technical achievement is alarming. A
single misreading of a radar report, a
mistake by a simple technician may mean
world disaster. Humanity may be
destroyed and no one will have wanted it
to happen.
Alienation has had a decisive influence
on the arts and literature of the twentieth
century. It has influenced the great
writings of Kafka, the music of
Schoenberg, the surrealists, many
abstract artists, the 'anti-novelists' and
'anti-dramatists', Samuel Beckett's
sinister farces; and also the poetry of the
American beatniks, one of which reads:
Now listen to this
a do-it-yourself laparectomy
set the hydrogen strophe
the best fallout possible.
Think of the. funny embryonic mutations
generous, genial, genocide.
It's democratic too
it'll take fragmented man
everyone will move upward
in the free world
equally
in that final illumination	
(Carl Forsberg:
Lines on a Tijuana John)
The sense of total alienation veers into
total despair, veers into nihilism.
Diego Rivera was a revolutionary
Mexican painter whose murals arid
portraits are well-known in and outside
his native country.
Friday, February 11, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Many days lead to one
The   Day   by   Stan   Persky,
Vancouver Peoples' Press,
available   at  the  Student
Coop     Bookstore,     SUB
basement for 80 cents.
The Day is a collection of
prose and poetic images
which concern us with several
parts of many days in the life
of the author.
The focal points of our
existence can be as simple as
the things we are doing now,
at .this instant. When these
things become stripped of
context or philosophical
meaning they stand on their
own so that the'person can
judge them and him/herself.
"So, some directions are
open for whatever you'll
make of them." Here and
now are sometimes as real a
concern as the state of the
world. Not that Persky would
deny that the state of the
world is important.
The Day is a political book
but from the personal to the
general rather than the other
way around. Of course we
must remember that Persky
came to the book itself out of
a much more general context
- society - and makes this
clear in several places.
"I tag him, the hard apple
in my hand, I say, he's out, I
hold up my thumb and closed
fist, giving the sign, who'll
believe me, there are no
umpires,..."
No umpires but an
existence to be thought out
and lived.
An existence which
entails living with others,
loving others, getting your
house together, images to
.contend with and write
down, work to do, days off in
the country, political work
and responsibility,
cooperative arrangements to
be worked out — anyone who
says Persky isn't a solid
citizen should have a look at
The Day.
The forward to the reader
says, "This is meant to be
read aloud." It is a communal
book and to try to enjoy it
privately is missing the point
of the writing.
The attempt to turn life
into something other than a
series of meaningless events,
to take control over one's
existence is Persky's central
theme throughout the book.
His images of many days, past
and present collapsed into the
image of one day suggest that
one's life has meaning even
when it seems meaningless.
"Of course the day isn't
everything you want it to be
... The events if that's what
they were can be put here
and there."
Evidently Persky is aware
of one of the major
contradictions which face our
day to day lives, the split
between meaningless and
meaningful. If we live out our
days in total confusion and
alienation then events
become meaningless,
something to be absorbed
vicariously. If we sense a
purpose in living and
recognize the forces which
prevent us from living a full
existence plus hope to alter
these forces then our image
The resolution of each day
is important whether it is
making love or sitting up
smoking a cigarette and
reading manuscript work. The
de sc ription of the
denouement of days is in
some instances relaxed and
satisfied and in others
harried.
"... why have they had
to wait outside, and then
squeezed in here, to see this,
only this, as I see them I
know itTl be disappointing,
how can they know I have
ridden in the boat, a little
scared, I have seen the food."
In the total context of the
book and its parallel with life
itself The  Day  succeeds in
of self takes on a meaning
and what we do becomes
meaningful.
The images fall where they
may throughout the book.
This almost casual use of
language leads into some
interesting constructs. On a
single page we find emotions
of boredom set side by side
with an adventure or an
important event such as a
friend's wedding.
bringing home elements of
experience in a total
framework of meaning. I
found it to be both honest
and refreshing in its
simplicity of style. It's about
life and what could be more
relevant in the present time
and society?
The Day is illustrated with
line drawings by Brian
DeBeck.
-Dick Betts
HILLEL EVENTS
SATURDAY MOVIE NIGHT
"The Fixer"
Starring DIRK BOGARD
based on a novel by Bernard Malamud
At Hillel House Saturday, February 12, at 8:30 P.M.
Admission — 50c Members        75c Others
WEDNESDAY PROGRAM
"Jewish Pioneers of B.C."
Slide show and Commentary by CYRIL E. LEONOFF, President
Jewish Historical Society of British Columbia.
At Hillel House, Wednesday, February 16th at 12:30 P.M.
SATURDAY MOVIE NIGHT
"St. Valentine's Day Massacre"
Starring JASON ROBARDS and GEORGE SEGAL
At Hillel House, Saturday, February 19, at 8:30 P.M.
Admission — 50c Members
75c Others
NOTE:-Regular Hillel-sponsored INTRODUCTORY TALMUD
CLASSES every Wednesday and Thursday at Hillel
House, 12:30 P.M. - BET. CAFE - Hot lunches every
Tuesday at Hillel.
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Page Friday, 6
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, February 11, 1972 Ian Adams — The Trudeau Papers, McClelland and
Stewart.
"Another series of doors and my tacc was pushed
up against the bars of a cage. Inside, a woman sat on a
prison cot. It took me several moments to recognize
Brigitte. Her hair was cut short and her face was aged
and shadowed. She watched me, frightened,
unmoving. I do not think she even recognized me. I
tried to speak. But I was unable to force a sound orft
of my mouth. After a moment the guards
away ..."
I take it as a warning, not simply fiction, but
circumstances that Adams sees and wants to pn
from    happening.    Or,    perhaps    he   sees*
inevitability and wants us to be clear on the el
we can make.
The story goes like this. A nuclear disaster t
destroys Edmonton, North Battleford and Saskati
In the days that follow, thousands more die fri
burns and radiation poisoning. As the fallout sp:
to Winnipeg the people panic and head couth to cr
the U.S. border. The First Air Cavalry it rushed to thi
border to keep them out. A border guard describes
what happened. The increasing numbers of Canadians
grew tired of waiting. "Whole families were ferrying
themselves across the river in boats and hastily made
craft. The soldiers were doing a lot of shouting and
pushing. About mid-morning the fine white ash began
to fall from the sky. I think it had a frightening effect
on everybody.
"The    river   became   crowded   with   people.
Suddenly, a few single shots were heard, immediately
followed by a short burst of automatic fire. Then
seemed as if every trooper on that rivcrbank fired'
weapon on the people in the water and nun
crowds on the opposite bank. It must liaffi-
about fifteen or twenty minutes before the offices*"
could bring their men under control."      . ' ■*
The parallel to Vietnam is delibeute'lnd explicit.»
When the local and provincial govenrfjenti, udkpse
and the federal government is unable filestore order,
Trudeau
/Papers
S^iorporjtion presidents demand the presence of
%nencjn  troops in C'anadj J^JjWtgct American
is movelHF*<^gmm*mJs%*f,   \
t with tligas^^Q^^pffisf^fdamsl
~Us 'UHELtiy   to  the  scenery  using personal'
jccount^The narrator is in ^JS^fiHSfh reporting
jgpjaa's "National" inajia/im.- Vrfee the horro(
ph  his eVes.  People  vomiting blood in      ~
tstieets, hanks of hair coming aw.iv m their!
ay brush itkfrom their eves, young girls j
elves foMj ride ouLof Regjiv*<
oui   every?
pot cars to escd
flUnccthc)
.taking
police the
iold citizens
iber the War
igjlante    gioups.
military beat and
3-*
Adams has given us a narrator who moves
through these events appearing as a left-wing
journalist* but, who in fact gives information to the
C.I.A. Thereat an account of how he moves from a
wealthy background to drifter to working in a
Montreal waterfront hostel which turns out to be a
C.I.A. operation, It's not from committment that he
works for them, but more from a refusal to choose.
He'a taken to that point.
It*> when he sees the bodies of six left-wing
students hung by vigilantes that he begins to see the
choice he must make. It's when he sees the horrors of
the prairies, 'it's finally, when the one thing that
"means something to him is torn from him, when he
sees BrigUte.in.the prison and she doesn't know him.
As he puts it, "their doctrinaire ideology has nothing
to do with.why I am a guerrilla. I am a guerrilla
cause by along process of elimination it is the last
ion left tome. It is as simple as that."
|f ideology seems too abstract, if we're not
by it io make a political choice, Adams wants
ee what kinds of things can actually occur in a
Fnot Controlled by us, but by the American
rations*'-what can actually be done to people's
Anything can be done to us. Anything can be
Eh from ua.
Our task is to work now to take control of our
lives before we, have only one choice open. Adams is
telling us that we cannot isolate ourselves, that we
cannot find "a* way out where we can remain
mtouched by what goes on in the world.
I found the last section of the book disturbing.
The security committee of the guerrillas turns out to
Iv brutal and ruthless. I think of Stalinist Russia.
I el low guerrillas of the narrator have lied about his
laclions. 11e^s.starved and forced to stay awake with
drugs. Adamius not wrong to suggest that socialist
revolutions can" go wrong, they have, but he fails to
show, in I his book, how it's happened. He doesn't
show how the men and women doing the fighting
lave lost control to insance megalomaniacs.
I Brian Loomes
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Friday,  February 11,  1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 The UBC PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY PRESENTS: Friday,  February 11,  1972
THE      UBYSS-EY
Page 15
Blacks 'relocated' in Mozambique
The Aluminum Company of Canada (Alcan) plans to
sell more than 6,000 tons of Aluminum rods valued at
$3.6 million to Portugal to be made into high tension
cables which will carry electricity from the Cabora Bassa
Dam, now under construction iri the Portugese colony of
Mozambique in southeastern Africa.
Cabora Bassa will entail the 'relocation' of a large
number of black Mozambicans and the settling of about a
million white Portugese in the colony. The dam will also
provide power to South Africa and possibly Rhodesia.
Jean-Pierre N'Diaya of Jeune-Afrique (via Last Post
News Service) examines the consequences of the
development of the Cabora Bassa dam.
MOZAMBIQUE - Cabora Bassa! This name evokes
more than the six-mile gorge which the Zambesi River
slashes through Tete province in Mozambique, 55 miles
from the Rhodesian border. It also brings to mind the cry
of joy mingled with resignation uttered by the Nhugue
people, transformed into porters by the European
conquerors, as they reached the steep cliffs above the
swirling torrents after endless steps through the brush and
put down their heavy loads. 'Kebra Bassa!' 'This is the last
halting-place!' Now Portugal is engaged in a second
colonial conquest, extending its domination over man and
nature alike, building one of the biggest dams in the
world.
The plan to construct a series of dams on the
Zambezi centred around the generating station of Cabora
Bassa dates from the end of the last war. Plans became
concrete a few years ago with the progress of liberation
movements in the Portuguese colonies of Mozambique
and Angola, as well as in Rhodesia and South Africa. The
size of the project and the geo-political context in which
it is taking shape give Cabora Bassa an economic, strategic
and military importance which present it as the most
disturbing challenge Africa has known since the European
penetration.
The economic and financial implications are of great
importance. Portugal's international tenders were
answered by well-known world financial groups. Three
consortiums group American, European and South
African interests. South Africa, through the Industrial
Development Corporation, has assumed 20 per cent of the
cost of the infrastructure to 'warm up' interest and give
guarantees of political stability and profitability which
Portugal cannot offer. Pretoria isn't stopping there. Not
only is it lending the project $40 million, but it has also
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - The
blorgs danced around the main
maypole in the tiny, ugly republic
for the last time today although it
is already Rectember on the
blorgian calendar.
They raged, danced, farted,
collapsed, waxed pusillanimous,
and at last sang 'The Maypole
Leaves Forever."
promised to buy vast quantities of electrical energy.
European investors and their governments, attracted by
risk-free dividends, are by-passing United Nations
resolutions on apartheid and colonialism.
By the terms of an agreement negotiated in 1969
with the Lisbon government, the contract was taken by
one~of"theJ:hree consortiums, Zamco, which groups four
South African firms, including the Anglo-American
Corporation of South Africa. The ramifications of private
participation became multinational, bringing in French,
German and South African industrial groups. The
excitement quickly spread to banking interests. Union
Acceptance of South Africa took the lead and brought in
the Kreditanstalt fur Wiederaufbau through which West
Germany is putting $80 million in credit at the disposal of
the promoters; France, through the Banque de Paris et des
Pays-Bas, has come up with $78 million. To this group of
European financial organizations have recently been
added Barclay's Bank of England and Italian groups.
The cohesion of international capitalist milieux in
favor of the Cabora Bassa project serves both economic
and political objectives: economic, because of the
immense unexplored riches of this region, and political
because of the need to reinforce the white bastion of the
apartheid regimes which profits the western economy.
The hydro-electric capacity of Cabora Bassa will
allow 10 billion kilowatt-hours to be exported to South
Africa. By making the Zambesi navigable, Cabora Bassa
will make it possible to open up Rhodesia by means of an
artificial lake 140 miles long and 12 miles wide. The
complex will lead to the development of large-scale
stock-farming and the exploitation of deposits of bauxite,
iron, uranium, diamonds, copper, nickel, manganese, etc.
The steel industry which will be set up is expected to
furnish an annual production of five million tons.
A second phase will increase the annual production of
electricity to 50 billion KWH, five times that of Aswan.
Of course, South African industry will absorb the best
part of this energy, allowing it to affirm its predominance
in the whole area. The ambition of the project is such
that it seeks to extend its zone of influence to Kenya and
Congo-Kinshasa in the north, Angola and Namibia
(Southwest Africa) in the west, and Capetown in the
south.
A white vertebral column in the heart of the region,
Cabora Bassa also seeks to divide Mozambique in two and
to weaken the bordering African countries which are
supporting the liberation movements. It is with this
objective in mind that Pretoria and Lisbon have decided
to set up a colony of a million whites who will take over
the land. This will help Portugaiio defend .the area better
at lower cost. In 1970 the army absorbed 58 per cent of
the national budget. NATO's aid in these pacification
operations is hardly negligible. Already a group of
adventurers led by Jorge Jardim is advocating the creation
of an independent white-dominated state — a sort of
Portuges&Rhodesia - and this is being studied by NATO's-
subversioivspecialists. —         —
The turn of events, particularly the massive
involvement of South Africa and of private international
capital, shows that the only choice left to the unified
liberation organizations of Mozambique is the
intensification of war against white fortresses. The acts of
sabotage against Cabora Bassa and in Niassa and Capo
Delgado provinces have increased in the past year despite
the logistic support of at least two South African elite
battalions.
As well as carrying on offensive actions against the
Portugese occupation forces, the liberation movements
have undertaken an information campaign to mobilize
public opinion against the Salisbury-Pretoria-Laurenco
Marques axis. In the Council of Europe, Belgian socialist
Ernest Glinne asked in February 1970 if it was fair to
have European taxpayers support the political risk of
investments such as Cabora Bassa.
Heinz Kuehn, minister-president of Thine-Westphalia,
said at Dusseldorf Airport that he was upset to see six
West German firms on the list of participating companies.
He claimed the Portugese government had forced the
evacuation of African villages after Cabora Bassa had been
declared a zone of military operations. A group in London
called the 'Dambusters' Mobilizing Committee is carrying
the fight into London's financial district. There have also
been statements by the General Confederation of Labor,
and a demonstration at an Alcan shareholders' meeting in
Montreal.
On the shores of the Zambesi are two conflicting
worlds — that of the comfortable lodgings of European
workers attracted by high salaries, and the Mozambican
villages, with their horrible misery maintained by a
colonial policy which refuses to yield to the imperatives
of new times. Cabora Bassa is no longer a terminal for
long lines of porters, but the site where profit is striving to
propel man ... into a gorge.
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THE      U BYSSEY
Friday, February  11,  1972
Skagit flooding protest still strong
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Wrkagit Valley protest hasn't been tabled,
unlike the International Joint Commission
report on the proposed flooding.
While the IJC report now rests in a
house of commons file for "study and
analysis" after being presented in the house
last December, environmentalists in both
Canada and the U.S. are still fighting the
proposed flooding.
But it is the Americans who have lately
taken the initiative in the protest.
Lawyer Richard Aramburu, representing
the North Cascade Conservation Council
said his group plans to take the matter
before the Seattle city council once again.
He said he would ask the council
Monday to approve a public meeting on
the proposed flooding.
"We expect it to pass.
"Since December, 1970 when the
council defeated the motion to stop the
flooding by a vote of 6 to 2, two new
councillors have been elected. We believe
they will vote with us to hold a public
meeting," Aramburu said.
Members of the NCCC are talking to the
new councillors, presenting them with the
facts about the flooding he said. But NCCC
doesn't know yet how they will vote on
the matter.
"They are still waffling," he said.
"Waffling" is also a word applied to the
Canadian government stand on the
flooding by Vancouver lawyer and
conservationist John Fraser.
"A feeling prevails thoughout that the
Canadian government could stop the
flooding if it wanted to, but instead it
waffles ineffectually," Fraser said.
"I am frustrated by the government's
inability to get tough."
But both the Canadian and American
governments are facing what has turned
into a touchy diplomatic problem,
involving the authority of the IJC and a
Canadian's rights in American courts.
/
n 1909 when the foundations were
being laid for the flooding, the matter
didn't look so controversial.
That year the International* Joint
Commission was set up under the
International Boundary Waters Treaty to
control the use of international waters and
determine compensation when water is
blocked up by one country to flow into
another.
In 1941 the IJC received an application
from the Seattle City Light and Power
Company (SPLPC) for approval of raising
the Ross Dam, built in 1939, from 1,602
feet above sea level to 1,725 feet.
This would make large amounts of
cheap hydro-electric available to Seattle
residents.
It would also result in the flooding of
eight miles of the Skagit Valley adjacent to
the border.
I he request was granted in 1942 subject
to auitable compensation being agreed on.
"Suitable compensation" was defined as
meaning SCLPC would pay B.C. capital
costs of clearing the valley basin and
replacing an access road which would be
flooded plus an average yearly rental of
$35,000. Seattle would get an estimated
$1,000,000 in yearly benefits.
This in itself has caused objections, but
the conservationists base their protests
instead on the uniqueness and beauty of
the valley. In this they feel themselves
supported, albeit guardedly, by the IJC
report.
"T
■ he IJC was asked to prepare a report
last summer by the Canadian and American
governments which was not inconsistent
with the agreements of 1942 and 1967.
This meant they couldn't recommend not
to flood the valley and only say it was a
damn shame the flooding had to go
ahead," Fraser said.
The report was presented to the house
of commons last Dec. 19 by environment
minister Jack Davis.
The report said the IJC couldn't
properly study the matter in the four
months it met, and recommend a
three-year study period. Davis said the
government would study the "raw and
incomplete data" in that time and then
meet with representatives of B.C. and
Washington.
"It would be better to meet it head on
than hoping if we delay long enough it will
go away," Fraser commented.
/<
'f the government is looking for other
excuses, to stop the flooding, Fraser said
his group can provide two:
• "The IJC is anything but
enthusiastic about the proposed flooding
and by its own admission can't find the
advantages of the project.
• "There is also a strong argument
that the 1942 decision is legally invalid
because it gave B.C. and Seattle
discretionary powers which under the
Boundary Waters Treaty it cannot do.
"If all else fails — if Seattle votes to
continue the project and Canada doesn't
protest we will take the matter to court,"
Fraser said.
That is where diplomatic problems
come up.
The court case would be fought on the
last of Fraser's points - the authority of
the IJC. Do they have authority to delegate
responsibility? If not, what about other
decisions made in the past? Can they be
challenged?
mr\nd most significant — can a Canadian
bring suit in an American court?
Said Aramburu, "The right of a
Canadian to be represented in an American
court has been denied before. But we have
here another test case concerning truly
international interests."
The implications of this case reach far
beyond the valley's 5,200 acres.
(Unflooded, of course.)
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BUG STOPS Friday, February 11, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
Alternate papers bicker
Georgia Straight owner Dan McLeod made
another offer this week to the break-away Grape
staff, continuing the sporadic bargaining taking
place between the two alternate newspapers.
Grape music columnist Michael Quigley said
Wednesday he had been approached by McLeod
earlier in the week and told that the sole owner of
the Georgia Straight would let the Grape use his
typesetting equipment at $3 per hour.
In addition, McLeod wanted a full free page in
the^Grape to "clear the lies Grape people had been
spreading about him," Quigley said.
He said McLeod did not specify what "lies" he
was referring to.
Furthermore, McLeod wanted Grape staffers to
call advertisers and retailers and straighten out the
"lies" which he claimed the Grape had told them.
Quigley said the Grape did not try to hoodwink
former Straight advertisers into placing ads in the
Grape and added McLeod had again not specified
what "lies" he believed had been told to advertisers.
Grape staffers are unwilling to pay McLeod for
use of equipment because McLeod owes them at
least $2,000 in back wages from when Grape
staffers worked on the Straight.
* Quigley claimed McLeod proposes to decide
how much money he wants for use of supplies and
damage done during the occupation of the Straight
office and then to simply take that amount off the
back wages.
However, McLeod, who is thousands of dollars
in debt to his paper's printing company and staffers
from both papers, is unlikely to be able to pay
anybody's wages (with a few possible exceptions) in
the near future.
REGULAR WEEKLY PROGRAMS AT I.H.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Every Wednesday 8 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY -18th
— Roller skating at Stardust
meet at I.H. 7 p.m. sign at I.H.
— Information on Work, Study & Travel
programmes. 4:30 at I.H.
— Slides on Turkey-12:30
lnternatlonal=Between Nations
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20th
Slide show on Galapagos Isles, Panama and Ecuador 3-5
Reifel Bird Sanctuary Trip weather permitting — Sing at I.H.
BCIT shape up'
- BURNABY (Staff) — Few people would consider sartorial
splendor a requirement for contemporary students.
Not so across the city at the British Columbia Institute of
Technology.
Reacting to the shabby dress of institute students last week,
vice-principal J. C. McAdam kicked off a "shape up or ship out
campaign".
Since opening, BCIT dress requirements have been business
attire: tie with jacket and slacks or suit.
To date, enforcement of dress regulations has been primarily at
the discretion of instructors. Some threw out recalcitrant pupils; most
ignored regulations.
With McAdams declaration of war on waywards, BCIT's
administration plans to enforce the rules. As of this week ill-dressed
ingrates will be sent to their department heads and possibly to BCIT
principal Dean Goard.
On another front, the BCIT student newspaper, the Link, was
censured Thursday by the student government for editorially
opposing the dress regulations and for frequent use of swear words.
Joshua refused money
The federal government has refused a request by the Joshua
anti-pollution group for a $36,000 grant under the local initiative
program.
The decision came 10 days after the federal government gave
approval to a UBC administration request for $39,575 under the
same program to improve, among other things, the quality of UBC
rhododendron gardens.
Joshua spokesman Frank Portka said Thursday the $36,000 was
intended for hiring of 15 people at $100 a week to re-cycle pollutants.
He told The Ubyssey the group would continue its re-cycling
work for as long as possible.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 11,  1972
Hot flashes
Canadian
imperialism
A seminar on Canadian
imperialism will be held
Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. in salons
A, B and C of the faculty club.
Sponsored by the history
department, the seminar will
feature University of Toronto
history professor Carl Berger.
English meeting
The national conference on
graduate education in English will
be held at the Hotel Vancouver
today and Saturday.
UBC English department head,
Robert Jordan, will chair the
meeting continuing from 9:30
a.m. both days.
"The conference is the first of
its kind in Canada and will bring
together department directors
from across the country," Jordan
said.
UBC English prof Hendy
Kriesel and Peter Ross of the
manpower and immigration
department will be featured
speakers. Ross- will talk on
academic manpower.
Land grab
New med dean
The faculty of medicine has a
new dean.
"Dr. Vincent Gates, the new
dean, is an outstanding medical
researcher and an authority on
respiratory physiology," said
William Menzies, a student
member of the selection
committee.
Menzies said Wednesday Bates
is also considered an authority on
air pollution and has been active
on Montreal public television as a
commentator on air pollution
problems.
But he said Bates didn't specify
what he intended to do as UBC
medical dean.
Environment
Environmental Crisis Operation
will present a free documentary
on the cultural basis of man's
environmental problem
Wednesday, in Hebb Theatre at
12:30 p.m.
The film, entitled The Time of
Man, will feature anthropologists
Dr. Margaret Mead, Dr. Jane
Goodall and Dr. Colin Turnbull,
paleontologist Dr. Roy Andrews
and Dr. Harry Shapiro, director of
the American Museum of Natural
History.
The B.C. government has
extended its land grabbing
business to 38 acres of federal
land owned by the department of
national defense.
The 38-acre plot on West
Fourth Avenue is planned for sale
by the DND to private developers
for construction of multiple and
single dwelling housing units.
Profits nearing $4 million from
the sale will finance the cost of
moving the DND site to
Chilliwack.
However, minister without
portfolio Grace McCarthy
Tuesday put a motion before the
B.C. house calling for an all-party
recommendation that the land be
sold to B.C. at its 1947 cost price
of $2,500 an acre.
The federal government
acquired the property from the
province in 1947.
The land would be turned over
by grant or lease to Vancouver for
recreational use.
City council Tuesday voted to
support the motion before the
B.C. legislature.
An adjacent 72-acre plot of
land was leased to the city for $1
a year.
'Tween classes
TODAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Coffee house at Lutheran campus
centre starts at 9 p.m.. Games,
entertainment and friends.
CHINESE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Slides and a lecture by Dr. Johnson
on   Reflection   of  a   recent  visit  to
China   will   be   at   8   p.m.   in   the
International  House, upper lounge.
CHESS CLUB
See notice board in clubs
washroom, SUB 216, for UBC open
chess tournament wtiich starts next
week.
RADICAL UNION
(EX-HUMAN GOVERNMENT)
Jack Scott speaks on the
development of socialist theory at 8
p.m. in Brock 303.
CINEMA 16
Horrorama — four features, $1.00 a
night, starts at 7 p.m. in SUB
theatre.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting to form grievance board at
noon in blue room of Arts 1
buildingg.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Reverend P. Stevens, Father
Michele, professor Anderson and
Karl discuss Christianity at noon in
SUB 111.
SATURDAY
HILLEL
Film:    The    Mixer,    starring    Dirk
Bogard,    based    on    a    novel    by
Bernard  Malamud, at 8:30 p.m. in
Hillel House.
CINEMA 16
Horrorama — four features, $1.00 a
night, starts at 7 p.m. in SUB
theatre.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk mass at St. Mark's chapel.
L'ESCRIME UBC
Sunday practice cancelled because
of B.C. junior championship.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Workshop, discussion and coffee at
10:30 a.m. In Lutheran centre.
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Important meeting for all members
at noon in Angus 24.
ELCIRCULO
Cocktail party for Colombian
visitors at noon in International
House lounge.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack speaks on Dynamic
Relationships at noon in Buchannan
216.
WEST COAST TRAIL
Slide show with varsity outdoor
club at noon in Angus 104.
SAILING CLUB
Club racing meeting at noon in SUB
111.
ALPHA OMEGA —
UKRAINIAN CLUB
Meeting    with    speaker    from   the
Canadian Ukrainian students' union
at noon in SUB 213.
ECO
Film: A Time of Man, a CBS
documentary film on the cultural
basis     of     man's     environmental
problem, at noon in Hebb Theatre.
Admission free.
THURSDAY
ECO
Film and discussion of Lummi
Indians' acquaculture project at
noon and at 2 p.m. in Bioscience
2449 (new wing).
ALPHA OMEGA —
UKRAINIAN CLUB
Guest speaker. Professor Reveutsky
at noon in SUB 213.
FRIDAY
SPECIAL EVENTS
Speech by David Anderson, MP on
the problem of west coast oil spills,
titled Man Against the Oil Tankers
at noon in SUB Auditorium.
LUTHERAN CENTRE
Ian Adams will speak on the real
poverty report at noon in SUB
party room.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CREDIT COURSES ABROAD
SUMMER 1972
FINE ARTS
* Art of the Renaissance - Florence, Italy May 15 - June 23.
Advanced Seminarin Art History - Venice, Italy May 15 - June 23
ANTHROPOLOGY
* Peasants and the Third World - Mexico and Cuba July 2 - August
GEOGRAPHY
* Geography of Latin America - Mexico and Cuba July 2 - August 11
For further information write:
Directed Studies Abroad,
Centre for Continuing Education,
University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
*  Persons who wish to take the course on a non-credit basis will also be
welcome.                    . 	
Beautiful
clothes
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312-925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
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OF
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HOMECOMING AND SPORTS WEEKEND ON
SATURDAY MAY 6th - ALL PAST STUDENTS
REGARDLESS OF YEAR OF ATTENDANCE WHO ARE
INTERESTED IN COMING PLEASE
Phone 687-2296 after 6:00 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus  —   3   lines,   1   day   $1.00;   3   days   $2.50
Commercial   —  3   lines,   1   day $1.25;   additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone end ere payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dences
11
M.S.S.A. CHINESE NEW YEAR
dinner and dance, 14 Feb., 7:00
p.m.-l:00 a.m. I. House. Tickets
$3,50,   $2.75.   $1.50   (dance   9   p.m.)
VANIER FIESTA HAPPENS FEB.
19 Crosstown Bus plays upstairs.
Refreshment downstairs. $1.00 res.
$1.50  non-res.
Rides & Cat Pools
14
DESPERATE — RIDE TO UBC
from Willow and 19ht between
11:15 and 11:30 (stop). Contact
Jude,   876-4403.
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent   furnished   condominium   opposite   Gondola,   224-0657   eves.
  3 FOR $1.00 ???? 	
Why pay this much for your prophylactics?
We will mail you 24 assorted brand
name prophylactics for only $2.00 in
a plain sealed envelope by return
mail.
Clip and enclose  this ad.  for additional bonus of 3 prophylactics to:
POSTTRADING
Box  4002 Vancouver.   B.C.
SKI APEX MID TERM BREAK —
Large A frame available on Apex
Mt., sleeps 12 comfortably, cooking facilities, large fireplace.
Reasonable. Contact Box 526, Pen-
ticton.	
INFORMATION ON WORK,
Study & Travel programmes
Friday, February 18, 4:30, at In-
ternational    House.	
PHYSICIAN WITH YOUNG FAM-
ily, returning to Vancouver for
one year post graduate work
looking for accommodation from
July 1972 to July 1973. Dr. &
Mrs. John Crosby. Burns Rd.,
Hopkins Landing B.C. Tel. 886-
7200.	
PIRATE PAPERS WRITES ES-
says for you. Call 416 924-3432
or write 11 St. Joseph Street
No.   23   Toronto   Ontario.	
HITCHHIKER TOOK IEEE-
placeable papers from black
Volkswagen in error on Wed. Feb.
9.   Call   263-8246   immediately.
VANIER FIESTA
- CROSSTOWN   BUS
- REFRESHMENTS
9-1   PLACE VANIER
$1.00   RES.        $1.50   NON RES.
Travel Opportunities
16
LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO
crash, then stay at the Vancouver
Youth Hostel. Only $1.50 per night.
Phone 224-3208.
Get your
EURAILPASS  &
BRITRAILPASS
at
Gateway   Travel   Service
2627   Granville   St.   at   10th
Phone:   732-3788
No service charge
Wanted—Information
17
LADY IN BLACK, SEDGEWICK,
Monday evening (Feb. 7th) Roeth-
ke's book of poems, meet Joe in
Sedgewick  foyer Monday  12:30.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
I960   MERCEDES  180;   FOUR   CYL.
immaculate    cond.;    rblt.    motor.
Ph.   George   224-9769.   $800.	
•57   LAND  ROVER   PICK-UP.   OF-
fers    to    $675.00    732-5576    (After
6  p.m.)
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
DO YOU DRIVE A MAZDA, TOYOTA or Datsun? Does Henneken-
Auto service it for you? If not
you're paying too much. Call us
at 263-8121 or drop into 8914 Oak
St. (at Marine Drive) — get a
tune up so you can enjoy your
ski trip over Mid Term.	
RECORDS, WE HAVE THE LAT-
est releases in rock, folk, and
blues only. Trade-ins accepted.
We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctum, 6610 Main (at 50th) 11
a.m.-7 p.m.
Scandals
37
GOOD FOOD IN SUB 207 - 209
every day from 12:00 to 1:30.
A.M.S. International Food Festival
..        DO   DOGS    THINK?    	
Come  and  find out  in Angus  110,
Feb.   24  at  noon.
Photography
"3T
ut\)t Hen* anil gutter
\Si,1      Cameras!
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
LOOKING FOR
STUDIO LIGHTING?
We  have   an  excellent  selection   of
stands,   reflectors   and   bulbs.
—   ALL   AT   DISCOUNT   PRICES  —
Professional Photo Special-
1 gallon DIAFINE List $13.60
L & S SPECIAL
PRICE >G«vy
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
essays and thesis. Reasonable
terms. Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-
5235 — evenings 263-4023.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING PROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick ser-
vice on short essays.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, .etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone   263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Beautiful work, Mrs. Ellis
321-3838.	
TYPING - THESIS, ESSAYS,
assignments. 41st and Marine
Drive.  266-5053.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
II
STUDENTS WITH JOURNALISM
and/or photo abilities. Proposed
O.F.Y. project. May 15-Sept. 15,
Call Kathi,  939-9805 by Feb. 11.
SPEAKER TO TALK TO SMALL
class on the Phillipines; Please!
Box   518  Totem   Park.
INSTRUCTION St SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
83
WORRIED ABOUT A COURSE?
The UBC Tutoring Centre is open
12:00-2:00 p.m. Weekdays SUB
228. Tutors available in almost
every   subject.	
THESES, ESSAYS CORRECTED
by retired publisher for grammar,
syntax, spelling, punctuation, redundancy,   etc.   263-6565.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
HEAD STANDARDS WITH MAR-
ker bindings 200 cm; $40 Ph. Geo.
224-9769.
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•I
2 STUDENT ROOMS, $50-*60, SEMI
furn., share kitchenette and full
plumbing 4337 W. 11th Ave. 224-
3070 available Immediately.	
$60, CAMPUS ROOM AND KIT-
chen 5745 Agronomy Road behind
Village. Phone 224-9549 or drop
over.
Room fc Board
ON CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION.
St.   Andrew's Hall,  224-7720.  Men.
IT'S NEW—STAY AT THE D.K.E.
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
•3
SELF CONTAINED BSMT SUITE,
65th & Granville, utilities inc.
$105.,  after  6   p.m.   call  266-0993.
Houses—Furn. 8c Unfurn.
86
COSY 2 BD. OVERLOOKING UBC
land, w-w drapes, carpet, priv.
yd. & half bsm't. $220 marrieds
only. Optional - new s.c. bsm't
suite.   224-1973. Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February  11,  1972
Slavic studies issue simmering
By HELEN HOSSIE
Affairs within the Slavonic studies department have
taken on a schizophrenic appearance since The Ubyssey's
recent expose of internal difficulties.
Outwardly, all is calm. The graduate association of
students of Slavonic studies which met Thursday, has
decided to remain neutral in the dispute.
It was felt by the graduate students that the
organization must remain non-political if it is to avoid
splitting the graduate students into radical and
conservative camps.
It was explained by the chairman, John Yancey, that
unity within the organization is necessary to ensure that
GASSS can play a strong role within the university-wide
graduate students association.
In spite of outward unity, the issue has polarized the
students into opposing groups, each attempting to use
GASSS to their own advantage.
Judith Bezeredi took advantage of the meeting to
circulate a letter defending departmental decisions on
hiring and firing. She characterized the Feb. 4 Ubyssey
story as "unfair" and "harsh".
Similarly, the group seeking department change
succeeded in getting two of its associates unanimously
appointed to departmental committees at Thursday's
meeting.
The fact that association members who defend the
department didn't realize the significance of the
appointment is indicative of the problems facing the
department, according to a graduate student present at
the meeting.
"These people (graduate students defending the
department) don't know what they're doing. A lot of
them have come here recently from other-countries. They
don't know what is going on."
He added that a lot of the graduate students aren't
interested in the academic quality of the department.
"Some of them are housewives who only come one
day a week. They're not interested in academic
excellence.
"They just want to have a nice little department," the
spokesman said.
In regard to revelations made in the Ubyssey story,
"Nyet, Said The Killer", he said: "Everyone knows it's
true."
"Everything in The Ubyssey's story is fact."
Another graduate student The Ubyssey talked with
characterized the hiring and firing policies of the
department as "nepotism".
The first student concurred with this judgment and
said that almost no consideration is given to objective
criteria such as teaching ability or publication record.
"It's a question of personality," the first student said.
People are hired and fired, promoted and demoted on
the basis of the personal likes and dislikes of the person
responsible for the hiring, he said.
On top of all these internal problems there is a
general feeling of intimidation and harassment.
For example, it was reported at Thursday's meeting
that some graduate students felt there was some
considerable   degree   of  coercion   involved   in   getting
ATTENTION
All Students
In Faculties Of
student signatures on the letter defending the department.
The students The Ubyssey talked to all insisted on
remaining anonymous. The reasons for their anonymity
were frankly stated.
One student said the faculty members who he
criticized in his discussions with The Ubyssey "are the
ones who are going to be marking my exams."
A second student voiced the fear that he would not
get an impartial hearing from his MA committee if his
name was mentioned.
Because of the fear of individual harassment the two
students interviewed by The Ubyssey feel the best way to
achieve redress of grievances is to work within the larger
GSA.
They said the problem of harassment is common in
many departments and students must fight it through an
organization such as GSA where they cannot be
victimized individually. (GSA has called for support from
all students in fighting harassment.)
They said their aims in working with GSA is to
achieve a revelation of criteria governing hiring and firing
practices.
Meaty debate as burger
roasts third crossing plan
By MIKE SASGES
"Hamburgers of the city, unite.
You have nothing to lose but your
freeways!"
That's the reaction of alderman
Harry Rankin to Vancouver mayor
Tom Campbell's statement that the
third crossing of Burrard Inlet is
being opposed by "Maoists,
communists, pinkos, left-wingers and
hamburgers."
"Now that the city has a meat
chart I suggest that alderman Walter
Hardwick with his PhD is a filet
mignon and the mayor is a potted
head," Rankin told more than 250
persons in Angus 110 Thursday.
He said he believes Swan-Wooster
Ltd., the city's consultant, has done
a superior job but:
"What's the good of that if the
right questions haven't been asked?"
West Vancouver mayor Art
Langley told the meeting the North
Shore desperately needs some kind
of rapid transport to accomodate the
people heading to and from Greater
Vancouver who pass through that
area on their way to other areas.
Replied Rankin: "Myself and
alderman Halford Wilson suggested
three years ago that a bus system be
provided for people who want to go
Whistler and beyond.
"However to date I've had no
reply from any of the North Shore
councils and that was after B.C.
Hydro agreed to provide 50 buses."
He also said any third crossing
cannot help but end up as part of a
grand freeway plan and that promises
for a rapid transit system as part of
any scheme were misleading.
Bruce   Yorke,   chairman   of the
citizens' committee for public
transport, called on the audience to
support his group's meeting at the
Vancouver courthouse at noon
Saturday and to support the group's
action of visiting provincial cabinet
ministers to get them to back the
opposition to the third crossing.
UBC professors Paul Roer of
planning and John Gaitanakis of
architecture said they oppose the
proposed crossing.
Roer said he is opposed to the
third crossing because it does not
follow regional development plans
agreed on in 1966 by the Greater
Vancouver Regional District board.
Gaitanakis said he opposes the
crossing because it would be
connected to a regional freeway
system.
TRUCkiVMV BLUfcS *wAy
• Commerce and Business Administration
and Law
There will be elections for students Senators on
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1972
Polls will be open from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. as follows:
in Angus and Law Building
TAKE AN INTEREST!
TAKE FIVE MINUTES OUT TO VOTE
BLACK SHEEP
pouttciuesi Htb-
NOW ON SALE
::W:::W::?S»»H-tK«K4J:S*
50%
OFF
834 Granville St.
Mon.-Wed.-9-6   Thurs.-Fri.-9-9
Sat.-9-6
50%
OFF
202 Carroll St.
Mon.-Sat.-10-10        Sun.-12-6
SHEEP JEANS    • SLACKS    • COATS
• T-SHIRTS    • SWEATERS Friday, February 11, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Weekend Action Box
DATE
Feb. 11-12
Feb. 11
Feb. 11-12
Feb. 11-12
Feb. 13
Feb. 11
Feb. 13
Feb. 12
Feb. 11
Feb. 12
Feb. 12
Feb. 12
Feb. 12
Feb.12
SPORT
Hockey
Hockey JV
Basketball
Basketball
(Thunderettes)
Gymnastics
Track & Field
Gymnastics
Wrestling
Swimming
Swimming
Basketball JV
Rugby 3rd
Rugby 4th
Rugby Frosh
OPPONENT
U. of Alberta
SFU
U. of Calgary
U. of Calgary
U. of Calgary
WCIAA Champs
U. of Calgary
B.C. Seniors
U.of Puget Sd.
Highline C.C.
Van. All Stars
Seattle
Trojans
Trojans
PLACE
Edmonton
Forum
Mem.Gym
Mem.Gym
Mem.Gym
Saskatoon
UBC
New West.
P. Norman
P. Norman
PE Gym A
Wolfson
Wolfson
Wolfson
TIME
8:00 p.m.
8:15 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m
11:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
CINEMA 16 PRESENTS A
HORRORAMA
Friday, Saturday Feb. 11,12
SUB Theatre
7:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. each Day
—kini mcdonakJ photo
RON THORSEN steals the ball from Bob Morris of the Golden Bears during Thursdays game. Thorsen led
the 'Birds to victory with 25 points.
First place within easy reach
;: *1.00
AT THE DOOR, OR ROOM 247 SUB
With House of Frankenstein,
Island of Lost Souls, Wolfman, etc.
For the second time in as many
days, the UBC Thunderbirds
dumped the University of Alberta
Golden Bears and they can be
excused if caught placing an
Occupied sign on their divisional
championship.
In a game played yesterday
noon before about 2,500 fans the
'Birds exploded for 52 second half
points and turned what had been
a scrappy game into a walk-away.
The 'Birds led by four, 33-29,
Highlights
Hockey
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team took off today for
Edmonton and a weekend series
with the U. of Alberta. The results
will probably decide first place in
the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association.
The 'Birds are still chasing
Alberta for the league title with a
10-2 record, against Alberta's 11-3
showing.
The 'Birds will carry one extra
player, Tom Williamson, if the
money can be found- Williamson,
a top-scorer in the conference last
year, is just rounding into shape
and could possibly throw the
winning punch.
Win or lose in Alberta, the
'Birds will be back on Wednesday,
Feb. 16 against Brandon, and on
Tuesday Feb. 22 with Manitoba.
Game times will be 8:00 p.m.
at the half and before Alberta
could add to their score the UBC
total was 45.
From here, the 'Birds never
looked back, but if they had, all
the fans would have seen was a
fine basketball team that has
completely lost their poise.
Ron Thorsen, lived up to his
reputation as 'Super Guard'
yesterday scoring 25 points in
leading the 'Birds to this most
important win. But his
contribution to yesterdays win
was far more important than
those 25 points.
He stole the ball at least five
times on the press yesterday and
forced several crucial Alberta
turnovers.
And as if that wasn't enough
he and fellow guard Stan Callegari
combined with 6'3" forward John
Mills in some of the prettiest plays
ever    seen    in    these    parts
completely taking the fight out of
the Alberta team.
UBC has now only to win one
of their weekend games against
the University of Calgary here to
finish ahead of Alberta. Calgary
and UBC have split their two
games played this year with the
'Birds winning 81-71 and then
dropping the second 65-58, last
weekend in Calgary.
On the strength of yesterday's
and Wednesday night's games, the
'Birds deserve to win the title.
Both teams came into the series
knowing the games would
probably determine the league
champions, and UBC came up
bigger when the pressure was on.
Enrol Now For
SCUBA CLASSES
Beginning February 20
TELEPHONE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
732-8521   ■fe^M 732-0421
3145 WEST BROADWAY
SPECIAL WET SUIT SALE
Soccer
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team hosts Pauls Tailors of the
Pacific Coast soccer league
Saturday. The last meeting of
these two clubs ended in a tied
match.
A win for the 'Birds would
move them into second place in
the league. Game time is 2 pjn. at
Thunderbird Stadium. Coach Joe
Johnson is confident the team can
pull off the victory.
Intramurals
BASKETBALL championship
game takes place today at noon in
the War Memorial Gym.
Recreation goes against Fort
Camp. In their last outing Fort
Camp beat recreation 45-41.
GOING SKIING
OVER MID-TERM?
We don't blame you one bit,
you've probably worked hard
this past term and deserve it
However, make sure you aren't
going to have car problems
when you're 6000 feet up.
Bring in your Porche,
Mercedes, Volvo or
Volkswagen now to be checked
over and serviced.
ATTENTION UBC STUDENTS!
GENERAL PANTS CO.
is proud to   announce   that our operation is now totally
Canadian owned and operated. We invite you to use
the offer below and
BUY CANADIAN AT GENERAL PANTS CO.
339 WATER ST., GASTOWN
OF CANADA
orth one dollar   off on any $10.oo purchase

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