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The Ubyssey Nov 29, 1968

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Array Bennett
is
a cunning
linguist
Vol. L. No. 32
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1968
228-2305
— |ahn frizell photo
KEN HARE, always the cool, calm, country gentleman, nervously confronted students in debate enrolment cuts, and generally wowed 'em.
Crowd supported Hare when
he wouldnt sign petition
By JOHN GIBBS and FRANK FLYNN
Kenneth Hare refused to sign the petition
and the crowd loved it.
The UBC administration president was debating with students Wednesday over the question of enrolment.
Hare was answering questions after the
debate when bearded and long-haired Jim
Tweedie, a grad student, mounted the stage
with a petition.
The crowd waited, slightly scandalized, as
Tweedie read the paper asking that all charges
against students arrested at Simon Fraser
University last weekend be dropped, and pointed out signing did not mean support of the
occupation.
He then turned to Hare and asked him to
sign it.
Hare, looking slightly weary at the whole
thing, sat for a long silent moment without
moving.
The crowd of 600 sat with him in silence
WHAT'S INSIDE
Occupation     P. 2
SFU strike   ._   P. 3
AMS council   P. 3
Funds campaign? _    P. 4
Bloodstained university?     P. 5
Jerry Farber    P. 8
Zap  _ _  P. 9
Page Friday    P.11
Sport _   _ _   P.28
until a female voice called out, irately, "It's
not fair!"
No, they didn't think it was fair and gave
Hare solid applause when he refused to sign.
"As president of this university I cannot
do anything which is not directly concerned
with this institution," he said.
When Tweedie challenged him to sign as an
individual, Hare said he could not separate his
identity of UBC president from any comments
he might make as an individual, and therefore
all comments must be made in that capacity
as long as he remains in the position.
More applause from the audience and booing when Tweedie challenged him again.
Tweedie later told The Ubyssey that it was
not an attempt to embarrass Hare.
He said he had talked with the president
Monday in his office and he was aware of
Hare's reasons for not signing.
"It was necessary to demonstrate publicly
Hare's silence was not cine of neutrality," he
said.
Hare himself told the meeting he didn't blame Tweedie
for trying.
The crowd's reaction to the
confrontation was typical of the
meeting: by far the majority
liked Hare and what he said,
and they showed it.
His statements were met with
consistently heavy applause
and when he left after an hour
and a half, a scattering of students stood up for a standing
ovation.
The debate, organized by the
Students'    Democratic    Union,
Continued  Page  27
See: PETITION
Hare asks
students to
tell public
Administration president Dr. Kenneth Hare Wednesday
called on students to help carry the message of the universities'
problems to the public.
After outlining the university's lack of money and space at
a press conference, Hare avoided directly asking the provincial
government for more money. "I am not aiming at a confrontation with the provincial government but at working in collaboration with them," he said.
"The student body is a major vehicle for getting this campaign moving."
'CONFRONTATION DOESN'T HELP'
"It doesn't help if they get in conflict with the police and
administration," he said.
After saying that recent estimates show enrolment will rise
from the present 20,232 to 34,371 students in five years, Hare
concluded, ". . . higher education in British Columbia has reached
a crisis point."
"Merely to catch up with our present lack of space we need
to start at once building that will cost $25 million."
He said an additional $60 million would be needed over the
next five years to pay for new buildings.
". . . and we have not capital at all to start: building to
accommodate increasing enrolment."
When asked if the problem hinged on the B.C. government's
spending priorities, Hare replied, "The university problem depends on whether the people of the province want better planning
and more money for universities.
"I ask the people of the province to wake up to the situation
we are in," he said
"Students are getting a bad press at the present time and
there's another side of the story that hasn't been told. There's
a grim reality behind the smokescreen of noise."
If the -university did not receive enough money from the
government, Hare said he thought the senate would have to
decide to restrict enrolment. "No decision has as yet been taken
by the governors to restrict enrolment," he pointed out.
Hare said he called the conference because his hand was
forced by "tensions of students and faculty in this -community."
UNREST RELATED TO OVERCROWDING
When asked if he reared unrest at UBC, Hare, who appeared
tense and anxious throughout the conference, said he was afraid
of unrest everywhere. He related this fear to the problem of
overcrowding:
"If you don't let students into university, what are going
to do with them? If they don't go to university, there's nothing
else for them to do." He said that if talented students couldn't
get jobs and couldn't go to university, they could turn their
efforts to bad ends.
Answering issues that prompted the current unrest at SFU
he said UBC has an open door' to transfers of credits from
regional colleges such as Selkirk and Vancouver City College.
"The admissions committee, under deputy president Walter Gage,
has a student representative on it, and I propose to suggest to
senate that student representation be increased.''
UBYSSEY TO HIBERNATE
Ardent readers, fervent fans, and Malcolm McGregor: Alas,
good?bye. This is it for '68.
As Santa's helpers put the last douches on this season's loot,
and our worn-out editors gracefully pick the last remaining
hairs out of their frustrated scalps, we bow out.
Next year's model promises to be bigger and better, but
only twice a week, since we can't afford otherwise. If you want
a Thursday issue next term, let the AMS treasurer know—he
supplies the bananas.
And joy-abounding Christmas to you all. Ho ho ho yippie. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
The occupation
Events  at SFU:    from  the  first  meetings to  today's  strike  vote
By GEORGE  REAMSBOTTOM
The Peak  (SFU)
"In a university, confrontations of power are corrosive'.'—Acting President Kenneth Strand, opening
address, Sept. 9, 1968.
NOV. 4—First meeting is held at UBC of Vancouver City College, SFU and UBC students for a
Democratic University union.
At the SDU meeting, students discuss problems
experienced in transferring from one post-secondary
school to another. This includes accreditation and
possible political discrimination. VCC students have
the most acute problem, particularly in relation to
SFU  registration  department.
It is decided to begin accumulation of case histories of students confronted with such problems.
NOV. 2, 3—Western regional caucus of SDUs
meets at UBC. SFU, VCC and UBC unions finalize
plans for rally and teach-in at SFU to dramatize
four demands:
• Freedom of transfer and automatic acceptance of credits within the B.C. public educational
system;
• An elected parity student-faculty admissions
board;
• The opening of all administration files;
• More money for education as a whole and
equitable   financing   within   post-secondary   institu-
BOING
Happy New Year
tions. This involves the immediate end to the current
school construction freeze.
NOV. 14—About 500 students from SFU, VCC,
Selkirk College and UBC hold rally at noon and
later walk into administration building and hold
teach-in to protest SFU admission policies. After a
series of talks with the registrar and acting president
Kenneth  Strand,  the  students  at  night  meet  with
the SFU senate undergraduate admissions committee.
The noon rally adopts the four demands, Strand
tells students they have a good issue. But the admissions committee this night refuses to address
first demand and on second demand determines
this question to be out of its term of reference as
the committee cannot discuss its own composition.
The rally and sit-in demonstrate more militancy
and gain more student support than planners at first
expect. Also, students are angry at failure of admissions committee to answer any of the four demands.
NOV. 20—Noon: Rally is sponsored by three
SDUs. Students at rally discuss four demands and
decide to attend this night en masse a special SFU
senate meeting called Nov. 14 by Dr. Strand in
response to sit-in that day. A teach-in begins in tht
administration building main entrance and lasts
throughout the day.
Senate frustrates students by starting with prolonged debate on which agenda of three choices to
use. Senate refuses to set up a PA system so that
students may hear the proceedings. Eventually, the
four student demands written into a petition presented by senators Don Korbin (student) and Jerry Sperling (faculty) were defeated.
Only student senators Stan Wong and Korbin
and faculty senator Jerry Sperling vote for the
motion.
The 300 students at the senate meeting walk out.
The occupation begins at 10:30 p.m. The senate
later passes proposals to set up an appeals committee.
Strand becomes aware of the occupation and calls
the students by phone. He asks senate to not take
disciplinary action but rather to leave the matter in
his hands.
NOV. 21—Morning: Students remain in administration building and send out representatives to
speak in cafes and classes to students and ask for
support. All staff working in the academic services
part of the library building are instructed not to
report to work.
Noon: A mass rally begins. More than 700 students
ask non-student press to leave room 9001.
The four demands are unanimously adopted by
the SFSS. The tactic of occupying the building is
approved by a firm majority of students present.
Strand moves into the librarian's office and holds
meetings all day with faculty and administrators.
Only the front door of academic complex in the
administration building is left open by students. This
allows students to pass back and forth to classes on
the fifth floor. The door leading into the administrative offices is controlled by students who use a
chain to secure the door. Only those students who
support the occupation are allowed in and out of
the occupied area.
The students inside draw up their own rules:
No dope inside; do not destroy any property; people
will have to submit to some sort of elementary discipline. This is not, they say, a do-it-yourself action.
9:00 a.m.: A general meeting of occupying students
decides to strike a six-man committee to meet with
HM
feels strange after 3 years.
Strand to determine if administration is willing to
undertake serious negotiations. The committee is
not to meet any longer than one hour.
Strand appears outside chained door in quest of
a meeting. He leaves during the student meeting.
He later returns and agrees to meet student committee. Senator Sperling consents to be chairman.
Meeting is held at midnight.
Students tell Strand he may bring up to six
persons. Only he and vice-president Haering appear.
Strand tells students they have not been given a
fair hearing by senate which he calls an ineffective
body. He says that senate will have to be rebuilt.
Strand will not talk about the four demands. You
have a* good issue, he again says, and have made
your point. Now, get out and you will have a moral
victory over senate. Students see moral victory as
no guarantee of anything. Strand tells them he may
have to "get tough".
Students propose leaving if Strand promises to
call a meeting of senate (in a specified time) to review the four demands. (This, it is pointed out, is
subject to ratification by a general meeting of all
occupying students.) Strand refuses. His persistent
theme is "you make the first move".
The negotiating committee reports back to the
students. Strand had said he could make no commitment without approval by senate. Yet, he refuses
to call another meeting of senate.
NOV. 22—2:30 a.m. Strand again asks to speak
to students. Two are sent down. Strand implies he is
under heavy pressure to remove students. He talks
Continued Page 26
See: FIRST
IT'S HERE MONDAY PEC. 9
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SUB BASEMENT
OPEN 11:00-5:00
(Official opening & extended hours in January)
Come in and see our large selection of Xmas Gift items
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MEN'S & LADIES' TOILETRIES
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You haven't seen an unique shop like ours before - come in and browse.
MARSHA - PENNY - NICKI - BONNIE        -        MARILYN        -        ELLEN        -        JUDY
LORYL Friday,  November 29,   1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Strike on hill
still up in air
BURNABY—Voting on a strike at Simon Fraser University
continued today as 51 persons of the 114 arrested by RCMP
"last Saturday were remanded Thursday to Jan. 16 and 17.
Another 62 persons arrested in the pre-dawn police raid,
which ended a three-day occupation of the SFU administration
building, were to appear in court today.
Students originally were to vote all day Thursday on a
strike, with the results being made known in the evening.
But some thought the ballot, which said the strike would
continue until "all charges against the 114 are dropped", was
in contempt of court. The wording was changed.
Ballotting finally began at 4 p.m., went to 8 p.m. and finished
' at noon today. Results were not known.
A mass rally of about 2,000 students Thursday supported a
teach-in today and suspension of all regular classes.
In what appeared a timely move supporting students, maintenance men at SFU gave 48-hour strike notice. About 90 men,
represented by 12 unions, can quit working any time after 11:45
a.m. today.
Student society president Rob Walsh said if students vote
for a strike, SFU would probably shut down, since unions providing services would honor picket lines.
"But I think if a strike is called, Strand will pull the same
> ploy he did last time—call the cops," he said.
The strike ballot read: "Be it resolved that the SFSS declare
an immediate and voluntary strike (1) in sympathy with the 114;
(2) until the SFSS believes that satisfactory progress is being
made on the demands passed by the SFSS Monday Nov. 25 and
ratified Tuesday Nov. 26."
The demands presented to Strand Tuesday with a 5 p.m.
deadline were that:
• all charges against the 114 be dropped;
• Strand convene a special senate meeting to reconsider its
adamant stand on admission and accreditation, which touched off the occupation Wednesday night;
• formation   of   a   student-faculty   committee  to   investigate
administration procedures at SFU;
• assurances that there would not be a continual presence of
RCMP on campus.
Wednesday's developments saw a seven-hour special rally
in the gym, a conciliatory reply from Strand, and rejection by
attorney general Les Peterson of a student demand that charges
against the 114 be dropped.
After learning Peterson's answer late in the afternoon,
" Walsh made an impassioned speech to nearly 2,000 students in
the gym.
"Students have been castrated by a statement from Peterson
—told in effect to get lost," he said.
"Militancy . . . almost seems necessary.
"Dr. Strand himself is almost irrelevant. Tomorrow (Thurs-
iiay) may be the second-last day in the history of SFU."
Students cheered wildly and gave Walsh a standing ovation
when he finished.
His speech came after ballotting on a motion saying that
"at this point in time" students were satisfied with Strand's
response was declared invalid because of irregularities.
Voting on the "satisfaction" motion was declared invalid
by student senator Stan Wong, who chaired Wednesday's meeting, because of the great number of irregularities.
Wong said he had several written complaints and he personally saw poll attendants hand students the wrong ballots.
Students, some of whom had lined up for an hour to vote,
were asked if they intended to vote yes or no on the motion
, and were handed accordingly a blue ballot for yes and a yellow
one for no.
Senate solicits ideas
on governing directions
The senate committee on long-range objectives has invited
members of the university community to present it with ideas
for a policy to govern the growth and directions of the university
for the next ten years.
In a preliminary report released Monday, the committee
outlined some of the topics it is dealing with. These are:
• What should be the goal of the university?
• What criteria should govern enrolment policy?
• If the university grows larger, how can we reduce or
control the size of academic units which compose it?
• What priciples should govern the academic process and
how many innovations be sought?
• How should financing and material facilities reflect the
answers to the previous questions?
The report says although some limitation on enrolment will
be made in the immediate future, any sever restriction is "a
restriction on the number for whom university education in this
province is available."
But this is not the most important matter before the committee.
"What concerns us most is to provide a more stimulating
academic environment while at the same time attempting to
- minimize the disadvantage of that impersonalization which is
widespread now on campus."
— gordie tong photo
IS A DUAL PERSONALITY YOUR PROBLEM? Engineer one donates $1500 to charity while engineer two, three, four . . . stuffs horseshit into a scienceman's mouth. A PR's nightmare.
AMS refuses to support
students arrested at SFU
By JOHN GIBBS
Council refused, at a special Tuesday meeting, financial support for the 114 students
arrested at Simon Fraser -university last weekend.
The meeting was prompted by a motion
passed at a solidarity rally Tuesday noon which
demanded an emergency meeting for the Alma
Mater Society to consider setting up a defense
fund for those arrested.
The motion for the defence fund was defeated at the meeting, as was a subsidiary motion asking the AMS give some money to the
fund.
Earlier, at its regular Monday meeting,
council avoided any real position on SFU occupation.
Several hours were spent passing qualified
and cautious motions of support for the arrested student. Then council turned around and
nullified them by defeat of a similar motion.
It passed a motion calling for the criminal
charges to be dropped, and called on community
groups to help in the effort to get this done.
Council defeated, however, a motion condemning SFU administration for calling the
police and at the same time passed motions
"deploring" the need for police and condemning the calling of police "at that time".
It also passed a demand for a judicial inquiry into the arrests in which students were
"intimidated to give evidence against themselves and were not allowed legal counsel".
A motion to name Friday a day of solidarity
with SFU students was defeated.
Then came the motion to end all motions.
Bud Abbot, medicine rep, moved that the
AMS support the 114 students, their cause,
and their "mode of action".
This was promptly defeated, with Abbot
among those voting against it.
AMS president, Dave Zirnhelt, said he
thought the sequence of motions, passed and
defeated, indicated that the council disagreed
with the occupation in general but felt that
criminal charges  were not warranted.
Three hours of often bitter debate proceeded the voting on the motions, moved by arts
president Ralph Stanton.
The discussion was opened by a detailed description by internal affairs officer Ruth Dworkin, who was among the 114 arrested, of the
events leading up to, and including the arrest.
At its conclusion former vice-president,
Carey Linde, speaking in favour of the motions, rebuked council it's  laughter.
"It's nice to see everybody laughing here,"
he said, "when 114 people have criminal
records."
He then condemned the presence of police
on the campus and the giving of the ultimatum
for withdrawal and then immediately cutting
phone service so the occupiers could not contact .their lawyer.
"The whole thing reeks," he said.
Law rep Peter Braund then questioned what
would have happened if the police hadn't been
called.
Miss Dworkin said that a strategic withdrawal within 24 hours was "being considered."
Braund said he thought the 114 students
had grounds for improper arrest, "if what
we've been told tonight is true".
Shaun Sullivan, a former AMS president,
spoke against the motion, saying that the decision to be arrested was a personal one for
which they were responsible. Page 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
e  VvUBS, it  'vw      " J9V*      r       / *St. S '     ..      j,
THE WSSSY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pag*
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
NOVEMBER 29, 1968
More SFU Letters
The Ubyssey presents, reprinted from The Peak, more evidence taken from SFU  administration files.
Simon Fraser University
Memorandum
 , Peter
Mount public campaign...
file. The RCMP wish to have his
Complaint Desk 291-7131
Dan .
Do you have Peter —
new address — Jocelyn took the message on her line.
Jackie
•        •        •
Memo to President:
The Geography Department asked me to check the political
sympathies of Dr. Wagner. I have contacted my biological colleagues at Davis and find that he is O.K.
I can pursue this further if you wish by getting in touch
with the Chancellor at Santa Barbara. He was formerly at Davis
and is a friend and colleague so that there would be no embarrassment to us. As you know the Chancellor at S.B. has been
unavailable the past few days.
In short I feel there should be no hesitation in proceeding
with Wagner's appointment.
(signed) C. D. Nelson
Joyjoyjoyjoyjoyjoyjoy
Now that the joyous season of Saturnalia is upon us, The
Ubyssey wishes to counter this week's bundle of letters containing vile accusations of negativity, truculence and ill-will on our
part, with a message of sweetness and light.
Generous, lovable souls that we are, bursting with youthful
idealism, we hereby light our little candle of hope in today's
dark abyss of gloom by fondly wishing for the following boys
and girls the, following Christmas presents:
it    To Alan Emmott — a city, one or the other.
fr    To Tom Campbell—53 dozen tins of Spice Islands Mace.
* To Donald Brothers — some sisters.
fr    To Leon Ladner — a student-donated bell tower for his
front garden.
fr   To Ken Strand — Richard Daley's personal autographed
nightstick.
• To SDU — an issue.
fr To the students — One Ubyssey per month.
* To Ubyssey staffers — one deadline per month.
fr To Ken Hare — a solid gold fence to sit on.
* To Premier W. A. C. Bennett — 30,000 Eskimos.
fr    To the Board of Governors — ten boxes of Alice B.
Toklas brownies.
• To Dr. David Suzuki — the UBC beer bottle concession.
• To David Zirnhelt — a calendar with erasable dates, for
ultimatums.
fr    To Jerry Rubin — a lifetime membership in the Faculty
Club.
fr    To everybody — a lifetime membership in  the  grad
student centre.
fr    To Stu Keate — a newspaper.
* To Al Frotheringshlosh — facts.
• To Jack Webster — Canadian citizenship and a Favorite
Foreign Agitator award.
• To UBC — us.
* To us — 1969, and a big kiss.
The Vancouver committee to support the
National Liberation Front of South Vietnam
will sell Vietnam Christmas cards in SUB and
Buchanan noon today and all next week.
EDITOR: Al Blrnl*
News  John Twigg
City    Peter Ladner
Managing  Bruce Curtis
Wire       Irene   Wasilewski
Photo .... Dick Button, Powell Hargrave
Sports   Jim Maddin
Associate    Mike  Finlay
Without   Portfolio       Paul   Knox
Ass't News   John Clbbs
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Pago Friday   Andrew Horvat
Poor Mary Christmas was too sick at
press-time for her usual Xmas cheer.
After receiving the proceeds from The
Ubyssey's Cup of Hemlock fund she
was found in a shape too bade for
public consumption in her Xmas carrell.
But   just   wait   for   Hippie   New   Year,
exclaimed hard workers John Gibbs,
Nate Smith. Normal Gidney and Peter
Kennedy (who worked in vain). Sacha
Fox announced her shotgun marriage
to Rick O'Shea yesterday. "Holy Hemlock," burst forth Rob Tyhurst. (We
now publicly apologize to Jim Dandy
and Barb Wire, who were driven
viciously from the office by Peter Out).
Frank Flynn and Terry Cloth are canvassing blorg leaders to see what to
think about it. Dirk Visser, Gordie
Tong, Dick Button and John Frizell are
to blame for the first darkroom molesting in Miss Christmas* career. Plucky
sports writers John Twigg, Bus Philips,
Rik Nyland and Tony Gallagher put
plume to parchment portraying pointil-
lating playoff particulars. Jim Nasium
helped too. And now we descend from
the heights to join the masses in our
last remaining classes. "What're they?"
spake one. Everyone meet at noon in
the  office  finale   fling.
By CAREY  LINDE
Here we go again. It is nearing Christmas, which is nearing Jan. which is nearing Feb. which is when the budget comes
down in Victoria. The annual UBC event
known as "campaigning for more funds for
higher education" is now in full swing,
thanks to a highly successful (tactically
speaking) dinner planned for the board of
governors and student council where intimations of an enrolment restriction were surreptitiously dropped into the very large ear
of the editor of The Ubyssey. The university
president quickly denied it all as a bald-
face untruth. However, said Dr. Hare, we
are very seriously considering it. (Coinci-
dentally UBC Reports came out on the same
day, with UBC's size and enrolment policy
as its main theme.)
Without much effort then, this university suddenly finds itself in a crisis confrontation with itself, with its own obese
size and claustrophobic conditions.
We all know that the threat of enrolment
restrictions seems an excellent prod to get
Bennett to give us the money we need, but
certainly we can't be naive enough to think
that it will work. Feb's budget allotment
to higher education will be only enough to
keep us the same number of years behind
that we presently are.
So what will happen? We have a progressive president in Dr. Hare, who intimates that he is putting his job on the line
over this issue, and who asked to be admitted into the campus chapter of the SDU
knowing he needs the support of all campus
groups, particularly the radicals. We have
a potentially concerned and active student
body, and we have an ossified and prehistoric government in Victoria that will have
to run for re-election soon. Most likely Bennett will choose the summer months to hold
an election, when the'students are split up
and incapable of mounting a united campaign against him.
This isn't the first year that the university community has tried to reason with
Victoria. And Dr. Hare isn't the first president to realize the potentially disastrous nature of our condition. How much longer will
we continue to be polite in our dealings
with that money-pig in Victoria?
Hopefully this year we will not hold
prissy press conferences, send blue-blazered
delegations to the Minister of Miseducation,
and wear nonpartisan halos. This is the year
to support Dr. Hare in his very political war
with Bennett; a year to come on strong with
the province and tell it like it is; a year to
raise a great campaign to get a government
in this province that will treat us adequately.
This means becoming very partisan and defeating Bennett and his flunkies.
As much as I'm against students paying a
higher central AMS fee, I would willingly
support a referendum to increase the fee by
two dollars, with the clear understanding
that that money is to be used solely for pushing the aims of all levels of education in this
province.
As students we must wake up to our
latent potential, our real power. Forty thousand dollars annually collected and put into
a continuing program, to be used during election years to back the party or candidates
that best suit our aims, coupled with our
great numbers, would rapidly make university students a political force that all B.C.
political groups would have to recognize and
whose support they could not afford to be
without.
...which covers all issues
By AL BIRNIE
Editor, The Ubyssey
The idea of a province-wide campaign
to publicize the crisis in B.C. higher education is a good one, but only if all aspects
of the problem are brought before the
public.
The crisis shouldn't be looked at at
simply the Social Credit government starving UBC of badly-needed funnds, nor the
solution as mounting a campaign simply for
more money for higher education.
The higher education issue goes deep
into the political, economic, and social roots
of the province and is only one aspect of
grave social ills.
This province survives primarily on the
export of raw materials, despite the obvious
economic and social disadvantages inherent
in a colonial economy.
For example, the extraction and transportation methods of raw materials are becoming highly mechanized, meaning less
manpower is needed. Finished secondary-
industry goods bring higher economic returns and give a wider and more stable base
to the economy. (It can be pointed out as
well that increasing foreign control of our
basic industries means even less of the
money gained from exploitation of resources
remains in the province.)
Our government places its expenditures
and (lack of) legislative emphasis on projects
aimed at assisting natural resources exporting, to the detriment of education or social
welfare projects.
For example, most government funds go
towards dams (export electricity and later
water) highways, a super-port (for export
of American-owned B.C. coal, taken by destructive strip-minning operations), with very
little legislation against pollution or destruction of scenic beauty or ecology.
As is obvious in elementary, secondary,
and post - secondary education building
freezes, and other problems education funds
are totally inadequate—but the problem is
more complex than just that.
Education, because of the province's
economy, is to an extent also being used
as an exportative resource, with absolutely
no economic return.
Technical graduates, because of the lack
of technologically-developed secondary industries, are forced to leave the province
to obtain jobs, after having been educated
at the expense of the B.C. public.
At the same time, to a large extent the
higher learning institutions of the province
are being used to store surplus youthful
manpower for safekeeping, because of lack
of job opportunities.
Youth are conditioned all throughout
school to attend university — when they get
there, find they don't want to go after all,
and drop out, there is nowhere for them to
go and they have the unacceptable social
stigma of a drop-out and are rejected by
society. Small wonder they reject society in
return.
The government is lying to the people
as well by saying that the development of
community colleges will take the burden off
the universities — the quality of education
is obviously inferior, due partly to lack of
funds, and the students if they go on will
have to attend a university eventually, which
has not got room for them, and adopts arbitrary and unfair enrolment restrictions to
keep its population down.
The government is clearly not going to
change its ways, and the big businessmen
(mainly in export and/or American-controlled industries) who control tbe province
(and this university) are personally benefiting from the way things are running now
and cannot be expected to push for or want
major change.
So the public is being screwed, along
with the students.
A campaign to bring these issues before
the working people of B.C., the taxpayers,
is clearly needed ,and can be based around
the needs of higher education but obviously
cannot be based around education alone.
The campaign can derive impetus from
students, but must have the co-operation and
support of the labor unions and Canadian-
oriented businessmen.
The campaign must be one against the
present government and its policies, and call
for major reassessment and change of the
economic and social base of the province. Friday, November 29,  1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
A Bloodstained University:
By BERT HILL
Cecil Howard Green is 68 years, three months
and 23 days old today, which plainly isn't news.
Cecil Green Park located behind Fort Camp and
beside the Social Work School is 56 years old and
cost $200,000 to buy and renovate in 1966, which
isn't news today either.
Today's news is how Cecil Green got the money
to buy the house which bears his name.
Texas Instruments of which Green is honorary
"chairman and director wins defense contracts from
the U.S. armed forces and is the 30th largest defence
contractor in the U.S.
And we all know what that means.
Dead Vietnamese.
•        •        •
The  photo-portrait  hanging  in  the  entrance  of
Cecil   Green   house   shows  an   unremarkable   man
about whom it would be difficult to summon any
cech
emotion let alone anger or outrage or even guilt
over accepting his money.
a He stands by a world globe with Australia closest
to view in what looks to be a study with ornate
woodwork as a backdrop. He holds a slim brown
book in one hand and glasses in the other. His dress
is conventional business suit (dark), tie (red) and
shirt (white).
You have to look hard to find anything remarkable about his thinning grey hair, firm chin, healthy
complexion or reasonably large nose. His eyes
perhaps. If you walked through Dallas, Texas and
watched for him outside his home or office (addresses available in Who's Who) you might remark
about his blue eyes and their sense of restrained
amusement. But then you might not.
Texas Instruments, on the other hand, is a large
international corporation that deals in transistors,
semi-conductors, computers, the US space program
and has subsidiaries in Germany and Japan.
In 1967 its Government Products Division "received substantial production contracts for radars
that provide terrain-following navigation and other
functions for RF4 Phanton, A7 Corvair II and F111A
aircraft" according to a US Defense Department report. Being a modern research-oriented corporation
it was also involved in research and development
test and evaluation work on "air to ground attack,
reconnaissance and weapons selection and delivery."
How much money? Well over $32 million last year
on just the last stuff.
, Texas Instruments has won contracts of over $17
million this year from the US Army alone. And
even when profits haven't been that good (almost
$34 million in 1966) all investment houses considered it to have "good growth potential". Budding
capitalist readers can have that tip free of charge.
Though a word to the wise: Texas Instruments has
prospered like most Texan defense industries in close
relation to the Vietnam, war and the presidential
career of Lyndon Johnson. Now with a new man in
.the White House, Texas could go from second among
all states in winning such contracts back to nowhere,
which is where it was before LBJ.
Cecil Green was born in Manchester, England
and raised in Vancouver. He was a UBC engineering
student from 1918 to 1921 but left for some unknown reason, perhaps because UBC was so much
an agriculture school in those days; At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology he won his degree
in 1923 and his master of science degree the following year.
From then on he was engaged in seismographic
oil exploration for numerous companies and still
lists his occupation in Who's Who as geophysics
engineer. By 1950 he was president of Geophysics
--^ervice Inc., chairman in 1956 and honorary chairman in 1959.
GSI is presently a wholly-owned subsidiary of
TI but apparently Green organized TI before being
kicked upstairs.
Drop-outs are by no means a university's proudest product but UBC overcame this stigma. Perhaps
it was ths sweet smell of Green's money. Also UBC's
Alumni Association is very effective at tracking
down and wringing money out of former students;
so much so that it won an award (the Golden Leech
or something) among all alumni associations in North
America a few years ago.
Green has kept close ties with geology and such
departments in a variety of North American universities over the years. In 1959 he gave MIT $2.5
million in TI stock to organize a Centre for Earth
Sciences that would bring together geologists, chemists, physicists, meterologists and oceanographers
under one roof. UBC has a similar body.
In 1964 UBC gave Green an honorary doctorate
of sciences degree. The citation described him as
"a leader in geophysical exploration whose love for
science and higher learning was first aroused in
Vancouver."
It praised his aid and counsel to institutions of
higher education, and his efforts to "promote, widen
and enrich ... a very close and understanding bond
between industry and universities."
Two years later Green came through with
$200,000.
•        *        *
Built long before UBC even was at Point Grey,
suggested that the huge numbers of students flooding universities today was not so much thirst for
knowledge and the better life as the demands of a
complex, technologically-based economy.
And this economy shows itself no better aware
of its maldistribution of wealth, its misuse of resources and its propensity for futile adventures like
Vietnam then it did when everybody had a high
school education at best. The problem is power and
public interest; so much more than just getting rid
of Bennett.
For those who believed in the purity of UBC I
can only offer you guilt. It may not be the same
quality of guilt as enjoyed by someone in the Columbia University community or even at McGill where
two-thirds of the board of governors there have ties
with Canadian companies doing business wjth the
U.S. Defense Department.
For those who think it is only a lousy $200,000;
that it is Green's oil not Vietnam money; that Vietnam is just about over or any other cop-out you
might find: remember the stock tip on Texas Instruments. It is so progressive that it recently put all
its wage earners on salary (loads of prestige) and
gave one of its vice-presidents the job of merely
thinking on 'whither TI.' If you would prefer to
jump to Nixon and the other power bloc within the
American establishment that the represents — the
Yankees (as opposed to the Cowboys) then you might
consider that Nixon's initial appointment to his per-
(or how UBC got Cecil's green)
the 3 Vz -acre estate overlooking English Bay and the
Gulf of Georgia, known as Yorkeen, was gradually
surrounded by UBC and finally purchased in 1964.
It is a handsome wood and stone-faced house set
in an attractive setting. There are 93 varieties of
shrubs and trees on the grounds. It presently houses
the Alumni Association and Capital Fund Drive.
It is also used extensively as a seminar and
general meeting place to encourage contacts between
university and community.
At one such seminar recently I was being bored
to death by statements of various professors present
that they were engaged in the process of making
students into revolutionaries who would challenge
the commonplace and study everything with a critical spirit. This claptrap is an indispensable part of
every academic's rhetoric this season especially if
he has any administrative responsibilities.
One of the exceedingly few UBC professors you
could consider a radical was even so foolish to suggest that the university was a progressive institution
that in some miraculous way would show students
the light and create a new class of educated engaged
citizens who would build a world where ugly brutalizing things like Vietnam don't happen.
The assembled audience being of liberal sentiments, that is they believed in the dialogue, has no
appreciation of the workings of power and were
self-deluded sufficiently not to wonder why they
were at UBC, gave no support to one radical student
present.
He suggested that modern universities were more
than willing to use whatever means necessary to
crack down on confrontations. He might have also
sonal  staff  was a lobbyist for a  large toothpaste
company.
Lobbyists have amazing influence in shaping
everything from gun-bill to cigarette legislation.
Don't worry, advertising makes good things happen;
we're all after that bitch-goddess success and to hell
with the Vietnamese.
• *        *
The commemorative plaque in Cecil Green Park
includes the following quotation from Shakespeare.
"Sure he that made us with such large discourse
gave us not that capability and godlike reason to
fust in us unused." Hamlet IV, iv, 32.
For those whose taste for action is on symbolic
and melodramatic levels, the following from the
same author might be tastefully added.
"Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood
Clean from hand?   No   this  my  hand  will rather
The multitudinous seas incarnadine,
Making the green one red."—Macbeth II, ii, 61.
* •       •
For all the rest?
As Norman Mailer leaves Chicago following the
convention he encounters Eugene McCarthy's daughter 'in quiet horror' over the fury of the police
action during the convention.
"She asked him (Mailer) what he would do
about it.
"I'm going to catch a plane and see my family,"
he told her, smiling into the proud disapproval of
her eyes. "Dear Miss," he could have told her, "we
will be fighting for forty year." — from The Siege
of Chicago (Harper's).
CECIL GREEN PARK Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
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LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Space race
Editor,  The   Ubyssey,   Sir:
With exams coming up it
might put an end to disputes
over ownership of study spaces
if the students knew that, as
stated in library rules, study
spaces may not be reserved
just by throwing some books
on a desk.
Only students with carall
badges can ask you to vacate
a space. Otherwise, all places
where no one is seated can be
occupied and the previous tenant has no recourse but to
find someplace else.
BRUCE  LINDSAY
Plot Revealed
Editor,  The   Ubyssey,   Sir:
Another shocking example
of what is wrong with UBC:
The history dept. had not been
able not to invite Prof. Kordt
who has been here for some
time and who is one of the
plotters who tried to overthrow Hitler in 1938. A plot
that could not been pulled off
because the British government preferred to deal with
Hitler.
a). The lecture was not
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Stelco is not only interested in your scholastic discipline, but also in
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announced in The Ubyssey and
hardly at all.
b). Prof. K. was not to speak
about the German resistance
but only whether war had been
inevitable after Munich—and
even so the history dept.
announced his lecture wrongly
as about Russia after the war.
c). His lecture was kept as
secret as possible; and against
the wishes of Prof. K. no
opportunity to answer questions or to discuss was provided for on the pretext of a
seminar—that was kept secret
as a private affair in Faculty
Clubf
What is behind it? Prof.
Conway has been teaching that
there never was any plot
against Hitler except in the
last year of the war. Whan
some years back I took two
lectures C. was giving as
extension courses, I protested
and suggested a discussion.
Prof. C. refused telling ma that,
he cannot discuss with "Ignorant people".
Another example of the
arrogant incompetence of
Prof. C: He said in these two
lectures: The Neo-Nazis made
a law that if you leave for
good you have to report to the
police and let them know
where you go; they made this
law in order to arrest everybody in one night when they
take over again.
On my protest he again refused to discuss with "ignorant people". My complaint at
the extension was also rejected.
The most profound problem
at our universities is vanity,
i.e. that too many professors
are not interested at all in finding and teaching truth but only
in self-aggrandisement and in
money; therefore they try to
brainwash their students with
their personal bias and to suppress everybody who is competent and honest.
But I am a free man—and
still on campus. So I invited
Prof. Kordt to come and tell
us of the 1938 plot to overthrow Hitler. Of course, we
will have discussions — and
opponents, including great
John Conway most cordially
invited.   Do  not  miss  it this
Monday, 12.30 in Buch. 100.
KARL BURAU
Land rape
Editor, "The  Ubyssey,   Sir:
You know the popular tune,
"This Land is Your Land, This
Land is My Land"? Did you
see the latest rape of it on
"The Way It Is" Sunday? Yes,
it's true, the "bigger than
nature" world corporate strip
mining companies have begun
to devastate without adequate
restrictive government legislation, this jewel of Canada,
Beautiful British Columbia.
Don't be fooled, it will be
done with an efficiency that
will prove to the world that
automation and cybernation
has made man finally too big
foil his environment.
. . . and doesn't this latest
short-term sellout at bargain
rates to foreign corporate
"bigs", for our ultimate long-
term loss, show once more that
we Canadians must be the
biggest suckers of the 20th
century. Can you imagine, selling these precious natural resources, already in short
supply, for the future of man,
for quick dollars now, but
with permanent loss of the
land as our legacy to the next
generations. Yes, its always
the buck that counts, isn't it.
Employment, you say; who
needs people with such a level
of automation? Mountains; who
needs those anyway, they're,
just in the way of stuff we
want to burn to help a fat
society escalate to new levels
of affluence.
Let's not be taken in; this is
destined to turn significant
areas of B.C. into a West Virginia - type wasteland. Ask
about the slides due to strip
mining blocking our southern
B.C. highway. Ask about the.
trailings from a strip mining
operation entering Lake Okanagan. Beautiful B.C. for how
long? It's up to us; the con-
crened public, no one else is
going to change it. Get aroused
— demand restrictive legislation now—before it's too late.
Sincerely, R. R. READ
Ottawa'
U.B.C.  HOME SERVICE
LARRY BROWNLEE
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DUTHIE BOOKS Friday,  November 29,  1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Fraser bitches on SFU
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Dear Al: In supporting the 114 people arrested Nov. 23, the AMS has set its worth at
zero. The members in supporting this have
revealed their intellectual or political perception as a negative quantity. In presenting the
motions of support for the 114 individuals arrested, Stanton was asking me as a councillor
to support a movement for free universities yet
that same movement chained the doors of SFU
and denied me, a fellow student, entrance. A
movement which protests discrimination to
political beliefs yet they discriminate against
me, not for my political beliefs but what they
assumed my political beliefs were ON THE
BASIS OF THE COLOR OF THE JACKET I
WORE. A movement which protests authoritarian, 'top-down' ruling structures yet structures itself in the identical fashion with guards,
security committees, discipline committees, food
committees, steering committees if certainly of
doubtful authenticity and sincerity.
Do not misinterpret me, however. I feel I
can give a great deal of support to the demands
made by the SF students to the senate. I would
very much like to see an adjustment of courses
at the various post secondary institutions in
this province. In addition, I feel there should
be easy transfer from one university to another
across the entire country. Furthermore, if there
Reply:
Fraser:
Your attitude may reflect that of a large
body of students on campus, and I hope this
reply will result in better understanding of the
situation. If the points you raise are the totality
of your objections, I think they can be refuted
— but I think the lack of understanding goes
much deeper.
First of all, people were denied entrance to
the building unless they supported the occupation because of several reasons:
<1) The fear that groups of anti-occupation
students, if admitted, would fail to obey the
democratically-decided rules of conduct for the
occupation and cause trouble and damage —
the rules being no damage to property, no tampering with student files, and no drugs.
(2) Many students who wanted to 'look
around' and talk to the occupiers did not fully
realize the meaning of their going in — that is,
they were taking part in an illegal action and
could have been arrested if police had come
without any advance warning.
You were likely denied entrance because
you were unknown to the people at the door
and did not express sympathy with the cause
— however, if UBC people in the building had
been contacted (in any event, if I had been there
then) and explained the situation to you, you
undoubtedly would have been let in for a look
and take part in discussions.
Another point — you are misled if you
think radicals condemn structures per se — for
example the committees and such within the
building. Obviously, society needs structures.
We condemn structures imposed from the top
down, and bureaucrats who are not responsible
to the people for their decisions — the occupation committees were democratically decided
. upon and selected, to serve necessary functions.
Your point about creating an elite class
within the university safe from police protection is a good one — students should not be
above the law, as they are in some cases (e.g.
engineers assaulting people), if the laws are
just and necessary.
are legitimate charges of discrimination, I
would certainly support a proper and thorough
investigation. I cannot, however, support the
people who proposed the demands in the manner in which they conducted themselves.I
found that they themselves practise the same
discrimination that they accuse the administration of when they close the same university
they advocate should be open. In addition, they
employ the authoritarian power structure that
they protest against, and they preach a classless, just society yet set themselves up above
society as students who can defy the laws of
the country. To ban police from university
campuses in the name of academic freedom is
nothing short of a fallacy creating an elite class
in society which is not subject to the scrutiny
and criticism of the general public. To claim
that the student is a nigger then expect that
the student be granted status above the laws
of the country is as contradictory and as hypocritical as so many aspects of the so-called radical movement.
Monday the AMS council in approving several motions in support of the 114 students
arrested then failing a final motion clearly
stating support showed itself to be irrelsvant,
and contradictory.
FRASER HODGE
president   EUS
However, the SFU dispute was a purely
university affair—springing from just demands
from the student body being arbitrarily denied
by the adminstration and senate with no reasons given, and the students decided their only
course of action was to occupy part of the
esstablishment in which they work (WITH THE
SUBSEQUENT SUPPORT OF THE MAJORITY
OF THE STUDENT BODY), much as workers
in an industry may decide to strike or to sit-in
and occupy their plant.
Laws that permit an illegitimate power
structure to bring in an outside force to deny
the wishes of the majority of an institution are
wrong and unjust — and that is what happened
at SFU, and has happened many times in labor
disputes.
If you agree with the issues involved at
SFU, you cannot object to the means the majority took to press their demands.
Another point, brought up by Frank Gregory in council, was that those arrested should
not come crying to council for support after
taking actions of which they should have been
aware of the consequences.
However, that is not the point of why they
came. The first issue was the severity of the
charges — criminal charges laid in a situation
where misdemeanor charges could just as easily
been laid.
More importantly, the action involved did
not warrant the police being called, let alone
charges being laid.
They came to ask support of another student
body against charges being laid, and the fact
that police were used when they were unnecessary and unjustified.
Council denied their full requests, and indeed you and about eight other councillors
denied them all, with cries of "Law and order,
make the bastards pay."
This, in a situation where students were acting not for themselves alone, but for the welfare and benefit of students all across the province— and over issues which you yourself
support as just.
AL BIRNIE
Editor, The Ubyssey
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THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
JERRY
By NATE SMITH
"University is a giant
machine that produces Barbie
dolls; a machine that breaks
down if it's fed too many real
people."
So says Je-rry Farber, author
of "The Student as Nigger"
and English prof at San Diego
State  College.
"Somewhere early in your
life you learn to be something
that is not a person," Farber
told 900 students in SUB ballroom  Thursday.
"You learn to be something
that is weird and unreal,
something that is almost a
dirty word to me."
"You learn to be a student."
Farber described a student
as one who is convinced he is
lazy and can't learn without
being coerced.
"But you're never lazy with
your own work," he said.
"You're only lazy with Mister
Charlie's work.
"Any intelligent slave is
lazy.
"A student is someone who
figures the centre is somewhere
else, not in you but in the
'they' you always hear about."
Farber cited the compulsory
standards of dress at British
Columbia Institute of Technology as an example.
"It doesn't astonish me that
there is a rule everyone wears
a shirt and tie," Farber said.
"What astonishes me is that
students do it.
"You'll do any bloody thing
they tell you."
Farber said education is the
last thing provided by the present educational system.
"Education isn't coercion, it
isn't trying to please someone
else, it's trying to please yourself.
"That doesn't happen in
school, it happens everywhere
else.
"School is like getting hooked on a laxative and thinking
you need it to shit," he added.
The grading system also
came in for harsh words from
Farber, who described students as "grade junkies."
"I've seen what happens if
someone has to go cold turkey
without grades," Farber said.
"He has to be defined by
someone else because he can't
define himself."
When asked for his opinion
on sex education in schools,
Farber replied that he doesn't
want schools ruining sex.
"If they start giving grades
on sex the race will die out,"
he said.
Farber said the sitJin at
Simon Fraser University and
the administration's reaction
have demonstrated that the
university is not a free institution.
"If I have a criticism it is
that they didn't take over the
whole school."
Farber praised direct action
as means of getting results.
"There's always a mayor or
a police chief or a college
president who says 'well you
niggers have blown it now, I
— powell hargrave photo
JERRY FARBER
FARBER
was your friend but I can't
condone  pressure'.
"He says that with a cop
standing beside  him.
"They always say that, but
direct action is the only thing
that gets them to change."
Farber said students don't
have to be grateful to society
for  educating   them.
"It's a privelege for them to
be able to shape your mind,"
he said.
"They get to perpetuate
their own hang-ups and
values, that's what school is
for.
"Students must recognize
that they have the power to
say 'no, we won't let you do
it'."
Farber said students should
remain in university despite
the conditions.
"Don't walk out, use it, you
can change things.
"In a sense, there's nowhere
else to go anyway, work where
you are."
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Granville and Marine Drive Phone AM 1-7277 Friday,  November 29,  1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
ZAP:
Remember that huge pictor-
■    ial display on SUB's main floor
last  week ?   It was  sponsored
by UBC's Mormons, who call
* themselves the Deseret Club,
and featured pictures of dejected-looking sinners et cetera. CBC interviewer Jim Mc-
Kibbon asked one of them
whether Mormons admit black
^ people into their church. The
Deseretter said yes. "Do they
admit them to the priesthood?"
asked the Anglican ex-minister.
'1No," said the Mormon, according to McKibbon. "They're
inferior. God showed his disdain for them by turning their
skin black . . .
' Labor on the board
The next UBC governor
appointed by the provincial
government will be a labor
representative. Speculation is,
* however, that a mild liberal
such as Ed Lawson of the
teamsters' union will be chosen
as a sop to those who clamor
for fairer representation. Why
not   come   out  in  support  of
-f Canadian unions, Cece ? Pick
Orville Braalen . . . behind
the scenes in UBC's funds
crisis: board members have
made continual jaunts to Victoria during the past two
weeks, imploring the Socreds
to shell out for UBC. All to no
avail . . . board members do
work fairly hard. Lawyer Ait
* Fouks estimates he spends two
and a half days a week on
UBC business.
Last Friday's student council-board of governors meeting
cemented some odd friendships. It seems those rich, corporate types are right down
the alley of female councillors.
Board chairman Walter Koerner  hit  it  off just  fine   with
"* council secretary Issy Semple,
chancellor John Buchanan
with nursing pres Jenny Johnson and boardman Allan Mc-
Oavin with internal affairs
officer Ruth Dworkin. Politics,
as they say, makes strange
bedfellows . . . Alma Mater
Society treasurer Donn Aven
•*■ blushed at Monday's council
meeting as he announced to a
Ubyssey society reporter his
engagement to Barb Colbert,
BPE '67. Donn: "I'm proud of
a five-year courtship in this
age of shotgun weddings."
Barb, with a loving smile:
"He's just indecisive."
~ Cop turned the tide
At Tuesday's rally of solidarity with the 114 arrested at
the Simon Fraser University
occupation, things were going
only so-so for the organizing
Student Democratic Union
when an unidentified student
stepped up to the mike and
' announced: "I'm an ex-police
officer Who couldn't get into
SFU, and I support everything
those kids have done up
there." The tide turned. Amazing what a little respectability
can do . . . rumors are there's
no way any student could dig
up damaging evidence in UBC
* registrar Jack Parnall's files.
They were all moved three
weeks ago. Soon after the
faculty club was stormed, a
directive from Chairman Koer-
- ner ordered the important files
removed from the administration building. Anyone checked
the locked ex-booze cabinet in
the AMS executive conference
room lately ?
Watch that building
UBC officials are also super-
up-tight about the possibility
of a situation similar to the
SFU administration building
occupation, following the ruckus created when Jerry Rubin
spoke here little more than a
rmdnth ago. When Columbia
University leader Mark Rudd
addressed students in the SUB
ballroom a week after Rubin,
students who tried to get into
the admin building found officials had closed shop for ihe
afternoon. Paranoia ? . . . when
the faculty club was stormed,
one of the interested observers
was forestry rep Frank Gregory, who knows every member
of the 206-student forestry undergraduate society. Frank
spied two fellows in the club
wearing green jackets who he
didn't recognize, and in the
interests of communicating
with his constituents went over
to have a word with them. After a little shuffling, they
blurted out the truth: they
were undercover RCMP men.
Speaking of the horsemen,
The Ubyssey's renowned reputation for accuracy and correct
prediction was vindicated once
again Tuesday when cops raided over 80 Vancouver area
people on dope charges. Re-
]parlte*r James Conohie, in a
story dealing with the harassment of coffehouse owner
Mark Derrick, predicted the
imminence of the bust less
than a week before it happened. Needless to say, the cops
hassled Conchie too. A uniformed mountie and two plain-
clothesmen with a search warrant woke him up near noon
Tuesday and proceeded to grill
him for 20 minutes on his
sources for the story and the
general Vancouver drug scene.
They also thought he was
stupid enough, after having
written the story, to keep dope
in his house. Among other
places, they checked his oven,
and even sniffed his cigarettes.
Fair trial? Ha...
UBC information director
Arnie Myers, the man in the
hot seat when the issues are
confused, sat in the student
council meeting for five hours
Monday night (along with several Ubyssey staffers) waiting
for the issue of The Ubyssey's
reported inaccuracy on president Ken Hare's limited enrolment announcement to come
up. It didn't.
Then, without bothering to
tell editor Al Birnie, the same
council held a special meeting
Tuesday night — when Birnie
couldn't attend—and censured
him. Only dissenting member
was law student president
Peter Braund, who claimed —
rightly — that when someone's
integrity is being questioned,
he should be present to defend
himself ... to quote: you can't
please everybody. At least one
Ubyssey reporter has been castigated by radicals and participants in the SFU occupation
for naming some of the takeover's leaders in a story. Seems
it's not exactly the revolutionary thing to do.
Jean Cameron, daughter of
the dominion senator who tried
to get special consideration
from SFU chancellor Gord
Shrum in admitting her to
UBC . . . CYVR, toy of local
radio types, recently had $60,-
000 worth of equipment delivered to SUB . . . the new
SUB management committee
is worse than the old. Their
latest move: to deprive the
Summer Session Association
of booking priority in SUB, in
favor of "revenue - producing
non-student functions" . . . contrary to rumors in Sun gossip
columns, Ubyssey editor Al
Birnie isn't throwing in the
towel.
Heartened by sympathetic
student reaction to the recent
events at SFU, the paper's chief
blorg is attacking his job with
unprecedented vigor . . . speaking of credibility, the Sun gos-
sipist's claim that The Ubyssey
is cutting back to two issues
a week because of "staff problems" was also crap. Cutting
back we are, for lack of an
adequate Alma Mater Society
grant (not loss of advertising
revenues). Understaffed w e
aren't.
A pressing problem
Since this space provides
the only ins and outs of Pacific
Press you'll ever read, eat this
one up. Sun managing editor
Bill Gall is apparently not too
pleased with the coverage Sun
reporters gave the SFU occupation. He doesn't think it was
complete enough — which is
true. The big-city rag gave
prominent front-page play to
a story quoting — of all people
— the president of the B.C.
Truck Loggers' Association (a
"community leader") condemning the occupation. It also reported, with faithful detail, the
mindless blatherings of Mayor
Thomas J. and leading businessmen on the same subject.
Did the rag report, with equally prominent play, the
thoughts of other leaders —
such as labor and church representatives? Three guesses
. . . Sun publisher Stu Keate is
trying for UBC's chancellorship ... a final word about
the evening edition of Pacific
Press: the publisher's daughter
is a UBC Young Socialist . . .
in the final analysis, liberal
-Culminations just don't go
down with the kids.
Politics unlimited
Still with the fence-sitters:
a check of the current UBC
Young Liberal club member-
Ship roster shows engineering
president Fraser Hodge on the
list and — horrors — longtime
member Peter Braund missing.
Braund must have been kicked
upstairs. The same list reveals
that arch-and-ardent middle-of-
the-roader Shaun Sullivan
hasn't paid his membership
dues up to date . . . look for a
liberal move to take over the
arts undergraduate society, The
power play is sparked by the
disintegration of the radical
movement built up by '67-'68
arts pres Stan Persky. Radicals, disinterested in the frustration of the AMS, have turned to SDU. Great white leader
Zirnhelt may be backing the
play for the AUS . . . creative
writing people are organizing
to destroy the present bookstore hierarchy, which sets arbitrary prices and decides
which books will be sold and
which profs' requests will be
ignored. They're fed up with
having to send to the University of Washington for books
the bookstore refuses to import  .  .  .
VOTE
IAN BRUCE KELSEY
Consultant to Teachers
for
Vancouver School Board
N.P.A.
Student Protest
ww>TOi*f**;;aw*wa*K'«*ifl*K^-^
Gerald R McGuigan
Student Protest
um
The Student
Radical in Search
of Issues . . .
or
Please Don't
Shoot the
Piano Player
G.F. McGuigan
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THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
Mousers hold vote
on classes boycott
Mousers  arise.
The education undergrad
society is holding a boycott
referendum Tuesday and Wednesday next week (D"ec. 3 and
4)  in  the  education building.
The exact wording of the
motion is as follows:
"Whereas education students have been subjected for
far too long to courses which
they find irrelevant, meaningless and impractical according
to their various goals, desires
Defence fund
makes $200
More than $200 and 500
petition signatures have been
collected at UBC in support of
the defence of the 114 persons
arrested during the Simon
Fraser University administration building  occupation.
The $200 has been delivered
to the defence fund managers
at SFU and will be used to
defray legal costs.
The 500 signatures are on
a petition asking attorney-general Leslie Peterson to drop
criminal charges against the
114 and to ensure that no other
charges are  pressed.
The petition points out that
signing does not imply agreement or disagreement -with the
actions of the 114.
Contributions to the defence
fund can be made in the Ubyssey office at any time, and
copies of the petition are also
available  there.
and aspirations, the education
undergraduate society strongly
recommends and advocates
that education students boycott
as a unified body within a class
and only as a last resort those
courses that they find to be
meaningless and/or those professors who they find to be
incompetent.
"Such a boycott would be
sanctioned by the education
undergraduate society but
should take place only after a
concensus of opinion has been
reached within a class by
students who have approached
the professor or teacher in
question, the student-faculty
liaison committee, or any other
channels available and have
found nothing changed to their
satisfaction."
Crime rate
rises -RCMP
The RCMP said today the
incidence of theft on campus
is slightly higher than the
normal despite their efforts.
They say the best way to
cut down on thefts in the parking lots is for students to be
continually on the watch for
suspicious activities.
Then if such activities are
observed the student should
challenge the person involved.
Articles stolen on campus
range from cars and car parts,
to briefcases, wallets and
umbrellas.
7
IN PERSON
Nov. 29 thru Dec. 7
*
Capitol
Recording Star of
"Ode to
Billy Joe"
THE
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THFATRE RESTAURANT
FISHER SCIENTIFIC CO. LIMITED
offers challenging careers to
CHEMISTRY GRADUATES
who are interested in TECHNICAL SALES
On campus interviews will be conducted
Wednesday, January 8, 1969
Successful candidates will be given programmed training in all
phases of company operations for six or more months, including
nine weeks at the company-sponsored orientation and products
school, in preparation for assignment as technical sales representatives. On*-the-job training is continuous through sales meetings,
seminars and follow-up career counselling.
For further information and appointment please contact the Placement Office.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
XS
U.B.C.  ALUMNI  ASSOCIATION
presents
3 ORIGINAL ONE-ACT PLAYS
THE ACTORS
by CHERIE STEWART
Directed by Rod Langley
ONE IS ENOUGH
by JAMES SAIT
Directed by Jana Veverka
WE THREE: YOU AND I
by BILL GREENLAND
Directed by John Linton
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DECEMBER 10th -8:00 p.m.
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By RON WONG
In the heat of pre-election debates and
promises, the- "freeway over Chinatown" issue
has assumed the dubious proportions of a political football. Candidates actively seeking office in
the Dec. 11 city elections have publicly subscribed
in principle to "no freeway over Chinatown" and
commissioned a feasibility study on an underground Carrall St. alignment. In light of all this
public interest over the preservation of Chinatown, perhaps we as Chinese Canadians should
ask ourselves what this community means to us.
Arguments in favour of and against its preservation have been advanced by many diverse
parties. There are those among Chinese Canadians
who believe that Chinatown, as a dispersion point
for incoming immigrants, has outlived its usefulness citing as justification the new immigration
code (its selectiveness would seem to indicate a
higher grade of immigrant material who, pre-
sumably, would have less trouble adjusting -without the cultural tie-up proffered by Chinatown)
and an increasing rate of residential mobility.
There are also those who believe that Chinatown
as a community or a culturally competitive force
should not even exist. Having divorced themselves from the struggles of previous generations
they cite the present permissiveness of the social
climate and their relative status in present-day
Canadian society as arguments against retaining
Chinatown. They feel that it now constitutes a
liability rather than an advantage. In their race
to assimilate into the Canadian mosaic, they feel
that the glaring incongruity posed by this relic
of an "inferior" past should be hastily obliterated.
The "melting pot" ethic is a valid one, in that
it does hold promise for the future of this country
and possibly of the world. Homogeneity as opposed to heterogeneity is attractive in terms of
minimizing social conflict, but the process which
we undergo to assimilate into the Canadian
mosaic is not without conflict. How is our melting
pot to come about? Is it to be through the uncompromising rejection of all that's old and of
the old country? Is it to come about through the
wholesale adoption of American middle class
values? Should we, as members of a minority
group, exert ourselves as cultural entities only
through the restrictive framework of American
monolithicism, a culture of intolerance, self-
interest, cynicism, in short, as bourgeoise? Or
should we pave the way for a smoother transition
by actively promoting a cultural pluralism that
recognizes and respects, affirms and guarantees,
the exclusive rights of individuals, races, and religions to innovation and perhaps even deviation,
when these do not incur harm for others?
Chinatown as it presently exists is a ghetto:
iis inhabitants are generally of one race and
character, belong to a group of low socio-economic
status, and subscribe to a culture which, though
living, is uncompetitive and hence inconsistent
with our efforts to assimilate. But it is also a
community within which cultural ties among the
old and unassimilable are reinforced, where those
recently arrived may find security and a cultural
balance, where the impact of cultural displacement may be softened, and where one finds a very
tight and extensive network of self-supported
organizations and agencies that provide social
and cultural outlets.
We, as "Canadians beyond the ghetto" tend to
think of Chinatown as one big conglomeration of
evils—slum tenements, third rate restaurants that
cater to the whites, the stronghold of a foreign
and inferior culture. It constitutes a blight on our
self-image, a glaring reminder to both ourselves
and the whites of our humble origin. In our zeal
to protect and enhance our present and future
status, we are apt to negate this emblem of our
heritage and, perhaps, even support efforts to
obliterate this monstrosity.
It is suggested here that perhaps we are overreacting to white monolithicism. Minority groups
have a history of succumbing to collective pressures, especially when these are backed by economic sanctions and/or the effective withdrawal
of esteem. Social conformity is the watchword
for survival in North America. However, in an
age of cultural bankruptcy and communications
breakdown in the West, when basic values and
premises are increasingly coming under the light
of public scrutiny, perhaps we should also reassess our situation.
It serves no purpose to negate the history of
our forebears. Their politics of deference, accommodation and adjustment in coming to grips with
white racism and ethnocentricism, although not
quite palatable in view of present mores and
standards, have ensured our survival and progress in Canada. A progressively permissive
social climate has enabled past generations to
evolve from a coolie labouring class through
small-time entrepreneurship to the current competitiveness within the business sector. What of
our generation and our responsibility?
Chinatown at present is not, for us, culturally
viable. If we desire to revamp its structure and
image, however, we must first of all prevent its
destruction. To do this we must effectively mobilize the articulation of community needs and
interests, and bring pressure to bear on the city
government. Political modernization is hence the
major first step. An emergent awareness of prerogatives and the exercise of these same may well
prove the only effective means of re-ordering
society's priorities.
The preceding was not intended to promote
racialism or even a return to traditional forms
of Chinese culture. Culture is a living and dynamic thing, and is constantly being recreated.
Although couched within the framework of the
past, it should be meaningful and alive to those
of us who participate in it. Political modernization is culture; going into Chinatown to recreate
it so that it would satisfy the needs of its inhabitants, is culture. Seeing that minimum housing,
sanitation, and wage requirements are implemented, is culture. Saving Chinatown is culture.
Private transportation versus
Freeway
By RICK BLAGBOURNE
It is everyone's privilege
to describe the kind of city
he wants to live in. A broad
cross-section of the community actively involved in
describing their preferences,
may actually be the basis of
the city we all want. If any
subgroup fails to surface
and articulate its conception of what it needs, the
priorities become inaccurate
and the structured environment becomes an inappropriate container for the people who live in it.
Here in Vancouver, the
powers that be are about to
make some decisions about
the future environment of
this city which will affect
the fabric and movement of
this city more than any previous commitments. Their
choice   will   greatly   deter
mine the way you move in
the city, the quality of the
air you breathe, the volume
of the noise around you, the
degree of frustration you
will suffer as a pedestrian,
where you will be able to
live in relation to the facilities you desire, etc. In short,
a very large part of your
life.
The crisis is that these
decisions are being made
without soliciting a reasonable statement of preferences from the community
which will suffer the consequences. By reasonable, I
mean a statement made
after the speakers have been
exposed to any of the available information which
might indicate the possible
alternatives and consequences of their decision.
The example case is of
course the proposed freeway
system and the current attitude of Vancouver city
council. They are most reluctant to give up the idea
that every automobile which
wants to go downtown must*
be accommodated.
Why should university
students get involved in this
fracas ? If there is one group
which has a vested interest
in the future environment,
it is youth. I believe that
they can be effectively mobilized to articulate positive
alternatives to the kind of
city the current powers are
planning for us. I also believe that this is a timely
opportunity. The discontent
and energy shown in campus conflicts might well be
better extended against the
manifold urban crises we
are facing. The difference,
between the potential of our
environment and the actuality of it, may be the challenge which demands the
most effective expression of
our expectations. It may
well be the vehicle with
which we can bring about
some of the changes we all
agree are needed in this soc-*
iety. I do not question the
need for student efforts to
reform the educational sys-
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 pfi shree
Poet's physic
By KIRSTEN EMMOTT
Physics is finding its way into poetry . ... at leest, into
the poetry of Vancouver's Greydon Moore. In a recent
collection of his work, Moore included a semi-mathematical
"concrete poem" expressing some curious harmonies he discovered while delving into particle physics.
Moore first got interested in physics nearly two years*
ago, on reading the speculations of Ward Carson, a Burnaby
electrician who said he had discovered mathematical relationships tying together many physical constants, including
dimensions of the universe and so on. Carson worked his
equations out on a slide rule.
"When I studied Carson's figures, they didn't balance
to more than two significant figures," said Moore.
"But I saw some things that got me interested in fundamental physics, and recently I found some curious things
that were hard to dismiss as coincidence."
Briefly, Moore discovered equations relating the gravitational constant (by which we figure out the attraction a
body has on other bodies) to the speed of light, Planck's
constant (useful in many ways to physicists) and pi, the
fundamental number used in calculating the areas of circles.
"There are many elementary particles such as electrons,
protons and neutrons," explains Moore. "I seem to have
found a direct mathematical link between the first 5 stable
particles heavier than the proton, including the neutron.
What it is, is a mathematical interval which is added a
number of times to the mass of each particle, and every
time the result is the mass of the next heavier particle."
The interval is the mass-energy difference between
the proton and neutron.
It happens that the particles have several different
mass levels each — that is to say, they are quantumized,
and can have only certain masses, at one or another available level, but not in between the levels. The results indicated by Moore's constant always produce one of the
resonance levels for each particle.
In each case, the figures balance out to six significant
figures, meaning they are as close as 1.000001 and 1.000002.
"Apparently, this simple concept has not been noticed
before," says Moore.
Meanwhile, Moore is taking another venture in fundamental physics, this time using an unusual mathematical
system.
Suppose you were to abandon decimal points, and thus
make all numbers into whole numbers. In this scheme, the
2 in 21 would have the same value as the 2 in 21,000 or 2
million.
"As things stand now, the system is absurd, but that's
only because the idea is not well understood yet," says
Moore.
"Within that system, you can find relationships between
the gravitational constant and other fundamental concepts.
It seems that certain things happen that don't happen otherwise.
"Of course that doesn't prove anything, but it's quite
intriguing and worth looking into."
Moore is presently involved in testing these hypotheses
with the help of a computer.
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
The atmosphere was tense at SFU Tuesday evening when I arrived to see the campus theatre's adaption of Shakespeare's
Coriolanus. President Strand's response to
the four demands of the Student Society
had just appeared on the bulletin board:
none of the demands are directly met;
charges against last week's demonstrators
will be pressed.
Over supper we talked to some of the
students, among them one of "The 114".
People had just begun to realize the implications of a criminal charge, just begun to
feel the full weight of the administrative
machine on their private backs. Student
opinion seemed now completely unified in
support of the demonstrators; a strike was
in the making.
As I walked the hundred yards from
student "headquarters" at the Rotunda to
the theatre, I was anxious to see what the
play would add to the surrounding action.
I was disappointed — by a predominantly middle-aged audience which only half
filled the theatre, and by a play which
seemed thoroughly dedicated to the (presumed) dictums of art. True, the theme is
entirely political. It pits the heroic Roman
consul, Coriolanus (Norman Browning),
against a corrupt Roman senate, and a
sheep-like mass, completely manipulated by
their representatives, the tribunes. Like
Shakespeare, director Peter Hay says that
no good can come out of this aspiring democracy: the senate is too self-involved and
power conscious, the mass is just what the
word implies, and" Coriolanus, like all
heroes, is a victim of hubris. Nor can he
make the drop-out scene of the Volscians
because he is hung up with his wheel-
chaired helmeted mother (Margo Dunn). In
the end, of course, Coriolanus is killed . . .
with heroism on his lips — and the mass
goes on consuming pizza and small-screen
television.
Fine. Throughout, however, I was
searching for the relevance, for some point
of view on the events outside. Hay then
told me in a conversation we had afterwards that this had not been his intention.
He wanted — again like Shakespeare (and
unlike Brecht) — to make a "statement"
on the political action from a standpoint
(perennially the artist's) above it. He did
not want to take sides. The connection to
the specific situation at Simon Fraser, he
said, was the audience's concern — but
the play should lead beyond that. Accordingly, the production adhered fairly strictly to the superstructure provided by
Shakespeare's plot (and language), although
over half the original text was dropped.
And of course the theme centred more
around the futile aspects of politicking
than around the tragic heroism of Coriolanus, (which appeared ludicrous in the
modern setting anyway.) I think, however,
that in his desire to be universal, to present "art" and not "propaganda", Hay has
forfeited much of his potential impact.
John Juliani's choregraphy, however,
deserves laudatory mention. With the aid
of effective lighting and costuming, and a
Godot-like set, he has really portrayed the
involvement of each with everyone.
It is precisely this somewhat strained
fusion of classical drama and absurdist
techniques which weakens the play. If Hay
had worked a bit more from the backdrop
presented by the chorus than he actually
did, if he had adhered even less rigidly to
Shakespeare's text and more to the atmosphere dictated by the set, (and by Simon'
Fraser), relevance and effect would have
been heightened. And people wouldn't be
asking themselves, well what is this really,
Shakespeare or Arabell ?
tem, only mention that
while we are pursuing academic freedom out on the
campuses, our real pattern
of living is being set in rein,
forced concrete in the city.
You may also ask what
reasons we have to believe
that current transportation
plans are misdirected. After
a thorough perusal of the
recent consultant's documents, it became obvious
that the students should demand:
1. A reconsideration of
the Brockton Point alignment considering downtown
congestion levels.
2. More information about
the effects of the east-west
freeway connection to downtown over the Georgia
Street viaduct replacement.
3. That public transportation studies be commenced
immediately.
4. That freeway proposals
be reconsidered in the light
of those studies.
5. That efforts be made
immediately to get public
preferences stated.
public transportation
More drama
By KEITH FRASER
The Arts Club, itself a
loft, and the new comedy
by Neil Simon combined on
opening night to fashion
some of the tightest humor
seen there since Stuart Baker handled Help Stamp
Out Marriage last season.
This time director Otto
Lowy deposited The Star-
Spangled Girl onto Lionel
Johnston's topnotch set, and
its apparent ease in execution was a compliment to
both this play's freshness
and Mr. Lowy's ability.
No novice at comedy (he
directed The Odd Couple
last year), Mr. Lowy has
cultivated excellent entertainment from Mr. Simon's
latest and best work. Here
the author exhibits an
awareness of the modern
scene in as much as he discovers humor implicit in the
writing and distribution of
a protest magazine concern
ed with degenerating America.
But more significantly,
Mr. Simon has arrived as a
playwright committed to
drama in its fullest sense.
Always master of the situation, he has utilized a tape
recorder to enhance The
Star-Spangled Girl in an incredible number of ways
that are both ingenious and
integral to the humor of the
proceedings.
Unlike the rather archetypal characters found in
Barefoot in the Park or in
The Odd Couple, this comedy is new in its treatment of
young people whose buffoonery never detracts from
their believability.
Director Lowy used the
different levels of his set —
entrance, sunken living
room, stars to the roof —
all to advantage. The characters were meaningfully
placed, and moved naturally
from door to tape recorder,
typewriter to attic.
This comedy is a guaranteed delight. It runs evenings at 8:30 until Dec. 5.
Friday, November 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY Kit $5
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TUEXDOS,  DARK   SUITS,  TAILS
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Ragas and Muffins
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
I want to introduce you today to a new game: a sort
of party-game for intellectuals (and/or students) who enjoy
matching wits and linguistic ingenuity. It's called the
Question Game.
It originates in Tom Stoppard's brilliant play, Rosen-
cranlz and Guildenslem are Dead, a highly entertaining
variation on Hamlet, which plays all sorts of fun games
with words and reality.
The rules are simple. Any number can play, but it's
best with just two. You carry on a conversation, which has
to consist entirely of questions: a statement is a foul, and
loses a point. Every question must follow on logically from
the one before, and must in some way elucidate it. There
can be no non sequiturs. no repetitions, no merely rhetorical
questions. Breach of any of these rules loses a point. These
are the basic rules: you'll see in practice how it works out.
There are two basic ways to play this game. The first
is the way it is played in Stoppard: very quickly, with no
time allowed between answers, in a spirit of cut-throat competition. Thus (the two players are Rosencrantz and Guilden-
stern):
Whose serve?
Hah?
Foul! No grunts. Love-one.
Whose go?
Why?
Why not?
What for?
Foul! No synonyms! One-all.
What in God's name is going on?
Foul! No rhetoric. Two-one.
What does it all add up to?
Can't you guess?
Were you addressing me?
Is there anyone else?
Who?
How would I know?
Why do you ask?
A.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
G.
R.
Are you serious?
Was that rhetoric?
No.
Statement! Two-all.  Game point.
What's the matter with you today?
When?
What?
Are you deaf?
Am I dead?
Yes or no?
Is there a choice?
Is there a God?
Foul! No non sequiturs, three-two, one game all.
(Quotation from Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are
Dead, by Tom Stoppard, Faber paperbacks, pages 30-31.)
It will be observed that in the above extract, speed
is clearly more important than strict logic—some of the
questions which are allowed to pass seem to me to be
inadequately derived from the previous question—and that
the main object of the game is to win.
There is, however, another form of the game, which
I developed myself with the participation of my good friend
Alastair Howard Robertson, M.A., late of St. Andrews,
Scotland, currently domiciled in the fair city of Fredericton,
New Brunswick. Mr. Robertson is an erudite gentlemen of
vast and curious knowledge, an inveterate conversationalist,
and the possessor of an esoteric sense of humour, deeply
versed in all the classics of Western thought from St.
Augustine to Caich-22. Salve!
In our form of the game, speed is unimportant. Players
are allowed as much time as they like — often several
minutes to phrase their questions. Logic is more firmly
insisted on. The object of the game becomes, not to score
points, but to prolong a conversation for as great a time as
possible, and to guide it towards the most far-fetched and
esoteric fields of philosophical inquiry. Such games should
only be entered on by those assured of their sanity, and
those who have several quiet hours to spare.
One night in June of this year, during a visit which
Mr. Robertson paid to me in Vancouver, we settled down
about 11 p.m. with a bottle of Scotch and a tape-recorder.
The ensuing game was pursued far into the morning: It
was nearly 3 a.m. when we finally staggered off. The
resulting tape consists mainly of long silences and drunken
laughter. In between times, many questions emerged, and
I submit to you an edited transcript of that conversation:
A. Stephen, why did you draw the short lot?
S.     Do  you   consider   that  there   is   an   element   of
purpose in a purely chance process?
A.    Do you mean by that, is there by any chance a
purpose in it?
S.    Is there any purpose in chance processes?
A.    Is there any process in chance purposes?
S.    Is there any process in purposed chances?
A.    What are purposed chances?
S.    Are there any such things as unpurposed chances?
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
If there were any such things, would you regard
them as purposed or as chances?
How can   anything   unpurposed   be   regarded   as
purposed?
How  can  anything  chance  be regarded as  purposed?
Are you confining "purpose" to the purpose of a
human agency?
Are all humans agents?
Are all agents humans?
What are agents?
What are humans?
Are there humans?
Would you regard Lyndon Johnson as an example
of a human?
Do you think he's a particularly good example?
Scientifically speaking, are there such things as
good or bad examples?
Can examples be defined scientifically?
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
How else can they be defined?
How can anything be defined?
Why should anything be defined?
Why should anything be?
Is anything?
How can anything be?
Why shouldn't anything be?
What does it mean for anything to be?
Does existence need to have a meaning?
If existence does not have a meaning, does meaning
have an existence?
Is meaning part of existence?
Does not meaning imply existence?
Can meaning imply anything?
If meaning does not imply anything, does implication have a meaning?
Need implication have a meaning?
Need anything have a meaning?
Is necessity involved here at all? -
Is necessity not the* mother of invention?
If necessity is the mother of invention, who is
the father?
Need invention have a father?
Does invention spring solely from necessity, or is
there any other possible source?
Could one not invent a source?
Need one invent a source?
If invention needs a father, and no-one has invented one, how else is it to have a father?
If invention needs a father, which no-one has yet
discovered and/or invented, how could invention
have come to be in the first place, unless there
was a father?
Could not invention have invented itself?
Can something be invented out of nothing, or must
there  always be some material  upon  which  invention works to produce something new?
Are you implying that invention is nothing?
Can a non-existent thing create itself out of the
nothingness of its non-existence?
How else would it create itself?
How does one normally create something?
How does one create nothing?
Does nothing need to be created?
Is there such a thing as nothing?
If there was such a thing as no-thing, would it be
a thing?
What else would it be?
What else could it be?
Is it anything else?
Do not  the words  "anything  else"   imply  some
thing that it is else than?
What is this thing that it is other than?
Is not the opposite of no-thing thing?
Are they opposites?
Are not a proposition and its direct negation normally regarded as opposites?
Must this always be the case?
Continued on pf 5ive
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 .- •<»-
m
s.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
S.
A.
S.
A.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
s.
A.
^^^■■^^ pf SiVe MM^MHMMB
More Ragas
Continued from pf  4our
Can you give me a specific example of when it is
not the case?
Must you have an example to accept a possibility?
Is a purely potential example the same thing as
an actual example?
Would you accept a potential example as the proof
of a potentiality?
Is there any such thing as a purely potential example?
Is the potentiality of a potential example of the
same kind as the potentiality of which it is an
example?
Can an abstract theory be said to have any potentiality at all except in terms of examples?
If a theory subsists only in its examples, is it a
theory?
What is a theory?
Would you like an example?
Can you give me an example?
Would a theoretical example be acceptable?
•        •       •
How were you married?
How do you know that I am married?
Because my knowledge of your marriage is of the
same sort as a great deal else of my knowledge,
if your marriage is put in question, is all the
similar knowledge put in question?
How far do you normally generalise one particular
example?
Do you expect me to generalise from the fact that
you are married to the fact that everybody is
married?
Is everybody married?
Does "everybody" exclude me?
Does not the word "every" exclude exclusion?
Is "everybody" then confined to human beings?
Are you a human being?
What standards would I apply to find out if I were?
Are dogs human beings?
Am I a dog?
Do you consider yourself to be a dog?
If I consider-.,    nyself to be a dog, would that
make me one?
If you considered yourself to be a dog, and thus
became a  dog, and  in that dog-state considered
yourself to be a human being, would you revert
to being a human being?
Would you notice any difference in the process, or
would this process be observed only by me?
If you were a dog, do you think you would exhibit
it in any external fashion?
Do I exhibit being a human being in any external
fashion?
Do you walk on two legs instead of four?
If I walk on two legs must I do it instead of doing
it on four?
What other alternatives are there?
Could I not walk on one leg?
Do you consider, walking  on one leg to be an
external manifestation of a human being?
Does walking on one leg make me any more or
less human than walking on two?
Does walking characterise a human being?
Does walking not characterise dogs?
A.
S.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
**£? «
ARI|
Wes
TAURUSl
Wm Gemini
CANCERS
f-***^^£i             /   dl 1
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Can a species be characterised by a characteristic
it shares with another species?
Are  you merely  concerned  with  differentiating
human beings from other species of living things?
Is it possible to differentiate human beings from
other species of living things?
Is it possible to differentiate living animals from
things which are not living animals?
Are there such things as not living animals, i.e.
animals which are not living?
Do all animals go on living for ever?
Do any animals go on living for ever?
If there are animals which do not go on living for
ever, what are they when they stop living?
Are they, when they stop living?
Are you equating living and existing?
Continued on pf 8ight
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Canada's leading trust company
can offer rewarding
opportunities to students
graduating in 1969
A Royal Trust representative
will be interviewing interested
graduates December 3 & 4
Make a point of talking
with him.
Opportunities to advance with Royal Trust—
Canada's leading trust company—are
limited only by tiie individual's desire to
get ahead.
If you are interested in a rewarding career
with a company that has been respected
throughout Canada for 69 years, talk to your
University Placement Officer with a view
to seeing the Royal Trust representative.
TALK TO
Royal Trust
it's in your best interest
the
S&y
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your
personal  drive and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you to any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you
could be sent on buying trips to markets in North America, Europe
and Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge
your initiative and  drive  in the ever changing world of retailing.
Graduates in
Commerce, Business Administration or Arts
are eligible for our Training Programme of:
• Initial rotation programme showing you the major sales supporting departments such as Advertising and Display.
• An in-store merchandising course given by Bay executives to
supplement your on-the-job training.
• Assigned to a particular department, you will receive guidance
and experience in all aspects of department administration, buying and sales management.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full details or come in and see us in the Personnel
Office, fifth floor in the Bay.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
December 3rd, 4th and 5th
Friday, November 29, 1968
':>'.•".''.   -.'ii'   .t.l.'M •fd/.    \"-''**X*i
THE
UBYSSEY
■*-■»    i       .*   .;-•,* by Stanley Cooperman
This book brings together seventy-two
new poems that are uncompromising
in subject, and powerful in impact.
Stanley Cooperman, an Associate Professor
at SFU, has also written two other works —
WORLD WAR ONE AND THE AMERICAN NOVEL
and THE DAY OF THE PARROT and OTHER POEMS.
AVAILABLE
BOOKSTORE
rassie
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The rings illustrated are exclusive Grassie
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^"" pf 6ix «c
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"I think that during the twentieth century,
the decade oi least importance to me is the
litties — in 1954. Muzak was brought in. The
filties are a blah period. My music is a complete
contrast, a complete diversion from a Muzak-
type ol form."
Assassinations for Orchestra and Electronic Tape by UBC
composer Lloyd Burritt will be given its world premiere by
the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra next Sunday and Monday.
Other compositions by Burritt include The Hollow Men,
premiered at last year's UBC Contemporary Arts Festival.
The composer talks here with Page Friday music
columnist Michael Quigley:
MQ: What is the form of Assassinations like?
LB: I was given certain restrictions to start off with. I
was told it couldn't be more than twenty minutes, no less than
fifteen—it's turned out to be seventeen minutes long. It was
to be scored for full orchestra using sectional material, If
possible, to make it more interesting, and was to be used
with electronic tape.
The machinery used is put in the wings on purpose so
the audience is not aware of machines, because the sound
created is such that people will have difficulty in determining
whether this is tape-produced or orchestrally-produced. There
are certain sections where there's supposed to be a very, very
fine line of making it impossible to discriminate whether you
are hearing a machine sound or an orchestral sound. For me,
this is the fascination of using a machine, using it as an
extension of what we already have, but not tearing down
what we already have. I want to say that I'm assassinating
the nineteenth-century musical form (i.e. — Tchaikovsky's
eight-bar phrases, over and over again) but not the symphonic
presentation as using people in orchestras made up of strings,
brass, woodwinds, etc . . . this can be further enhanced through
electronic media.
MQ: What about the actual size of the orchestra for
Assassinations?
LB: I'm using a normal full concert orchestra, plus six
various pitched drums.
MQ: Are you trying for any kind of special effects with
the electronic speakers?
LB: This is my biggest worry—the technical aspect. I'm
having eight separate cabinet speakers installed in a 360
degree radius completely surrounding the audience and this
will be hooked up through separate tape recorders. I'm using
my own tape decks which I've synchronized with counter-
tppe going into mixers and a thousand-watt four-channel
amplifier. This equipment will not be affected by any of the
equipment that is now installed in the theatre. However,
besides the eight speakers in the 360 degree circumference,
I'll use the house system to boost climax effects—about three
or four times—in the score, but this will all be done through
the tape recorder that I'll be operating on stage.
MQ: Does this mean that you'll be on stage with the
performers?
LB: No, I won't. That's the whole purpose. I don't want
anyone to see equipment, because if they see me push a button
and they hear a sound they'll know, "Oh well, that's an
electronic sound", but if they don't see me or the equipment,
they won't be able to distinguish between what's orchestral
and what's electronic, which is
orchestra beyond its means at
acting as complete electronic so*
the tape decks and the volumes
MQ: Won't all this pose cei
Davies conducting?
LB: Mr. Davies couldn't pei
a special tape, so he's going to
be wearing earphones. First of all
score and we played the tape,
had to synchronize so closely, v
effects, that it was pretty well
nightmare trying to co-ordinatr
writing music that's not perio
there's no need for it and it's juc
did was make use of the tape ;
myself our own tapes for cues. T!
has been synchronizing to the sp
and the audience tape.
"The  title Assassino
topic—therefore 1 don't e;
It's a pretty nasty topic, at.
to expect to hear Tchaikov
they're in for a pretty big
MQ: How do you think aud--.
of music like Assassinations?
LB: I think that the biggest
to electronic music is the fact th
"machine" or "intellectual" w&l
not the end result that's importa;
back and try not to think, just
give an example, the decibel syf
in high frequencies are to such a;
vibrations on the cranium skull,
should be able to feel in your ri
seventeen minutes—such an imi
take. There are other passages tl
hearing a majority of people wil
Assassinations, you've just got to
you. Don't let yourself take over
MQ: You seem to be gettinj
melody, and music becomes men
LB: You say we're getting
melody. Well, what is melody?
was a certain line in past forms,
a new shape entirely, and it is a
merely a linear process into a <
One attribute of electronic mus
rounding the listener is that the
into sound which is acting as a ;
MQ: Could Assassinations t
in the sense that, like many *
breaking out of the old forms?
LB:   For   an  electronic" pie-
is very romantic. This is ironic, b<
the nineteenth  century form.  It
sense of it being a theatre piece,
the  best combination  for  work
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 7even
j-
3
my purpose—to expand the
present. What I'm doing is
and coordinator. I'll operate
feom backstage,
-tain problems for Meredith
-form Assassinations without
have a counting tape. He'll
1, when we got the orchestral
we**tsaw that certain effects
vhich also incorporated light
going to be a  conductor's
t  them.   I'm   really   against
rraable   or  that's   difficult—
it bad craftsmanship. What I
ind simply give Davies and
ie difficulty in Assassinations
■lit second the counting tape
:tions isn't a  pleasant
cpect pleasant reactions.
~>d ii people are coming
sky's Nutcracker Suite,
shock."
"unces should relate to pieces
difficulty in trying to relate
at people associate the word
v-it. As well, it's a process,
at. If a person could just sit
feel, it would be better. To
items used in Assassinations
a extent where you will feel
and the low vibrations you
b cage. It's not constant for
pact no human being could
iat are so quiet that on first
i miss certain subtleties. For
sit back and let it take over
the piece of music.
% away from the concept of
r* sound.
away from the concept of
Melody is  what we're told
but today melody takes on
shape that is expanded from
:ompletely sculptural effect,
ic  and  using  speakers  sur-
linear melody has changed
iculptural quality,
e termed a romantic piece,
jf   Schoenberg's   pieces,   it's
:e Of music, Assassinations
scause I say I'm assassinating
would be romantic in the
not as a musical form. I feel
s  is  a   combination  of the
intellect and the emotion, which get together to produce a
unified work. On one hand, you've got Tchaikovsky being a
little bit too much emotion, and on the other hand you have
John Cage being too much of the intellect. I think that
people take ideas that John Cage uses, and create better
pieces—masterpieces. Today's masterpiece is not in the sense
of nineteenth-century masterpieces. A masterpiece would be
something so spontaneous that it made the audience volatile
and erupt, and they can erupt in an agreeable or a disagreeable way. If they do that, then your work has succeeded, and
at the time it is performed, it is a masterpiece if it succeeds
in making the audience volatile and completely explode.
"The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, like
all other symphony orchestras in North America
I'm sure, has patronage horn a limited number
ol stuffed shirts that should really go fo the
Burrard Bridge and jump off into Burrard Inlet
as far as I'm concerned, and make room for the
persons that really want to go fo listen fo music,
people that don't wanf fo gef up and walk out
in the middle of a performance. I would really
like to know what the people who walked out
during The Whale would do if the people that
sat through The Whale had stood up and walked
out during the Mozart."
MQ: On the subject of audience reaction, what did you
think of the people who walked out during The Whale?
LB: I think people should leave before or after a piece,
but not during. Getting up and walking out is all right if you
don't have to make other people stand up, thereby inconveniencing them. You can protest in any way you like except
by disturbing people that really and sincerely want to listen
to the piece.
MQ: Well, Lawrence Cluderay, in last week's Province
Spotlight, says if you don't like a piece, you should boo it.
Doesn't this conflict with your ideas about ruining the piece
for other people?
LB: No, not if they boo at the end. I'd want people to boo
at the end of Assassinations if they felt like booing—that's
marvelous. If they boo during the concert, then it's a chance
composition in which the audience is participating and
Assassinations is not for audience participation. Otherwise,
I would have put it into the program—"Boo at your will". I
would be really happy if people booed rather than to hear
polite clapping.
MQ: Do you think the VSO's new "young audience" will
react better to Assassinations than the older members of the
audience?
LB: Through mass media, our audiences, especially our
young audiences, are so sophisticated, simply through media
like television, much more sophisticated than the older generation. If the young people don't react, don't turn out, don't
demonstrate to something like Assassinations, it's going to be
the end of the VSO even attempting to do more. This is not
just .filling up the seats for the box office. It'll be how the
audience reacts. This isn't really falling on the audience's
shoulders at all—it's falling on my shoulders as to whether
I've created a good or bad work. Well, that remains to be
seen Sunday afternoon . . .
"I think there should be more and more
performances of music written for the specific
incident. Also I think the preservation of the holy
manuscript — the first manuscript written — is
kind of a dead way of communicating. You can't
communicate just on paper now. You have to
give instruction on tape, through tape for your
orchestra. Once Assassinations is performed I am
consciously thinking of never having it performed again, not in the form as I've written it for
December 1 and 2. I do want to manipulate certain sounds from the tape—fhe performance—
for another composition, but once it's performed
it's had its function. It's not to be filed in a library,
and it's not for posterity. We don't create art
for posterity today."
The Pfragamuffins pformed at the pfrinters with pre-Noelian
nonchalance. I'll be sleighed, cried Maureen Scobie, but Santa
Stephen snowed her out of it, while Santa Horvat stood on his
head singing deko boko. Gordon Fidler covered the frontsides
and Bruce Dolsen doodled, then departed. Ich Hebe dich Yrat dit
Valerie Hennell heureusement. And good night to all and to all
a good night.
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■pS Sight
More Muffins
Continued from pf 5ive
S.     Would you regard this as a false equation?
A.    Would you regard all things which do not live as
being non-existent?
S      Do stones exist?
A.    Have you ever asked them?
S.    If a stone said to me that it existed, would that be
sufficient proof that it did in fact exist?
A.    Would you regard such proof as sufficient?
S.    How could I be sure that the stone was telling the
truth?
A.    Would you apply the same standards of truth and
falsehood to statements made by human beings as
statements made by stones?
S.    If I did apply the same standards to both, would
I thus be implying an equation between stones and
. human beings?
A.    Do you regard yourself as in any way equivalent
to a stone?
S.     Does a stone regard itself as being in any way
equivalent to me?
A.    Do your conversations with stones throw any light
on this subject?
S.    Do not conversations with another party normally
throw some light upon how the other party regards itself?
A.    Is it not possible, however, for a stone to conceal
how it feels about itself?
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
A.
S.
Do you consider it likely that if a stone had the
heaven-sent opportunity at last after a million
years to converse with a human being that it
would conceal anything about itself?
Well, would you conceal things about yourself
when talking to the stone when you had the opportunity after a million years to talk to a stone?
Why should I want to conceal anything about
myself?
Might not stones be dangerous?
Have you ever met a dangerous stone?
Are you assuming that I talk to stones?
Does not everybody talk to stones?
Are you asking that question defensively?
What have I got to defend myself against?
Might  you  not have  to  defend  yourself against
stones?
Am I not bargaining with stones from a position
of strength?
Do not stones have a strength of their own?
Is not the strength of a human being greater than
the strength of a stone?
Are the two comparable?
By what standards could they be comparable?
Do  human beings  and  stones  have  anything  in
common besides speech?
Is it possible to have speech without a rational
mind shared between the speakers?
Is speech always rational?
Are stones always rational?
Continued on pf 11 even
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II
TrfE
UBYSSEY
'i i*   i
Friday, November 29, 1968
»-.»'  :' X        !   '   II!   •>   *   I. I I   |   |    I  r. The Psychedelic
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A Question from '68
By IAN D. SLATER
The question is "Can we have a good
news cast?" Would it be possible to switch
on your TV and rather than be greeted
with heavy doses of catastrophe, riot and
homicides. instead be informed of some
positive and charitable achievements? The
cry of "censorship" in reply to this question is muted by the fact that the news
media censors itself, within the boundaries
of what it calls public tolerance. The
excuse for so much reporting of violence
is that there is an appetite for violence.
The other side of the coin is that the news
media in large part creates the appetite
and very often the climate for violence.
The TV camera, it seems, can often turn a
moderately passive rally into a potentially
inflammable situation merely by its presence. The answers are not easy and lurk
somewhere in the misunderstood and, at
times, virtually unknown medium of violence.
1968 ends as a year of violence. Its most
spectacular exhibition it appears was the
outburst at the Sorbonne; an outburst
which ushered in widespread revolt across
France. The fact that th© spirit of this
revolt met with decisive rejection at the
voting booths seemed not so much a tribute
to "The General," but rather a testimony
to the fright many Frenchmen experienced
when they recognized their hitherto unsuspected capacity for, or at very least,
indirect support of violence.
The thing which concerns so many investigators today is the basic nature of
violence. There are biological views, cultural views, genetic views and views inculcating all these as being responsible
for the origin of violence. Do you subscribe
to Ardrey's theory as expressed in
African Genesis that man is fundamentally
a weapon maker, a fighter? Is your peak
hour traffic urge to clobber the front car
a product of your environment or has it
always been with you?
Camouflaged by apparent civilization yet
still there as a corollary of man's evolve-
ment, U.S. society by and large has said,
"We are a violent society." This has caused
unprecedented soul-searching—if man has
a soul—upon the basic mental health of
his society. Can the democratic idea exist
in a paradoxical state of financial warfare,
and sustain itself on a basis of social
justice when success is measured in money?
The successful American is the affluent
American in industry or in art. Can you
imagine Anthony Quinn working for the
State? Perhaps you could. If you could
then you are one of those who do not
subscribe to the old-time religion that
American values are the most honourable
ones. Beware—you are part hippie!
From this conflict has emerged the hippie
movement. The majority of Americans
don't like hippies. The hippie may be
dirty, shabby, bearded and bare-footed
but that is tolerable. What is not tolerable
and is his crime is that he will not work—
at least not within the hitherto accepted
definition of that word. I often think that
Americans would rather deal with a
potentially violent motorcycle gang who
work, than a pacifist hippie who doesn't
work. If a militarist can justify his existence by saying that he is merely a tool
of his society, be it good or bad, then
surely a hippie can offer a similar excuse,
adding that while he does sponge welfare
payments he does not kill. The hippies
have made and are making a real contribution to our society. While our theorists,
with good intent, analyze the causes of our
violence, the hippie movement simply
opposes it. They reject in its entirety the
idea of war. Perhaps they have fostered a
substantial internationalist feeling, if not
among nations then among themselves, and
in time even a certain international solidarity. The hippie band is far from angelic
and the connotation of hippie is usually
dominated by the charge of "drugs", and
this is perhaps an iU-fated escapism from
a violent and apathetic society. However,
personally injurious as it may be, it does
not invalidate thdir basic precepts of
pacifism in a world of virulent confrontation.
Of the many questions emerging from
such a confrontation one frequently asked,
particularly of the investigators is, "Is
violence that big or is it blown up out of
proportion?" The answer now forming is
that it is blown up but the threat of internal haemmorhage is nevertheless very real.
We all know that from time to time our
discontent broils in an embryo of potential
violence. This realization extending from
the menial to the great invariably manifests itself in the conclusion that, "You
can't change people". This idiotic and
inane remark has been indirectly responsible for the suffocation of so many progressive ideas that its effect upon the impressionable and progressive mind of
youth is virtually incalculable. Since time
immemorial it has been the deduction of
Continued on pf 14urteen
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byFraneoisTruffaut
Pfilm critic Kirk Tougas attempts to
justify his acquisition of another free
book by sharing his appreciation of
it with our loyal, and less financially
fortunate, readers.
"You have to design your film just as
Shakespeare did his play — for an audience". So, in this remarkable interview,
Alfred Hitchcock speaks of his art which
has captured world-wide audiences and has
likewise thrilled the French "auteur" critics. As Truffaut puts it: "The nature of
Hitchcock's cinema is to absorb the audience so completely that the Arab viewer
Hitchcock by Francois Truffaut. Illustrated, $12. Simon and Schuster (Musson
Book Co., Don Mills, Ontario), 1968.
will forget to shell his peanuts, the Frenchman will ignore the girl in the next seat,
the Italian will suspend his chain smoking,
the Swedes will interrupt their love-making
in the aisles."
The attention of this book/interview
fixes on this actual conceptual design in
the suspense as it developed through the
last 56 films by the director — from the
silents and the first "Hitchcock" film, The
Lodger, through to sound, colour, and Torn
Curtain.
The controversial "auteur" theory held
by Cahiers du Cinema and Francois Truffaut is that the director is the single artistic source for the creation of cinema;
naturally every work by a film author
bears his unmistakable marks, his way of
seeing the world and his particular medium. In the U.S. however, adherents to
this theory have been hard pressed because
Hollywood has long been a composite production line often with the producer pronouncing the final word; so the theory is
only manifested in a few, including Alfred
Hitchcock.
Other than the fascinating background
material (technical, casting, scripting) surrounding the director's comments on each
of his works, Hitchcock reveals his concern and relentless progress toward the
complete use of filmiO methods, showing
rather than saying — perhaps derived in
part from his experiences before the sound
medium.
"The silent pictures" — he says —
"were the purest form of cinema; the only
thing they lacked was the sound of people
talking and the noises. But this slight imperfection did not warrant the major
changes that sound brought in; there was
no need to abandon the technique of pure
motion picture .... To me, one of the
cardinal sins for a script-writer, when he
runs into some difficulty, is to say 'We
can cover that by a line of dialogue'." It
is the development of visual suspense that
pinpoints the art of Hitchcock.
"Suspense" — says Truffaut — "is
simply the dramatization of a film's narrative material, or, if you will, the most
intense presentation possible of dramatic
situations". Hitch emphasizes the wide gulf
between surprise and suspense; a whodunit
is a simple intellectual puzzle, suspense is
physical, gripping, gutsy. Surprise, at best,
will remain with the audience for 15 seconds, while suspense (where it is indis-
pensible that the public be made completely aware of all the facts involved)
might hold the audience for 15 minutes.
To this end, the reactions of the viewer
must be manipulated: "The public always
likes to be one jump ahead of the story;
they like to feel they know what's coming
next. So you deliberately play upon this
fact to control their thoughts".
However, the accent is not on realism
but effect and motion ("The fact is, I practise absurdity quite religiously".) Factual
representation in the suspense film is quite
pointless, "you can get anything you want
through the proper use of cinematic technique, which enables you to work out any
image you need".
The interview also reveals the humour
of Hitch, the practical joker revealed in
his films and anecdotes . . . "There's just
so much one can do with a love scene.
Something I wish I could work out is a
love scene with two people on each side
of the room. It's impossible, I suppose, because the only way to suggest love would
be to have them exposing themselves to
each other, with the man opening his fly
and the girl lifting her skirt, and the dialogue in counterpoint. Something like:
'What are we going to have for supper
tonight?'
"Some films are slices of life. Mine are
slices of cake.''
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 pf 11 lev en
.
A.
S.
A.
S.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
A.
S.
S.
S.
A.
S.
A.
More more
Continued from pf 8ight
Do they have to have a mind to be rational?
Can reason proceed  from any organ in  a stone
except the stone's mind?
What other organs do stones have?
Is it not common knowledge that stones have the
organ of speech?
Does anything have to have an organ of speech
in order to speak?
Are you questioning the ability of stones to speak?
Do you have a program for improving their speech
habits?
In what way does a stone's ability to speak need
improving?
Is the speech of any mortal thing, stones or human
beings, perfect?
Are stones mortal?
Do we not usually regard them as being dead?
Do we ever regard stones as having been alive?
Does something have to be alive to speak?
Can you give me an example  of a  dead  thing
speaking?
Have you never heard corpses grumbling in a
graveyard?
Is grumbling really a form of speech?
Are not their complaints at times very vocal?
Do they have cause for these complaints?
How do you expect me to know that?
Have you ever talked with a corpse?
Assuming that I have talked with corpses, unless
I had been a corpse, how would I know that what
they were saying was well-founded?
Unless  I were  Alastair Robertson,  how do  you
expect me to know whether what Alastair Robertson says is well-founded?
Do I expect you to know whether what Alastair
Robertson says is* well-founded?
Is not an element of mutual trust a part of any
friendship?
Are you not making the assumption that we are
friends?
Are we friends?
What are friends?
Would you not regard my stone as a friend?
You have one particular stone that you are friendly
with?
Would you regard stones as capable of being
individuated?
A.    Does not the use of the plural imply this already?
S.     By what standards would one individuate stones?
A.    Would topographical separation be sufficient?
S.     Is not walking a characteristic of stones?
A.    Are you not confusing walking and movement?
S.     How else can stones move unless they walk?
A.    Could they not use their legs for something else?
S.     Have you ever seen stones play football?
A.    Do  they  ever  win in matches  against  human
beings?
S.    Have you ever seen the result of a football match
between a team of stones and a team of human
beings?
A.    If I saw such a result, would it be a proof that such
a match had taken place?
S.     In what medium would you have to see this result
before you yourself accepted it as sufficient proof?
A.    If you had told me the result, what would this
prove?
S.     Would you not demand to know where I had seen
the result?
A.    If you had told me you had seen the match yourself, what conclusions would I draw?
S.     Would you be likely to draw the conclusion that
I was suffering from a delusion?
A.    Why should I?
S.     Have you ever met anyone else who has seen a
football match between stones and human beings?
Continued on pf 13irteen
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ipfi I2welvei
Binri
The article in last
week's Page Friday
about the "mad critic"
Robert Forsythe, and
the Four Binri, has
aroused much comment.
.Page Friday editor
Stephen Scobie visited
Professor Kirkwood on
Tuesday in his Gulf Island retreat, where he
is spendiing his year's
sabbatical leave from
the English Department,
and put to him some of
the questions our readers had raised.
Scobie: Are Forsythe's
works generally available, or will we have to
wait until next year, for
your edition of The Binraic  Cosmology ?
Kirkwood: Well then.
The Muse's Tablets is of
course long out of print,
but fortunately there is
a copy in the UBC Library. The call number
is PR 99 F 5. The Four
Binri was published privately as a pamphlet,
and there were very
few copies. I have one,
which is as far as I
know the only copy in
Canada. But there are a
few copies in University
Libraries down in the
States; you could try
Inter-Library loan. Its
call number is BD 496
F 4 F 5.
Scobie: Some students
have commented on the
remarkable phonic similarity between "Forsythe" and "foresight."
Kirkwood: Yes indeed.
I also have noted this,
but on mature consideration I feel it to be entirely coincidental. You
see, Forsythe did not,
strictly speaking, indulge in "foresight": his
"prophecies" were dictated to him by the Four
Binri, and involved no
conscious volition on his
part.
Scobie: Was your own
article dictated to you
by the Four Binri?
Kirkwood: Not to my
knowledge. But perhaps. I have premonitions. But beyond that I
am not prepared to say.
».:»
^
Representatives of
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CHEMISTRY GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
on December 5th and 6th
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 3rd, 4th
and post-graduate years
on December 5th and 6th
We invite you to arrange an interview through the Office
of Student Personnel Services
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA LIMITED
Copper Cliff, Ontario, Thompson, Manitoba
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 p£ I3irteem
A.
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Enough!
Continued from pf lleven
Do you play in such matches yourself?
If I played in such matches myself, what side do
you think I would be on?
Have you any reason for supposing you would be
on one side rather than the other?
Is it not empirically obvious that I am either a
human being or a stone?
What reasons should you have to expect me to see
this as obvious?
Is not something which is empirically obvious an
axiom, and does an axiom need to have reasons?
Is it axiomatic that you are either a human being
or a stone?
How do you prove that anything is axiomatic?
Do the stones you know regard this as axiomatic?
Why  should  you  suppose  that  stones   share  the
same system of logic as human beings?
Would it not be rather difficult to talk to stones
if they did not share the same system of logic?
Does all conversation depend on logic?
Are we then the only people in the world who
can talk to stones?
If the two of us are the only two people in the
world who have ever talked to stones, would you
regard this as evidence that we are not in fact
people but stones?
If we are in fact stones, and we habitually talk to
other people, then are there not other people in
the world who talk to stones?
Is it not possible that other people in the world
have talked to us believing that we are human
beings whereas in fact we are stones?
Would this belief make any difference to the fact
that they have really been talking to stones?
If they thought we were human beings, would we
not actually be human beings?
Do we not in fact regard the stones we talk to as
human beings?
Do the stones we speak to regard themselves as
human beings?
If they do in fact regard themselves as human
beings, is it not then the case, sadly, that there are
no people in the world who have talked to stones?
Is it not then a matter for some joy that they do
not in fact regard themselves as human beings?
Are you satisfied that they do not regard themselves as human beings?
Have you ever talked to a stone who said he was
a human being?
Have I ever talked to stones?
Didn't you say that you'd talked to stones?
Do you always believe me when I talk about my
talking to stones?
Since I have talked to stones myself,  is  it  not
natural for me to believe you when you say that
you have talked to stones?
Is it natural for you to believe anything?
Am I not capable of doing an unnatural thing?
Is believing one of these unnatural things that you
can do?
Is believing any more unnatural than talking to
stones?
Is talking to stones unnatural?
Is what is unnatural for human beings necessarily
unnatural for stones?
Ought we to change our value judgments to conform with those of stones?
Should   our   value   judgments   not  be   the   value
judgments of our own species?
Are stones of a different species from us?
Are stones in fact a single species?
Are  you  qualified  to  distinguish  species   among
stones?
Would you  regard   as  sufficient  qualification  of
my ability to distinguish species among stones the
fact that I had talked to the leading stone specialist
on this subject?
Can he talk to stones?
Is it not natural for stones to be able to talk to
stones?
Are we not basing this on human ideas of what is
natural?
Why shouldn't we base it on human ideas of what
is natural?
If stones cannot talk to other stones, is this not a
good reason why they talk to human beings?
Do stones need a good reason for talking to human
beings?
Do not human beings need a very good reason for
talking to stones?
But here, alas, the game ended, in mutual exhaustion.
We consumed the last of the Scotch, and retired to our
respective beds.
I trust this pastime will enliven a few Christmas festivities around Vancouver. I wish you all a happy holiday
and a very good New Year.
A.
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A.
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FILMSOC pMAxntA
• • *
PAUL NEWMAN
in
Cool Hand Luke
FRIDAY 12:30-3:30-6:30-9:00
Sub Auditorium
50c
Best Wishes For
The Holidays
from
UBC BOOKSTORE
A good selection of books for Christmas
Now available
A few suggestions:
AGE OF EXPANSION: Europe end the World 1559-1660 by Hugh Trevor-Roper—McGraw Hill     $29.95
AIRCRAFT OF THE WORLD: Text by Angus MacKenzie — Odhams Books Ltd. ..     3.65
Andrew Wyeth: Dry Brush and Pencil Drawings — New York Graphic Society —      6.50
APPOINTMENT ON THE MOON: The Inside Story of America's Space Venture by Richard S. Lewis-
Viking Press 12.50
ART IN ARCHITECTURE: by Louis G. Redstone — McGraw Hill ~ -   25.75
THE ASMAT: The Michael G. Rocker-feller Expedi tions ed. by Gerbrands —
Museum of Primitive Art, N.Y. 33.00
THE AUSTRALIANS: by R. B. Goodman & G. Johnston — Rigby Ltd  - .._. 18.50
THE BIRDS OF CANADA: by W. Earl Godfrey — Queen's Printer, Ottawa   12.50
BIRDS OF THE EASTERN FOREST:! by Lansdowne & Livingston — McClelland & Stewart 17.50
BIRDS OF THE NORTHERN FOREST: by Lansdowne — McClelland & Stewart          20.00
A BOOK OF CHRISTMAS: by William Sansom — McGraw Hill   18.25
THE CHRISTMAS STORY: ed. M. Northrup — Metropolitan Museum of Art  _  4.25
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: ed. P. Alexander — Collins .._     10.00
THE DISTEMPER OF OUR TIMES: by Peter C. Newman — McClelland & Stewart    .._    8.95
DIVING INTO THE PAST: Archaeology Under Water by Hanns-Wolf Rackl — Scribners    5.95
THE DOUBLE HELIX: by James D. Watson — Atheneijm ,    —    7.25
THE DOUKHOBORS: by G. Woodcock & I. Avakumovic — Oxford  .-      7.50
DRAWING HISTORY AND TECHNIQUE: by H. Hutter — McGraw Hill    16.25
EARTH, MOON, AND PLANETS: by Fred L. Whipple — Harvard     7.25
EXPO '67 MONTREAL, CANADA: — Thomas Nelson & Sons   -  20.00
THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF WONDERFUL FAIRY TALES: — Golden Press ....           4.95
A HISTORY OF WARFARE:    by Field-Marshall Viscount Montgomery of Alamein — Collins... 15.95
THE JOYS OF YIDDISH: by Leo Rostem — McGraw Hill ._..            12.00
MOUND BUILDERS OF ANCIENT AMERICA: The Archaeology of a Myth by Robert Silberberg
New York Graphic Society     9.85
NEW FRANCE THE LAST PHASE 1744-1760: by George F. G. Stanley—McClelland & Stewart   10.00
THE NEW YORK TIMES LARGE TYPE COOKBOOK: by Jean Hewitt — Golden Press  11.95
THE OWL BEHIND THE DOOR: by Stanley Cooperman — McClelland & Stewart       3.95
PAUSE: A Sketch Book by Emily Carr — Clarke Irwin        3.00
PRINTMAKING HISTORY AND TECHNIQUE: by  K. Sotriffer — McGraw Hill         16.25
THE RANDOM HOUSE DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE: Random House   29.50
A SCAR IS BORN: by Eric Nicol — Ryerson Press   —       3.50
THE SEXUAL WILDERNESS: by Vance Packard — Musson         8.50
THE TAMING OF THE CANADIAN WEST: by Frank Rasky — McClelland & Stewart  14.95
THIS ROCK WITHIN THE SEA: A Heritage Lost  by F. Mowat & J. De Visser —
Atlantic/Little Brown  10.00
TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON: by R. Beny — Longman's of Canada     25.00
TOTEM POLE INDIANS: by J. H. Wherry — Wilfred Funk Inc        8.50
THE VIKING: by Tre Tryckare — Time Life Books *      27.50
THE VOYAGES OF ULYSSES: A Photographic Interpretation of Homer's Classic by Erich Lessing —
Time Life 25.00
THE WARRIOR AND THE PRINCESS AND OTHER SOUTH AMERICAN FAIRY TALES —
Golden Press 4.99
THE WHALE PEOPLE: by R. Haig-Brown — Coll ins         2.95
THE WIND HAS WINGS: Poems from Canada — Oxford University Press       5.95
Also a Comprehensive Selection ol
Children's Books, Canadiana, Sports, Cook Books, etc.
We also have a selection of other gift items, including UBC jeweler*/, crested, sweeat shirts, etc.;
also, Christmas cards (including UBC crested and Photo Cards) and gift wrap.
Friday,  November 29,  1968
THE      U BYSSEY COLES, MONARCH, SCHAUM
STUDY GUIDES
THE BOOKFINDER
4444 West 10th
willy van yperen
4410 w. 10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
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• WEDDINGSI & CORSAGES A
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PRESENTATION  OF A.M.S. CARD
Three  Short   Blocks  From   UBC   Gates
4427 W. 10th Ave.   224-1341
Under   New   Management
-****
-w
CHRISTMAS EVE
10:00 P.M.
Carol Singing
and
Candlelighting Service
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
CHAPEL
Across from the Village at
5885 University Blvd.
pf l4ourteen
By VALERIE HENNELL
The grinning green gremlins <nee elves)
gathered gradually in the gracious grey
grotto to gregariously get together the gladsome gold goodies for today's garrulous
gospel of Backsides in our grand old gaz-
zette.
Several sighing students simpered about
the season's sad assortment of essays to be
submitted, and so we succumbed and suggested some sideshows for soothing diversion.
You're a Good Man Charlie Brown will
not be seen at the Playhouse as foretold
by pre-season promotion. In its place we
have A Thurber Carnival, a lively review
based on the collected works of James
Thurber. Laugh-In style one-liners and the
hilarious "Secret Life of Walter Mitty"
are all part of the show. It runs Dec. 5-18
and Jan. 2-11.
Sounds like a prime rump roast to me,
quoth Quigleymus, echoed by a resounding
chorus of Humbug.
But, he continued, I would prefer to go
to the world premiere this Sunday of Lloyd
Burritt's Assassinations for Orchestra and
Electronic Tape at the QE Theatre.
And also to the VSO Christmas concerts
on Dec. 20 and 21, plus performances of
Handel's Messiah (Hallelujah!) on Dec. 9
and 10. Tickets are cheap.
From out of the mistletoe there emerged
a wild rasping, reminding all that Janis
Joplin appears with her Big Brother at the
Pacific Coliseum Sat. nite. Should be a
screeching good time.
A Christmas card wafted down from the
mantle and on it we found news of an ex
hibit of traditional Chinese water colours
at Imperial Arts, 4458 W. 10th. It is to be
a one-man show of the works of Ng Ting-
chit who has shown his work in Australia
and New Zealand. Exhibition runs Dec.
7-21.
Film goodies include two large musicals
of dubious quality, Oliver! at the Hyland,
and Star at the Stanley. Much more to
whatever point there is will be Luis Bunuel's erotic masterpiece Belle du Jour,
opening December 19th at the Varsity. And
on December 8th, at the Olympia Theatre,
one showing only at 7 p.m., will be The
Emperor Hirohito and the Generals, otherwise know as Japan's Longest Day, but
much better known as Nippon no ichiban
nagai hi, a massive Japanese film starring
Mifune and everybody else, which tells the
story of the events which led up to Japan's
surrender in 1945.
Through the rear-view mirror we caught
a glimpse of the Co-op Bookstore which is
sponsoring a Book, Art and Record Fair in
the Avon Room of the Devonshire Hotel
Dec. 6 and 7. The Fair will highlight the
latest publications from twenty countries.
Ten B.C. authors will be present to discuss
their recent works. Opens 10 a.m. daily.
At the Village Bistro till Sunday, The
Poppy Family. Running consecutively weekly through December: Papa Bear's Medicine
Show, Wholly Smoke, Mock Duck, Seeds
of Time. Mother Tucker's Yellow Duck.
And from out of the valley there rose
a cheery chortle that sounded suspiciously
similar, to season's greetings cum merry
Christmas cum happie gnu year . . .
And the happie helpers headeth homeward and the silent knight ensued.
More from '68
(Continued from pf 11 even
those too ignorant, too insensitive and too
complacent to contemplate change. Even
to the most cynical, history is charged
with people and movements who changed
significantly, if not greatly within themselves, then certainly the course of human
events.
For those who consider violence as a
basic ingredient of man's nature the task
of society is to create the social conditions
wherein maximum control of that potential
violence is afforded; not by police but by
the contentment of its populace and with
harmless built-in safety valves. On the
other hand for those who believe that the
mark of Cain is an environmental condition, something may be done by way of
radical change in the educational and communication media. This may be accomplished by depriving violence of all its
commercial glamour and drama and reporting it complete with all its ugliness.
The legacy of 1968, it is suspected, will
be more violence. One thing should be
known and that is, that if violence is
advocated and accepted by large segments
of our social order as a -weapon of progress
then that order will cease to exist.
Something Different!
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
THEY'RE
Coming
BACK
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS  -  DINNER  JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
Latest Styles
10%  UBC Discount
JIM ABERNETHY, MANAGER
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968 Friday,  November 29,  1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 25
Polisci boycott
termed  success'
MONTREAL (CUP) — The occupation of the McGill Uni.
versity political science department moved into its second day
Tuesday and scored a major success when its boycott of all
political science courses was 100 per cent effective.
No professors or students crossed picket lines set up in
front of all regularly scheduled class rooms. In addition, all
sociology classes were given over to study sessions on the question.
Some 75 students spent the night on the fourth floor of the
Leacock humanities building. They awoke Tuesday to a schedule
of 11 separate counter-classes, lectures and seminars by the
occupation committee.
The students are now officially supported by UGEQ, CUS,
the sociology students and faculty caucus, the students' society
of McGill University and the arts and science undergraduate
society at McGill. The student society has donated $200 to occupation funds to help buy food and blankets.
The fourth floor organization crystallized Tuesday with the
election of a five-man executive committee established to run
the occupation and negotiate with the faculty.
In addition, there are about six separate committees to
handle the logistics of the occupation including sanitation, food,
equipment, communication, security, etc.
There were no student-faculty negotiations during the day
as the faculty seems prepared to wait before playing its hand.
Students say they will stay until their demands are met.
THE FRIAR
4423 W. 10th 224-0833
EVERT   SUNDAY
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Juice, bacon, all the hotcakes you can eat — $1
EVERY   SUNDAY
PRIME ROAST BEEF $1.50
THE TIME!
flrudy. JimjL,
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2034 W. 41st 263-7121
P.S. — Fall Coats, Suits and Dress are now being "DUMPED".
&«t«Kt@gWC«iCWC!<E««iCtra
To Ail Their Patrons
A Very Merry Christmas
and
A Happy New Year
From Elio - Ron - Evalyne
4554 W. 10th Ave.
THE FAMILY IS PR0BABL Y STUCK ON WHAT TO
GET YOU FOR CHRISTMAS HEM'S A FEW IDEAS!
■>! l&sSffsfc
ZEISS
Ikotron
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J, •_ ****** A Here is a compact, yet powerful,
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originally sold at $74.95 is now, by virtue of this
Special buy, only $49.88! It features a fully rechargeable Ni-Cad battery & price includes the recharger.
Will deliver up to 65 flashes per full charge. Has a
power rating of 50 with A.S.A. 25; built-in battery
check circuit; vertical or horizontal mounting; hot shoe
or regular contact! A truly outstanding buy!
A.L.C.
Cassette
RECORDER
ONLY
39.88
Perfect
For Students
The newest Cassette recorder from Sanyo is ideal for
students as well as general use. Designed with a
student's budget in mind, it none the less records and
plays back beautifully. (Even music) It has automatic
record level control and requires no adjusting or setting. Just press the record button and it will record . . .
loud or soft . . . even clear across the worn. Perfect
for lectures on the latest pop records
PEN EE AUTOMATIC
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This camera is small enough to carry in a pocket yet
will produce a bright clear picture with a minimum of
fuss. It uses regular 35mm film, yet gets twice as many
pictures from the roll. (A worthwhile saving.) It is fully
automatic; requiring you to set nothing more than the
A.S.A. of the film. The shutter even locks if there is
not enough light or the lens cap is left on. This camera
has been a favorite of travellers the world over, and
at this new low price would be a perfect gift for
someone   leaving  on   a  trip   ....  or  for   yoursetf.
Or have them get you a Gift Certificate at
the store that gives you full value for your
money and has the time to give you full
service too.
THE BEST T.T.L. REFLEX
BUY EVER! ONLY 139.88
Reg. List 204.95
Only 139.88
This is our Christmas season feature!! Similar in design
to the famous Pentax Spotmatic, the Yashica T.L. has
all of iH important features with a new very low
price. Never before have we been able to offer a
quality, "thru-the-lens" metering S.LR. camera below
$150. Yashica, (the largest in Japan and very well
known in other parts of Canada) has selected local
dealers to move Yashica into our market in a big
way.—By cutting their profits to the bone and selecting
dealers who are willnig to work on small profit, large
volume; Yashica are offering a full feature, quality
S.L.R. at far below the market price. We have priced
it even lower -for the Christmas season!
BY SUNLITE
OPTICAL
OF JAPAN
CABIN
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$59.88
FULL REMOTE
This is from the only major projector exporter in Japan
. . . Sunlite Optical. A good quality, full remote projector for only $59.88. It takes the standard low
cost "Universal" trays and allows slide changing and
focussing adjustment by remote control. Blower cooled
and with high efficiency optics for superior brightness
and sharpness on the screen.
The Big Swinger From
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Get in the swing of things with the big Swinger. New
big pictures! Easy pack loading! Never before so much
fun at such low prices. Built-in photometer and flash.
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KERRISDALE CAMERAS
2170 W. 41st Ave.
266-8381
In West Van.
THE CAMERA SHOP
1550 Marine Dr.
922-4921 Page 26
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
A FIVE DAY HUMAN RELATIONS
T-GROUP PROCESS
."•**
Available to students, faculty and community
December 27th - 31st
Brochure and application forms available
at International House
More detailed   information  available   by  appointment
tween 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. Monday to Wednesday in Decern!;
toil*
From Page 2
for half an hour, mostly about
personal problems. He seems
upset that the crisis is going
to jeopardize his carefully
built career. He leaves at 3 a.m.
Strand is asked if he will
convert Nov. 22, 9:30 a.m. mall
lineeting called by him into a
Rebate over the four demands,
answer is no.
Merry Christmas
Vancouver's international hairstyling staff,
including much famed stylists such as Frans,
Charles, Martin and many more have developed
ideas for this party season that will have your
hair looking stunning all day but especially for
that important party.
DEREK
I
562 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1, B.C.    •    TEL. 684-5905
Haute   Coiffure
first talk
NOV. 22—7:30 a.m. Plenary
meeting of students inside
building sends 25 students out
to Strand's meeting to distribute a petition in support of
four demands. A press release
is issued.
9:30 a.m. Second morning
plenary is called. Discussion
turns to soliciting off-campus
support for occupation and
four demands by holding public rallies. Administrative services are again cut off by occupation of building.
Strand holds his large rally.
He has cancelled all classes
for 9:30. Students on mall are
told to reflect on the actions of
those who have occupied
buildings, but, not to take any
direct action. Strand's dilemma
seems to be that he doesn't
want to ask students to choose
between himself and occupying force. Also, polarization
could lead to violent clash
between students.
This, clearly, is an important meeting. It is at the president's house this Friday morning where the final decision is
made. Meanwhile, 11:30 to 1:30
rally is called by occupying
force. More than 1,000 students
hear arguments for and against
occupation. Many fear degrading of their degree and of the
university image. The four
demands are supported, however, the tactic of occupation
is strongly challenged by many
students.
NOV. 22 — 4:00 p.m.
At this time, a steering committee meeting is beginning
inside the occupied area. The
political discussion changes in
emphasis. The four demands,
it is now stressed, should be
related to wider societal issues
such as the role of the student
in the university and the role
of the university in society,
i.e. whose interest does it
serve, the student or that of
business?
The steering committee decides to recommend to a general meeting an education program to be implemented on
and off campus.
9:00 p.m. General meeting of
occupants begins. Students decide if necessary to stay until
police come. Strand this night
has conveyed through student
senator Stan Wong his decision
to negotiate no further until
building is cleared.
Students agree that arrests
will be best means of dramatizing unwillingness of administrators to negotiate on anyone's terms but their own. It
is recognized that since it
would take 72 hours (business
days), notice to call senate that
body couldn't meet any earlier
Continued on Page 31
See: COPS
GIOVANNI'S
COIFFURES
Something new has
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Windshields-All Models Beetles to '64 Installed $17.00
Specials on Mufflers and Tail  Pipes—Gaskets
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2 Blocks N. of Hastings Ask for Tyrone or Linda Friday,  November 29,   1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 27
Petition
From Page 1
featured Hare and registrar
Jack Parnall, against student
senator Stuart Rush, and
Daphne Kelgard, arts 4, of
the SDU.
The subject of the debate,
which was more like a discussion, was possible enrolment
cuts at UBC in view of the
university's rapidly-increasing
enrolment.
Hare reiterated -Statements
made at a press conference
earlier in the day and emphasized the administration had
not yet decided to restrict enrolment.
"It is still an open question,"
he said.
"I am in favor of admitting
all students who have the ability to do the work and I don't
give a damn about their color,
creed,  religion,  or  politics."
"However, if the door remains open the university will
be destroyed. We have not
been building to meet the need
and we have no uncommitted
building funds.
"This is not just our problem," he said, "it is a provincial issue because this affects
every university student in
British Columbia."
The president indicated
there were probably several
methods of restricting enrolment if the university decided
to do so.
"I personally feel we should
do it on a first come first serve
basis."
Rush challenged the premise
that enrolment cuts are the
answer.
He proposed alternatives be
investigated before this step is
taken.
He suggested such things as
night classes, use of non-
academic buildings (SUB) for
classes, and the implementation of the trimester system.
SERIOGRAPHS
By
NORMAN  RICH
6 Color  -   Editions  Limited
Open 3 - 7  Evenings
ODYSSEY GALLERY
4368 W. 10th Ave
PIMATft^
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Full Facilities
Dine In - Take. Out -  Delivery
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PIZZAS - CHICKEN
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4544 W. 10th
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224-1351
266-7188
Hours: Weekdays 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.
Sundays   10  a.m.  to  11   p.m.
Rush accused senate of already having made up its mind
on the issue.
"There is a presumption in
senate we will have enrolment
cuts," he said.
He then said restrictions, if
made, could be based on higher entrance requirements, refusal to permit failures to
repeat, and regional restrictions, such as forcing students
on Vancouver Island to attend
only the University of Victoria.
Parnall gave a general outline of the admission policy at
the university, stressing all the
while points to emphasize
UBC does not have the problems afflicting SFU.
Miss Kelgard acknowledged UBC does have an open
enrolment policy.
She said there are two issues
at hand.
"There is a crisis at UBC
and there is a crisis in the
province because of the deprivation of funds to all levels
of education in B.C.
"At present we must do the
best with what we have and
go out and talk to people of
'lids province and tell them
education is being starved."
Miss Kelgard  criticized the
board   of   governors   for   not
speaking   out   to   the   public
about the crisis facing the uni-
• versity.
Hare replied that as president he was glad the board was
silent, for he could think of
places where board members
were vociferous and this did
not lead to harmonious situations.
In response to a question
from the audience Hare stated
the public doesn't like sit-ins
and doesn't like universities
that don't act severely with
them.
When asked why he was not
a member of the SDU, Hare
replied that he had never
been asked to join.
SDU members immediately
extended an invitation to join
the organization and Hare
accepted, but quickly asked
what "democratic" means.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS
FOR THE
SPORTS CAR OWNER
$1.95 & UP
#y%
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
12th & ALMA 736-9804
CUE CARDS
(A Student Discount Card With Free Directory)
Use your Cue Card for Christmas Shopping and  Entertainment
during the Holiday Season
OFFER:
- SPECIAL DISCOUNTS IN 125 STORES -
Just Show Your 'Cue Card' Each Time You Shop!
A GENEROUS COUPON SECTION
IN THE DIRECTORY FOR LIMITLESS ENTERTAINMENT
Available: Bookstore - SUB Information Desk -
Canteens in Residences
ONLY $1.50
Expires:   Sept.   1/69
ATTENTION
GRADUATES
The Noranda Group of Companies offers a wide range of
opportunities to university graduates with ability and intia-
tive. Broad diversification promises successful applicants
unusual scope to develop skills and gain experience in their
fields of specialization. The policy of the Group to select
personnel from within our companies to fill key positions as
they open up, makes it possible for a trainee to travel widely
and, over the years, to get exposure to a great variety
of job situations which will help prepare him for supervision
and administrative duties.
A Noranda Group representative will be on campus here
December 2nd to interview applicants from among prospective graduates. Appointments can be made in advance
through the University Placement Office, telephone 228-3811.
NORANDA MINES GROUP OF COMPANIES
1
*  ■  *
. n|m .
Beginning This Sunday, December l
—ADVENT   I—
LIVE TRADITIONAL WORSHIP
IN A CONTEMPORARY SETTING
10:30 A.M.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE, UBC
Car  Pick-Ups:   10:15 a.m.   Fort  Camp,   Totem,  Vanier
Car Return:  11:45 a.m.
TRAVEL
U.S.S.R. -Eastern Europe
Travel to these parts still requires careful preparation well in advance.
As official agents for the government
tourist offices of all these countries, we
can give you accurate up-to-date information and assistance.
Why not call in and see us during the holidays?
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
HAGEN S
736-5651
12996   W.   Broadway
Hagen's Travel  Service Ltd.
Starts CHRISTMAS DAY
DECEMBER 25th
JULIE ANDREWS
RICHARD CRENNA
MICHAEL CRAIG DANIEL MASSEY
M -mm »«*.» _ ii »o.i co.«a
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STANLEY THEATRE
GRANVILLE AT 12th - 733-262*2
Evenings: 8 p.m. — Matinees Daily 2:00 p.m. Page 28
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
1°"
JpppfSsrattfr- V*I.U.
r~-
SPOR TS
Birds, Clan clash
in Totem tourney
By JOHN TWIGG
Dr. Bob Bell, head basketball coach at the University of
Victoria, sat as quiet as could
be expected and watched his
team get drubbed Saturday
night 94-38 at the hands of the
UBC Thunderbirds.
After the game he said,
"There's not much you can say
— that's a great ball team (referring to UBC)."
And the Birds are a great
ball team, probably the best in
their history.
Take the players, for example. High scorer in the
UVic game was Ken Shields,
who just happened to be an
all-star in the same league two
years ago, when he played for
Calgary.
Following him was a potent
pair, one a rookie and the
other in his fifth year of eligibility.
The rookie is Ron Thorsen,
the basketball wizard from
Prince George. He scored 14
points against UVic and led the
team with 7 assists.
The veteran is Bob Baraz-
zuol, owner of practically every
scoring record at UBC. He
also scored 14 points while
pulling down a respectable 13
rebounds.
Neil Williscroft,    the    6-6 Vfc
foot jackrabbit centre, controlled the boards with a remarkable 1 5 defensive rebounds, and '5 offensive rebounds.
But the talent doesn't end
there. Add Phil Langley, a
hotshot guard who's sometimes
plagued by a cold shot and a
hot temper, but was easily a
starting guard last year, and
Bob Molinski, last year's hustling defensive expert, and you
probably have the starting
lineup.
Note, there were six names
in that list. Also capable of
breaking into the starting lineup are sweet-shooting Derek
Sankey and 6-7 Terry MacKay,
much improved from his performance as a JV last year.
Rounding out the lineup are
Bill Ruby, a guard up from
last year's jayvees, Neil Murray and Dave Rice, both capable forwards from last year's
team.
UVic coach Bell had words
on that too. His team lost
77-40 to SFU the night before
playing the Birds. Asked who
would win, he replied without
hesitation, "UBC!"
I agree with Bell, but go a
little farther. I say UBC by
10 to 15 points.
STARRY RON THORSEN and
his team are gunning for a
win against SFU Sat. night.
"Where the puck is the blessed crotchet?"yelled blue blorgs
coach Be Moon, as the big guys
beat the little guys in the
national sport about which
much hoopla was raised.
Totem tournament history
The UBC Thunderbirds have won their own
Totem Tournament four times, more often than
any other team.
This is the seventeenth start of the tournament, which has been played continuously since
1951 but didn't happen last year, because the
Thunderbirds had made previous arrangements
to play in an international tourney in Portland.
A minor catastrophe, the gym burned down,
aborted that, but the Birds had to go and play
anyway.
The last UBC win was in 1964 and tbe
last winner of the tournament was Gonzaga
University, reputedly one of the best National
Collegiate Athletic Association schools to play
here.
This is Simon Fraser's first entry into the
tournament, and their starting game will be
against the Birds at 9:15 Saturday night.
The two American entries will play off in
the first round game which starts at 7 p.m.
In their game, Mr. B. Philips the athletic
director at UBC thinks that Portland State
will probably win.
They have the tallest of the teams on the
rosters and seven returnees and five Junior
College transfers.
Great Falls College from Montana is the
dark horse of the tournament. They had a 20-4
record last year against some of the schools the
Birds  played.
There will be no advance ticket sale or
give away as the case may be, the tickets will
be let out to the public starting at 6 p.m. on
Saturday night.
There will be 2,550 seats in the gym and
of those there are fifteen hundred accounted
for now so there will only be a thousand distributed on Saturday evening.
Birds face Clan
By  TONY   GALLAGHER
The UBC Thunderbirds face their first real test on Saturday
evening at War Memorial gym when they play host to the
Simon Fraser Clansmen in the Totem basketball tournament.
The other two clubs participating in the two-day affair,
Portland State and Great Falls College from Montana, will
meet in the first game at 7:30.
As for the feature game, the Birds and Clan both put their
undefeated records on the line in a contest matching two of the
best collegiate teams in Canada.
The Birds, led by their big three, Ron Thorson, Bob Barazzuol
and Neil Williscroft, will receive help from defensive specialist
Bob Molinski, who will probably check the talented Clansmen
rebounder Dave Murphy.
With the return of Dave Rice and Neil Murray, the Birds
will be at full strength, but in order to score they must first
penetrate the tough three-two SFU defense.
Concerning his own defensive plans, coach Peter Mullins
said, after Saturday's 94-38 bombing of Victoria, "We are planning nothing special, just our regular man to man defense."
It is this defense which will have to contain a line-up featuring Murphy, and scoring threats Gary Smith and Brian McKenzie.
Predictions on the outcome of the game have been few,
but Dr. Bob Bell, coach of the Victoria Vikings, who were
crushed by both teams last weekend, said, "UBC is a great club,
and should win with no trouble".
The winner will take on the victor of the Portland State-
Great Falls game, at 3 p.m. Sunday afternoon.
To All Our Customers And Friends
A
Really Merry Christmas
AND
A Happy New Year !
from
THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF OP
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th
224-0828
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICERS TRAINING PLAN
A military career counsellor will be on the campus to provide details of the various government sponsored university
training plans on the 29th and 30th of November.
There are many advantages to be gained by making a
career in the services and both graduates and undergraduates would be well advised to investigate the possibilities of such a career — arrangements for interviews
may be made through the Student Placement Office or by
contacting the
Canadian  Forces Recruiting Centre
545 Seymour St. 684-7341
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses ...
look to
I    Ptesctibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
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The really different Christmas Gift!
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Studying, relaxing or working — their contoured, inner-soles give your
feet proper support, especially good for "after-ski" wear.
Call 736-0725 for a look at the newest in foot comfort Friday,  November 29,  1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 29
Weekend Bird to watch
This weekend amid many other athletic
events the ruby team is playing an important game.
One of the players that they are relying
heavily on is a twenty-three-year-old, hundred and sixty-five-pound, five-foot-ten
center.
Dave Austin is a native Vancouverite
who played rugby all through his high
school career at West Van Senior Secondary.
Dave has represented both British Columbia and UBC in various match games.
He played with the Thunderbirds when they
played against the Australian Wallabies in
1967.
He also played on the B.C. team that
won the Canadian Rugby Championships.
Dave and the Birds will play against the
Meralomas this Saturday at Wolfson field.
Game time is 2:30 p.m. and there will be
other games going on simultaneouly at the
Wolfson complex.
Birds skating against Bisons
By RIK NYLAND
The Thunderbird ice hockey
team was faced with very
little opposition as they took
two weekend games from the
University of Winnipeg "Wes-
men" by scores of 6-2 and 6-1.
In Friday night's opener Jack
Moores opened scoring for the
Birds, while Bob Lennox replied for the Wesmen in the
first period, while the Birds
were still finding their legs
after the long journey.
Barry Wilcox and Miles Des-
harnais scored in the second
frame to put the Birds ahead
3-1.
In the final 20 minutes Jim
Fowler was set up twice by
Mickey McDowell; Dwayne
Biagioni scored once while
Bill Kearns replied for the opposition to end the score at 6-2.
The game was marred by 17
penalties as both teams threw
their weight around but the
score indicates the Birds physically dominated the Wesmen.
Birds outshot Winnipeg 45-
31. A little one-sided.
Saturday's game was a repeat of the first as the Birds
came out even stronger.
Rookie Tom Williamson, up
from the JVs and Mike Dan-through scored first period
goals.
Bill Kearns with a goal tried
to put Winnipeg back in the
game, but Williamson scored
his second goal of the game to
make it 3-1 going into the final
frame.
Birds pumped in three goals
in the final period from the
sticks of Wayne Schaab, Mickey McDowell and Brian
Jones.
This time the Birds tested
goalie Grant Clay, backup
goalkeeper with the 'Nationals,
with 51 shots, while Rick Bardal was called upon to make
16 saves.
Coach Bob Hindmarch is
still juggling his talent to get
a winning and scoring combination.
Hard-hitting Tom Koret-
chuck will see action for the
fL*st time this year as he returns to the lineup this weekend at the Winter Sport Centre
when the Birds play the University of Manitoba.
Friday's game starts at 8
p.m. and Saturday's game at
2.30 p.m.
Manitoba dropped two close
games, one in double overtime
by a 1-0 score,   last   weekend
when they played Edmonton.
Last   years   winner   of   the
League scoring title, Rod Lin-
quist will be in the Manitoba
lineup and he should provide
a good portion of their scoring
punch.
Is it the all-Canadian scientific news
magazine for science students? Are
its articles written by Canada's top
scientists and engineers? Does it'
report new developments and
suggest innumerable career
opportunities?
Find the answers in a complimentary
copy, by writing to:
SCIENCE AFFAIRS
1255 University, Room 222
Montreal 2, Quebec
Subscriptions:      Students    $3
8 issues (2 yrs.)    Adults        $4
THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF
THE YOUTH SCIENCE FOUNDATION
DIAMOND HEAD
SUMMER
tferrruTE
A summer program designed for the involved individual.
Sailing, Scuba Diving, Surfing and Outer Island Safaris.
Interested?  Fill in the blanks below and mail to-
Diamond Head Summer Institute
P.O. Box 9492   Honolulu, Hawaii 96820
Name
Address
College
IMbr*  CELEBRATE THEIR 46th
ANNIVERSARY
With The Bridal  Bouquet Diamond  Event
WIN an ALL EXPENSE PAID WEDDING
No purchase necessary to win. Just register your names at
any of MILLERS 3 stores and you CAN WIN $500.00.
However,  if you  purchase your diamond  and  wedding  ring  at
Millers and you are declared Ihe winner, you win an extra $500.
HURRY - REGISTER YOUR NAMES NOWI
This offer closes Dec. 31, 1968.
Convenient Credit Terms arranged with  Courtesy
Discount to U.B.C. Students and Personnel
655 Granville  St. 683-6651
Vancouver
47 W.  Hastings St.,      682-3801
Vancouver
622   Columbia   St. 526-3771
'    New  Westminster
VaiKouvar Stores Open Fridays Until S. Now Wcstailmtar Store Opm Thure. & Fri. Until •
BASKETBALL
TOTEM TOURNAMENT
Saturday, November 30th
Tickets Available from 6 p.m. Sat.
MEMORIAL   GYM
Limited Seating
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS —-
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS —
12:45 to 2:45 pjn.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 pjn.
3:00 to 5:00 pjn.
7:30 to 9:30 pjn.*
3:00 to 5:00 pjn.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 pjn.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
'Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
PAPA
■   BEARS
tfg^a^^ffi-'-^-'ffljg
5S& HOUSV^i
Dec. 10-15.
The Holy Smoke
Dec 17-22
Mock Duck
Dec. 24 - 29
Seeds of Time
Dec. 31 - Jan. 5
Mother Tucker's
YELLOW DUCK
DRINKS
SCOLD]
drims
mm
FUSHlT
? f36-9920 4£
^*&'V£W:W^itZ^$&&
-rfc Page 30
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 29, 1968
~*0**S.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Nov. 29
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Nov. 30
Dec. 1
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
1
7
7
Dec. 14
Dec. 15
Dec. 20
Dec. 21
Dec. 20
Dec. 21
Dec. 23
Dec. 26
Dec. 27
Jan. 3
Jan. 4
Jan. 4
Jan. 4
Jan. 6
Sport
Ice hockey
Ice hockey
Rugby
Soccer
Wrestling
Basketball
Basketball
Swimming
Cross country
Soccer
Cross country
Soccer
Basketball
Basketball
Ice hockey
Ice hockey
Basketball
Soccer
Basketball
Basketball
Basketball
Cross country
Soccer
Basketball
Opponent
U. of Manitoba
U. ofManitoba
Meralomas
Croatia
UBC Invitational
Totem tournament
Totem tournament
Thunderbird relays
League race
Firefighters
End of season race
Eintracht
Lewis & Clark College
Lewis & Clark College
U. of Victoria
U. of Victoria
California State
Columbus
Portland State
U. of Winnipeg
Western Wash. S.C.
Abbotsford Champs.
Royals
Fresno Pacific College
Location
Thunderbird arena
Thunderbird arena
Wolfson field
Thunderbird stadium
Women's gym 7
Memorial gym
Memorial gym
Percy Norman  pool
Victoria
Callister Park
Stanley Park
Callister Park
Memorial gym
Memorial gym
Victoria
Victoria
Memorial gym
Callister Park
Portland
Memorial gym
Bellingham
Abbotsford
Thunderbird stadium
Memorial gym
Time
8:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
a.m.-11 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
all day
2:00 p.m.
11:00 a.m.
2:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
11:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
Jayvee Hotkey
The UBC Braves hockey
team won their eighth straight
league game by defeating
Richmond Mounties 2-1.
The Braves worked hard to
take a two-goal lead going into
the final pe-riod. On a pair of
picture goals, Joe Petretta
was set up by Larry Watts
early in the first period and
midway through the second
Ken Lemmen had a perfect
pass from Roy Sakaki.
From this goal on th© Braves
appeared to ease off until the
Richmond squad scored at the
7 minute mark of the third
period, at which time the
Braves again started to skate.
The Braves have an exceptionally good team which results in their easing off at
times while still being able
to come from behind to win.
Three games in the next
five days will provide a real
challenge to the team as they
meet Simon Fraser today,
White Rock on Monday and
the powerful Hornets on Wednesday.
Coach Andy Bakogeorge always optimistic but still concerned stated "The Hornets
are not that good of a skating
club but they outweigh us by
about 401bs. per man.
Wrestling  meet
The UBC wrestling team is
hosting an Invitational Tournament this weekend on campus.
The meet will be in the
Women's gym so as to hold all
the competitors entered in the
nine  separate  weight  classes.
Beside the 12-man UBC
team, -university teams are
entered from University of
Washington, Seattle Pacific
College, Central Washington
State College, UVic, and
Western Washington State
College.
Wrestling for UBC will be
Camm Christensen, four-time
WCIAA champ; Dave Gray,
Beaumont Trophy winner and
Bob Laycoe, a new addition to
the team.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville ot 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10th - 738-9833
DISTINCTIVELY
NOW
FASHIONS
4409 West 10th Ave.
"Just Off Campus"
224-5352
Big Block Club Meeting
Next Wednesday, the first Wednesday of December,
the Big Block club will hold its third monthly business
and lunch meeting.
All members are asked to attend, as the meeting will
cover some important points, such as, the annual dinner
sweaters and others.
For the first time it will be on campus; the site will
be the upstairs lounge in the gym, with the meal starting
at 12:30 and ending before 1:30.
OPEN FRIDAY TILL 9 P.M.
BOOKS    FROM    20    COUNTRIES
You are cordially invited to a
BOOK, ART and RECORD FAIR
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7
10 a.m. to 11 p.m. each day
at the
DEVONSHIRE HOTEL — Avon Room
849 WEST GEORGIA STREET
10 B.C. Authors will be present
to discuss their recent books.
Sponsored by:
CO-OPERATIVE BOOKSTORE
341 West Pender Street
Vancouver.   Phone 685*5836
■Sft
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
UNIROYAL LIMITED
We are looking for high-caliber CHEMISTS and
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS at the B.Sc, M.Sc. and Ph.D.
levels for opening  in the RESEARCH  LABORATORIES.
These are challenging positions which involve basic
research, applied research and development in varied
fields, including organic chemical synthesis, reaction
studies, elastomers, plastics, polymerization and physical properties of materials.
A UNIROYAL Scientist will be on campus
December 2,  1968
For further information and to arrange an interview, please
contact the Student Placement Office, or write to the Coordinator
of Research and Development.
UNIROTAL LIMITED
Research Laboratories
Guelph, Ontario
Say "Merry Christmas"
in a special way
Accutron Calendar
14K yellow gold, Waterproof,
Sweep Second Hand, Gilt
and Silver Dial, Luminous Dots
and Hands, Alligator Strap.
Model *253O8Y«S0.00
ACCUTRON* 1,1
by BULOVA
Accutron with its electronic
powered tuning fork splits each
second into 360 equal parts.
This makes Accutron so precise
it's truly the world's most
accurate timepiece.
There's not
another gift
that does
as much
for a Man's
Pride.
Special Christmas Discount to Students
VARSITY JEWELLERS
4517 W. 10th
224-4432 Priday, November 29, 1968
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 31
... and then, cops
From Page 26
than Nov. 28. It is unlikely the
occupation will be allowed to
continue this long.
The consensus is that the
confrontation with police will
occur over the weekend. A oneway door policy is implemented. Only those wanting out
may pass through th© door.
Nobody else is allowed to
enter.
NOV. 23 — 2.00 a.m. RCMP
are seen arriving in cars,
station wagons and bus. Meeting convenes on main floor at
2:25. Pamphlets are passed in
to students by RCMP at 2:30.
Signed by Strand, the pamphlet gives students one half
hour to leave peacefully and
without any charge being imposed. The majority will stay.
At 3:00 a.m. RCMP enter
the building. After 24 hours of
refusing to negotiate Strand
has returned.
They have forced one door
through which they enter and
they control all other doors.
There are with Strand some
200 of them. There are left 114"
folk-singing students. All are
finger-printed three times in
process of arrest and jailing
and each person arrested is
also photographed twice. Those
who leave within time limit
given by Srtrand are also photographed by police as they
leave  building.
NOV. 23 —' 6:00 a.m. Emergency SFU student council
meeting is convened. Motions
■ passed in principle guarantee
legal aid and bail for SFU
students arrested. Strand is
condemned for calling police
on campus in violation of the
principles of academic freedom
and of integral autonomy of
the SFU community.
Swin.G AT
OIL CAN HARRY'S
The meeting also asks students to not attend any meeting called by Strand.
NOV. 23 — 3:00 p.m. 114
meet with lawyers to discuss
charges and possible trial procedures. They learn th© prosecution may prosecute all 114
collectively or it may prosecute
each of the arrested individually or it may enter stay of
proceedings against most of
arrested and pick out just a
few as a test case.
NOV. 25—General meeting
of SFSS endorses four demands of students. Strand is
condemned for calling RCMP
on to campus. Motion is defeated narrowly to declare a
general strike of all students
effective immediately.
The general meeting gives
Strand to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday to
answer the four demands.
The meeting asks Strand
and faculty council to not take
any punitive or academic actions against anyone, arrested
or not, who may or may not
have been involved in the
crisis which involved the calling of the RCMP to campus.
NOV. 26 —SFU SFSS asks
all charges be dropped. General meeting affirms motions
passed previous day. It adds a
key motion calling for a vote
by secret ballot to ask students
if they wish to strike if Strand
by 5:00 p.m. Tuesday afternoon
has not satisfactorily answered
four demands. Strand's answers to Monday meeting of
SFSS are back at .:00 p.m.
Tuesday. He takes no new
position but on the new demand for amnesty for the 114
he asks for reasons why 114
should have charges against
them dropped. He is leaving
one door open.
The TA union holds a vote
asking TAs if they will join
student strike if it materializes.
Machinery for a possible
strike has been set in motion.
Students will decide in a two-
day ballot whether or not to
walk out.
TRY OUR
PACK
Six qreat performances by the Vancouver Symphony. Half-
season offer gives students up to 54% savings on regular
prices. Student prices $7.20 - $18.00 for SIX-PACK.
Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., 683-3255
GRAND
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Until December 31, 1968
Alma  Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
]| High School Visitations
KERRISDALE
FASHION FABRICS
2363 West 41st Ave.
Near Balsam
261-9554
WITH YOUR STUDENT DISCOUNT
Dtake JabricA
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WIDE SELECTION OF IMPORTED BROCADES
FULL STOCK OF
VOGUE, McCAU, SIMPLICITY, BUTTERICK, POLYNESIAN PATTERNS
AMPLE PARKING IN THE REAR OF THE STORE
Students interested in applying to make visitations
to B.C. high schools during January and February
please either leave your name and phone number in
Room 232 in SUB or come to a meeting on Wednesday
Dec. 4, also in Room 232. The visitations are to orient
B-C.'s high school students to U.B.C; to go out and tell
it like it is.
ptOJfL  JLJ0WL  £x&CUiivSL
A HAPPY CHRISTMAS
^ Wonderful Gift
Suggestions from
Junior to Grandad
INSTAMATIC KITS from 15.95
POLAROID from 18.50
FLASHGUNS from     4.95
ALBUMS from     1.50
ELECTRONIC FLASH from 19.95
MOVIE CAMERAS from 34.50
MOVIE LIGHTS from 12.50
ENLARGERS from 45.00
PHOTO BOOKS       .95
And all the accessories one could possibly use for stuffing the stocking.
So why not spend an interesting visit with
(OPP. SAFEWAY)
4538 W. 10th Avenue
224-5858 224-9112
"The  Store  with   the  Technical   Photographic   Knowledge" Page 32
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, November 22, 1968
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
NDP's Lewis talks,
Tween bids adieu
TODAY
NDP  CLUB
David Lewis, New Democratic Party
deputy leader and NDP house leader
speaks noon today SUB  ballroom.
PHRATERES
All phi noon today Bu. 104.
FILMSOC
Cool   Hand   Luke   eats   50   raw   noon
today,  3:30, 6:30 and  9 p.m.
FOLK  DANCE  CLUB
Dancing  Tuesday  noon,  SUB   125.
VCF
Communion  service   with  Rev.   Birch
7 p.m.  tonight SUB rooms L and M.
CIRCLE   K
General meeting noon today SUB  C
JAPAN   STUDENT   EXCHANGE
Slides taken by students last summer
shown  noon  today.   Bu.   102.
CIASP
Meeting noon today SUB 105-B.
NEXT WEEK
UBC SCC
St. Nicholas round rally Sunday 10
a.m. L lot. Four-hour rally in and
a*roujnd Vancouver. For info call
738-5078.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEOE
Plot to overthrow Hitler in 1948: talk
by Prof.  E.  Kordt  (one   of the  main
plotters)   noon   Monday   Bu.   100.
EL   CIRCULO
Spanish conversation Monday noon in
International House 402. Also,- important   meeting   for   members.
UKRANIAN   CLUB
Meeting Monday noon in SUB 215.
UBC   CONSERVATIVES
Speakers forum: David  Sinclair noon
Monday  in   council   chambers.
NDP  CLUB
Hear candidates Harry Rankin (COPE)
and Franklin Wiles (TEAM) Monday
at 8 p.m. Dunbar community  centre.
RAILROADERS
All people interested in forming a
model railroad club meeting in SUB
C Monday noon.
ACEI
Mr.   MacPhee   speaks   noon   Monday
Ed.  209 on Integration in  Vancouver
schools, Non-members 10 cents.
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOC
John Walker lecture Monday 7:30 p.m.
at International House on the Greeks
in    Asia    Minor.     Refreshments    and
Greek dancing follow.
-   CLASSIFIED   -
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines. 1 day 75tf, 3 days 82.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Clarified ad* are not accepted by telephone mod
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline it 11:30 a.m. the day before publicatiom.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, BXk
UBC   RADIO
General meeting Tuesday noon in
council chambers to discuss constitutional revisions.
SUB FORMAL OPENING
The elusive (illusive, epicene?) committee now meets Tuesday noon SUB
224 Be at the meeting to arrange
for' meetings in Christmas holidays
and to  put G.L. in the bag.
GERMAN   CLUB
Duetsche   weinachts  lieder  bei   einen
berunten deutschen jugen choir Tuesday   noon   upper   lounge   of   International House.
IPHEC
Meeting   Tuesday   6:30   p.m.   SUB   N.
HIGH   SKOOL   VISITATION
Students interested in going out to
B.C. hi skools to "tell it like it is"
and prepare students for UBC. meet
in SUB 232 noon Wednesday.
VISITING LECTURER
Cambridge land economy prof. D. R.
Denman speaks Dec. 5 Lass^ 102 on
Property, the Forgetten Dimension of
Planners.
FILMSOC-ENG   2M
The Importance of Being Earnest noon
Thursday, 6:30 and 9 p.m. Same
times Dec. 6. Tickets on sale at 11:30
a.m., get them early, all shows usually  sold   out.
KOERNER   LECTURE
W. A. Williams, Oregon State, speaks
noon Dec. 6 in Bu. 106 on The Roots
of the Modern American Empire.
INFINITY
LEGAL   AID
Free 'egal aid available Monday, Wed
nesday and Friday noon in vice-
president's office in SUB until Dec   7.
AQUA SOC
NAUI scuba course info in 9UB 216
or sign list on outdoor club notice
board.
VOC
Membership cards available in clubroom at noon. Needed for the Whistler cabin at Christmas or you pay
guest fees.
YOUTH    RESOURCES
Dec. 5 concert cancelled.
PHOTO  SOC
We  are  now located in SUB  245.
CHEERS
TC bids a fond adieu to all her illiterate customers. Come back next year,
Roget, Webster's and Fowlers' in
hand. Have  a miserable Christmas.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION PAPERBACKS
Specializing in Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W.  10th Ave.
224-4144
whEN Love Happens,
fiNd ThE STARS W*ITh AIM'
JL)tflMfW
Ifs no problem at -
all when you let our
diamond experts
light the way.
They'll counsel you
in the choice of the
right stone, the
most appropriate
setting ... tell you
exactly what you're
getting for what
you're spending.
And you'll find the
best costs you
no more.
Registered Jeweler AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY.
Granville at Pender
Since 1904
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE!! THE HOFBRAUHAUS
German - - - Garden. Live band —
SUB Ballroom. Nov. 29, 9-1. Admission $1.50 Members & guests only.
Tickets  sold  in  advance.	
GIANT STROBE LIGHT FOR RENT.
Reserve early for your next party,
dance, or drunk.  Phone  922-1451.
12
Greetings
COME IN AND SEE US — THE
Thunderbird Shop. Opening Monday,
Dec.   9.
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST $20 — SUNDAY, NOV. 24 BY
hitchhiker in a white Porsche.
Please phone Doug, Room 404 at
224-9720.
LOST: BLACK RAINCOAT, YELLOW
half-lining, in Buchanan Bldg., lec-
ture room. Professor Pinkus. Reward.
FOUND: LADIES' WALLET IN
women's washroom in Math Building. Owner contact Math Office,
Room  122  or call 228-2860.
LOST: THREE M-16's WITH TELE-
scopic sights. Near the Pentagon.
Urgently needed before January. If
found, send C.O.D. to L. Johnson,
General Delivery, Washington, D.C.
20000.
LOST: MEN'S GLASSES, BLACK
rimmed on Tues., Nov. 26. May be
in Volvo I hitched a ride with on
Tenth.   Phone   738-4877,   George.
WHO EVER TOOK MY TEXTS AND
notes from Bookstore phone TR 6-
9457 or take them to SUB info. desk.
STEVE: I LEFT MY YELLOW UM-
brella in your car, hitch-hiking last
Friday.   Phone   Cathy,   738-2217.
MONDAY NOV. 18 IN LIBRARY OR
SUB, gold bracelet. Return to Pub.
Office,  SUB 241.
Rides fc Car Pools
14
Specie! Notices
15
SKI APEX — STAY TWIN LAKES
Guest Ranch in Penticton. Maka up
a group for an exceptional ski weekend. For a minimum of 12 people
we provide accommodation, lodge
facilities and meals, Friday night
to Sunday for only $12 per person.
For complete details write or wire
Twin Lakes Guest Ranch, Box **7,
Penticton.
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
know.
REDUCE THE COST OF TOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott.
299-9422.
BOARDERS UNSATISFIED WITH
food. Infrom. as to best food on
campus. Reasonable price. Call Paul
224-9986.
STUDENT AS SLAVE. PAWN IN
the game. If you don't like the rules,
you don't have to play. Life is for
real,  man.  So live!
NAUI SCUBA COURSE SPONSORED
by Aqua Soc. Information in SUB
216 or sign list on Outdoor Club
notice board or phone 224-0336.
Travel Opportunities
16
MEXICO BY LIGHT PLANE, $190.00.
Destination: Mazatlan (out-of-the-
way places). Expenses will be kept
to a minimum. 4 passengers needed.
Will need passport, smallpox innoc.
and sleeping bag. Leave name in
ride's box.
IF P.E.T. DOESN'T STOP BEING
a Conservative-Liberal like JFK
and RFK were then he may get shot
by a   radical   reactionary   like   LBJ.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
G  T  I
■ad
SPITFIRES
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.  Las M2-71SS or WE I-10ST
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Call at
1162 Seymour St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
GOOD      TRANSPORTATION.      1952
Chev,   $100.   Phone  263-6180.
1953 STUDEBAKER, GOOD ENGINE,
excellent brakes. Fairly good body.
Spare   snow  tire.   $95.00.   AM   6-9544.
1955 DODGE WAGON, 6 AUTO. GOOD
running condition, reliable, city-
tested,   winterized.   $150.  ,733-5906.
FOR SALE: '63 SUNBEAM ALPINE.
Radio, tonneau, snow tires. Phone
731-9638.
RAMBLER 220—'64. EXC. COND. 36,-
000 mi. Duty free, foreign stu. only.
$950.  Torrens,  228-2872,  9 to 5.
1960 VW. RUNS FINE BUT A BIT-
eaten out. Phone 681-4023 for try-
outs.
'56 VOLKS. NEW CLUTCH, BAT-
tery, starter, king pins, transmission mount, etc. $250 or best offer.
224-0035.
1960 PONTIAC V-8 HARDTOP.
Looks good, mechanically excellent.
$550. Dave, 263-3116.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
1956 PLYMOUTH 4-DOOR SEDAN.
Excellent running condition. Family
pet for past 10 years. $135.00. 876-
9595.
'61     CORVAIR.     3-SPEED.     EXCEL-
lent condition.  $250.  261-5690.
1967 FIAT 850 FASTBACK. ONLY
12,000 miles. 2 snow tires included.
Priced for quick sale, $1250. 298-5784.
Automobile—Parts
23
WANTED     TWO    USED     45     DCOE
Weber  carbs.   Phone   John   922-1451.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA 150 ROAD BIKE AND HON-
da 250 Scrambler. 4652 W. 10th. 224-
0942.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating fc Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SILK SCREEN POSTERS. BEAU-
tifully made. Lowest Possible cost.
24   hr.   service.   731-7301.
CHE KILLS! LISTEN TO ABRAHAM,
Martin, and John. And Gandhi,
Christ, Schweiter, Thoreau; and
Yourself.
LADIES' CITY HAIR STYLING &
Wig Fashions. Wigs— Falls— Wig-
lets on sale at 783 Granville Street.
688-4243.
Home Entertainment
35
GUARANTEED EXPERT AND
EFFICIENT  REPAIRS
Color  T.V.  — Black and White  T.V.
Record Players — Radios
Stereo  Equipment — Tape  Recorders
ALEXANDER AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W.  10th — 22J-908S
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
RENT THE PAISLEY MULTICOL-
ored Strobic Light-Show to make
your party or dance happen. Reasonable rates. Paul 731-7301 .
DIG RHYTHM AND  BLUES?
GASTOWN   SOUL
AL 261-8341
A PHONE CALL WILL GET YOU
your youth fare card to fly half
fare this Christmas, New Year, $3.
Good until your 22nd b'day for travel
on most airlines in Canada and
States.' Phone Deirdre Swing Air
rep.  738-1678 NOW"
SLAVONIC PEOPLE, GET-TOGET-
her at tbe "Cecil", Dec. 19th, 8:00
p.m.
MARCHES DON'T END WARS . . .
they start them. No more Hiroshimas! No more Vietnams! No more
Americas! Free Canada Libre. Now!
N.A.U.I. SCUBA COURSE — SPON-
sored by Aqua Soc. Information in
SUB 216 or sign list on Outdoor
Club notice board or ph.  224-0336.
OPENING MONDAY, DEC. 9 — THE
Thunderbird Shop — Large selection
of Xmas gift items.
Typing
40
EXP. TYPING. ESSAYS & THESIS;
legible draft. Reas. rates. Phone 738-
6829 after 10 a.m. Mon.-Fri. and
Sundays.	
TYPING.    PHONE    731-7511.    9:00   TO
'5:00. After 6:00 — 266-6662.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable rates.   TR 4-9253.
APEX TYPING SERVICE (MRS.
Gow). Mimeographing, typing. 4370
W.   10th.   224-6033.
EXPERIENCED      ESSAY      TYPIST.
Reasonable. Phone 681-8992.
EXPERIENCED HOME TYPIST
available for essays, etc. Call 738-
7881.
ESSAY    &    THESIS    TYPING.    MRS.
Hall.  434-9558.
Help Wanted—Female
51
ROOM & USE OF HOUSE IN Exchange for babysitting, incl. Fri. &
Sat. night. Call 224-0833 evenings.
Darleen.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
EXCELLENT EARNING OPPOR-
tunities for serious spare-timers.
Call 985-9220 from 10-1 and 3-5 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT AT XMAS. SALES &
business experience preferred. Phone
299-4820 — 9 a.m.-l p.m.
THINK PINKI
I need students for evening and
weekend work. Earn up to $100 or
more per mon. Part-time. No experience necessary. Phone 524-4618.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Tutoring
64
1st AND 2nd YEAR MATHS, CHEM.
physics by science and engineering
graduate.  731-1930 or 731-3491.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BOOKS FOR RADICAL THINKING
students. Feature works of Marx,
Lenin, Malcom X, Che Guewera H.
Marcus, F. Fanon, etc. Vanguard
Books,   1208 Granville.
MARTIN GUITAR 018. CONCERT
model with case, as new. Best offer!
988-0752. Must sell!
KASTLE COMBI WOOD SKIS WITH
harnesses. Very good condition.
Phone Ken 261-8392. Please leave
message.	
SOUL TO SELL. FILTHY. WILL
scour for buyer. Serious. $12,000 or
nearest   offer.  Allan,   224-9866.
MUNTZ 4 & 8 TRACK STEREO TAPE
player, Davis Reverb, 9 tapes. $125.
988-3067
THRIFT SALE
Sat.,    10   a.m.-4   p.m.   1951   West   3rd
Ave. Appliances, Old Furniture, Knick-
knacks, etc.
1 PR. NEW LADIES' ITALIAN SKI
boots & 1 pr. used men's ski boots.
Call  733-2073.
7.75x15 SNOW TIRES. GOODYEAR
Suburbanite. Only used once. 95%
tread. Call 228-9104 after 6 p.m.
$35.00.
DELUXE ACCORDION 120 BASS.
New guaranteed, reasonable. 255-
5689
N.A.U.I. SCUBA COURSE — SPON-
sored by Aqua Soc. Information in
SUB 216 or sign list on Outdoor
Club notice board or phone 224-0336.
TONY SAILER'S (210CM), SALOMAN
anti-shock toe and heel, ski boots,
size 9. Head poles. Phone Bob, 922-
1326.
FOR SALE: TWO HUNDRED JAZZ
records. Two dollars each. Phone
736-9337.
RENTALS  & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
TWO LnA R G E COMFORTABLE
sleeping rooms available in family
home. $45.00. Call after 5 p.m. —
261-4100.	
ROOM FOR RENT. KITCHEN Facilities.   Separate   entrance   $35   per
month.  Call  733-9758  after 7:00 p.m.
ROOM FOR FEMALE STUDENT.
Two blocks from gates. $40.00 mo.
Private entrance, cooking facilities,
furnished.  Phone 224-9084, room 425.
LARGE SLEEPING ROOM FOR
male or fem. stud. Well furnished.
Call   732-5327   anytime.
ON CAMPUS! COMF'Y FURNISHED
room for girl. Available Jan. 1. Call
224-3162.  $35.00.
QUIET PRIVATE ROOMS FOR TWOt
male students. Partial board optional.   Some kitchen facilities.  266-9946.
BASEMENT — SEPARATE EN-
trance, private shower. Use of fridge
and  den.   No cooking.   228-8948.   $45.
WARM BRIGHT ROOM, SUITABLE
auiet female student. $45 per month.
Phone 224-6471. Near UBC.
MALE STUDENT, NON-SMOKER.
Priv. bath & entr., fridge, electric
kettle,    toaster   &   phone.    Call   RE
8-1576.
ROOM FOR RENT. ALL MALE
house. Use of all facilties. 3rd &,
Burrard. Phone 738-0784 or 736-7128,
Paul.
ROOM WITH HOME PRIVILEGES.
Pt. Grey area. Phone 732-8448 till
new phone  installed.
Room & Board
62
2 GIRLS OR 2 BOYS. 3 MEALS,
telephone, studio space. Some flexibility re meals. Near 4th & Sasamat.
224-0074.
WANTED: ONE SENIOR GIRL STU-
dent  to  share  house  with  one   student   and   one   working  girl.   Avail.-
immediately.  Phone  321-9633.
FREE ROOM & BOARD OVER XMAS
vac.   for b'bysts.   Call  224-6035.
Furn. Houses fc Apts.
2 MEN TO SHARE STUDIO LOUNGE.
224-5245 after 5.
WANTED MALE STUDENT (PRE-
ferably grad) to share kits. apt.
from Jan. 1st. Furnished, $60.00 per
month. Phone Lyle at 731-1343.
OWN   ROOM  FOR  GIRL   TO   SHARE
facilities   and   expenses   with   young
couple and one other girl. Kits, areaj,
733-5679.
WANTED TWO SENIOR MALE
students for basement bed-study
rooms. Separate laundry, bathroom
and entrance. One-half block from
gates. Phone 224-3152 noons or after
6:00 p.m.
COUPLE MUST FIND S.C. SUITE,
furnished or unfurnished during
December. Reasonably priced. Phone
Richard,   738-2217.
BSMT.      SUITE,      PRIVATE     BATH.
Suit   1   or   2.   $70.00.   224-3833.   Avail.
Dec. 1.	
WANTED:      FEMALE      TO      SHARE*
with  Arts  2  student.  Rent   $35.  1765
West  10th,   Suite 2.
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
HOUSE FOR RENT NEAR UBC. 2
bdrms. plus 2 in bsmt. Dble. plbg.
$200  p.m.   224-3666 evenings.
LARGE BASEMENT SUITE FOB
rent. Fireplace, shower. Very close.
4324 W.  11th Ave.  228-935*8.

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