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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1983

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Array tJBC Archives Serv
Vol. LXVI, No. 12
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 21,1963
228-2301
Grade's workers
on firing line
By DON PLANT
A neighbor complains to the police about noise
emanating from the house next door. A television is blaring
and children are whining. The police send a social worker
to assess the situation, but when she arrives, she is overwhelmed by the chaos.
Junk food and beer bottles are strewn all over the house.
Two of the children, ages four and seven, are whimpering
outside the mother's bedroom door. A five year old is crying quiety under the kitchen table, nursing a bruised arm.
Quickly, the worker attempts to decide if the children are in
serious danger and if they should be removed.
Jackie, not her real name, used to work with a family
support worker when she encountered situations like these.
The family support worker would help her assess the
premises, and determine whether one member of the
household was strong enough to pull the family together.
More importantly, they would decide if the children could
safely remain in the home.
Jackie would also have access to a family-child assessment team, a group of professional consultants. She would
call on the team to determine if the family situation was
abusive, and if so, to set up interviews with each family
member and recommend proper action.
But on Oct. 31, these services will be terminated. Under
the provisions of the recently passed Public Sector
Restraint Act, workers employed in the family support
worker program and the assessment team will lose their
jobs. And joining the ranks of the unemployed will be
homemakers and childcare workers — other essential
sources of support for the social worker.
Jackie, a consultant for the team, says the problems
caused by the firings will be monumental.
"The people who are going to pay the biggest price for
these losses are the clients (parents and children). But the
social workers I've seen are terrified to think of what it's
going to be like without the support services. The stress
level is very high in social work because you're making decisions about people's lives, and whether or not to take their
children away from them."
Without the much needed support services, the social
worker is left alone to deal with a family whose conflicts
may be beyond her capabilities. She can either remove the
children or leave them at home, hoping they will not be
neglected. But removing them is difficult because it means
obtaining provincial court approval and finding foster
homes for each child.
Human resources minister Grace McCarthy claims the
family-child assessment team and the family support
worker program are no longer "vital" aspects of social
work in B.C. The program, set up to train 900 B.C. social
workers in the area of child abuse, was "needed at the
time," she says, adding funding cannot be provided for it
anymore.
If social workers require expertise after Oct. 31, they can
seek professional help from psychiatrists or counsellors
whose fees will be paid for by the provincial government,
McCarthy says.
"It won't be any different."
Nancy, who also requested anonymity, was a human
sexuality consultant for the human resources ministry
before becoming a member of the family-child assessment
team. She conducted workshops on sexual abuse
throughout B.C. and has been involved in adolescent sex
education in high schools for nearly 10 years. And she feels
that McCarthy's suggestion that social workers seek iprofes-
sional help in times of need is "unreal."
Professionals such as psychiatrists charge exhorbitant
hourly rates which far exceed the cost of sustaining an
assessment team member, she says. In addition, may
psychiatrists are not properly trained in the area of child
abuse. Many of the 900 social workers supposedly trained
by the assessment team have been moved to other a;eas and
replaced by people with little or no practical experience, she
says.
But at the core of the problem is the children themselves.
If specialized services are not available, disturbed children
may grow up to be dangerous, Nancy says.
"If you have a highly disturbed male child who has been
sexually abused, chances are fairly high that the child as an
adolescent will molest kids . . . and will become an adult
molestor further down the road. We know now through
research that adult molestors will hit up to 80 kids before
they're caught ... A little girl who's sexually abused will
probably grow up to be incapable of nurturing and protecting her own children."
Research shows up to 80 per cent of adult female pros-
.titutes in Seattle were sexually abused before they left
heme. Other figures, based on North American statistics,
indicate that one quarter of all girls and one eighth of all
b:ys will be sexually molested by the time they are 18.
These incidents range from an isolated confrontation in the
park to constant molestation by a family member.
"These statistics are very conservative," says Nancy.
"I think we're just hitting the top of the iceberg in terms
of abuse . . . There's no way of knowing how much is going on. All we know are the reported cases."
Until March of this year, the assessment team dealt with
an average of 1,142 within a 12 month period. These were
not average child abuse cases, but ones which the social
worker felt she could not handle alone and which needed an
intensive assessment. Of these, 735 were related to sexual
abuse, 333 to physical abuse and 271 to physical or emotional neglect.
Jackie says the provincial government has no conception
of the harm that will be caused by the elimination of these
programs. "I don't know why so many people seem to
think that prevention is more expensive than crisis intervention. It's definitely cheaper to do preventative work."
But McCarthy maintains that it is impossible to determine if one is cheaper than the other. The provincial
government has poured a great deal of money into social
services — yet there is no concrete evidence of family
members becoming closer or coping with the conflicts better, she says.
"No one wants to fire anyone," she says. But with a $1.6
million budget deficit, the government had to decrease its
services, she claims. "We had to be selective in reducing
core services."
However, the firings will warrant a long term loss rather
than a gain, says Nancy, adding the government could
reduce its spending in less important areas.
"It's going to be so expensive processing those kids
through the courts and finding foster parents for them.
What we have, with the current system of family support
workers, who aren't paid much really, is a very inexpensive,
cost-efficient way of keeping (a problem) family under its
own roof and sorting thing out," Nancy says.
"Now (as a result of the firings), a social worker goes in,
sees chaos, has no access to family support workers, and
has to go to court in order to apprehend the kids. That's
court time, with lawyers and judges — expensive stuff.
Then, this worker has to find foster homes and pay each
foster family for the care of each of those kids. That costs
See page 6: FAMILY Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,1983
OCT. 22-23,29-30
NOV. 5-b J
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6138 S.U.B. BOULEVARD
M
LOWER CONCOURSE       (QjJJVg
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AMS TICKET OFFICE
SIDEWALK
SALE
All stock of Vancouver souvenirs and UBC
mementos up for grabs at reduced prices.
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 24-28
or until we run out of stock!
e.g. — UBC Sweatshirts,  4 colors,
machine wash and dry
were $15.95 - NOW $11.89
New Alumni logo lapel pins
were $6.99 - NOW $4.99
UBC Beer Steins
were $7.99 - NOW $4.89 Friday, October 21,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bv CHRIS WATTTE
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
I
Ifs called the National
Survival Game. All across Canada,
you can play pretend war. Is it as
innocent and harmless as it looks?
could hear the enemy moving through
the bush somewhere ahead of us. I signalled
"Mad Dog" Hammond, my photographer
and the best point man alive in the Eastern
Theatre, but he'd heard it too. Narrowing my
steely eyes with cruel determination, I huddled lower in the dense undergrowth to await
my quarry. Mad Dog's face showed that he
was thinking the same thing I was: let the
Commie bastard make the first move. We
professionals always think alike.
The cool barrel of my trusty pistol lay motionless against the line of my iron jaw, ready
to strike another blow for democracy and the
American Way. With silent cat-like
movements I rechecked my cartridge and
took off the safety. Now all we had to do was
wait.
Suddenly he was in sight. Slinking like the
pinko subversive that he was, our target crept
out from behind a tree not twenty feet away
from where we waited in ambush.
He turned his beady little eyes left, then
right, seeming to stare right at me. I remained
as motionless as a rock, though my trigger
finger itched with anticipation. Any second
now I'd have one more enemy of free enterprise to add to my tally.
His suspicious KGB-inspired mind
satisfied, the enemy began to scurry across
the open ground to my right, never suspecting the torrent of righteous death I was
about to unleash. My pistol leapt into action
with a life all its own. I lined up the swine in
my sights, drooling at the thought of his
socialist head exploding into a red mist.
"Die Commie pig-dog" I screamed in
triumph as I squeezed off my shot: For a split
second he turned in disbelieving horror as my
round sped toward its target.
SPLAT! My bullet had homed in on its
mark, thanks to my expert marksmanship.
The enemy sank slowly to the ground as a wet
sticky substance began to spread from a
point directly between his eyes.
Another agent of the Kremlin bites the
dust, I thought with satisfaction. I felt no
more remorse that if I had squashed a fly.
He was just another enemy of the American
Way, and besides the paint I'd shot him with
would wear off in a day or two. That's right.
It wasn't Vietnam in the '60s, it wasn't
Angola in the '70s, it was somewhere near
Perth, Ontario on September 18, 1983 and
Strike Force Charlatan was here to play the
National Survival Game.
The National Survival Game was devised a
few years ago in (where else?) the United
States by someone with a sense of fun even
more warped than my own. The idea is to
give jaded North American thrill-seekers the
feel of combat without messy blood and
bodies cluttering up the landscape.
There are four game sites in Ontario, and a
few others across Canada. Through some
advertising but mostly by word of mouth, the
games's popularity has mushroomed in its
two-year existence here. Games happened
every day this summer in Perth, and we
waited two weeks before getting our chance
to don fatigues, grab our gear, and test our
skills. Most of the men (there were three
women), were in their late twenties, early
thirties, and many have been here before.
The game site is about one square mile of
bush and swamp just outside Perth with
boundaries marked off with bright orange
tape. Each of the two 18-man teams has a
flag set on opposite ends of the playing area,
and the object of the game is to capture your
opponents' flag and bring it back to your
own flag area first.
To achieve this goal each of the combatants is given carbon dioxide pistol and 30
bullets full of paint. What makes the whole
thing worthwhile is the prospect of mailing a
member of the other team with a large dollop
of paint. If you're hit by one of these little
wonders you are 'dead' and get to sit out the
rest of the war in the comfort of your command post along with a commemorative welt
on the spot where you were hit.
As I stood over my somewhat bedazzled
victim, Mad Dog Hammond moved up to me
with this usual catlike swiftness. "Christ,
Wattie, calm down," he muttered, uneasily
scanning nearby trees for snipers, "It's only a
game."
"Only a game!?' I screamed, wiping the
froth from the corners of my mouth. "Don't
you realize what we're doing here? Don't you
see the crucial point of this entire bizarre
excursion?"
"Uh, have fun?" he asked, nervously
backing away from ihe sight of a khaki-clad,
war-painted, screaming and heavily armed
reporter. Mad Dog was obviously losing his
grip, something that happens to the best of us
under combat conditions. How could I make
his alcohol befuddled brain understand that
this was no game, this was war.
Mad Dog and I had been drinking heavily
since the beginning of the game, a medical
necessity considering the warped atmosphere
surrounding this entire venture. What had
begun as an innocent seairch for adventure on
a boring Sunday afternoon had become
something much more ominous.
"Look," I said, speaking as slowly and
clearly as I possibly could, "if we wanted to
get the feel of a war situation, we'd probably
have to go to some place nasty like El
Salvador or Lebanon, right?"
We had been wandering around for half an
hour now, ostensibly on a mad dash for the
enemy's flag. Tactics in the Survival Game
are rudimentary at best and most games tend
to devolve into running firefights after about
ten minutes of maneuvering. Our team's
agreed upon plan was to send most of our
people on a frontal assault of the enemies'
defences leaving a small defence force at our
flag, while an elite commando force snuck
around behind them and stole their flag.
Mad Dog and I agreed to join the commando force largely because it offered the
best opportunity to slip off and do what we
were there to do. Blast away at anything that
moved.
At Mad Dog's nervous insistence we left
the scene of our ambush in search of new
prey. Racing silently through the forest, we
listened for the telltale sounds of unwary
enemies ripe to be pounced upon by seasoned
veterans like ourselves. Already we had nailed four of the suckers between us and we
were feeling very fine, very sharp.
Our first intimation of trouble was the teri-
fying pop of a pistol and the slap of a paint
bullet against a tree six inches away from my
head. We threw ourselves into a small hollow
in a rather unelegant and panicked swan
dive.
"Shit," I swore as enemy pistols sounded
around us, "where the hell are they?" It
sounded like about fifty angry Viet Cong out
there zeroing in on our voefully shallow cubbyhole.
Mad Dog began swearing furiously as
paint bullets whizzed over our heads. "If
you'd stopped screaming 'Die Commie Pig-
dog' every time you hit someone, this
wouldn't have happened," he snarled at me
between expletives.
"Shut up," I replied, "I'm trying to
think." Actually I was trying not to wet my
genuine Israeli combat pants. It was impossible to tell where the buggers were shooting
from or how many there were.
This was rapidly becoming an extremely
unpleasant experience. Being the focus of attention for ten or twenty armed and vicious
maniacs was a good excuse to go into a panic
stricken frenzy of terror.
"Hey," I said as casually as I could to Mad
Dog, "why don't you stick up your head and
try and see where they are?" This seemed like
a good plan to me, but Mad Dog apparently
didn't agree.
"Have you lost your alleged mind?" he
asked.
"Listen, don't worry. I'll cover you," I
replied, trying to sound sincere. I actually
had no intention of exposing myself to the
wrath of those lunatics out there, but why tell
him that?
"Besides," I added, "you'll only have to
show your eyes up there. They'll never hit a
target that small." Fortunately the medicine
had done an adequate job of twisting Mad
Dog's already marginal brain, for after a few
minutes of cajoling, he agreed to take a look.
The poor fool never knew what hit him.
The next thing I heard was a loud "gish" and
when I looked over at Mad Dog he had slipped back down into our foxhole with white
paint covering most of his head.
This called for quick thinking. Faced with
the prospect of staying in the foxhole with a
very upset partner, dealing with the enemies
outside seemed downright inviting. I
scrambled out of cover and began sprinting
in whatever direction looked promising.
I was hit almost immediately. Three high-
velocity paint pullets struck my left leg, right
armpit, and left hand respectively. They
hurt. I hit the ground, covering my head with
both arms and wailing "Komerad" as loudly
and as often as I could. I had no desire to add
any more welts to my collection.
The camouflaged enemy that bounded out
of the undergrowth didn't look particularly
dangerous, but there's no sense taking
chances so I kept on whimpering pitifully.
"Help (gasp) . . . wounded (wheeze) . . .
Geneva Convention ..." I groaned.
"Pretty good shot eh?" my assassin
remarked smugly. He noticed my condition
of total personality breakdown and asked
what was wrong.
"I'm hit (gurgle)... medic ... need medic
"Hey, calm down man," he said with what
passed for a placating grin. "It's only a
game." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,1983
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island community reacted with outrage yesterday when island dictator Ditch Hitman was found to have absconded
with the Amalgamated Media Services flagship the H.M.C.S.
Flounder. Hitman was caught just
off the island, while attempting to
sail the boat to Australia. Vice dictator and keeper of the coin of the
realm James Hollow expressed
outrage. "Why didn't he invite me,
I could have brought some coin of
the realm with me, and we could
have gone to El Salvador to support
my good buddy Ronny in his attempts to suppress the evil communist insurgents who are attempting to undermine my Mercedez and
other good things us reformed NDP
supporters, turned capitalist, really
like and enjoy."
PASSPORT
PHOTOS
3 Minute Service
No Appointment
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
proudly presents
AI
DiMEOLA
JOHN
McLAUGHLAN
PACO
DeLUCIA
with special guest
STEVE MORSE
Q.E.
THEATRE
Tuesday
NOV. 1,8 P.M.
Tickets: At all VTC/CBO
Outlets, Infocentres in major
malls. All Lower Mainland
Eaton's & Woodward's, AMS
Tickets, at UBC. Charge it:
687-4444 info.: 687-1818. Produced by John Bauer Concerts.,
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURES
Professor Edward Cone
Princeton University
Professor Edward Cone of Princeton University is one of the world's most
distinguished contemporary music theorists. An accomplished composer and
pianist, Professor Cone is widely known for his contributions to the area of
music criticism and is the author of many provocative and insightful publications dealing with the analysis and interpretation of music performance. Dr.
Cone has a reputation as a stimulating and engaging speaker.
Tuesday, October 25, 1983
"Schubert's Unfinished Business"
In Room 113, Music Building
at 12:30 P.M.
Friday, October 28, 1983
"Congruent Harmony in Brahms"
Colloquium in Library Seminar Room, 4th floor of Music Building
3:30 P.M.
Saturday, October 29, 1983
"Hearing and Knowing Music"
Vancouver Institute Lecture in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. — at 8:15 P. M.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Enquiries: R. Rumley 5675
MOLSOM MALT
When you've got
Molson Malt
you've got it all! Friday, October 21,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
T.V. Bennett has nothing to say
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Canadian University Press
Premier Bill Bennett, with calm
and reason in his voice, took steps
to diffuse a possible general strike
with a televised speech Thursday.
Bennett has adjourned the
legislature for an indefinite period
of time and urged government
unions to negotiate a settlement at
the bargaining table.
But Operation Solidarity and the
Solidarity Coalition reacted with
caution to Bennett's plea for "consultation using the language of
reason."
Art Kube told reporters at a press
conference after Bennett's speech
he couldn't comment on anything
because Bennett said nothing.
Kube said Oct. 31 is still a
deadline for government action.
"We don't really know what the
premier said in his statement. The
premier has not come out and
stated anything in a very concrete
way," said Kube.
"The only thing he has indicated
is that maybe he can't get his own
way on all things if the opposition
isn't placated or some of the needs
of the coalition aren't met," he
said.
- neil lucente photo
LET ME OUT says SUB prisoner locked in cage to promote Amnesty international's week of consciousness for
political prisoners.
Amnesty cages mock prisoners
Several local politicians and campus representatives gave up an hour
of their freedom Tuesday to sit outside SUB in a mock prison cell in an
effort to promote prisoners of conscience week.
Aid. Marguerite Ford, campus
chaplain George Hermanson and
Horacio de la Cueva, teaching
assistants union president, were
some of the mock prisoners.
De la Cueva said he wanted to
make the public aware of the abuse
of human rights occurring in many
parts of the world. "Every human
has the right to a decent life. This
taking away of rights is happening
today to people like us," he said.
Another mock prisoner, political
science professor Mike Wallace,
said supporting prisoners of conscience is important because "it
could happen in any country, even
here.
"People like me are imprisoned
now in other countries," Wallace
said. He added democratic freedom
must be constantly defended. The
governments of Guatemala, El
Salvador and Iran are especially
prone to removing democratic
rights, he said.
The purpose of prisoners of conscience week, which began on Monday and is sponsored by Amnesty
International, is to educate the
public about imprisoned human
rights   activists   and   increase  the
association's membership, said
UBC's AI chapter spokesperson
Rob Stephenson.
AI conducts two letter writing
campaigns urging the release of
prisoners of conscience, he said.
One is the prisoner of the month
campaign through which three
prisoners a month are selected as
the campaign's focus.
About 60,000 letters a month are
sent asking for the prisoners'
release. The other campaign is called Urgent Action, where prisoners
subjected to torture or those facing
execution are the focus. About
10,000 letters worldwide are sent on
behalf of these prisoners.
Amnesty claims a 50 per cent success rate in the prisoners' release
and in the betterment of prison conditions.
Kube said it is a good sign if the
government will negotiate to prevent government employee firings,
but he added Solidarity needs
clarification of government intentions in the areas of education,
human rights, social services and tenant rights.
During his speech, Bennett
outlined the province's economic
situation and said investment and
business would be driven out of
B.C. with unstable industrial relations and the threat of high taxes to
pay for high government deficit.
Bennett called his legislation the
first step to getting "the house in
order" so private industry could
create jobs.
Kube said, based on the mood of
the speech, he would be contacting
the premier's office Friday.
Bennett's speech contrasted
sharply with a speech he delivered
to cheering and applauding
delegates to the Social Credit party
convention a week ago.
There, Bennett told delegates the
government would not submit to
"government by protest" and that
people could not picket or strike
their way to prosperity.
He used the same language
Thursday but unlike at the convention Bennett wasn't vehement
about altering his government's
legislative package.
Legislation to alter government
union negotiation rights — Bill 2,
and to abolish the human rights
branch — Bill 26 and rentalsman's
office — Bill 5 have not been passed
through the legislature.
"While our objectives are firm
there is still considerable opportunity to consult on several measures
where several concerns have been
expressed," said Bennett.
With the legislature adjourned
Bennett assured labor Bill 2 would
stay at second reading so the
BCGEU can negotiate the items in
the bill.
Freeze hurts UBC
By HOLLY NATHAN
UBC's hiring freeze is forcing the commerce faculty to cram students into classes resulting in a decline in the quality of their eduction, dean Peter
Lusztig said Thursday.
Seminars have up to 45 students and first and second year classes have up
to 180, said Lusztig.
"This cannot be called a university education," he said.
If the hiring freeze continues, the department will suffer even more next
year, Lusztig said.
"The cost for young people in this province is going to be enormous."
The commerce and business administration faculty received more than
1,400 applications from first year arts and science students for only 375
available positions, Lusztig said.
Forestry dean R. W. Kennedy said the hiring freeze is eroding the quality
of research and teaching in the forestry faculty.
"It is like a disease, like a nail in the coffin," he said.
Research is sponsored by certain agencies with the understanding that
the university has resources behind it, Kennedy said. But the hiring freeze
has created a shortage of research technicians and support staff, he added.
Associate education dean Douglas McKie said the problems caused by
the hiring freeze are compounded in his faculty by the provincial government's negative attitude toward education.
"There will undoubtedly have to be more cuts in the department," said
McKie. "I think the freeze will be indefinite and things will get worse
before they get better."
The freeze prohibits the hiring of new professors, teaching assistants and
support staff. It will continue indefinitely to balance UBC's budget shortfall of $4 million by April 1984, which was created by a zero per cent increase in provincial university funding.
Science threatened
By JOEL PECCHIOLI
Inadequate funding is threatening the future of Canada's scientific
community, according to the president of a major research council
which sponsors more than one-third
of UBC's research.
The Natural Sciences and
Engineering Council of Canada has
received no increase in funding
from the federal government, Gordon McNabb said Wednesday. "It
is critical that NSERC get increased
funding for employment training to
insure the future health of the scientific community in Canada,"
/I
Watchdog may curtail legal services
By GORDON CLARK
An organization that monitors legislation at all
levels of government for civil liberties violations
may be forced to curtail its services because of
government underfunding.
The B.C. Civil Liberties Association, which
also gives free legal advice, may lay off its three
employees in December if funding is not secured
soon.
Reg Robson, the association's president and a
UBC sociology professor, said the situation is
"catastrophic". The employees who will be laid
off organize the work of 50 to 60 professionals who
volunteer their services to the association, he said.
Services will be seriously minimized without
this "backbone", he added.
The association's current activities include informing people about Bill 27 — legislation which
would allow the government to disband the
human rights commission. It will be submitting a
proposal of its criticisms of the budget legislation
to the government later this month.
The association has also begun protesting the
proposed formation of the civilian secret service.
It has been writing to members of the federal
government urging that Bill C-157 be revoked.
Until November 1982 most of the association's
funding — about $45,000 — came from the legal
services society. But the society was forced to
cancel its grant to the association when the provincial government cut its 1983 budget by 20 to 30
per cent.
"The effect of these cutbacks has been
devastating. We have had to reduce our services a
substantial amount," said Kurt Neuenfeldt, a
lawyer with the society.
The association received emergency funding
from the Law Foundation for this year, but it will
not be extended for 1984.
And unless funding will be secured, the association will be forced to operate solely on member
fees and donations and its services will be
drastically reduced, said Robson.
NSERC allocates funding for the
training of scientists, engineers and
researchers, equipment and
strategic and operating research
grants.
It supplied more than one-third
of the $47 million UBC spent on
research last year through 613 different awards to faculty members.
The council was also the largest
single source of outside scholarship
support for UBC graduate students,
at a total of more than $2 million
for 180 students.
Additional funding is needed
because some of NSERC's programs were launched with the
assumption that more funding
would continually be allocated,
McNabb said.
NSERC has given about $19
million to UBC this year soley for
training researchers, he said. This
amount was the second largest
given to any university, exceeded
only by the grants given to the
University of Toronto.
NSERC will be limiting the
percentage of its fund that any
university may use to support foreign graduate students, he added.
Although few problems have
arisen, the funding for foreign
graduate students is potentially
"political dynamite," McNabb
said.
McNabb said more undergraduate students who received
grants to work in labs should be
placed in industrial laboratories.
About 1,500 students are working
in university labs while only 300 are
working in industrial labs. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,1983
Family workers hit
From page 1
bucks. Those kids are the
taxpayer's responsibilty until
they're at least 19."
Of the 599 workers fired by the
human resources ministry, 269 are
family support workers and 15 are
assessment team members.
"This   was   not   a   choice   we
wanted to make," McCarthy says.
But the programs did not exist five
years ago, and "we got along fine
without (them)," she adds.
Nancy disagrees. "Bennett's
argument is that we've gotten along
fine without specialized services.
We didn't get along fine. If we're
going to say that children have not
got the right to be protected, either
physically or sexually, then we've
got a different kind of society. If we
say it's okay to do that sort of thing
to kids, and say it's okay to ignore
them, then the whole fabric of our
society goes down the tube. That's
barbarism and it's a giant step
back."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Pornography linked to violence
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A
women's group has graphically
shown government and law officials
why it wants the word "pornographic" added to criminal code
sections that deal with obscenity.
The Manitoba Action Committee
on the Status of Women showed examples of pornograhic material
available in Winnipeg at an Oct. 3
meeting where several pages of
recommendations were added to
federal, provincial and civic politicians.
Bonnie Diamond, co-founder of
the Canadian Coalition Against
Medial Pornography, said the video
material is commonly available at
video retail outlets and on pay TV.
The presentation included both
"soft core" and violent pornography. Diamond said pornography contains the message
"violence is cool and brutality is
chic" in a country where a woman
is raped every 17 minutes, at least
one in every ten women are beaten
by husbands and lovers, and child
prostitution is increasing.
She said recent studies at the
University of Manitoba and the
University of Wisconsin show a link
between pornography and violent
sexual behavior. She also pointed to
the testimonies of police officers
across Canada who say wherever
sex crimes are committed, pornograhic material is found at the
scene or in the offender's home.
Often the offender appears to
have tried to emulate pornographic
imagery, she said.
Diamond said the film "Snuff",
where a woman is actually
dismembered and murdered, was
recently available in Winnipeg until
the distributor was arrested and
charged by police. She said another
film, "'/iVideodrome", in which lit
cigarettes are applied to a woman's
breast, was financed in part by the
Canadian Film Developmenl Corporation.
In its recommendations, the action committee stressed the need
to add the word "pornographic" to
"obscene" in the criminal code and
to define pornography as ' 'the verbal or pictorial material which
represents or describes sexual
behaviour that is degrading or
abusive to one or more of the participants in such a way as to endorse
the degradation."
The definition comes from Helen
Longino's book, "Take back the
Night."
The committee supports Justice
Minister Mark MacGuigan's proposed act to amend the obscenity
secions of the criminal code, but
says the changes should go no further. It wants stiffer penalties imposed on the products and the
distributors of pornography, including prison sentences of five
years.
"The thrust of the proposed
changes is that women should have
protection, under the law, from the
abuse perpetuated by the pornography industry," said the committee's press release.
Strike considered
By DOUG SCHMIDT
Student council directed the
Alma Mater Society External Affairs Committee Wednesday to
meet with campus unions to discuss
the ramifications of a possible
general strike on UBC.
Council members voiced their
concerns on the possibility of a
Council Briefs
general strike after Oct. 31, when
the current B.C. Government
Employees Union contract expires
and 1,600 members are threatened
with layoff.
"If there are pickets (on
campus), half of the faculty may
honor them," AMS External Affairs Co-ordinator Lisa Hebert told
council, adding that if the bus
drivers refuse to cross picket lines at
the university gates, 80 per cent of
UBC students will be affected.
"The academic year must be
guaranteed," she said.
EXAC was directed to negotiate
with unions to ensure that as many
services as possible be maintained,
and that supportive alternatives to a
general shutdown be suggested.
Hebert said essential areas of
UBC would not be picketed. One
avenue open to council in a general
strike would be to define more areas
as essential, she said.
Council acted on an amendment
to a code stating all council constituency representatives must sit on at
least one committee.
"Eleven out of 19 eligible constituency reps are not even on a committee," Comesotti said.
* » *
Roberts Rules of Order are still
foggy to members of council. Motions were tabled for lack of
quorum and others were voted on
even with a lack of quorum while
members idled in the hallways.
At one point AMS president
Mitch Hetman had to ask vice-
president Renee Comesotti to "get
quorum" by collecting some of the
strayed members.
Paper takes new angle
The need for a monthly newspaper for gay men and lesbians is
demonstrated by controversy surrounding acquired immunity deficiency syndrome, says a spokesperson for a new gay and lesbian
publication slated for release in late November.
"The straight press wants to believe that gay lifestyle is changing
as a result of the AIDS scare, but we are more skeptical," said Neil
Whaley.
A forum with greater emphasis on opinions and less on sensationalism will be provided in the newspaper Angles, which is intended to serve an estimated 10 per cent of the greater Vancouver population.
The newspaper hopes to act as a watchdog for discrimination
against gay men and lesbians, as in the recent case of Rob Joyce.
Joyce was a counsellor for gay street kids who was suspended
without investigation by the B.C. government for allegedly having
relations with one of his charges.
Angles also wishes to provide a "slightly different perspective" on
pornography. While it shares feminist attitudes towards exploitation
of and violence against women, gay male pornography, it is a "little
more complex", says Whaley. Pornography between two men does
not constitute exploitation of an entire sex, and must be considered
in a different light than the pornographic subjugation of women, he
Vsaid.	
The committee's recommendations also called for the Canadian
Radio Television and Telecommunication Commission to ensure
satellite-received programs abide by
the Canadian criminal code.
And women should be protected
from "hate literature" under the
Broadcast Act, the committee says.
That right is currently extended to a
CRTC list of minorities.
Provincial attorney-general
Roland Penner said he was "shocked" by the presentation. The com
mittee had recommendations for his
department, too.
There should be written
guidelines on the enforcement of
the criminal code, and satellite programming should be moniitored by
Penner's office, police and the film
classification board, the group says.
And the committee wants the city
to enact a by-law to make "adult"
magazines and books less visible in
stores.
Committee chair Roberta Ellis
said the presentation was the result
of "organizing like crazy" for fout
months. She said her group wanted
to bring pornography to the attention of officials for discussion and
consultation with the community.
The presentation showed some
examples of magazines available in
15 out of 17 Winnipeg bookstores.
These included "Family Affairs"
— about incest, "Switch" and
"Hogtie" — about bondage. Also
public libraries and public funds to
carry pornographic material, a
spokesperson said.
  — rory alien photo
GETTING AROUND CAMPUS in wheelchair isn't as easy as one might think discovers unidentified person.
Wheelchair relay was part of exceptional person's week at UBC, which ends today.
Reagan's peace efforts not serious
EDMONTON (CUP) — Ronald
Reagan is not very serious in his efforts for peace in Central America,
says Pastor Valle-Garay,
Nicaraguan Consul General in
Canada.
Speaking in Edmonton Sept. 29,
Valle said Henry Kissinger, Reagan
appointee as head of a special commission on Central America and
special envoy Richard Stone were
appointed with a mandate to fail.
"Kissinger's credentials in Latin
America are horrendous," said
Valle, pointing to Kissinger's involvement in the overthrow of
Salvador Allende in Chile in 1973.
Stone lobbied for increased arm
shipments to Guatemala, said
Valle, "one of the most brutal
military dictatorships in Central
America today."
Valle is also concerned about the
U.S. military presence in Central
America. He said the 16,000
American troops on joint
manoeuvers with the Honduran army constitute a "serious threat to
peace." There are also several U.S.
warships including the aircraft carrier U.S. Ranger off the coast of
Nicaragua.
"We are not the aggressors,"
said Valle. "We have been invaded
by the U.S. three times. We have
had marines in our country for 30
years at a crack for no particular
reason ... we want to be our own
people."
Valle dismissed U.S. fears of
Nicaragua becoming a Soviet
satellite. "The Americans have
been playing that tune for a hell of a
long time. The United Fruit Company overthrew the government of
Guatemala in 1954 because it was
supposed to be a communist
beachhead . . . anytime you want
help from the Americans — particularly weapons — all you have to
do is cry communist."
"The problems of Central
America are not the problems of the
Soviet Union vis-a-vis the United
States. They are essentially problems of social injustice in Central
America," said Valle.
Convinced the U.S. is preparing
to invade Nicaragua, he accused the
Americans of being "gangsters of
paranoia."
Students to cruise rally
V'ancouverites will have a chance
to add their voice to the first world
wide disarmament rally Saturday.
Organizers of International Protest Day are hoping to attract
millions of marchers in cities across
North America, Europe, and
Japan. In Vancouver protestors will
walk from Jericho Park to Vanier
Park where a rally focusing on the
cruise missile will take place.
Helen Spiegelman of the End The
Arms Race Coalition which is
organizing the Vancouver rally said
students should be taking an active
role in the march.
"Students are still avoiding the
issue, pretending it will go away,"
she said.
When asked about expected UBC
student turnout at the march, Gary
Marchant of the UBC Students for
Peace and Mutual Disarmament
simply rolled his eyes.
But the $11,000 spent on advertising by Vancouver peace groups
doesn't seem to be wasted on other
Vancouverites, Spiegelman said.
"We're seeing an upsurge of
response to the cruise issue in many
white collar neighbourhoods" she
said. Heavy volunteer efforts have
defrayed costs of letting Vancouver
know about Saturday's rally, she
added.
The rally may effect talks taking
place Monday in Ottawa between
NATO defense ministers, said
SPMD member Andrew Milne.
"The amount of worldwide
dissention generated by the protests
can't be ignored by the ministers,
who themselves are politicians
responsible to their constituents, he
said.
Saturday's walk to "Refuse the
Cruise" begins at 11 a.m. and the
rally will include speakers and
entertainment. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Oc
Refuse the Cruise and Pershing ll's.
IuiluM G TOTAL
ABOUT fieMuK- I'll
LisrewToAwycoMW^
yoo AfAV HAV& AtouT
m
BoPGrZf-
Join the world Saturday in opposing
the arms race to
English 100 works ignore women'
I am concerned about the conspicuous exclusion of women
authors and poets from this year's
English 100 syllabus; not one of the
plays, poems, or novels on the
selection list was written by a
woman.
I would not suggest that gender
alone should warrant a writer being
represented in a survey literature
course. However, surely there are
women authors of the last two centuries who have demonstrated sufficient distinction to be included
among the sixteen works chosen
from this period.
The list of novels, for instance,
runs as follows: Findley's The
Wars, Joyce's Dubliners, Melville's
Billy Budd, Moore's The
Luck of Ginger Coffey, Twain's
The Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn, and Conrad's Lord Jim.
These choices raise a question on
many accounts as to the criteria
employed for selection, but the sexual bias in author and content is
perhaps the most blatant cause for
criticism.
Despite the possible universal appeal an author's work may have,
there are always aspects of his/her
socio-cultural milieu that make it of
more particular significance to
those sharing the same experience.
This is evident in the subtle and
sometimes not so subtle differences
one finds in literature composed by
men as compared to that composed
by women.
There are unique elements in
women's shared experiences that
are translated in the literature they
produce; the language, imagery,
form,   content,   and   themes   can
each reflect the idiosyncratic experience of the world as perceived
by woman. The Africa Doris Less-
ing portrays is very distinctive from
that of Conrad or D.H. Lawrence.
Yel to claim one to be of greater interest or significance is to make a
prejudicial judgement.
This should not be misinterpreted
Anti-budget group 'not cultisV
The October 13 Rally organized by the UBC Campus Community Alliance and the Alma
Mater Society special general
meeting held concurrently were
political activities, on that I cannot disagree with Lynn Snyder's
letter Oct. 18 (George 'cult
leader'?) What surprises me is
that she equates them with cult
aims and recruiting tactics.
On first impression, and the
depth of Snyder's analysis goes
no further, this rally and a
recruiting campaign are very
similar activities. But a more
detailed account of the rally and
its aims will reveal important
differences.
A recruitment campaign by a
political or religious cult hides
the final aim of the campaign, to
convert people to a dogmatic
ideology which always includes
little, or no, tolerance for other
dissenting groups.
The UBCCCA was formed
with a well defined aim and a
clear ideology, to raise
awareness among students,
faculty and staff of the implications of the "restraint" budget
and   accompanying   legislation
of the Socred government in Ihe
future of this university, education and the province, and to act
against the legislature and its
implications. The rally was
nothing more than a way of presenting the issues to the community.
I am convinced that only
through a co-operative, open
minded, and creative effort
amongst the university community, and this community,
again, with all the other groups
affected by the government
measures will we be able to effectively oppose a real and immediate threat to the social
structure of B.C.
Freedom of speech, and the
accompanying freedom to dissent, are not denied by the UBCCCA in any one of its activities.
Engineering undergraduate
society vice-president Neil
Smith, backed by other
engineering students, first voiced, in a rather loud manner, his
disagreement with the UBCCCA
and the Solidarity Coalition. An
act considered nothing short of
heretic in any cult.
We are not trying to convert
people by playing on their emotions or guilt feelings, we are offering a viable form of opposition to the excess of authority
being imposed on us by the
Socred government.
Horacio de la Cueva
TAU president and
Campus Community
Alliance member
to mean that we don't have
something to learn from the
literature of both sexes. Quite the
contrary, it is for this very reason
that a literature course having the
largest enrolment of any other
course on campus should use the
opportunity to expose students to
both perspectives.
The absence of women authors
and poets begs the question of
where women's literature as a whole
stands in the english department's
estimation; the validity of its role in
the literary tradition of our
language appears to be in doubt.
This is particularly suggestive if, in
addition, one considers the fact that
interested students are forced to go
outside the English department to
participate in a course studying the
literary tradition of women/women's: studies 224.
The exclusion of works by
women writers from English 100 is a
misrepresentation of the achievement of women in this field; denying the students, particularly the
female students, exposure to this
achievement is unjust and irresponsible. This omission leads me to the
unfortunate conclusion that
women's sex may still be perceived
as a liability in the eyes of the critics
who pass judgement on the worthiness of our art and ideas. I think
it only fair that we be afforded the
opportunity to make an assessment
of our own.
It distresses me that women
writers of today may still find
themselves asking the tragic question Virginia Woolf was led to pose
over fifty years ago; "... who
shall measure the heat and violence
of the poet's heart when caught and
tangled in a woman's body?"
I think the English department
owes an explanation to the women
and other concerned students of
this campus.
Seonaigh MacPherson
arts 3
r
THE UBYSSEY
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"All staffers, come to the peace rally on Saturday," bellowed Justin Wyatt, Gordon Clark
and Betsy Goldberg. Victor Wong said he would skip his Seamen's song Night, change out of
his khaki and attend after pleading from Alar Ollum and Joel Pecchioli. "I'll cover it for the
Solidarity Times," muttered Muriel Draaisma. "And I'll get this line story in the Western
News," bellowed Chris Wong. "I'll get it in the MOPE and SNAG newsletters after some
CD " Sarah Albany guffawed. "Oh fuck it all, just march," said Doug "I know how to
criticize" Schmidt. "Here here," Patti Rather, Holly Nathan, and Lynn Holt yelled in harmonious unison. "I'll draw some reeaall mighty fine graphic after the march," said Robby
Robertson in a Colarada drawl. With this note Jack Tieleman, Rory Allen and Steamer "This
is really my name" Plant headed towards Jericho, '""his could make a great movie," said
Shaffin Shariff reeking of English Leather and clutching nis bath robe. "Get off your chair and
let's go," Arnold Hedstrom told Neil Lucente. "Can I b'eak it first?" he asked Robert Beynon.
Dear D
Addressed to applied science Dean
Martin Wedepohl:
It is with a great deal of
displeasure that I feel obliged to apprise you of the demeanor of approximately 150 of your
undergraduate students during a
university community function
yesterday. Those members of your
student body who so boorishly
disrupted an otherwise orderly and
responsible gathering should be
severely chastised.
While the latter half of the function was devoted to a student
general meeting, the opening
statements and presentation were
representative of a wide range of
organizations and churches. Essentially, the first hour of the rally was
a university community function
which was sponsored by the UBC
Campus Community Alliance.
Guest speakers from on and off
campus gave of their time and efforts to research and present an
educated and articulate reflection
on the current provincial budget.
None of the organizers expected
to have an entire audience that was
in full agreement with the views of
those stage, and in consideration of
those people an open forum, open
microphone period was planned to
Gears fear 1
It seems that if you are not for
the Solidarity Coalition, then you
are against. That if you do not
belong to their organization then
you are doing nothing to
paraphrase one Audrey Fiene.
I did not know that the Coalition
elected itself the sole voice of the
masses. The engineers do not disapprove of the Solidarity Coalition,
but rather we are concerned our
voice, the students, will be lost
among a lot of whining and moaning. And a possible general strike by
the B.C. Government Employment
Union is hardly going to help us obtain favorable relations with Bill
Bennett, not that we have any to
begin with.
What the Engineers said, in their
own manner, was no to the
Solidarity Coalition, but we sure as
hell did not say yes to Bennett.
Students are so low on the
political totem pole, that you need porJf yoo
OP€r?AfiOM sxid^
UJHAr frt D01W&
JOSf AUOlO
a fSir.
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
6uTHMAlA>
T»f  6[LUS
Au"P TrlftXW
(OUT
ih«#
ean Wedepohl
democratically allow for
"civilized" opposition. Individuals
were openly invited and made
aware of that fact. This invitation
was directly extended to a representative of the engineers during an
organizational meeting several days
prior to the event.
It is suficient to say that the
engineers chose the most "uncivilized" manner at their disposal to
cause havoc. They managed to project an entirely ridiculous and infantile image. That image was, I am
sure, carried off campus by the
many community groups which
were present and by the press including radio, television and
newspapers.
If funding to various engineering
programs is at risk of being cut or
reduced, the representation provided by the entourage of engineers
yesterday, will likely hamper the
possibility of campus support for
your cause. The engineers have
once again gone out of their way to
alienate themselves from others on
this campus.
Destruction of private property is
still a legal offense. The University
Campus Community Alliance is
outraged that the engineers seem
entirely ignorant of that fact. During their 'entrance' they chose to
destroy a large fabric banner which
we had produced at a cost of $30.
oss of voice
sonar to find them. Since the majority in the Coalition or the B.C.
Government are not university
students, I am not really convinced
that my precedence is theirs. My
priority is quality education, which
has very little to do with a seven per
cent tax on restaurant meals.
When it comes down to the wire
between the Solidarity Coalition
and Bennett, the student will be in
the best position to get the elbow in
the teeth. After all the swearing,
yelling, and back stabbing that goes
on in negotiations, somebody gets
to hold the bucket.
Solidarity is not going to lose,
Bennett is not going to lose. But,
who is to say that we, the students,
are going to come out a winner?
Our track record up to now has
been nothing to brag about.
Jim Davies
appliance science 1
The Alliance had planned to use the
banner at another function this
weekend and obviously cannot. We
are demanding that we be reimbursed for that loss immediately.
We are also demanding a written
apology from the engineers in attendance for the verbal and physical
abuse that they directed at the
stage. While people on this campus
have had to put up with their foul
language we are not prepared to accept that it is appropriate to throw
things at anyone. One woman was
hit in the face by an object thrown
from the throng of engineers behind
the stage. I personally witnessed the
event and was enraged. A group of
fire fighters who were acting as
marshalls for the rally attempted to
identify the offender but were
unable to get any co-operation from
the engineers questioned.
This campus is a community. Its
objective is to provide people with
the tools needed to achieve career
and research goals. The university
has traditionally been looked upon
as a positive and directive influence;
on the community it serves. The:
university is not a day care centre
for irresponsible, inarticulate, post-
pubescent individuals. I have
specifically avoided the term
"adults" as it is clear that adults do
not conduct themselves in the
fashion that was witnessed yesterday.
Your investigation into this matter is greatly appreciated and I am
sure that we will hear from you in
the near future.
Fairieigh Wettif;
UBC campus community alliance
treasurer
Canada needs autonomy
Canada needs a new economic
strategy in order to recover from its
present crisis. Part of Canada's
(and B.C.'s in particular) problem
is that its economy is overly dependent on the export of raw materials.
While it will always be part of the
world economy, in order for
Canada to develop any economic
autonomy it must become more
self-reliant. This does not necessarily mean industrial development
along the lines of the United States,
but possibly more development based on more small enterprise.
George McRobie, a colleague of
the late E. F. Schumacher recently
said, "Large industries produce
goods, but not employment." He
was not condemning large industry
as a whole, which he considers to be
important, but was stressing the
role small enterprises can play not
only in creating employment, but in
creating greater local economic
autonomy.
Small industries require less
capital, are often environmentally
safer, and can avoid the
dehumanizing aspects of large-scale
industries. In his work as part of the
Intermediate Technology Development Group, he observed that in
both the third world and industrialized nations, industries that
required a small starting capital aided in creating a more democratic
economy because the low costs
allowed for more people to take an
active role in industry. However,
small enterprises are difficult to successfully start, especially in harsh
economic times.
This is partly because most
governments (municipal, provincial
and federal) give special attention
to large enterprises and favour them
Letters
Stuff it Bill
To those all for restraint — just
so long as it doesn't apply to them,
and all those who have total approval for the Social Credit's present repressive package of bills, I
would like to throw out a challenge.
Would you, who are clapping Big
Brother Bill on the back for cutting
a much needed $50 a month from
the 2,500 disabled (mentally or
physically, or both) person's now
pitifully inadequate government
grant on an average of $530 per
month, be willing to take a proportionate cut of $500 or $1,000 or
more a month from your own
secure salary with its assured cost of
living increase, and annual increases? I very much doubt it! In
fact, I think the back clapping
would abruptly cease, to be replaced by some very loud complaining.
And you, Mr. Bill Bennett, why
aren't you setting a good example
and applying some of your restrictive measures to yourself, and to all
those who can well afford to give up
some of their many, many benefits?
I'd like an answer, please!
Barbara Templeman
Unappreciated omissions
Dear Ubyssey;
I was pleased to see the coverage that you gave our meeting last
Friday with Pedro Cedillos, official spokesperson for the opposition
forces in El Salvador.
However, I have one quibble with it that relates to style. Nowhere
in the article did you mention who sponsored the meeting. When a
speaker of Mr. Cedillos' stature comes to campus, that's news. What
he says to students is also news. And how and why he came here is
news as well.
Did he drop out of the sky? Did he just happen to be on campus
and decide to hold an instant meeting? Or did a group of students
who are interested in events in Mr. Cedillos' country organize it?
Our group organized the event, and we and other groups I am sure
would appreciate it if when covering our events you would not omit
that one piece of news, that is, why the event is taking place.
^.
Lawrence Kootnikoff
Latin American Support Committee
in regulations covering credit,
research and development, and
transportation. It is easier to aid
one large business than many small
ones, even if the benefits are not are
great
Large enterprises also have an advantage in distributing their goods.
Since governments are inextricably
involved in the economy, they can
aid small enterprises, not just by
eliminating present inequalities in
the system, but by favouring small
enterprises. This can take the form
of loans, the provision of business
expertise to new enterprises, and exploring how modern technologies
can encourage decentralization of
the workplace as opposed to present
trends of eliminating jobs.
It is also a more realistic approach for local governments to encourage small businesses to stay, expand, or get started than to try to
attract large businesses. Recent
studies done in the United States
have concluded that large firms
rarely base location decisions upon
local government programs or local
tax breaks. This is not a short-term
solution, but one that requires
Canada to reconsider what type of
economy and society it wants for
the future.
George McRobie, author of
Small is Possible, will be discussing
"Economic Futures for Canada,"
Monday, October 24, 4 p.m. in
Buchanan A102.
Paul Chernoff is a graduate student in the School of community
and regional planning.
Cruise for peace
With the recent political turmoil
at the provincial level, many British
Columbians are not aware of the
significance of a wave of
simultaneous demonstrations that
will occur all over the world this
Saturday. The Oct. 22, "Refuse the
Cruise: International Day of Protest" will be a historical occasion. It
will be the largest single-day global
protest ever, on any issue.
Major protest marches are planned in every West European country,
Australia, New Zealand, Japan,
every major U.S. city, and 28 cities
in Canada, including Vancouver. In
West Germany alone, over a million
people are expected to march on
Second, the cruise missile will
greatly increase the probability of
nuclear war in the next twenty
years, as it is designed for fighting a
nuclear war, rather than deterring
one. It is intended to be used, and
will be used, during our lifetimes in
the belief that nuclear war can be
kept limited and can be won. For
example, the document "U.S.
Military Posture, F.Y. 1984" (p.
18) states that "if deterrence fails"
cruise missiles could be used "to
■ escalate the intensity of the conflict
in a controlled manner".
The third danger posed by cruise
missiles is that they are almost impossible to verify, and therefore will
this single day. Never before will so
many people, in so many cities,
march together in unity.
The focus of all the protests will
be the same: to protest against the
escalation of the arms race by the
deployment of cruise missiles; and
to call for a global halt of the
nuclear arms race.
There are three ways in which the
cruise missile is particularly
dangerous: First, the introduction
of cruise missiles into the strategic
arsenals of the superpowers will
result in a massive increase in the
number of nuclear weapons each
side possesses. In the next five
years, the U.S. plans to deploy over
5,000 nuclear-armed cruise missiles
on ships, submarines, bombers and
on land. The Soviets will respond
with a massive increase in their
nuclear arsenal, and will eventually
develop and deploy their own
modern cruise missiles.
make arms control in the future exceedingly difficult, if not impossible. For this reason, the cruise
missile is a weapon against arms
control.
This Saturday, informed people
all over the world will be protesting
against the production, testing and
deployment of cruise missiles; and
for a bilateral, verifiable nuclear
weapons freeze agreement between
the U.S. and U.S.S.R. Your participation in these marches is important.
The Vancouver march starts at
Jericho Park at 11:00 a.m., and is
followed by a rally at Vanier Park.
Come along, and be part of history
in the making. If the protests succeed, you may even have the opportunity to tell your grandchildren
about them, and to have grandchildren.
Gary Marchant
grad studies Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,1983
Ooooooooooopsssssss!!
The Ubyssey would like to
apologize for an error in a story
that appeared in the Oct. 18 issue
(AMS airs dirty laundry). The ninth
paragraph of the story was attributed to Alma Mater Society ex- jfc^ 5^5 '//S
ternal affairs coordinator Lisa
Hebert. The reference should have
been to AMS vice-president Renee
Comesotti. The person responsible
has been condemned to being
Tweens editor for the rest of the
year (if we remember Tweens).
AW AH.
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How the future began.
A ROBERT CHARTOFF-IRWIN WINKLER PRODUCTION of A PHILIP KAUFMAN FILM "THE RIGHT STUFF"
CHARLES FRANK SCOTT GLENN ED HARRIS LANCE HENRIKSEN SCOTT PAULIN DENNIS QUAID
SAM SHEPARD FRED WARD KIM STANLEY  BARBARA HERSHEY VERONICA CARTWRIGHT  PAMELA REED
Music bv BILL CONTI Director ot Photography CALEB DESCHANEL Based on the Book bv TOM WOLFE
Produced bv iRWIN WINKLER and ROBERT CHARTOFF Written for the Screen ond Directed bv PHILIP KAUFMAN
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THE   UBYSSEY
Page 11
Men working for coffee break
By JACK TIELEMAN
The Men at Work concert on
Thursday night could have been
called The Scalpers at Work concert. The grounds outside the
Pacific Coliseum were covered with
free enterprisers and entrepeneurs.
There were tickets available for any
price and for any seat. Some
scalpers came complete with maps
of the coliseum to show you exactly
where the seats were located.
The concert could have also been
called Man at Work, Stevie Ray
Vaughan the Opening Act. Vaughan
appeared on stage with a well-
battered Fender Stratocastor guitar
and quickly set to work wading
knee-keep into Texas Blues.
Vaughan, who is billed as a legend
in the making, could possibly attain
this if the world is ready for a full
dose of his searing blues guitar. The
45 minute set included Texas Flood,
Pride and Joy and Jimi Hendrix's
Voodoo Child.
Vaughan played behind his back
and walked his guitar across the
stage in a grand manner not unlike
Hendrix.
But it was evident by the quick
return of the over head lights that
Steve Ray Vaughan was not to
return. Men at Work were definitely not taking any chances with
Vaughan — they didn't even allow
him to use their entire sound
system.
Like all men at work they take
coffee breaks — it's unfortunate
that the concert started in the middle of one. Colin Hay walked on to
stage with an unenthusiastic expression and Greg Ham, the keyboardist and life of the band, fooled
around around with disguises in
Doctor Heckle and Mr. Jive. Ham
proved to be the most competent
musician switching easily from
keyboards to saxophone, snapping
out of his comatose state halfway
through the show.
The hits Down Under, Who Can
it be Now, and It's a Mistake were
full of life.
The band reflected their simple
music with an equally simple show.
But the second half was a definite
improvement. Colin Hay woke up
and danced through Johnny Be
Good during the encore.
One must remember that Men at
Work were all studio artists and
didn't take to the stage until a few
years ago. So look for a better performance in the future.
But it seemed most of the 7000
plus crowd enjoyed it, especially
when Hay invited the crowd up to
the stage, much to the dislike of
PNE security men.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21, 1983
Natives face many hurdles
VICTORIA B.C. (CUP) —
Native students are disillusioned
with the education system because
white control it and offer no reinforcement of Native culture, the
United Natives Nations president
charged recently.
Vic Wells said 80 to 95 per cent of
Natives drop out of high school
before completion and those who
do finish face further barriers to
post secondary education.
B.C. loans for Native students
are only offered to status Indians
who must remain on reserves to
maintain status, he said. But high
'*>
unemployment on the reserves
means most Natives don't earn
enough to supplement the insufficient student aid, said Wells.
And funding cuts to Native controlled programs also discourage
further education since students can
no longer take programs in Native
culture, language and history, he
said.
Meanwhile a UBC committee
continues to study ways for the
Native community to be better served by the institute.
Administration president George
Pedersen formed an advisory com
mittee in July to investigate ways to
improve access to UBC, improve
course offerings, and tabulate what
current research relates to Natives.
Committee co-chair Verna
Kirkness said very few courses pertain to Natives, with the exception
of a few in law, education and anthropology.
But Pedersen cautioned the committee not to expect funds, Kirkness
said.
"We have no promise of being
able to do things that require a lot
of expenditure in the near future,"
she said.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Always say never again to Bond
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
There wouldn't be much reason
to take a chance on Never Say
Never Again if Sean Connery
weren't in it. So many things are
wrong in this uninspiring and
disinterested Bond picture that it's
hard to believe that Irvin Kershner
— who helmed the best installment
in the Star Wars series, The Empire
Strikes Back — directed it.
It may t>e that audiences are too
used to the fast-paced, gimicky
Roger Moore Bond films to be patient with a slower, more contemplative version, but that doesn't
excuse Never Say Never Again's
lack of energy and drive. Never Say
Never Again isn't only the most
lacklustre of Bonds — it's also the
most disappointing Connery Bond
ever.
Never Say Never Again
Directed by Irvin Kershner
Playing at Capitol Six
In Never Say Never Again, an aging James Bond (Sean Connery)
finds himself at a health spa, having
lost his double-zero license to kill.
While getting in shape — or rather,
purging his body of "free
radicals", as M (Edward Fox )puts
Manic  works
against movie
it — he stumbles onto the evil Spectre organization's new plot to capture two cruise missiles. (The story
is actually a re-working of
American Thunderball, released in
1964.)
Although Max Voh Sydow appears as Spectre's head, he isn't the
chief villain. That distinction
belongs to Largos (Klaus Maria
Brandauer) a shipping magnate
who likes playing a holographic
video game called World Domina
tion. Brandauer, who was excellent
in Ivan Szabo's 1981 Hungarian
film Mephisto, gives a manic performance that works against the
movie.
It   says   something   when   an
energetic performance is a detriment to a move. Brandeur has so
much life in him that after a while I
thought he was being cavalier —
couldn't he see that Connery was
acting as if he were still sipping
parsely tea in the spa? It doesn't
help that the new Bond beauty is
played by Kim Bassinger, who is so
placed, she becomes part of the
background — a shapely prop who
seais virginal whites.
The real discovery of Never Say
Never Again is Barbara Carrera,
who plays the role of Fatima Blush
with relish and a sense of adventure. Carrera is so good in her role
that she eclipses Connery.
Perpetually wrapped in black, like a
black widow spider, Fatima Blush
pokes fun at the artificially
youthful Bond Persona perpetuated
by Moore. Much of the humor is
near the Beginning of Never Say
Never Again and you wish Connery
and director Kershner had kept it
throughout because later, the film
doesn't work as a spy-thriller.
Most people going to see Never
Say Never Again will need a
tremendous amount of good will to
ignore the film's flaws. But it's hard
to believe that anyone who says he
likes  the  new  Bond  film  really
Most people will need
good will to
ignore the film's flaws
tries to kill every man she come in
contact with — right after she
makes love to him.
Carrera is a match for Brandauer. But there are only a couple
of scenes with the two actors
together and after a while you can't
figure out why. When Bond finally
kills Blush, the picture goes dead
and you wish Connery had lived up
to his decade-old claim that he
wouldn't do another Bond after
Diamonds are Forever (1971).
Never Say Never Again might
have recovered from Carrera's
departure if it had other redeeming
features, such as a good musical
score. Because of contractual
disputes involving Albert Brocolli
— the producer of the official
Roger Moore Bonds — Never Say
Never Again doesn't have the
familiar Bond theme and it suffers
from the lacklustre music Michel
Legrand has composed for it.
Connery's performance isn't embarrassing but it comes close to being a smug, self-satisfying parody.
Connery's Bond is more: human
than Moore's mannequin spy and it
believes it. It's more the fact that
most moviegoers who've seen the
Connery Bonds such as Goldfinger
and From Russia with Love can't
stand Moore's artifice.
Never Say Never Again is enjoyable neither as parody nor as an
adventure film — it's stuck
somewhere in the middle. On the
one side are Carrera and Brandauer, who've kept their essentially
comic book roles intact. Pulling in
the other direction are director Kershner and Connery, who want to
deflate the Bond myth.
When Kershner says "as far as
I'm concerned, there was never a
Bond picture before," he's fooling
himself. The Empire Strikes Back
never subverted its Star Wars
characters like Never Say Never
Again does with characters like M
and Moneypenny, who are played
by actors new in the roles. Never
Say Never Again treats them so
shabbily that it virtually ensures
that there won't be a sequel.
The new Connery Bond only proves one thing: sometimes, you've
just got to say Never Again.
Aviation movie marked by heroism and camaraderie
By JUSTIN WYATT
Philip Kaufman's exuberant new
film is about the exploits of test
pilot Chuck Yeager and the Mercury Astronauts. The film is epic in
style and design, yet it is never
bloated and dull as many three-
hour historical peices are. The
Right Stuff is full of wonderful
comic moments and strangely moving tranquil scenes.
The Right Stuff
Starring Sam Shepard, Ed Harris
and Scott Glenn
Directed by Philip Kaufman
Opens today at the Vancouver Centre
Kaufman, adapting Tom Wolfe's
bestseller from four years ago, tells
two aviation stories to maximize the
contrast and drama between these
stages of history. The first segment
of the film centers on Chuck
Yeager, the first man to break the
sound barrier, and his historic flight
in the first rocket plane, the X-l.
Kaufman holds back during this
part of the film. Curiously, the segment with Yeager and his desert
cohorts resembles a mixture of film
noir and western. Scenes taking
place in the bar called Pancho's
Happy Bottom Riding Club are filled with striking shadows and
mysterious women such as Yeager's
feisty wife, "Glamorous" Glennis
played by Barbara Hershey. Yeager
represents trie forerunner to the
film's real focus: the seven Mercury
Astronauts.
The transition from Yeager's
story to the Astronaut saga is deftly
handled by Kaufman. Yeager never
really leaves the film. We follow his
actions and reactions throughout.
In the end, the film returns to
Yeager and his last attempt to set an
altitude record in 1963.
After Yeager's first scenes we see
the training and development (both
physical and emotional) of the Mercury Astronauts. Kaufman delivers
the story from this point on in a
fairly linear fashion as the men
prepare for and engage in various
flights.
The Right Stuff is marked by a
genuine sense of heroism and
camaraderie. One senses the honest
enthusiasm of the astronauts, and
their quest for that elusive combin-
tation of the right stuff. After so
many cold, cynical films, it is
refreshing to see a slice of American
history depicting eager and heroic
figures trying to achieve clear cut
goals.
The Right Stuff works well on
many levels. Perhaps it is best taken
as nostalgia. Like the 20's depicted
in The Great Gatsby, the 40's in
New York, New York, or the 60's
of American Graffiti, The Right
Stuff captures perfectly the late 50's
and early 60*s. Kaufman's detail in
costume, dialogue, set design and
music richly evoke this time period.
In addition, the film exists on many
other levels — as a history lesson,
moral tale or comic epic.
The huge cast works almost as
well together as the fine ensemble in
The Big Chill. Each actor manages
to distinguish his character.
Especially memorable are Sam
Shepard's Chuck Yeager, and
Pamela Reed as astronaut Gord
Cooper's wife. Reed's sensitivity
isn't shared by Veronica Cartwright
whose shrill performance as Betty
Grissom stands out as one of the
few flaws in the film.
Econometrician Ken White has
called The Right Stuff 'the
Democratic answer to Bedtime for
Bonzo'. With former astronaut's
John Glenn's campaign for the
Democratic presidential nomination, the film's success could well
contribute to his victory.
Kaufman's film works as a well-
oiled commercial for Glenn. He is
pof trayed in only positive tones as a
handsome, serious and dedicated
American hero. It's too bad Ronald
Reagan's film past doesn't contain
a gem like The Right Stuff.
Kaufman has crafted a fine
specimen of Americana that will
surely delight and uplift audiences.
With the added bonus of 70 MM
and Dolby stereo at the Vancouver
Centre, The Right Stuff is a recommended experience for October. Page 14
HiUflC
Dick Smith, Pat Caird: tenor duo playing
hot jazz, ooh sizzling, hot hot. Oct. 23, The
Classical Joint, 231 Carral St.
Toronto: Too bad it's not the city, watered
down metal rockers who rock bring on Windsor, Oct. 22, War Memorial Gym.
The Grand Dominion Jazz Band: more hot
jazz, never too much and besides it's another
special event night. Hot Jazz Club, 36 East
Broadway.
The Jon Doe Band: Unidentified rock, from
who knows where but a guarantee on good
cappucino and carrot cake, so groove with
good vibrations, Oct. 21, Soft Rock Cafe.
Violent Fammes: A debut performance by
an original punk folk band. Yes the new wave
is from Milwaukee and the band will pumping
out such new classics as I just want, just are
bleep, Oct. 26 SUB brawlroom
UBC Symphony Orchestra: featuring
James Parker, piano soloist, you know when I
see all these piano recitals, I think of my piano
lessons with Sister Mona, way, way back,
and I'm glad I took up the harmonica, Oct. 21,
noon, Old Auditorium.
Soundwave '84: a famous jazz choir with
Peter Taylor directing, Oct. 21, VCC King Edward Campus, 1155 E. Broadway.
Larry Sparks: one of the giants, look up, way
up, of bluegrass, Oct. 21, Oddperson's Hall,
1720 Gravely.
Unitarian Jazzfest: Vancouver's finest jazz
cats, Oct. 23, 8 p.m.. The Unitarian Church of
Vancouver, 949 W. 49th, 261-7204.
•
PiCVL£6
Produced through the gracious
munificence land gullible naivety) of a
special guest typist.
SUB Films (SUB) Auditorium, 1228-3697)
Oct. 20-23: Missing, see what Verne MacDonald wrote about in the last issue, 7 p.m. all
days, 9:30 p.m. also Oct. 21-22; Oct. 27-30:
Tron, 7 p.m. all days, 9:30 p.m., also Oct.
28-29.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3698) Oct.
24: Salt of the Earth, about a mine workers
revolt, 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.; Oct. 31: Point of
order, an insight into B.C.'s future, see this
documentary showing Sen. Joseph McCarthy
(does he remind you of another McCarthy —
how's your boat Gracie?) in action, 6:30 and
8:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinemathique (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6119) Oct. 21: In Person:
Filmaker Bastian Cleve, showing seven optically transformed short films from India, 7:30
p.m.; Oct. 26: Salo, an Italian film about
fascists torturing young people (more B.C.
future?), 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 27: Imagination
and the Rise of the Popular Front, 7:30
p.m.; Jenny, 9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Oct. 21-27: Vergigo, a very suspensful film by
Alfred Hitchcock, 7:15 and 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Oct. 21-23: Les Enfants du
Paradis, sort of like university students, 7:30
p.m.; Oct. 24-25: Citizen Kane, that famous
movie about a non-democratic editorial collective, 7:30 p.m.; Morocco. 9:45 p.m.; Oct.
26-27: Lola, not based on the Kinks song,
7:30 p.m.; The Stationmasters Wife, a
shortended form of Bolweiser, find out for
yourself, 9:30 p.m. Savoy Cinema (Main and
Kingsway, 872-2124) Oct. 21-24: Twilight
Zone, 7:30 p.m.; Creepshow, 9:30 p.m.;
Oct. 22: Starstruck, midnight; Oct. 24-25:
An American Wherewolf in London, this
film does not feature any relatives of anyone's
French teacher, former or present, "its a
howl," 7:30 p.m.; Cat People, see kinky Kin-
ski all you voyeurs, 9:20 p.m.; Oct. 26-27: Q, a
refreshingly briefly titled movie — The Times,
7:30 p.m.; The Evil Dead, what students
look like about now, 9:30 p.m. Hollywood
Theatre (3123 W. Broadway 738-3211).
Filthy Rich: just like a certain Step .
ooops, I promised this person I would not in
suit him anymore, who care if he's
bourgeoise, representing the upper class,
oops this person just pointed out he sold his
jag. Filthy Rich is about private eyes, mools
gangsters, and politicians, Oct. 21-Nov. 19,
Waterfront Theatre, Granville Island.
The Chastitute: a rollicking, uproarious,
totally funny play by Stage Eireann, Oct
21-22, James Cowan Theatre, 6460 Gilpin.
Sweet Bird of Youth: by Tenessee Williams
about the corruption of innocence, (see above
about a certain Steph . . . about the corruption of innocence), Arts Club Granville Island,
687-5315.
Ever Loving: the sad tale of woe about three
war brides. Arts Club Seymour, 687-5315.
The Diary of Anne Frank: by the Vagabond
Players about war-torn Amsterdam, Queen's
Park, New Westminster.
Children of the Night: ha ha ha ha ha, an example of the spine-tingling daughter from this
horror take-off, to be reviewed by Fidelper-
son, till Nov. 5, Firehall Theatre, 280 E. Cordova. 687-8737.
•
Calendar Prints: Popular Art of India, a fantastic collection of Indian prints depicting Hindi deities, Muslim or Christian religious
themes, or secular motifs, UBC Museum of
Anthropology.
October Show: an alternative exhibition of
contemporary Vancouver art from over 120
Vancouver artists, 1078 Hamilton, 681-0880.
Winnipeg West - 1945-1965: life on the
praries depicted, Surrey Art Gallery, 13750
88th Ave., 596-1515.
Elliott Barnes/Nora Blanck: photography
and sculptural work, Presentation House, 333
Chesterfield, 986-1351.
Wood Exhibition: Ron David's woodwork
models. Ping Gallery, 876-5160.
Beyond Hiroshima: atomic bomb survivor.
Kinuko Laskey will share her experiences of
the Hiroshima bomb attack and show film
footage taken shortly after the bombings.
Carnegie Centre, Main and Hastings, Oct. 24,
7 p.m. Phone. 665-2220.
Quote of the day contest: "Insult Me
Plooooooooooooze. I love it" said a certain
myopic oriental Friday type said Wednesday.
"It will make me feel less guilty about insulting
the greatest person in the world higher up in
Vista," he muttered Sheepishly. See Wong
whine and whistle in the land of Mctaco every
day.
TODAY
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Displays and stmilations, 11:30-1:30 p.m., SUB
foyer.
Speakers  from  People  First:  a self-advocacy
movement   of   mentally   handicapped   people,
noon, Scarfe 205.
Puppet show. Kids on the Block, sponsored by
the Kinsmen Rehabilitation Foundation of B.C.,
noon, Scarfe 100.
Speaker from Hero's Restaurant: "The Reality of
Business and the Exceptional  Person,"  noon,
SUB 212.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lecture by Hanif Vitcani, noon, SUB 211.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
The Great Pumpkin Chase Rally, 7 p.m., meet at
SUB loop.
UBC WARGAMIrtG SOCIETY
Video/bzzr night, 6-12 midnight, SUB 215.
End the Arms Race
REFUSE THE CRUISE
INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PROTEST
Saturday, Oct. 22nd.
Assemble at Jericho Park at 11:00 a.m.
Speakers include: C. G. Gifford
Entertainers include: Ann Mortifee
This ad sponsored by UBC Students for Peace
and Mutual Disarmament, Box 71, SUB
Friday, October 21,1983
UBC FACULTY OF MEDICINE
Donald Peterson lecture: "Glucose and Hormone — observations from Study of Children
with Type I Glycogen Storage Disease" by Dr.
John F. Grigter Jr., clinical professor Harvard
University, 9 a.m., Shaughnessy Hospital room
D308.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Winery tour; details at CSA office SUB 235.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada West League game vs. Alberta Golden
Bears, 4 p.m., O.J. Todd Field.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL
UBC Jr. High School Boys Volleyball tournament, 4-11 p.m., Osbourne Centre.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Thunderbird varsity vs. Kats, 2:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Stadium.
J.V. BASKETBALL
J.V. Men vs. Fraser Valley College, 5:30 p.m.,
War Memorial Gym
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Tennis night, 6:30-9'30 p.m., armouries.
DANCE CLUB
Our first genera! meeting, for all members, noon,
SUB ballioom.
Elections — come and vote!
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY
Benefit dance for material aid to Nicaragua, 8
p.m. 1 a.m., Grad centre.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
Dance, 8 p.m.-midnight, SUB partyroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House upper lounge
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Dance and merry conversation, 8 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
LATIN    AMERICA   SUPPORT   COMMITTEE/TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Benefit dance for Nicaragua, live band. S4
employed, $3 students and unemployed, 8
p.m.-1 a.m., Grad centre.
GEOLOGICAL COLLOQUIA
The Vredefort Dome in South Africa: Meteorite
Crater or Internal Explosion Structure?, noon,
GoeSci. 330A.
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bear garden, benefit for aid to Nicaragua (again),
4-9 p.m., SUB somewhere (see other listings
under today).
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Coffee house, storytellers, singers, classical
music and jazz, 7:X p.m., Ryerson United
church, 2195 W. 45th.
SATURDAY
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Candle-light vigil for prisoners of conscience
week, 7-8 p.m., Robson Square.
END THE ARMS RACE
Refuse the cruise: international day of Protest,
11 a.m., Jericho park.
J.V. BASKETBALL
Men vs. Fraser Valley college, 5:30 p.m.. War
Memorial gym.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL
UBC   Jr.   high   school   boys   volleyball   tournaments, 9 a.m.-11 p.m., Osborne centre.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada west league game vs. Sask Huskies, 2
p.m., 0. J. Todd field.
UBC WATER POLO
Practise,   everyone   welcome..   5   p.m.,   UBC
aquatic centre.
DEBATING SOCIETY
The UBC invitational debate: come see a competitive university tournament, 10 a.m.-4 p.m ,
Buch. lounge.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Dance/party,    7   p.m..    International    house
ballroom.
RUGBY
UBC varsity vs.  Kats, 2:30 p.m.,  Thunderbird
stadium.
SUNDAY
WOMEN'S SOCCER
UBC vs. Meralomas, 2 p.m., Magee high school.
MONDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Kung Fu class, 5:30-7 p.m., SUB 207/209.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
History seminar. The problem of atheism in early
modern England, Michael Hunter, Univ. of London, 3:30-5:30 p.m., Buch penthouse.
The true role of astrology in early modern
England: A Critique of Keith Thomas, Michael
Hunter, noon, Buch. A102.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting, ail welcome, 7 p.m., SUB 205,
THE UBYSSEY
Death, destruction, mayhem and maybe the production   of  another  substandard  edition  (i.e.
HELPI), noon to ?, SUB 241K.
MUSSOC
Oklahoma auditions, all welcome, 8-10 (p.m. we
assume), SUB 207/209.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
General meetings, all welcome, noon, SUB 205.
TUESDAY
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Regular meeting, noon. Lutheran Campus centre, conference room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside discussion the rote of the teaching
assistant in the university, 8 p.m.. Graduate student centre fireside lounge.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on radio:ogv ciiven Dy Dr. Newman,
noon. IRC V
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF
CANADA
"Juggernaut", award-winning film about the introduction of a Canadian atomic reactor to India
in 1967, noon, Such A204.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, important, noon, Buch B221.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:3C p.m. go to SUB 235
for details.
WEDNESDAY
NOP CLUB
General meeting, anyone interested may attend,
noon, Buch A205.
CHINESE STUDENTS  ASSOCIATION
Mandann ciass — a>' ievels, noon, Asian studies
centre.
CUSO
Information session, slide tape show, 7:30 p.m.,
international House upper lounge.
"CUSO overview -   A challenge and a change"
tfoffja^
Come and dance to a great live band
at a benefit for Nicaragua at the
Graduate Student Centre, Oct. 21, 8
p.m.-1 a.m. $4 for the employed, and $3
for students and unemployed. Sponsored by the Latin American Solidarity
Committee, Teaching Assistants Union,
and the Graduate Students Society.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
3RD   ANNUAL
'HALLOWEEN
MV:   HOLLY BURN
Sat  Oct   29   83.9pm. SHARP
North Foot ot Danman Street
Texas mickey draw-music CITR
Tickets 130O   AMS box office
SI-92 CORTEZ GUITAR, $100. El Degas
Mandolin, price negotiable. Call Nancy at
228-9831.	
FOR SALE: one way CP Air ticket to Toron-
to, Dec. 17/83. $151. Call 734-9516.
1973 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE, sunny yellow, 75,000 mi., radio, new brakes, ex. running cond. $1600. 224-1672.
70 - SERVICES
MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
80 - TUTORING
7 - LEGAL
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
THE I.Q. CONTROVERSY:
THE CASE OF
CYRIL BURT
Prof. Brian Simon,
University of Leicester
SATURDAY, OCT. 22nd
AT 8:15 P.M.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
JUDITH ALEXANDER
LAWYER
731-8323 or 261-8514
FAMILY LAW
Change of name      — Custody
Divorce Family Property
— Separation
PERSONAL INJURY LAW
EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTORS offer
TUTORING IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND
LANGUAGE. Also EDITING, RESEARCH,
XX and ASSISTANCE WITH WRITING
PROBLEMS (any subject). John, 873-0860
or Margrith, 986-7506.
ITALIAN LESSONS: Native Italian giving
lessons in conversation and grammar.
Reasonable rates. Call Gio"io, 734-8893.
85 - TYPING
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
CUSO-UBC
INFORMATION SESSION
Thursday, October 27th
7:30 p.m.
International House
"CUSO    Overview     -     A
challenge and a change"
SLIDE-TAPE SHOW
Returned   volunteers   will   talk
about   their   CUSO    posting
overseas. Recruitment information will be available.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME
THE KEG PRIME RIB
AND BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:00 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
UBC
TYPING
SERVICE
$1.50 Per Page
48 HOUR SERVICE
UBC pick up & delivery, editing
features, high quality printing,
professional, prompt.
CHARLENE
THE WORD SERVICE
733-9941
EXPERT
TYPING
Essays, term papers, factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes, theses,
IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rate.
ROSE - 731-9857
INSTUCTORS Required for LSAT, MCAT,
GMAT courses. Leave name and number
738-4618.	
FACULTY MEMBERS: We need people to
judge debates between UBC, SFU and
U-Vic on Saturday. Please call Debating
Society at 228-2069.
BAHA'I FAITH. Building a United World
Community. Formal and informal discussions on selected topics every Friday. For
more information phone 222-0261.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1976 PLYMOUT FURY Stn. Wgn. 360 V 8,
auto., 51,000 mi., AM/FM 4 spkr. cass
stereo, snows, city test. $2995. 321-5138.
35 - LOST
LOST: Green wallet. Believed to be lost on
campus or along 16th Ave If found call
Robert, 874-2781.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends
736-1208.
EXPERIENCED, FAST, accurate typing.
Term papers, thesis. Location close to campus. 732-1745
40 - MESSAGES
LOOK INTO THE BRIGHT SIDEI
VANCOUVER MENSA 738-2124
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. IBM Selectric,
by experienced secretary. $1.25/pg. Bing,
224-1567. .
WORD PROCESSING (Micoml. Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333. Friday, October 21,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Drugs and Dracula enhanced by humor
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Children of the Night is a
marvellous play worth seeing twice.
Paul Ledoux has penned a play that
absorbs the audience immediately
with its humorous plot and competent acting. A packed house laughed and clapped throughout the performance.
Children Of The Night
By Paul Ledoux
Directed by John Cooper
Play at the Firehall Theatre
Children of the Night is silly
comedy-thriller. It is a biography of
Bela Lugosi's life, which takes its
shape from the style and form of
the horror films that created the image of Dracula. It illustrates a conflict between the real Bela Lugosi, a
frustrated actor, played by Alf
Silver and the ham actor Freddy
(John Bryden) who is trapped in
horrible spaghetti-like 'B' movies
where Dracula lives forever.
The conflict is seen through the
games and manipulations of the second character in the play, Freddy.
He imposes these games on his hero
Dracula so his fan club can swell
with Bela Lugosi memorabilia.
An   addiction   brings   the   two
together on a rainy Hallowe'en
night. Freddy is involved in a
Hollywood drug ring and is addicted to the Horror Movie genre as
an escape mechanism. Lugosi, an
aging actor, wants to be a serious
actor and uses his addiction to morphine to escape from his failure.
Freddy will do anything to satisfy
his need for horror movie
memorabilia and Bella will do
anything for morphine. The situation turns into a Lugosi nightmare.
Bela uses Freddy's obsession to get
his drugs by becoming Dracula.
In one scene they exchange
humorous dialogue with Bela taunting Freddy. "You cannot resist
Freddy," he says.
"You are taking my brains,"
says Bela in a true Draculian voice.
"Some brains are not missed,"
answers Dracula.
After this exchange a tranced
Freddy hands over a canister that
opens to a Jack-in-the-Box and the
games progress in an increasingly
macabre manner.
Freddy wants to kill the count to
preserve his image from
degenerating as an adict. They
struggle. Freddy is stabbed and falls
into a convenient open coffin. The
count runs through his movies men
tally to discover a way of disposing
of the body. But Freddy's body has
transformed into a vampire and
vampires do not die from plastic
stakes.
Freddy goes for Bela's throat and
chases him into a bathroom offstage. They return and Bela wards
off Freddy with a cross constructed
from a toilet brush and a plunger.
But Freddy is Jewish.
There is constant use of bad puns
based on the writing style Freddy
found in Horror Fan rags. And the
television turns on periodically like
an appropriate footnote to enhance
the scenes.
When reality creeps in, Freddy
claims the magic is still there. But to
a serious actor such as Bela Lugosi,
the magic is just a cheap thrill. To
Freddy it is much more — and
escape, a world of dreams where
Dracula will live forever. Unfortunately, Dracula is not Bela
Lugosi, not a picture, but flesh and
blood.
Both the characters of Freddy
and Bela are played superbly, utterly believably and sincerely. The
Count's Hungarian accent is
perfect. Thunder and lightning,
flickering lights and the T.V. never
falter in timing. The set design is
also impressive. Minute care is
taken to create Freddy's museum of
horror.
This play deals with very real concerns in a style that makes pure
entertainment.
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*••*••****
•*•***•*•
E.U.S. & AMS CONCERTS
present
3rd Annual Halloween Ball
with
POWDER BLUES
Willie Wands Wevenge
Fri., Oct. 28
Sat., Oct. 29, 8 p.m.
THE ARMORIES
Prizes for best costumes
No Minors
Tickets from EUS Rep
or AMS Box Office
• ••••••••-A-**********
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Closed Wednesday and Sunday Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,1983
Black moon wanes over gutter lives
By CHRIS WONG
Scenes depicting squalor and
depravity run rampant throughout
a new French film, The Moon In
The Gutter. The film, directed by
Jean-Jacques Beineix who scored a
huge success with Diva, features
brilliant cinematography which
spares no details.
Without a doubt The Moon In
The Gutter succeeds in painting a
grim picture of the slums and the
hopelessness of trying to escape.
But it almost succeeds too well.
The non-stop barrage of pathetic
characters and shots of dirty
alleyways and broken beer bottles is
overwhelming. Beineix's emphasis
on exact description leaves one
gasping for air.
The Moon In The Gutter
Directed by Jean-Jacques Beineis
Playing at the Fine Arts
The film is set in a "port with no
name" and tells the story of a
stevedore, Gerard (played by
Gerard Depardieu). His job on the
dock consists of hooking and
unhooking huge cables with life
crates that crash to the ground with
a thunderous noise. The job is
dangerous and mundane, but the
only opportunity for survival in this
bleak world.
Gerard is tortured by the loss of
his sister who committed suicide
after she was raped in a dead-end
alley. Unable to forget his sister's
cruel death, he returns every night
to the spot where the blood stains
have dried.
He adopts a suspecting and
paranoid attitude as he searches for
the man who violated his sister,
whom he saw as innocent and pure.
The main suspect is his alcoholic
brother, Frank, whose role is
played well by Dominique Pinon —
one of the stars of Diva. Another
suspect is Newton Channing (Vit-
torio Mezzogiorno), a wealthy man
who is also living one long alcoholic
binge.
Gerard's search is interrupted by
the appearance of Loretta
(Nastassia Kinski), Channing's
sister — a ghostly reminder to
Gerard of his sister's own purity
and innocence.
Loretta represents Gerard's
chance to escape the gutter. He can
always go home to Bella, (Victoria
Abril) but Loretta is a refreshing
change to the despairing and tragic
scenes he must face every day.
Loretta possesses a beauty which
haunts Gerard's mind like the moon
which casts haunting shadows on
the port town.
In essence the film explores the
struggle of Gerard and others in the
gutter to leave their dead-end life.
It's a dark society which drives people full of inner conflict to seek
escape through alcohol or
violence. Diversions like Loretta
present both a challenge and hope.
In his role as Gerard, Depardieu
is convincing. He comes across as a
truly distressed, tragic figure —
perhaps to an excessive degree. His
consistently torturous demeanor
takes away from his role. Kinski's
scenes provide the only break for
the viewer forced to sit through two
hours of depression.
Beiniex makes each of her scenes
dramatic and overblown. Music
with lush violins plays in the
background while she enters with
her hair blowing in the wind and her
soft voice heard in seductive tones.
The only explanation for this seemingly cliched performace of Kinski
is to add to the film's theme of
despair.
Loretta is portrayed as an
elegant, upper class whose beauty
elicits awe from everyone she encounters. But although her beauty
is genuine and lasting, she cannot
pull the people in the gutter out of
their misery. In a way she resembles
the starlets of old French and
American films. Her presence provokes reverence, but in reality she is
distant and unapproachable.
Loretta can only offer false hope
and cannot revive Gerard from his
comatose state.
The film borrows many of the
elements of the classic film genre,
such as the mysterious plot, and the
tearful tale of woe. But it also owes
much to modern techniques. Like
the Francis Ford Copploa film, One
From the Heart, the majority of
The Moon In The Gutter was filmed mainly in the studio which
creates an artificial air to the gutter.
But it is a much improved version of Coppola's box office flop.
Beineix's film matches One From
The Heart with imaginative use of
light and camera angles. The opening scene is particularly strong when
Gerard's sister is pursued by the
rapist. Only hurried footsteps are
shown and the scene ends with a
pool of blood, blotting the screen in
gruesome shades.
This scene sets the out tone of
the film and illustrates the fault of
The Moon In The Gutter. The
realism has been stretched to
unbearable lengths. Kinski's
sporadic appearances provide only
a partial balance to the violent
nature of this grim film.
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