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The Ubyssey Feb 4, 1966

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Array Is
Acadia
Vol. mVIII,   No. 45
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY  4,   1966
CA 4-3916
We'll lose
on SUB'
—McAfee
By PAT HRUSHOWY
Student Union .Building
chairman Roger McAfee admitted Thursday students will lose
money  on   SUB.
"I admit that in the short
run we will lose out," McAfee
said in an open forum on SUB.
"But after the 35-year lease
expires we will receive $70,000
to $90,000 a year in rent from
the bank."
The Bank of Montreal, in an
agreement with the administration, gets 9,000 square feet
of banking, facility on campus
— 3,000 in the new administration building to be built near
SUB and the rest in SUB.
In return, the bank will pay
$202,000 to the AI£S and
$928,000 to the administration
prepaid rent for 35 years.
The $500,000 the administration will receive as prepaid
rent for the bank space in the
union building is considered
the student contribution to the
new  administration building.
McAfee, AMS president Byron Hender and coordinator
Graeme Vance faced 60 students in the open forum.
"As far as the question of
SUB is concerned, whether or
not we should have SUB is not
debatable. The students have
voted for it," McAfee said.
Students present protested
the lack of SUB information
available to the student body.
"The Ubyssey has received
all the information that you
would want but they don't see
fit to print it," said McAfee.
McAfee was asked for complete cost figures including interest.
"I haven't got accurate figures with me now but it will
run around $4.5 million," said
McAfee.
"Will you print complete
cost figures in The Ubyssey,"
asked  a student.
"I will print the figures in
The Ubyssey even if I have to
take out a paid ad," said McAfee.
— norm   betts photo
FRONT ROW SEAT couldn't keep this SUB-bug awake
during Roger McAfee's two-hour teach-in on the controversial building. Fewer than 60 students attended the
noon question and answer session Thursday.
Fraternity drinking rules
tightened by IFC vote
By ROSEMARY  HYMAN
The interfraternity council
has ordered a crackdown on
drinking parties in fraternities.
IFC president Mike Hughes
said Thursday the council has
outlawed afternoon drinking
parties in fraternity houses and
put strict curbs on evening
parties.
The new restrictions followed recommendations Wednesday including banning of evening fraternity parties involving the use of alcohol unless
permission had been received
from  the  IFC   executive.
Fraternities breaking these
rules would be liable to proba
tion, suspension or withdrawal
of recognition by the council
and university.
Hughes said if an evening
party is approved, there would
be someone there from IFC.
The crackdown followed a
coroner's inquest Tuesday into
the deaths of two 18-year-old
UBC students Jan. 20 in a car
accident after a four-hour afternoon drinking party at the
Kappa Sigma fraternity house.
Hughes said: The fraternities
themselves are going to have
to police their own members
for under-age drinking. The
RCMP have told me they plan
to have a liquor squad member
attend any party a permit is
issued for."
Evidence at the inquest
showed that both Charles Turner, Arts I, and Susan Bates,
Education I, had been drinking
at the fraternity before the
accident.
The coroner's jury blamed
high speed and liquor for the
double fatality.
Campus RCMP said they
planned no stepping-up of
checks on fraternity houses because of the accident and inquest.
"The law hasn't changed and
its enforcement hasn't changed," said a police spokesman.
AMS survey
rakes over
residences
A   comprehensive   survey  of  UBC   student   residences
shows that most resident students at Fort and Acadia Camps
are dissatisfied with residence conditions.
The survey which was taken [ ______________________________________________
by AMS first vice-president
Bob Cruise showed that there
are several areas of major complaint at all four campus residences.
The survey determined that:
• Two-thirds of residence
students feel they are not getting their money's worth. Over
one-half are opposed to the
policy of self-financing residences.
• Over one-half of the residence population say the food
is not sufficiently well-prepared. One-half of Acadia, three-
quarters of Fort and two-thirds
of Lower Mall and Totem residents feel there is insufficient
variety in  bag lunches.
• Nearly everyone complains of insufficient closet
space.
• All residences complain
of inadequate laundry facilities.
•      •      •
Cruise said this survey was
the first comprehensive and
accurate report ever compiled
on  residences.
He said: "I intend to meet
with the four residence associations and talk with them
about the changes which the
survey shows are obviously
needed.
"The association should at
least incorporate the information in this report into briefs
for submission to the director
of residences.
"If there is no reaction after
the briefs are submitted the
residences should get together
with the student council and
bring pressure to bear on the
administration.
Ninety-five per cent of residence students replied to the
questionaire on which the report is based. A random
sample of 20 per cent was selected for compilation.
Among the more significant
findings were: 73 per cent of
Acadia residences and 77 per
cent of Fort men found lighting was unsatisfactory; 85 per
cent at Acadian and 81 per
cent of Fort women stated
washing facilities were insufficient; and 68 per cent at Acadia, 85 per cent at Fort, 86
per cent at lower mall and 65
per cent at Totem believed
they were not getting their
money's  worth.
The survey also found that
94 per cent of residence students are from out-of-town.
About one-half live in single
rooms, one-half in double
rooms.
Impeach   Hender
petition   ready'
The engineers will be
ready Monday to begin their
move to impeach AMS president Byron Hender.
"We will have the necessary signatures to go to council on Monday night," Brian
Staples, Engineering I, said
Thursday.
He said the .petition Thursday noon was 50 short of the
500 signatures required to
force a referendum on the
issue.
Board OKs
$9 million
allotment
UBC's board of governors
announced Thursday approvement in principle of an $8.94
million capital construction
budget for 1966-67.
An administration press release said the program will be
almost entirely financed from
provincial construction grants
and public donations to the
Three Universities Capital
Fund drive.
The release said the budget
covers $7.09 million for continuing the forestry-agriculture
complex, dentistry faculty
facilities, and the new 3,000-
seat sports stadium.
About $230,000 is being allotted for music building construction and continuing development of agricultural and
athletic fields, and $403,000
will go for campus sewer, roads
and parking construction.
Subject to final approval is
$1.22 million for new projects
such as a metallurgy building
and bio-science complex addition, the release said.
The 1966-67 budget covers
the third year of UBC's five-
year $30 million capital expansion.
SOUTH AFRICAN
TERROR   HERE?
SEE: PAGE 3 Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February 4,   1966
Here are seconders  words
of support for   candidates
Five candidates will try to
slide into the AMS council in
Wednesday's second slate elections.
Three will try for the first
vice-president's slot and two
will fight it out for AMS coordinator.
One second slate position,
treasurer went toy acclamation,
to  Lome  Hudson,  Law  II.
Candidates for first vice-
president are Charlie Boylan,
second year grad studies; Jim
Taylor, Law I; and Bill Grant,
Ed. IV.
Taylor was AMS returning
officer this term — he has
been replaced by James Taylor, Law I.
Boylan, who was seconded
by Canadian Union of Students president Ed Lavalle,
ran second in the first vice-
presidential election last year.
"The man who beat me
last year — Bob Cruise — is
supporting me now," Boylan
said.
Grant was frosh co-ordinator.
Don Wise, Arts III and Jim
Lightfoot, Eng. II are up for
AMS co-ordinator.
Wise, a professional rodeo
rider, ran third in Thursday's
presidential election. He was
seconded by presidential runner-up, Gabor Mate.
Lightfoot was assistant coordinator  this year.
Hudson said he will work
to revise UBC's athletic financing.
"I'm going to spend a lot
of time on co-op housing he
said. "I don't think it will be
possible on campus, but I
hope Vancouver city council
will help us out."
First
Vice-President
CHARLIE BOYLAN
The first slate election indicates that over 2,500 students want a voice for a radical program on their student
council. A new concept, of
student government is necessary if it is to be relevant to
the problems posed by the
multiversity. Charlie Boylan
could provide the analysis and
imagination to initiate a new
program for student government:
1. Significant increase of
student participation in policy-making decisions, including those made by the Senate
and Board  of  Governors.
2. Strong opposition to any
fee increase.
3. Decentralization of student government and open
dialogue on important issues.
4. Thorough re-examination
of SUB with consideration of
an    alternative    plan    which
could     include     co-op     residences.
Vote for Charlie Boylan
and help put an end to sandbox politics.
Signed
EDWARD M. LAVALLE.
Law  III
BOA.  GRANT
The AMS needs competent
and mature people to represent the student body.
The position of first vice-
president is one of responsibility, requiring competence,
the ability to co-operate and
organize, and, most of all,
work. Bill Grant is prepared
to work hard to ensure that
all opinions of the student
body are voiced in council.
He has participated in numerous campus activities. He has
had experience as Frosh Coordinator, as a representative
in residence council, and last
year as an Education Society
representative.
I have nominated Bill Grant
for the position of first vice-
president because I believe he
is the man with the experience, the maturity, and above
all, the interest in student affairs to fill this position.
GARY SPICER.
Arts IV
JIM  TAYLOR
The AMS has long been
obsessed with the ideal of
action. The candidate I'm
nominating aims to realize
that ideal. He has been active
and will be active in many
aspects of student life. His
program is:
for grants in aid of out of
town students.
for SUB and all the facts.
for vigorous student representation in university decision making.
for first vice-pres. as the
spokesman of student concern.
His experience has been on
the Arts undergraduate executive, the debating Union
and AMS Returning officer.
5 lb. Turtle
Neck Sweaters
A Bad Boys
World
Exclusive!
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315 SEYMOUR
(Look For Our Other Two
Adds - Thoy'ra Worterl)
To sum up I believe that
Jim Taylor is the candidate
that is FOR constructive action.
JOHN WOODS
Co-ordinator
DON WISE
Mr. Wise asked me to second his nomination for coordinator in the hope that
my well known popularity
with the engineers will ensure his election. It is with
the greatest of pleasure that I
comply with his request. For
co-ordinator we need a man
of vision, of brilliance, of efficiency, of supreme ability to
organize, and of demonstrated
capability to woo the masses.
Instead, I ask you to vote for
Don Wise.
GABOR MATE.
Arts IV
JIM LIGHTFOOT
The co-ordinator's job is the
most detailed of the six AMS
executive positions1 — and the
job in which experience and
administrative ability count
most.
Jim was assistant co-ordinator this year, and is fully
familiar with the people, problems and procedure involved
in handling campus clubs,
bookings, and co-ordinating
all student activities at UBC.
Jim has served on Brock
management committee — the
important board which the
co-ordinator chairs. He has
three years of club experience
as co-ordinatOr and competitions chairman of the UBC
sports car club.
At 6-4 and 205 lbs., Jim is
the big man for this big job
— with the experience and
ability to deal with people.
He'll do the best job for the
students.
MIKE HUNTER,
Law II
BUT CHUCK STAYS
Censure upheld
in second vote
Arts president Chuck Campbell was censured by his
executive Thursday but has not yet resigned as he promised.
Campbell told The Ubyssey
Monday he would resign if the AMS lawyer B. B. Trevino said
executive censured him for his a recent article in Consensus
action in firing Consensus edi- about board of governors mem-
tors Nancy Corbett and Peter ber Einar Gunderson was libel-
Cameron, ous on three counts.
At a noon meeting Thursday
the executive upheld a previous decision by a vote of six
to two and reinstated Mrs.
Corbett   and   Cameron.
Campbell would not comment on the decision.
He told the meeting that
since he had appointed the
editors he also had the right
to fire them.
"I want to keep the matter
out of the student council,"
Campbell told the executive.
"I feel it is a strictly internal
matter."
Campbell fired the editors
Monday   after   a   letter   from
Campbell was not present at
a meeting Tuesday of the executive which censured him for
his action.
The executive later decided
to call another meeting with
Campbell as chairman.
Not enough
OTTAWA (CUP) — The federal government's increase in
aid to universities does not
alter the need for increased
provincial grants, university
presidents and students agreed
across Canada.
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STUDENTS IN ALL FACULTIES:
There's a rewarding future for you
as a CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
Learn how and why, February 7 to 18
During this period, members of The Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C. will be at UBC to
interview students who expect to graduate in 1966.
Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. J. C. Cradk at the University Placement Office. Earlier interviews may be arranged
by telephoning the Secretary at MUtual 1-3264.
Your opportunity to join a challenging
and fast-growing profession
Chartered   Accountants   play   a   decisive role   in
Canadian business, industry and government. Many
have attained executive positions of considerable
stature and influence; their training and experience enables them, as one writer has put it, "to
disentangle the threads of profitability that hold a
company together."
CA. training offers interesting employment with
practising chartered accountants. Your work "on
location" will introduce you to a wide range of industrial, financial, commercial, service and governmental operations.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 Burrard St.. Vancouver 1
MU 1-3264 Friday,  February 4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
EVEN TO UBC
SAY STUDENTS
Smith's tentacles stretch
to
PICKED FOR TURKEY recently were these three students,
from left: Petra Freybe, arts III; Rene Weir, science II;
and Carol Chertkow, Medicine I. They will attend a World
University Service seminar in Turkey this summer.
CANADA  TO  JAPAN
Exchange homes
during summer
By ANN BISHOP
Applications for the  Japanese-Canadian  summer  ex-
Fred and Sue
get greek nod
Mardi Gras — Ole!
King Fred Berman of Zeta
Beta Tau Fraternity and Queen
Susan LeFohn of Alpha Phi
Sorority were crowned on Friday night.
More than 1,700 senors and
senoritas, alias UBC students,
hit the Show Mart Jan. 28 and
29. They rhumba'd, cha-cha'd,
and samba'd to the Latin music of the Dal Richards' band
for the first part of the evening. For the last hour, the Accents, a rock band held sway.
The floor show, whose theme
fled south of the border was
a   rousing   success.
Friday night, the celebrants
started off with a cocktail and
dinner party.
A bazaar—Thursday—added
$2,800 to the total collected
and $882 came from the King
contestants' "home-made" cake
auction.
Legs for sole
The education undergraduate
society will hold a leg auction
Friday noon in the education
lounge.
Proceeds will be used to buy
equipment for an Indian school.
change program close today.
The student exchange, under
the sponsorship of the Asian
Studies department will send
six UBC students to Tokyo University and Keio University,
both situated in Tokyo.
Six Japanese students will
come to UBC where they will
live in residence while attending the summer session.
On weekends the Japanese
students will visit the families
of the Canadian students in
Japan and take trips to points
of interest including Banff and
Edmonton.
UBC students arrive in Japan
June 20 where they will stay
for about two months.
They will live with Japanese
families while attending international student seminars along
with American and Asian students.
The Canadians will tour with
Japanese students for at least
three weeks, staying at inns
and youth hostels.
The opportunity is open to
students who have a specific
interest in going.
Expenses will be about $700,
including spending money and
transportation both ways and
will be subsidized by special
grants and private donations.
Application forms are available at the Asian studies department. Further information
may be obtained from Eleanor
Riches, a research fellow in
preventive medicine at UBC.
Grads give
rowers,
Indian girls
By CAROL  WILSON
The graduating class voted
Thursday to spend their $7,000
alloted for gifts on two rowing
shells and a home for Indian
girls.
More than 500 students, including 200 engineers, attended the meeting in Hebb Theatre.
The class turned down suggestions for a climbing rock
for VOC, a new portable sound
system, a grad student fellowship, and a bursary fund.
A motion to donate $3,500
to the Three Universities Fund
was passed  unanimously.
• •      •
This is the $3,500 which the
grad class last year proposed
to donate to the Three Universities Fund, but which was frozen by the AMS after the 1965
fee increase.
The rowing shells, an eight-
man shell and a four-man shell
will be used by the UBC Rowing team.
The larger shell, which will
cost approximately $2,800, will
be  called  "Class  of '66".
The co-op home for Indian
girls is sponsored by the Canadian Union  of Students.
It provides a healthy environment for girls who might
gravitate  to Skid  Road.
Part of the cost of maintaining the home is paid by the
girls, but other funds are necessary.
• *      •
The amount donated by the
Grad Class will be approximately $2,000.
The grad class took action
to prevent their fund from being frozen, as it was last year.
By terms of an amendment
to the grad class constitution,
when an expenditure in excess
of $500 is decided upon, the
AMS has the option of calling
another general meeting of the
grad class within three weeks
to reconsider the decision.
Fear of security police reprisal is keeping several South
Africans away from the Canadian Union of Students seminar on South Africa, seminar chairman Peter Shapiro said
Thursday.
The seminar, to be held
Tuesday night at International
House, will examine the issues
facing South Africa  today.
Shapiro said South Aricans
had told him if they appeared
at the meeting, at International
House Tuesday night, their
South African passports might
be revoked.
There was also mention of
possible arrest and harassment
of relatives and friends still
in South Africa," Shapiro said.
"Apparently, before South
Africans leave their country,
they sign an agreement that
they will not make speeches,
or take part in political action,
unfriendly to the South African govenment.
"It was suggested that since
the seminar is receiving films
from the South African embassy, the embassy knows the
meeting is to take place, and
will have a watch on it," Shapiro said.
Daphne Kelgard, head of
CUS International Affairs at
UBC which is sponsoring the
Seminar, said, "this is the sort
of soul-destroying South African activity which should be
brought to public attention, but
because of personal repercussions, never is".
Neither Shapiro nor Miss
Kelgard would release the
names of South Africans involved.
He said the organizers have
attempted to achieve a balance
between government sympathizers, in the audience and
in the films, and government
opponents.
The first speaker, Solly Es-
sop, is a South African student
who had been studying in the
Maritimes but did not return
there this fall, after what was
to be short visit to the west
coast.
The second speaker, Alfred
Adams, was a member of the
Natal (provincial) Legislature
for the Smuts party in  1947.
Adams went to Rhodesia and
became general secretary of
the governing party of the federation of Nyasaland and Rhodesia, from 1956 until 1962.
The following year, he came to
Canada, and now heads the
Three Universities Capital
Fund, and is executive secretary of the Resources Commission at UBC.
International House is pre
paring to accommodate up to
150 people for the event, which
begins at 7:45 p.m., Tuesday
night.
Police decree
liquor control
If you want liquor and you're
an undergraduate society you'll
have to have a chaperone.
According to a new Vancouver police policy on liquor
licenses for UBC student
groups, the dean of a faculty
or some "responsible person"
must make the application.
First victim of the ruling is
the pharmacy undergraduate
society. PUS paid $30 down
payment for rental of a Vancouver hall for a faculty dance.
But when they applied for a
liquor permit police refused.
The dance was cancelled.
Science undergraduate society, who feel responsible, has
offered to pay PUS the $30.
BILL GRAF
... to Deutschland bureau
Germany
next stop
for staffer
By   CHRIS   EMMOTT
Ubyssey reporter Bill Graf
has been awarded a scholarship providing a year's study
in  Germany.
The World University Service awards several DAD (from
the German for German Academic Exchange) scholarships
annually to Canadian students.
The scholarships are open to
all faculties, and the recipient
may study at the university of
his  choice.
"I'm not sure yet which one
I will go to," said Graf.
"Tubingen might be a good
choice."
Graf said the cultural side
of the experience is definitely
the best aspect of the scholar
ship.
"It gives students like me.
who might otherwise never
have the expience of living in
Europe, a chance to find out
about different cultures," he
said.
Requirements for the scholarship are a good academic
standing, Canadian citizenship
and a working knowledge of
German.
It pays return fare to Germany, tuition fees and the cost
of books, and provides a
monthly grant of 400 deutsch-
marks,  or about $100.
Graf is taking third-year
German at UBC.
He will act as a foreign correspondent for The Ubyssey,
sending occasional articles
about the political situation
and university life in Germany.
Academic  plant  open
to bother mid-term skiers
Mid-term break is for studying, not for skiing, in case
you didn't realize it.
To encourage scholastic endeavor university facilities
will be operating as usual during the break from Feb. 17
to 20.
But all lectures will be cancelled.
All cafeteriars except the bus stop and the auditorium
will be open.
Brock will be available along with health services, the
library and the book store.
Purpose of the break, first held in 1965, is to allow
students to study and catch up on their work. mmsscr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
7ear by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
i-oc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Pi-ess. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,   and   for paymerft of postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY 4,  1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
Espirit de camps
The AMS residence survey presents not only
a challenge — but a double challenge.
Any analysis of the neat columns of responses
displays the shocking gaps in facilities that have existed
for a long time in residence areas, and especially in
the   camps.
Take study conditions: 67 per cent of Acadia protest insufficient lighting, and 85 per cent of Fort Camp
men agree.
Forty per cent of Acadia and Fort men agree there
is not enough desk space provided.
Forty-seven per cent of Acadia and 51 per cent of
Fort men say it is too noisy.
In translating the figures into human terms, the
survey shows clearly where change is needed.
And hence the double challenge.
There is the challenge to the university administration, and housing head Malcolm McGregor in particular, to take a hard look at the residence survey and
then at their priority lists.
Often, administration and student leaders in the
camps are fond of praising the esprit de camps which
hut life fosters.
And this is a very fine thing. Students all over the
world — and here at UBC — have proved over and
over again they can adapt to any circumstance and
survive and prosper and enjoy themselves.
But to use this innate adaptability of the young
human animal as an excuse for not providing better
facilities for living and especially for studying — this
is a university — is nothing short of disgraceful.
As temporary conditions after wartime, certain
things are tolerable. After two decades, temporary conditions should not continue to be lauded for the fact that
inhabitants can overcome those conditions.
Besides, no one attending Wednesday night's Lower
Mall water riot could say that good conditions end good
spirits in dorms.
And there is the other side to the double challenge.
The time is now ripe for the new student government
to end the long tradition of complacency toward conditions in the residences by quick and effective action
toward obtaining better conditions — whether by
pressure on the administration, or by providing new,
high-rise style co-op facilities.
The time to pipe-dream about unneeded superflui-
/ ties is at an end. Both the administration and past
/ student governments have been fond of stating they do
a lot for the university.
How about something for the students ?
WALLS   WORLD
BY JEFF WALL
ohpetey.,.i'm ,
so glad p\x made
it., and Where's
\the paddle?
padde?paddle?
rwhat paddle?
Up the lazy river . . .
IN THE EAR
BY IAN  CAMERON
It's art, for lans sake!
It seems that one of our
Brock proctors managed to
ruin a $500 masterpiece the
other day.
His reason for hacking the
thing into little bits was that
it was s o I
large that it I
wouldn't go
through the
door of Brock I
Hall.
Ever yone,
including  the
artist,      was;
incensed. Cameron
The one thing that no one
said, however, was what the
merits of this item were as a
work of art.
Presumably   not   much.
I find this hard to believe.
It is obvious that anyone so
talented that the AMS would
pay fare from New York to
get   him   here   couldn't   turn
THE DOSTHAS 5ETTLED;THE PROMISES FADE INTO THE SUNSET ■ ■• BUT SOMEUHERE^^
(cJBoo^riooTsoe i) Now that Y omF^JaI^t^
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ME
out anything but a masterpiece.
I well remember my initiation to the weird world of
modern art. I was at an art
gallery in Victoria with a
friend, who was somewhat
older than my tender age of
12 or so.
The first picture was an
amorphous blob of red, on an
otherwise   pristine   canvas.
"Jeez," I said. "It looks like
he hauled off and threw a
bucket of paint at it."
"Well, according to the program, the artist hurled a
thunderbolt of crimson at the
startled canvas, in a supreme
moment of artistic truth," said
my friend.
"What the hell's that
mean," I asked.
"It means that he hauled
off and threw a bucket of
paint at it," my friend replied.
"Oh."
The next masterpiece was
composed of a large, water-
stained sheet of roofing paper,
with a lot of white spots and
some three-pronged tracks,
like nuclear disarmament buttons.
"Looks like a bunch of
chickens walked over it on a
rainy day,"  I remarked.
The program informed us
that this "Extraordinary item
was composed in a moment of
sheer creativity when the artist had framed a piece of na
ture's own handiwork for the
enjoyment of posterity."
It went on to say that "The
work held the imprint of unleashed elements, and also
told of the true, earthy quality that composes every man's
life".
"What's that mean?"
"It means that a bunch of
chickens walked over it on a
rainy day, and the guy put it
in a frame and hung a $3,000
price tag on it."
"Boy," I marvelled, "Ain't
culture great!"
Since then, of course, I
have seen many of these
"moments of truth".
Truth, like the old grey
mare, ain't what she used to
be.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News    .   .         . _., Ron Riter
Associate     -   - George Reamsbottom
City  Al Donald
Photo   Norm Betts
Sports Ed Clark
Ass't News - Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City               Danny Stoffman
Page Friday  John Kelsey
Managing  Ian Cameron
Features    Mike Bolton
CUP ._      .   _.  Don Hull
If your story didn't get in, notice we only had two, count 'em,
two news pages, which we shared
with Al Vince's prolific copy writers. Incidentally, there's a notice
on the board in the office which
you should read, so read it. Bert
Hill, Jim Good, Dick Taylor, Ann
Bishop, Carol Wilson, Pat Hrushowy, Vicki Smith, Joan Fo-
garty, Kim Richards, Marilyn Hill,
Kris Koke Eromott, and Sillhou-
ette Hyman provided the cop.y.
AMS types, the new left, the
liquor control board, and the Mongol   hordes   provided   the   news. The House of Seagram
Interviews will be conducted February 7
for students graduating in
CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service for Information
and Interview Appointment
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction  Paper  Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
BAY
N.
A STITCH IN TIME
Wisdom, E. Chapman
plus
CAPTAIN  NEWMAN, M.D.
Gregory Peck, Tony Curtis
Angie Dickinson
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
BULLET FOR A BADMAN
Audie Murphy - R. Lee
Darin McGain
plus
LADY IN A CAGE
Adult
O. DeHavilland, A. Sothern
University Hill
United Church
Welcomes You
Sunday, February 6
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Sermon: "FAITHFULNESS"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
7:00 p.m. University Young
People's Group
COME TO CHURCH THIS
SUNDAY
The  masculine
look of the year.     '
wide wale corduroy in classic 3 button sports coat styl-
in9' 10 OR
Pat pockets '*•"
Come in and Choose Yours
from
Aft**
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 W. 10th Ave.
near Sasamat
2906 West Broadway
At Mackenzie
...the objet trouve and pop art
EXERCISE
EXERCISE
EXERCISE
EXERCISE
You'll tone up flabby muscles,
you'll slim down your legs,
you may easily prevent cramps.
Be active. Be the active teenager
you want to be. Nothing helps
you forget problem days as
readily as Tampax menstrual
tampons. Invisible, unfelt in place
—can't chafe, bind or create
odor. They give you back the
freedom you've been missing.
Try them. Millions already have
... and won't use any other
sanitary protection.
Developed by a doctor-
now used by millions of women
TAMPAX   INTERNAL   SANITARY   PROTECTION   IS
MADE   ONLY   BY   CANADIAN   TAMPAX   CORPORATION  LIMITED, BARRIE, 0NT.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents ...
Shakespeare's Romantic Frolic
LOVE'S LABORS LOST
AN ALL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed by John Brockington.
Designed by Aristides Gazetas
Feb. 22 - 28. Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Students 75c. (Adults $1.75)
NOTE — Univeristy  students  are advised to secure
tickets early as High School group bookings
are already coming in.
BOX OFFICE - ROOM 207 - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
FRIDAY &  SATURDAY
Don Crawford
with Carol Hedin
*    *     *
HOOTENANNY
SUNDAY EVENINGS
Next Week
The Irish Rovers
"VEL0UR
SHERKINS"
&
LEATHER
RINGS
"HOLY VALENTINE'S" FROM THE
BAD BOYS
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
315  SEYMOUR
...bad week
224-3730     4375 W. 10th
Feature ,>_ V
7:15 • 9:35 'Vfii
Students $1.25
WW 'OF THE
Spirits
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
C.U.S. Student co-ordinator needed to organize study
group to prepare for the seminar "Identity and Anxiety: crisis of a student generation" in Waterloo, Ontario, Sept. '66. Apply C.U.S. Office, B.E. 258.
CUS sponsors seminar on South Africa. On Tuesday,
February 8, at International House at 7:45 p.m.
Friday,  February  4,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5 pi
ON THE COVER-What happens
when an eight page paper it
forced down to six by the vagaries of  budgets and  advertising.
Editor: John Kelsey
Current affairs-
Steve  Brown
Science, the arts—
Al   Francis
Assistant-
Claudia Gwinn
arts
Arts, like the amoeba,
is  splitting  into  halves.
One half will be creative, the other academic.
Sounds pretty stifling
to us, since the artist depends on interdisciplinary  contact  to  create.
When fine arts is isolated in a happy complex
about the Laserre building, restricted to auditorium caf, it won't be much
different in practise from
today's big, homogenous
omelet.
But in theory it's all
wrong. The theory ought
to diversify the artist,
if necessary force him to
know something besides
his own art, compel him
through circumstance to
meet men working in
completely differ-
ent fields.
When you're sitting in
a bowl of mush, even artistic mush, all you see
around you  is mush.
There's a little more
variety if you squat on
the edge of the Buchanan
mush bowl, and a lot
more if you get chased
across the university
table.
A creative mind must
be influenced from outside. It must continually
feed on the ideas of other
men, contact their living
.patterns and assimilate
them into the artist's
world.
Splitting arts into the
creative and the otherwise half isn't a good
way to assist creative
people.
Maybe a better way to
be meaningful would be
to let sciencemen or engineers into Lassere, and
put some artists into the
Home   Ec  building.
Sure, it's impractical,
but the theory holds
more paint than the com-
ing reality.
And if you don't start
with a reasonable premise, you'll get ridiculous results.
pf 2wo
RHODESIA  NEEDS
WHITE  RULE
Crisis speeds commonwealth crack-up
Jim Halliwell is a Rhodesian living in Salisbury.
The following is lifted from
a letter he wrote on Nov. 30
to a relative in residence at
UBC.
We reprint two months
later because his comment
as a  white is still relevant.
By JIM HALLIWELL
There may have been, at
one time, disagree ment
about how Independence
should be attained, but no
Rhodesian will now surrender it and accept government from Whitehall.
Support for Ian Smith is
virtually total and Wilson's
hope of splitting Rhodesia is
ridiculous.
Wilson's opposition to
Rhodesian Independence is
causing Rhodesians to sink
their differences and unite
in a determined stand behind
Ian   Smith.
If Wilson carries out his
threats, it will only serve
to accelerate the breakup of
the Commonwealth and long
term disaster for Britain
while causing Rhodesia temporary   difficulty.
People of the Commonwealth cannot enjoy knowing that the queen will do
what the Briish Prime Minister tells her — or worse —
the queen won't even be
consulted.
Wilson will just write in
her name as he did to Ian
Smith. Wilson has destroyed
for Canadians, Australians
and New Zealanders the
unique position and loyalty
held by the queen.
Countries with money in
London cannot like the precedent created by seizure of
Rhodesian funds in England
for reasons of political disapproval.
When the next flight from
the pound takes place, economist Wilson can blame himself for flagging confidence
in England's financial integrity.
It is far more likely that
Britain and the Commonwealth will lose what prestige remains than they will
inside
ads pf l
art  pf 4
books       pf 4
campus      pf 5
cinema pf 3
festival       pf 3
festival pf 5
jazz     pf 3
look look pf 2
one column pf 6
overseas       pf J
war     pf 4
succeed in the present
attempts to crush independent Rhodesia.
It is disgusting to see how
and entirely erroneous impression of Rhodesia given
abroad. Reporters and photographers anxious to provide
stories of trouble here have
paid for incidents to photograph, and misreporting in
the English press is creating
unnecessary alarm there.
Prime Minister Wilson
has talked of increasing racial tension here. There
never was any racial tension
and there is none now, des
pite  attempts   from   outside
Rhodesia to stir it up.
It takes very little time
for newcomers to Rhodesia
with idealised views of our
black brothers to realize
how very unlike Europeans
the Africans are. And to
recognize how long it will
be before the Africans will
be able to take any part in
management of business,
town or national affairs.
Maybe the recent idiotic
conference at Addis Ababa
will make those who feel the
African understands the
first basic rules of politics,
statesmanship or government realize how very much
they have to learn.
Rhodesia needs white rule
to survive. Black rule will
turn a prosperous country
into an economic desert like
countries north of Zambia
who were given their independence too early.
LOOK,   LOOK
See: Sixth Festival of the
Contemporary Arts, pages 3
and 5.
Next week: More of the
great marijuana investigation.
Coming soon: LSD and you.
<*_"-»•*
\bereas m the course of human affairs history has shown that it may become necessary for a people to resolve the
political affiliations which have connected them with another people and to assume amongst other nations the separate
and equal status to wbicb they are entitled:
J\nd  WbeTeaS in such event a respect for the opinions of mankind requires them to declare to other nations the causa
t    which impel them to assume full responsibility for their own affairs:
j "' <^fmm> Therefore, We, The Government of Rhodesia, Do Hereby Declare:
*t '.-".*  •*- hat it is an indisputable and accepted historic fact that since 1923 the Government of Rhodesia have exercised the powers
_-   V . *    * of self-government and have been responsible for the progress, development and welfare of their people;
«c~J-
f%V
~ -Jfc./
the people of Rhodesia having demonstrated their loyalty to the Crown and to their kith and kin in the United
\"    ., *'■' . Kingdom and elsewhere through two world wars, and having been prepared to shed their blood and give of their
~i - '..._* suhtancr m what they believed to.be the mutual interests of freedom-loving people, now see all that they have cherished
• •'   » about to be shattered on the rocks of expediency;
/ V.   x hat the people of Rhodesia have witnessed a process which is destructive of those very precepts upon which civilization
t 'j     ' » in a primitive country has been built; they have seen the principles of Western democracy, responsible government and
^ • ,"/■? *, moral standards crumble elsewhere; nevertheless they have remained steadfast;
;f   *      WMhat the people of Rhodesia fully support the requests of their Government for sovereign independence but have witnessed
,.'      / 7' 'k consistent refusal of the Government of the United Kingdom to accede to their entreaties;
'  **. -*_ JL bat the Government of the United Kingdom have thus demonstrated that they are not prepared to grant sovereign
fain with
peace,
-*• '   .  V pmptriiy *nd good government of Rhodesia;
/ v —
Government of
of sovereign
J ^    'jWmbat the Government of Rhodesia have for a long period patiently and in good faith negotiated with the G
" I    / ~* '** United Kingdom for the removal of the remaining limitations placed upon them and for the grant 0)
f   __ T ■* independence;
^^ penaence;
c \1" / ■* hat in the belief that procrastination and delay strike at and injure the very life of the nation, the Government of
•   ■ *    1 > Rhodesia consider it essential that Rhodesia should attain, without delay, sovereign independence, the justice of which is
r  «"\; •   '^beyond question;
MM
v 1'fc Therefore, We The Government of Rhodesia, m humble submission to Almighty God
I.  j. ^      \ who controls the destinies of nations, conscious that the people of Rhodesia have always shown unswerving loyalty and
I x   ,   j.  '- \dewtim to Her Majesty the Queen and earnestly praying that we and the people of Rhodesia will not he hindered in our
•" ,   jy determination to continue exercising our undoubted right to demonstrate the same loyalty and devotion, and seeking to
ir • _»   ^promote the common good so that the dignity and freedom of all men may be assured Do, By This
>' \ y.., ijOClaniation, adopt, enact and give to the people of Rhodesia the Constitution annexed hereto.
i
• *
i:
Ii
*     4
is.
***
\*
ft
i
God Save The Queen
•> .    "' ' K, "" "*** 0ur H"^ "I Salisbury, this <_u»^«. day of November in the Year of Our Lord one thousand nin,
'  . ,> j *^ ^hundred and sixty-five.
>-r
'.'<
1
f
Prime Minister
?. A
ovwjC
V-    '\\e-Deputy Prime Minister   /(■&-&—i   OLfu^f.
•v. ,   .■
V
Iv*
"Mmisters
s
__.    .   /      u     a  Z,,
-     1 * • *'j*
SOUTHERN RHODESIA'S declaration of independence, issued by Ian Smith on Nov. 11,
1965. It was obviously in preparation by the Smith government for some time — note
the date inserted on the bottom  line.
W@!Mi®%%8$008%M$l?M!$MM®0M*$.
Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,   February 4,   1966 IN  THE
PLASTIC BAG
FOR PLASTIC  PEOPLE, furniture from  the Wosk  Modern
Arborite period . . .
Blues people odyssey
traced by Hendricks
The blues hit UBC Thursday and students merely
loved it. Singer-composer
Jon Hendricks spun out his
socio-musical narrative Evolution of the Blues to a visibly moved Auditorium house.
Hendricks had considerable assistance scoring this
coup: Blues singers Big Miller, Hannah Dean and Jimmy
Witherspoon supported, with
rhythmic backing from a
versatile jazz quartet-^-Larry
Vuckovich, piano; Bob Maize,
bass: Clarence Becton, drums,
and Noel Jewkes, tenor sax.
Hendricks traced the odyssey of the blues people from
tribal Africa to unban America.
Waypoints included the
Caribbean Islands, the antebellum slave South, late 19th
century New Orleans and1
ultimately wherever the
Negro found himself in America.
And his music evolved
with him. African ties of
language and tribal kinship
broke down with enslavement and were replaced in
America by the English
language and Protestantism.
In this environment Negro
music derived its form. Plantation slavery meant field
hollers and Protestantism
meant Gospel singing.
The   blues   resulted   as   a
synthesis of these and other
elements, just as jazz of any ■
era  draws   heavily   on   the
blues.
Hendricks chdse to illustrate his narrative with all
aspects of the blues: Hannah
Dean's powerful gospel voice
rang out in The Whole World
in His Hands and I'm on the
Battlefield for my Lord.
Rural blues came from Big
Miller, who accompanied
other soloists with gutty
trombone obligatos. Jimmy
Witherspoon brought blues
up to date with his high
powered interpretations of
C. C. Rider and It was a
Dream.
'Spoon was especially effective in ironically stating
the ambitions of the negro in
blues form. On Dream he
gassed everyone with:
"breamed I was in the
White House,
By the President's chair.
Johnson turned around and
said
'Spoon I'm glad you're
here."
'Spoon also said negroes
were still waiting to be recognized as men even after
army service, education and
the rest of the pseudo-barriers to equality, whites have
erected.
It was a meaningful message, powerfully stated.
Hendricks illustrated the
blues roots in jazz and
demonstrated how Louis
Armstrong, Lester Young
and Charlie Parker all used
the iblues as the basis of their
improvisations.
He concluded with a scat
vocal version of a John Col-
trane tune. Evolution was up
to date and all that remained
was for Preacher Big Miller
to intone a short sermon followed by some down home
church music.
I think everyone got the
whole message.
Love affair bags place
By IAN WALLACE
Baxter's bagged place.
We are so conditioned to the opinion that
artists are supposed to make works of art,
that when an artist wants to just do a thing
there is bound to be a reaction from those
who like to see artists keep in line.
Iain Baxter (Bagster), currently having a
love affair with  plastic,  has pulled  off a
Bagged Place, by Iain Baxter, Fine Arts
Galley, for two more weeks. With the Edge
of Pop.
"thing" that will have skeptics wondering
what has happened to art.
It doesn't hang from the wall, it doesn't
sit on the floor, it isn't "there". You are
"there", you move through it.
It is brand-new, perfectly familiar, technically known as an "environment" in which
the viewer is surrounded by the thing, he
acts in it, does his everyday things, he creates
his own time. This is distinct from a happening which is theatre-art; it begins and ends;
but the bagged place is just there.
The bagged place is an apartment complete with furniture, utensils, food in the
fridge, taters in the sink, turd in the can.
Absolute realism! Completely representa
tive. Except for one fact. Everything is bagged in plastic. Bagged coffee, bagged rug,
bagged water in bagged sink, bagged room.
The uniqueness of concept and the anti-
intellectual nature of the "environment"
defies interpretation — how can one discuss
his living room?
The choice of such tasteless decor is undoubtedly purposeful but whether or not the
plastic makes it more attractive is a matter
of opinion.
Is it a satire on pop art, which chooses to
glorify the common and inane? Is it satire of
our sterilized plasticized super-valu society
where everything comes packaged and
bottled?
Whatever the case, there is no "anger"
involved, just fun, and the opening night
crowd had a great party at Bagster's "bagged
place."
For an escorted tour of the apartment turn
up at the Fine Arts Gallery noon Friday.
The Fine Arts Gallery is also showing a
collection of paintings and sculpture titled
The Edge of Pop. This means that practically
anything that bears resemblance to pop art
is included, and the connection in some cases
is close enough to be termed plagiarism.
The pop master, Rauscheruberg, suffers
little at the hand of his third-rate imitators.
Most of the exhibition is gimmicky and
consciously arty and fails to excite interest
for very long.
BIG MILLER SINGING,  Clarence  Becton,   drums, Noel Jewkes, tenor sax, Jon  Hendricks,
narrator, Hannah Dean (seated) vocal.
Alcatraz reality big in brig
]m
V '-,'tJ"*sK».'
By JOHN STOCKING
For those who forget, The
Brig furnishes a thorough field
day in reality.
Unlike most contemporary
screen plays, it poses no cryp-
tis questions, but it answers
simple ones (people should
know better than ask.
Why didn't German troops
rebel in 1918, 1945? Why didn't
more Spaniards quit Franco's
army? Why is there still a
native South Vietnamese
army? Why don't more American boys burn their draft cards?
From most angles the film
is pure documentary realism;
the bare^bulb lighting, superb
type casting, details of uniform and set, script, gear, pace,
mood emotion . . . The only dishonesty is that it doesn't run
longer — say thirty days.
Profanity and obscene acts
of physical violence were play-
k'f*  " »f- *i
$8$$?^
ed down to keep the show respectable, no doubt.
Actually, it never fails to
amaze me how much creative'
power is required to put something on stage that is really
happening at the same time, in
the same way, all over the
civilized world — something
that could be filmed on site,
with less expense, tomorrow or
the day after.
Because of its conservative
realism, The Brig is better common-sense medicine than e. e.
cummings' Sing of Olav;
the victims are not saints, and
furnish a clear opening for
identification for all the non-
saints in the audience.
It is more effective than In
the Penal Colony because you
can't write it off as fantasy or
madness. You have to ask
yourself a question based on
reality: would you play the
prisoner's role, or the guard's,
if the play were real — which
it is — and if you were forced
to play — which you may be?
It's the punishment system,
the structure for spiritual degradation that impresses one
most in this film. In the last
analysis, this is simply how the
state operates, in inforcing its
amoral and non-human will.
Authoritarian sadists are always available to play the
roles. Let's thank The Brig for
once again reminding us.
You don't believe? Go dig
Auchwitz. Tour Alcatraz. Join
the Marines.
pf 3hree
Friday,  February  4,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7 ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
BRILLIANT
NOVEL
EYES EXAMINED        2 Convenient Offices..
■ BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
CONTACT LENSES      .KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
GSA NEWS
UNIVERSITY  VOLUNTEER   SERVICE:
This service group on Campus is interested in obtaining the services of Graduate Students, to Tutor,
students in Senior Matriculation or High School subject areas. The Students require a Tutoring Service
but their economic position makes this impossible.
It you can assist, please leave your name at the
GSC office.
THE  INTERNATIONAL   BALL:
International House's International Ball is to be held
on Saturday, Feb. 12, at the Vancouver Hotel Ballroom. Tickets are $5.00 per Couple or $2.75 single.
Time: 8:30-12:00. Dress National Dress or Semi-Formal.
CHINA TALK:
Dr. Keenleyside will speak this Friday, in International House, on his 1965 trip to China. Admission
Free, but tickets must be obtained from GSC or
International House.
NOMINATIONS:
Nominations are now being received for position on
the GSA Executive. Nomination Forms are available
in the GSC Office. Act Now!
J   \
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Quotations makes mind boggle
By JOHN KELSEY
"The only good Indians I ever saw were
dead."
—Phillip Henry Sheridan
"There is only one thing in the world
worse than being talked about, and that is
not being talked about."
—George Bernard Shaw
"I cannot sleep a wink."
—Alexander Pope
Such is the fascinating stuff of John Bartlett's novel Familiar Quotations.
It is filled with thousands of witty sayings
issuing from the mouths of many exciting
characters, comprising an imaginary chronicle of the human race.
The format is drastically different from
the average novel. Bartlett simply states the
character's name and launches into monologue, with perhaps a note on the occasion.
Often, the only circumstance given is Ibid,
which can be taken in many ways and is a
neat way to avoid rigid definition of scene.
Besides the main ibody of the work he has
included a preface, a list of characters with
the pages on which they appear, an amusing
and ingenious index, and a section aptly
titled Translations which refers to persons
in another, perhaps earlier novel.
Familiar Quotations' main fault is no plot.
Bartlett's amazing mind must have placed
some symbolic significance in the book's
order — his pagination is unusually sequential and regular — but it escapes lesser intellects.
In any case, he has augmented the pagination with numbers assigned to the people
mouthing his immortal words. For example
Mary Lamb on page 290 has 1765-1847.
Strangely, the intervals from one to the
next are totally irregular, but it ought to be
pointed out that in no case is the difference
between a character's two numbers more
than 125.
Unlike the lesser authors of the annual
B.C. Telephone directory, who seem to be
unable to progress beyond a mere list of
(albeit imaginative) names, Bartlett only
begins here.
He has entered every sphere of human
life in his people's sayings. He has coined
apt and amusing thoughts relating to every
situation in which men find themselves.
One of his characters, William Shakespeare, speaks voluminously in blank verse,
endlessly mouthing cliches scattered with
occasional strokes of brilliance.
One has to laugh at the thought of the
wordy Mr. Shakespeare entering a bar and
uttering, "Misery acquaints a man with
strange bedfellows."
Or, accosted by a creditor, softly uttering,
"You take my house when you take the
prop /That doth sustain my house; you take
my/lifewhen you take the means whereby
I live."
Mr. Shakespearse is not the only one of
Mr. Bartlett's people who speak incessantly
in verse. However eloquent, these many
poets must find it difficult to live indeed.
But imagine a world where everyone is
erudite enough to speak so well, where
everyone takes the time to phrase their
thoughts so finely. This is undeniably Mr.
Bartlett's Utopian purpose when he waxes
poetic so often.
The crowning touch is the fine index. It is
imaginatively ordered in an alphabetic
manner, another stroke of genius, and is
cram-filled with such gems as "Green, admits no vegetable, 933."
Investigation shows these numbers relate
to pages in the main part of the book, pages
whereon a character says, in this case, something about green vegetables.
The inscrutable Mr. Bartlett never says
why he included the index, since it does not
facilitate a casual reader's perusal, or even
aid the careful reader who would naturally
begin at the beginning anyway.
The index ends with the cryptic "Zuider
Zee, traveller on the, 398". A fine touch of
humor leaving just the right note.
As the wordy Mr. Shakespeare cried,
"All's well that ends well."
Certainly, all's well with a mind prolific
as John Bartlett's.
■g*»*&lfgmp!$Vf 'GVMMytp J "PJ'
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TOP
BANANA
Were funniest in world
Clothing   TO'-
742   Granville
campus  and   dress-up   occasions
MU   1-5625
By ROBIN JEFFREY
The opening of the 26th
Parliament of Canada has
been followed by the annual
growls of discontent from
the unthinking electorate.
"What," they ask naively,
"are we getting for the $5%
million paid to our elected
representatives?"
• •      •
These misguided millions
ignore the fact that Canada's
parliaments have provided
this country with a cultural
institution unequalled by
any other nation in history.
Since the dawn of civilization, no other country has
ever been able to boast its
own state-supported National Comedy Troupe.
And for what a moderate
cost!
• •      •
Rolf Harris, a competent
sort of comedian but no
match for a veteran performer like the Minister of
Transport of Canada, receives $500 a night. Those
woolly giants of comedy, the
Beatles, get $20,000 a show.
Let us, then strike a mean
and say that $10,000 a night
is  the   price   of  a  first-rate
comedian.
Now, my fellow Canadians, to pay this one comedian for a year's performance's going to cost $3,650,-
000. And how many Canadians are going to laugh at
him?
•      •      •
Let us, then, place one
first-rate comedian in each
province. At $36,500,000 a
year. Still we are not bringing humour to all 20 million
Canadians.
Take the Parliament of
Canada. For a mere $5%
million annually we have an
institution which makes all
20 million Canadians laugh.
It makes them literally roll
in the aisles. It brings tears
to their eyes.
Where else could you find
a year-long floor show with
a cover charge of 37 cents
a person?
So let there be no more
complaining about the salaries paid to the members of
the Parliament of Canada.
And let there be no more
concern for culture in Canada, no more invidious comparisons with the Bolshoi
Ballet or La Scala or the
Met or  Shakespeare.
• •      •
And so, my fellow Canadians, feel privileged to be
here. Feel proud that three
such distinguished top bananas as Larry, Moe and
Curly lead our nation's three
top teams.
• •     •
And the next time something excruciatingly hilarious comes out of that big,
towered building which
houses la Comedie Cana-
diene, pause for a moment,
allow a swell of pride to rise
in your throat, and then reflect that you live in the
funniest country in the
world.
))_ 4our
Page  8
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 4,  1966 loser
By GABOR  MATE
This is a succinct and cogent analysis of the AMS
elections by a somewhat biased observer. . .
The rise in both the number and percentage of the
vote indicates rising interest
in campus affairs among students.
The results showed a three
per cent increase over last
year, and would have shown
even more had not two key
polling stations been neglected by those responsible.
Before we got too choked
with enthusiasm, however,
it must be noted that two
thirds of the student-body
still doesn't give a damn, and
that even the winning candidate represents no more
than twenty per cent of the
student population.
The second obvious factor
is the relative similarity between the proposed policies
of the three candidates. No
matter who got in, the presidential boat would have
sailed down pretty well the
same  channels.
There were only shades of
differences, and the distance
between the "right", the
center", and the "radical
left" was almost negligible.
In fact, at times it was diffi-
Oh feter and Graeme,.,
I know youll find them
_.  invaluable oncevouQet
^  usediothem.  J   "
They keep vou-from
BEFORE THE AMS ELECTION, cartoonist Jeff Wall  speculated upon who would run . . .
cult to tell who was the
"right" and who was the
"center" candidate. The
truth is, that all three candidates represented a progressive "left of center" position in the policies they advocated.
Thirdly, it is significant
that, in varying degrees, all
three candidates represented
an anti-establishment mentality.
The winning candidate did
spend half his year as second
vice president fighting
against his colleagues on
council. Many people who
voted for him were no doubt
dissatisfied   with   the   short
shrift that our Henderized
council made of Cruise and
Braund proposed progressive
policies.
The large number of votes
gained by the second candidate represent not only a rejection of this year's council, but also a revolt against
the very system that produced this council.
There should be no joy in
the hearts of those who have
steered the AMS ship during
the past two years: their policies have run aground on a
rocky reef of student dissatisfaction.
The fact is that Peter
Braund was one of the only
two student councillors this
year who could have won
this election, the other being
his fellow minority vice-president, Bob Cruise. No Hen-
dor, McAfee, or Vance could
have been victorious — and
that, as all will admit, is
progress.
Another highly significant
factor to be noted is the
large size of the "radical"
vote, inasmuch as the second
candidate could be regarded
as a radical. For, it must be
rememibered, those who voted
for Mate rejected not a right
winger or a conservative,
nor even a middle-of-the-
road liberal, but a liberal
with left-of-center leanings.
That tis to say, for about
forty-five per cent of the students, merely left-of-center
wasn't left enough.
Whether or not this in fact
represents a "radicalization"
of student mentality is difficult to tell, or the motives
inluencing the way people
will vote are too complex
to be ascribed to any single
political  tendency.
However, the possiblity of
a great increase in radical
thinking on campus cannot
be dismissed, and this fact
must be braunded indelibly
on the minds of our future
leaders.
pf 5ive
The   modern   way  to  tee  it  with
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Have them expertly fitted at a
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Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
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•
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The Vancouver School Board
does hire many teachers
directly from university
SO
when   you   are
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For  an   interview
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FROM FREIDHOF
Whafs en at the festival
— today and Monday.
FRIDAY
Noon, Freddy Wood Theatre, Freidhof by David Watmough.
• •      •
Noon,     auditorium,     The
Byron Pope Quintet.
• •      •
Noon, Fine Arts Gallery,
Iain Baxter, Bagged Place;
Alvin Balkind skirts The
Edge of Pop.
• •      •
3:30 p.m., Education 100,
Adam's Way, theatre of the
irreal with a cast of dragons,
elves, ur-men and angels.
Written and produced by
Robert Duncan.
MONDAY
Noon, Buchanan 106, nonverbal presented by Pierre
Coupey, local poet.
• •      •
3:30 p.m., Auditorium,
films by Kenneth Anger, including Fire-Works, Inauguration of the Pleasure
Dome.'
3:30 p.m., Buchanan 104,
Les Puces Jazz Trio, Readings by James Reid.
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANTAMAC in Teryl-iie*. a Ol-Cil fibre.. «<y</ Can  I M
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      1
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings
Friday,  February 4,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9 Page  10
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday,   February 4,   1966
INFESTED — Sun reporter dive (secular)
Cocking is doing a show
on student unrest Tuesday
after the administration
coffee party. So he's asked
Peter (rabble) Cameron.
Bob (sinkin') Cruise, and
J. B. Macdonald to come
and be interviewed.
IN THE LOSERS' CIRCLE: Having been pasted
in the prexy race, rodeo
newcomer Don Wise is
contesting the co-ordinator
of activities slot on the
second slate.
He must have changed
his mind from the statement he made during the
prexy race: "The position
of co-ordinator should be
abolished."
INCONGRUOUS: Chinese Varsity Club holds a
Chinese New Year's dance
tomorrow, and Nisei Varsity Club holds a Valentine's dance next week,
both at the same place:
The Jewish Community
Centre.
Oi (ah so) Veh !
IN THE PORK BARREL:
The cubs learn fast these
days. AMS vice-presidentelect-by-default, Ian Mac-
Dougall. was in Bryon
Hender's office this week,
inquiring:
"Say, Byron, which of
us gets hired for the summer ?"
INEVITABLE: The
grassroots drive to nominate a candidate for chancellor to oppose the establishment's choice of fish
magnate John M. Buchanan has choked on its
own roots.
One prominent former
UBC wheel has declined,
not wishing to cause the
administration the considerable embarrassment of
having a contest for something that is done unanimously by agreement
among gentlemen.
The other grassroots
choice, a former UBC department head, would have
loved to embarrass the
present science - oriented
administration, and would
have loved the job.
Unfortunately, he's not
independently wealthy, a
prerequisite for the non-
paying position.
IN CONFUSION: Last
week's mardi gras parade
around campus had a float
boosting a king candidate
purporting to be a South
American revolutionary.
UBC's genial mouthpiece Ralph (May I Correct?) Daly was seriously
copying down such slogans
as "The Revolution Has
Come", figuring boss John
Macdonald's wishful predictions of a Berkeley at
UBC had come true.
DEAN'S
4544 West 10th Avenue
announces a new
Take Out Service
Phone: 224-1351
TRY THESE UBC SPECIALS
DEAN'S FRIED CHICKEN, Individual Order
3 pieces of chicken, French fries, cole slaw.
Fresh roll     $1.25
BUCKET OF DEAN'S CHICKEN
12 pieces of chicken, French fries      $3.60
CHICKEN SNACK
2 pieces of chicken, French fries     $ .75
CHICKEN  IN A BOX
Just chicken — 10 pieces      $2.50
FISH AND CHIPS
2 pieces fish, French fries, cole slaw      $ .65
FISH AND CHIPS
2 pieces fish, French fries      $ .55
DELUXE HAMBURGER
Fresh ground beef, served in a bun, with
relish, lettuce, tomato and fried onions,
French fries      $ .70
FRENCH FRIES
Side order-     $ .25
TELEPHONE AHEAD AND WE'LL HAVE
YOUR ORDER WAITING
65 On Your Campus Radio Dial
NOW
TOTEM
SWINGS!
U.B.C. Radio has completed the installation of "Carrier
Current" and now Totem Park swings to the great sounds
of Campus Radio along with Acadia Camp, Lower Mall
and Fort Camp. If you live in residence, you can listen
to U.B.C. Radio simply by turning your radio dial to 65.
ATTENTION RESIDENCE STUDENTS
Listen to U.B.C. Radio for details on how you can win
more than $1,000"Worth in prizes!
help wanted in Antigua, Burundi,
Columbia, Ghana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Madagascar,
Peru, Rwanda, Sarawak, Tanzania, Tchad, Trinidad, Uganda, and Zambia.
it's your world.
These countries have a lot in common. Every one is
no place for you if all you have to offer is lofty
ideals. These are countries that need realists—people
who are ready to get down to work. And come down
to earth. Literally. Don't kid yourself . . . signing up
with this outfit will mean slugging it out through a
tough, demanding job. That's the only way you'll fill
the needs of these countries. And who knows, maybe
you'll have a few of your own filled. What is CUSO?
It's a national agency created to develop and pro
mote overseas service opportunities for Canadians
It arranges for the placement of qualified men
and women in countries that request their
services. If you're sent to a country it's because they've asked for you. Or someone
like you. How does CUSO work? Abroad, it
works through different international agencies
who all assist in the placement of personnel.
In Canada it works through local co-ordinating
committees, located in most universities, but serv
ing the whole community. What kind of people are
needed? People with something to offer. People with
things like knowing how to teach mathematics or grow
wheat, how to clean a wound or build a bridge. These
countries need people who are adaptable and mature.
People with initiative. People who can earn respect, and
give it. Think about it for a minute. You'll know what
you have to offer. What is the selection procedure like?
Tough. Because we don't believe in sending underdeveloped people to underdeveloped countries. Preliminary
screening is carried out, where possible, by local
committees. CUSO then nominates candidates
to governments and agencies requesting personnel, who make the final selection. CUSO
also makes arrangements for preparatory and
orientation courses. How do you apply? Complete two copies of the personal information
form which you can get from local CUSO representatives at any Canadian university, or from
Executive Secretary of CUSO, 75 Albert St., Ottawa.
CUSO
A world of opportunity Friday,  February 4,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   11
COMPETING  AT  BANFF
Ski Birds slide in third
By LEIGH BROUSSON
UBC's skiing crew crashed down a notch
in skiing circles last week, with its third-
place finish during Banff's International
Intercollegate four-way ski meet.
Coach Al Fisher and his 13-man team,
second-place winners at last year's heralded
meet, finished up with a lowly 326.5 points,
behind University of Montana with 369.5
points and highly respected University of
Washington, winning with 377.6.
But the misfortune was not without its
highlights. Jan Atlung, skiing for his first
year with UBC, strode a deadly not-to-be-
beaten pace in the highly competive cross
country race, and was able to surpass 22
other collegiate runners (a total of eight
colleges) including University of Washington's (Norwegian ace, N. Sjoberg. Brian
Hulme also had a tremendous race skiing to
a fifth place, ahead of 17 other skiers.
The alpine specialists, however, didn't
sustain Jan's perfect record.
Racing over Mt. Norquays 1600-vertical-
feet downhill run. UBC's No. 1 downhill
skier, Dave Turner was best with a seventh
place, although only three seconds behind
the winner. Other members of the five-man
team were well back.
The slalom, however, proved the greatest
tragedy.
After the first run in the two-run, 40-gate
course on Norquay's cliff-hanging slalom
hill, three UBC skiers, Turner, Jenkins,
and Brousson, had standing runs, and were
in an excellent position for a clean sweep
of the slalom championship.
But in the second run over the ragged
rock-spotted course, every member "smashed", except Jenkins, putting the Thunderbirds a never-to-be-regained 35 points behind the leaders.
Eris Peterson and Eugene Ruelle tried
to regain UBC's standing in the jumping
competition with eight and eleventh spot
honors, although it wasn't enough to beat
out the "squarehead'' Norwegian flyers
from U. of W. and the U. of M.
Bill Shaak and Elwood Peskett, members
of the alpine team, will be off to Todd
Mtn. this weekend for the Western Canadian Championships, and a chance to prove
that UBC is really the No. 2 team in the
North-west and unquestionably the best .in
Canada.
BUT LOSES MEET
Splashing gang
sets two records
Two UBC swimming records were set last weekend
while UBC competed with Central Washington State College
in Ellensberg.
Bill Gillespie set a new time i
of 2:10.6 in the 200-vard in-I
dividual medley and Bob Walker bettered his old 50-yard
freestyle time of 24.0 seconds
splashing his way to a record
time   of   23.8.
Washington, a stronger squad
than a few years back, defeated the Thunderbirds 66-20
for the  first  time.
'Birds Gordie Auld, Bert
Vanderberg and John Conroy
turned in their best times of
the  season.
Coach Jack Pomfret is confident that all his swimmers
will reach their best times by
the Canadian Intercollegiate
Swimming Championships on
March 4-5 at Percy Norman
Pool.
THE
CAULIFLOWER
EUR
By ALAN CHRISTIE
Memo: Blast half-time entertainment at basketball
games.
The thing that brought this to mind was a poor little
cheerleader complaining last week at the first Hawaii game
that the pep band didn't bring any music for their routines.
Then the second night the pep band didn't even show
up.
The coming of Abe Saperstein's group last week should
tell a story.
It is surprising that none of the faculties have come
forward to offer entertainment this year.
The fact that the pep band showed up for the first game
is only a tribute to Norm Watt's junior varsity team which
is aiming for the Canadian junior men's basketball championships.
With some of the best junior talent in B.C., this team
theoretically should take the bundle.
Whether they do or not remains to be seen.
I personally challenge any undergraduate society to
provide half-time entertainment at Friday and Saturday's
basketball games against Northwest Nazarine College.
Saperstein showed up the good times to be had if a
basketball night is made a full show.
So! Get off your apathetic donkeys.
Speaking about basketball. The 'Birds dropped two
games to St. Martin's Saints in Oympia, last weekend.
It seems that one or two players are not putting out
100 per cent.
To step on toes, it seems that Morris Douglas played
better last year and even two years ago than he is these
days.
Also, Jack Turpin should try to find out the name of
Bob Barazzuol's determination pills. Then perhaps he could
play closer to his potential.
About their defense, one has to say it is one of the best,
man for man, on the west coast.
In wrestling, UBC hosts the University of Seattle Pacific at 2 p.m. Saturday in the women's gym.
They will be led by Chris Nemeth who won a fall last
Saturday against Western Washington!
Wrestlers
await prey
from south
UBC's wrestlers plan to
ground Seattle Pacific College
Falcons Saturday in the Women's Gym.
The 'Birds have defeated the
Falcons twice this year by
scores of 35-10 and 33-10.
The matches will be further
preparation for the 'Birds as
they get ready to defend their
WCIAA wrestling championship here Feb. 18-19.
Ted Emerson is out for the
season with a broken hand.
Ron Reagh is a possible starter
after suffering a bruised kidney last weekend against Western Washington.
Also returning to the lineup
after an injury is Bruce Green.
Other UBC wrestlers will be
Peter Smith, Don Chamberlain,
Dennis Christiansen, Ken Ker-
luke, Bruce Murray, Peter Fo-
minoff and Chris Nemeth.
Matches begin at 2 p.m.,
everyone welcome, free admission.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE   DINNER   JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE      COSTUMES
Special Student
Rates
4397 W.   10th  AVE.
CA   4-0034
Something new
Something new is (being added to intramurals.
On Feb. 14, coed activities
such as volleyball, badminton
doubles, curling, golf and tennis doubles will start.
Any groups, faculties, clubs,
etc. who wish to play are to
hand entries for badminton by
Feb. 9, and volleyball Feb. 14
to Memorial gym, room 309.
®
B.C. HYDRO & POWER AUTHORITY
will be on campus to interview
3rd Year Civil & Electrical
Engineering Students
for
Summer  Employment
Dates: FEBRUARY 9 and 10
Please arrange an appointment time through
Student Placement Office.
the
THUNDERBIRDS'   BASKET-
ball guard, Ken Atkinson,
will be in UBC lineup tonight
and Saturday against high
scoring Northwest Nazarene
College from Nampa, Idaho,
in War Memorial Gym.
Games start at 8:30.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Student wanted to assist
with SAIL BOAT RACING
PROGRAM in Vancouver.
May 1st to September 30th.
Apply in writing only to:
J. H. Long,
301  West 5th Avenue,
Vancouver  13, B.C.
RUSHANT
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4538 West 10th
The Store with the
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We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic  Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858    224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
(jetting tflame4?
Phone or call in for our new "Take
Home" invitation album. For a personal   estimate   of   costs   in   just   15
minutes, call —
rm CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-    3005 W. Broadway   -:-    RE 6 9012 Page  12
IWEEN CLASSES
THE       UBYSSEY
Dorion spark plugs here
Erik Nielsen, the Yukon MP
who prompted the Dorion inquiry after his charges in the
House, speaks today at noon in
Bu. 104.
• •      •
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Chinese New Year's Dance
with Doug Parker Band tomorrow night at Jewish Community Centre, 41st and Oak.
• •  •
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
L.B.U. all the way! Vespers
tonight at 10 p.m. in Student
Centre 4608 W. 10th. A must
for everyone!
• •      •
DEBATING  UNION
No Man Is An Island —
Commerce-Law debate noon
Bu. 217.
• •      •
MARDI  GRAS
All members of 1966 floor-
show cast meet Monday in
Brock stageroom.
• •      •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Guest speaker on Juvenile
Delinquency Monday noon Bu.
202.
• •      •
LOWER MALL CULTURAL
COMMITTEE
Art exhibition and sale. Feb.
2-6, 4:00-6:00 p.m. and 7:00-
10:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-10:3O p.m.
Churchill Grads!
You  are  cordially  invited  to attend
HOMECOMING '66
at the school on Friday, February 18
at 7:00 p.m. The program include!
basketball games, dance, and tour
of school. For invitation phone: day
— 261-6334 — School; night — 263-
5648 — Jane Wolverton or 321-2601
Gary  Cohen.
NO   ADMISSION   CHARGE
"HOLY
BAD BOYS"
BATMAN
SWEATSHIRTS
"IN BIG SLOPPY  SIZES"
(Science   Leads   Engineers 4-3)
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
315 SEYMOUR
(Look For Our Other Two
Adds - They're Worser!)
INDOOR
FOREIGN   STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday, Feb. 5
A cross bewteen a demolition derby and a stock
car race —
AGAIN the crowds demand thai we present this
spectacular show.It's fantastic.
AGR0D0ME
Time trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
Child under 12 FREE with Adult
ED.  U.S.
Leg Auction — male and
female legs sold in Ed. Lounge
at noon. Proceeds to aid Indian
School in northern B.C.
• •      •
U.N. CLUB
Current affairs discussion
Monday noon at I.H. Latin American program all next week.
• •      •
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Mrs. Dodson will speak and
conduct tour through library
microfilm section. Everyone
interested meet in Rm. 863 Lib.
• •'     •
QUAKER GROUP
Meeting for worship Sunday
at 11 a.m. in Bu. Penthouse.
EL CIRCULO
Recording of My Fair Lady
in Spanish at noon Bu. 204.
Bu. 204.
•      •      •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French day today at IH. Film
and discussion at noon.
«■■■•   PRESCRIPTION ■_■__■-■
EYEGLASSES
5b *£■»:• 169S
Includes
Frame *
Lena      _ ___
" w UP
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
861 Granville MU 3-8991
mm Money Back QuarantaeBH
Agricultural   Positions
* overseas with CUSO.
* requests from host countries for Agronomists, Agricultural Statisticians, Agriculturalists, Dairy Technologists,
Fisheries Experts, Plant Breeders and Pathologists, Hor-
ticulturalists, as well as positions in Tropical Cultivation,
Erosion and   Soil  Conservation,  Teaching,   Field  Work
and Laboratory Research.
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
Glasses   Single vision from ,_.   9.95
Bifocals from 12.95
Contact1 Lenses     49.50
ONE LOCATION ONLY
677 Granville, opp. the Bay, 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking al Rite Park
Friday,   February 4,   1966
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hail. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST: BROWN PURSE IN HEBB
Theatre after 11:30 class last Sat.
A.M.S. card and drivers lice'nce
urgently needed, l'hone Anne,
Room 443 at 224-9786 (after 6:00)
or send to Box 472, Totem Park
Residence.   Reward.
CLEAN, RELIABLE TRANSPORT -
ation; '55 Vauxhall with 40^000
original miles; perfect mechanically; spotless inside, ?150. Ph. 266-
0462.   City   tested.
Autos Wanted
25
FOUND MEN'S WRIST WATCH IN
War Memorial Gym. Call CA 4-
3242,   local  26.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
stole my UBC jacket, size 38 from
Chem. 270, Wed. a.m. Please return it to Blair Campbell, Union
College,   224-5214.   I'm   freezing !
FOUND — OUSIDE LIBRARY ON
Thursday, Feb. 3 — string of car
keys and license numbe.s, also
door key. Claim at Ubyssey Advertising   office,   Brock  Hall.
LADY'S WHITE GOLD WATCH
with inscrption. Found' outside
Bookstore in early January. Phpne
277-3507   after   6:00   p.m.
Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING
a card. Send Valentine and Birthday Greetings to your friends with
a   Classified   ad.
FREEZE    21    CONGRATULATIONS
Fud.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.   Phone  Ted   Elliott,   224-6X07.
EDUCATION FORMAL, FEB. 5 AT
the Commodore Cabaret. 13.50 per
couple with card, $4.50 regular.
8-12 (dancing until 1)—Tickets
on  sale A.M.S.   or Ed.  Lounge..
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.
HEY THERE! WATCH FOR THK
Sonics and the Shantelles in the
Armouries, Feb. 11th, Friday.
Lovely,   eh?!
i-INK PANTHER & JOLLY TUR-
quoise giant unfair to organized
carpool riders local No. 1—United
we walk  divided  we  ride.
WANTED! M.ORRIS "1000" CON-
vertible. Decent shape. Phone
Norm,   CA   8-8268   after   6   p.m.
Motorcycles 27
305 CC HONDA, CHEAP. PHONE
Dave at 224-0467 evenings.
Scandals
39-A
THE    OCTOPUS    IS    COMING!
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repair! at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company-
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West  Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to   U.B.C.
MEN OR WOMEN. WONDERFUL,
extra income part time. Flexible
hours. Training provided. Car
necessary. Pleasant dignified work.
Phone 255-8748 between ft to 10
a.m. and 5 to 6 p.m. for Interview.
INSTRUCTION
Music
63
LET'S GO ! TOTEM PARK, FRI-
day night with "Paul and "the
Penetrations." Dance from 9:00
p.m. to 1 a.m. AMS cards required  at  door.
CHINESE NEW YEAR'S DANCE—
Doug Barker Band, Jewish Community Centre, 41st and Oak, February 5th, 9:00 p.m. Tickets" at
door.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM 29TH &
Balaclava to 9:30's in Buch. RE 3-
5892.
CARPOOL WANTED FROM WEST
End. Phone Marg Campbell, MU
5-3100,  evenings.
HELP ! DESPERATELY NEED
ride vie. Kingsway and Patterson,
8:30's M.W.T.F. Phone Marg, HE
3-0384.
Wanted
15
MISCROSCOPE WANTED. Prefer
Japanese model. Phone George at
LA   2-0209.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'51   CHEV,   BEST   OFFER   —   SEE
Carlos  Henning,  Rm.  120.
'52    CHEV   —   NOT    RUNNING   —
Best  offer.   See   Miguel  Hennings,
Rm.   120.
JLilTAR— SPECIALIZED INSTRUC-
tion by experts in every type* of
Guitar and Banjo playing at 'The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's*
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone   CA  8-8412.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
USED   FURNITURE   MART
Where You  Shop at Auction  Prices
3207  West   Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store'
EUROPE ? FOR SALE: ONE RE-
turn ticket from London in Aug.
on AMS charter flight, only $200.
Phone   AM   6-4071   after   6:00.
ELECTRIC    GUITAR,    CASE    AND
strap,   $50.   CA  4-4555.
Rooms
81
ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH-
room. Hot plate, coking privileges,
private entrance. Phone 224-3526.
Near   gates.
Room & Board
82
IT TAKES HAIRS! ROOM AND
Board — Zeth Psi Fraternity. Near
to campus. Good food. Phone CA
4-9885. U
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED — BY MARRIED STU-
dent (2 children) to buy or r«!nt,
on or near campus, 3 bedroom, (or
more) house, living room, dining
room, etc., (basement preferred).
Occupancy May or June 1966. Send
particulars to 1011 Gordon Rd.,
Nelson.   B.C.
THE UBC MUSICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS
TAKE ME ALONG!
The Smash Broadway Musical
Starring:  Jerry Cook
Jan Rae
Dave Overton
Directed by: JAMES JOHNSTON
Music Conducted by: BEV. FYFE
Choreography: GRACE MacDONALD
UBC AUDITORIUM ~ February 7-12
TICKETS:
Auditorium  Box Office -    -    228-3176
AMS Box Office -    -    -    -    224-3242
Special Student Prices
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Noon 75c or 2/$1.25
Wednesday Night -    -    -    $1.00 rush

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