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The Ubyssey Jan 29, 1971

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The B.C. parkland grab - p. 16
page 3:%AMS$t«Mdk$^h<^^sy«tem
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H, M* 27     VAKCQOVBl, fcC; !$«)*¥, ^MtlARY 29, 1971
Operating
engineers
may strike
A strike by engineers operating UBC's heating system threatens to
strangle the campus by as early as next weekend.
Don Ankersen, business representative for local 882 of the
International Union of Operating Engineers, told The Ubyssey on
Thursday that strike notice has been served by the union against the
university.
The university and the union have been negotiating since May 14
on a contract to replace one that expired July 1,1970, he said.
"We haven't made much progress," Ankersen said. "A mediator
was appointed by the B.C. Mediation Commission some time ago, but
all he can do is make recommendations.
"The mediator's term expires on Thursday and we strike anytime
after 72 hours after that."
The strike, which could begin on the weekend of Feb. 6, would
be the result of many months of hard negotiations which the union says
have been stumped by failure to agree on what the engineers should get
during the first year of the new contract.
The union is asking for a 18-month contract with a nine per cent
boost in the first year.
UBC is offering a 30 month contract with a seven per cent
increase in the first twelve months.
Ankersen said this would mean the lowest paid of the 18 men
running UBC's central boiler room — which heats most campus buldings
• — would go from $637 to $694 if the union demand was met.
Under the university's offer, the man would get $687.
After this, comparisons between demands and offers become
impossible without careful study of the numerous offers and demands.
"We have not ruled out the possibility of picketing all campus
buildings," Ankersen said.
This would mean that union affiliated office workers, cafeteria
employees and other persons would not be allowed to enter buildings
on campus
UBC administration information officer Arnie Myers refused to
speculate on the consequences that might arise from the strike.
At press time, Myers — who is speaking for university personel
head John McLean, university negotiator — said the university had not
yet received the union's strike notice.
The union struck the university several years ago but picketed the
boiler room only.
Jericho highway
'has to be built*
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By SANDY KASS
The    wheel    of  pressure   is
grinding along Jericho Road.
City council now awaits a soon
to be released report by the city
engineering department advising
them on the structure the road
should take.
Meanwhile the city planning
department has sent letters to
residents of the 4400 block
Marine Drive advising them to
contact city hall regarding
purchase of their homes by the
city.
The road in question is a
proposed six-lane divided highway
which would cut away from
Marine Drive at Tolmie Street,
through the only grocery store in
the neighborhood, and through
Locarno  neighborhood  park, to
join with Fourth Avenue east of
the old national defense site.
The road scheme was passed in
principle at a council meeting
December 22, while Vancouver
mayor Tom Campbell was on
vacation.
Campbell was unavailable for
comment at press time but
alderman Ernie Broome, a staunch
supporter of the scheme, said the
road development was outlined in
the purchase of the federal lands
by the city and "has to be built."
to page 16: see TOWNHOUSES
—david bowerman photo
SOME PEOPLE will do anything for a little attention from the press and the public, including AMS
Ombudsman Hamish Earle. Earle was honeyed and feathered at the Wednesday AMS general meeting
that wasn't. Hoping for a capacity crowd, the otherwise shy Earle hired a gang of engineers to put him in
a cage. He escaped during the meeting in the War Memorial Gym, and flaunted his body to a crowd of
1,000 in a lightning, underwear-clad sprint across the gym floor.
AMS non-meeting lacks quorum
By RICHARD T. BETTS
Over 21,000 students were conspicuous by
their absence at Wednesday's AMS general meeting.
The attendance fell more than 1,000 short of
the required quorum of 2,300.
There were conflicting views among the
executive as to what the lack of a quorum signified.
'This is in no way a vote of confidence on the part
of the students towards the AMS," said treasurer
Stuart Bruce
"It is a vote of no confidence in the executive,"
said external affairs officer-in-exile Peter Hlookoff.
Hlookoff has been censured by students council
on the urging of the executive for his alleged "lack
of action and cooperation with the rest of the
executive." He had intended to make his points in a
speech but was drowned out by the chaos of the
break-up of the meeting.
AMS president Tony Hodge appeared to have
every indication of proceeding with the meeting but
the   quorum   was   challenged   and   the  meeting
adjourned.
The non-meeting was punctuated by the usual
stunts of the engineers and forestry students.
The engineers had kidnapped ombudsman
Hamish Earle and covered him with honey and
feathers prior to the meeting. Earle made his escape
during the forester's stunt and ran from the War
Memorial Gym. When asked about what had
happened Earle replied "Ba-rack cluck, cluck,
cluck."
Several observers were later said to have found
a large egg by the exit where Earle left.
Speaking of eggs, a member of The Ubyssey
terrorist squad, Ann Arky Cell, professionally
lobbed two eggs into the engineer's little red car,
making a mess in the back seat.
Said Hodge of the meeting: 'This has set the
process of constitutional revisions back a year."
to  page   6:   see MOTION Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971
'Non-political breathers
unite in eco revolution'
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
The environmental collapse is caused by
contemporary use of 19th century logic, Bob
Hunter said Wednesday.
"Our society has adopted a 19th century mode
of cognition and perception called operationalism,"
said Sun columnist Hunter.
He defined operationalism as a mode of thought
which sees only those things which can be measured
and related to a set of operations as real.
"It allows us to see or grapple with only those
things that can be measured and ignore things those
that can't be - like crucial environmental factors,"
Hunter said.
"My children can say: look at all the shit
coming out of the smoke stacks! But a specialist
cannot appraise the total situation because he can't
measure it," Hunter told 400 people in Hebb
Theatre.
He posed a wholistic approach as an alternative
philosophy.
'This means that you no longer look at the
trees and then the forest; your head is no longer
stuck in one particular groove; you no longer
question just yourself but the society in "which you
live," he said.
Hunter outlined the influence of this new
philosophy on self, and environmental consciousness.
"If I am trying to establish an integral
relationship with myself it is within these larger
contexts, the broadest of all being the
environment," said he.
Hunter compared the society-environment
relationship to that of the foetus and womb.
"If I started to litter my mother's womb with
beer bottle caps and more babies it would collapse
and I would rot," said Hunter.
Throughout the talk, sponsored by E.C.O.
(Environmental Crisis Operation), the audience
responded to Hunter's insight and relevance with
enthusiasm.
Hunter differentiated this revolution in
consciousness from many of those happening and
emerging. I
"This is the real revolution, it is not political or
doctinaire and it is all-inclusive."
The common slogan is: "Breathers of the World
Unite!"
The ecological revolution is similar to other
revolutions because it is vulnerable to what Herbert
Marcuse, (author of One Dimensional Man) calls
"repressive desublimation."
"Repressive desublimation is when the people
who are guilty of environmental crimes - like oil
slicks — set up Environmental Departments and
pollution investigators to undermine the sincere
efforts of others," said Hunter.
In some ways it is different than other
revolutions.
"Mass media can replace weaponry. Nobody
has to kill the czars, just get them out pf office
before they wreck the sandbox. And unlike other
revolutions, this movement does not attempt to
change people only to improve their environment,"
he said.
Asked about his optimism, he answered: 'The
thing is   the earth is on our side; the majority of the
people are reacting to the mounting pressure from
the environment itself."
Hunter finally left the meeting after repeated
attacks from a member of the audience who accused
him of perpetrating Nazi propaganda to detract
from the real revolution of the people.
No "Time Out" at
— We Hurry
HILLTOP GULF SERVICE
Discount for Labor
(UBC Students Only)
BIG SAVINGS-20%
4305 W. 10th
Phone 224-7212
Summer jobs rare again
The summer job situation will
be just as bad this year as it was
last year, UBC placement officer
Cam Craik said Thursday.
"Students should register early
for summer jobs and keep
checking in periodically," he said.
There are over 100 jobs in
various federal government
agencies right now. The
government has also allotted
$45,000 for additional jobs with
federal agencies in B.C.
"However, jobs in industry will
continue to be scarce this year,"
Craik said.
"The provincial government
has said it is going to open many
jobs this year, but these are
mainly career jobs and will not
help summer job seekers," he said.
The placement office has
printed a guide to students
seeking     summer     employment
which is available in its office. The
guide stresses that students should
not be content to simply register
with the placement office and
with Canada Manpower, but
should make as many direct
approaches as possible.
Most jobs, which do not
require special skills or are
generally hard to fill will not be
matched with students but are
listed on the bulletin board in the
office. Students should check in
periodically to see what jobs are
available.
Students can start registering
for the jobs available now at the
Placement Office, which is located
in the office of student services
on West Mall opposite the armory.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
A.M.S. EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS
Are you one of the people who has been complaining all year about your
student government? Well that's what we call all words and no action. Now
is the time to really do something to help the students on campus.
Nominations are now  open for  the  first half of the AMS Executive
Elections. This includes the following:
1ST SLATE
President
Coordinator of Activities
Secretary
Ombudsman
Nomination  period  runs  from  Wednesday,  January  27 th to NOON
Thursday, Feb. 4, and the election is to be held WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10th.
*Anyone running for President should submit their
nomination forms as soon as possible, as candidates for this
position are able to begin campaigning upon posting of
their nomination form.
All other candidates may begin campaigning after the nomination period,
Feb. 4, 12:30 p.m.
Nomination forms may be picked up in the AMS General Office, AMS
Executive Office or from AMS Secretary, Anne Clarkson, SUB 248.
More information on the 2nd slate will be given in Tuesday's Ubyssey. The
positions here will be:
2ND SLATE
Vice-President
Treasurer
External Affairs Officer
Internal Affairs Officer
Enjoy an exciting colourful career in the AMS! Make your mother proud
of you! Run for AMS!
1
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OPEN
THURSDAY
& FRIDAY
UNTIL
9 P.M. Friday, January 29, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
AS USUAL, UBC PReports missed the key area of UBC heart research in its
"historic" Thursday heart edition. After 25 years of painstaking research, however.
The Ubyssey discovered the secret nerve centre of work on open heart surgery as
performed by highly-skilled members   of the UBC forestry faculty. Following many
months of negotiations the foresters agreed to reveal their controversial new surgical
technique. This confidential photo should explode the administration press myth that
only doctors and researchers are capable of solving the problems of heart disease and
cure.  The future of heart research now clearly lies in the hands of the students.
'UBC haven for the wealthy'
By MIKE SASGES
An Alma Mater Society brief
released Thursday contends that
the provincial government is
failing to end the "closed-shop"
status of post-secondary
education.
The student financial assistance
brief looks at accessibility,
provincial government
scholarships, bursaries, and
Canada Student Loans.
"It is our contention that the
scheme (student financing) is
failing in its prime function - to
ensure that higher education is
not a closed shop, restricted in the
main to those of present
economic wealth," the report
said.
'The primary recommendation
is that the bulk of financial
assistance should be provided on
the basis of need," AMS president
Tony Hodge said Tuesday.
"A study last year showed
clearly that lower-income groups
are under-represented at UBC,"
Hodge said.
Hodge said that the
government can remove the
present economic barriers to
higher education if it wishes.
"It's obvious, however, that
nothing has been done," Hodge
said.
The report said that the
provincial government scholarship
scheme grants awards to the top
17 percent of post-secondary
students, provided that a
minimum of 70 percent academic
average is achieved.
Hodge said that the AMS
recommends that the government
make the bulk of its funds
available on the basis of student
need, not on the basis of high
academic standings.
'There's enough money in
privately funded money
scholarship money for the bright
one," he said.
Hodge said that the provincial
bursary scheme is defeating itself.
"Why is there an academic
requirement of 65 percent for
bursaries?" asked Hodge.
"Why should the government
tell a person he can't have a
bursary if his marks are good
enough for entrance?"
Hodge also said that the
amount of money available for
bursaries is too little.
"B.C. is third in Canada in the
number of bursaries presented,"
he said.
'The amount of money for
each bursary, however, is the
lowest in Canada - $173."
"It's not enough for the
low-income student," he said.
"We also want to get rid of the
parental contribution and summer
employment requirements of the
Canada Student Loans," said
Hodge
"We're trying to make it easier
for people to get in to
post-secondary education."
"At the same time, we want
people to think about the
drawbacks of going here. That's
the purpose of our community
visitations," he said.
Hodge said that the brief may
become very irrelevant in the
future if the federal government
decides to step in and look after
student financing.
"The provincial education
ministers of Canada have already
accepted, in principle the idea of a
Educational Opportunity Bank,"
he said.
Hodge said that the federal
government    would    make    an
outright loan to the student to
cover his stay at university.
"When you graduate, however,
you would have one hell of a loan
to pay back."
"The university would become
the domain of the higher-income
student."
"What student with a
low-income background would
want a $15,000 loan hanging over
his head?" he asked.
Hodge would like to know the
Socred Feeling on the EOB.
"I'm somewhat optimistic on
their manner of receiving our
recommendations," he said.
"The final say depends on the
man with the money —Finance
Minister W. A. C. Bennett."
Citizens' ad hoc committee
set up in UVic tenure dispute
Law on strike
SASKATOON (CUP) - Law students at the Saskatoon
campus of the University of Saskatchewan voted Wednesday by a
large majority to strike over the issue of Christmas exam results.
No students attended classes in the law faculty Thursday
after a 144-19 vote in favor of strike action.
Dissatisfaction with the college was brought about by
students' marks in Christmas exams, which resulted in massive
failure rates.
In one class, student papers were given a bonus of 30 marks
and the class average was still only 59 per cent.
A 60 per cent average is required for students to remain in
the college.
The strike, with no time limit, was made effective
immediately. A strike committee was set up and another general
meeting set for Feb. 1 to assess faculty response and determine
further action.
VICTORIA (Staff) - The
citizens of Victoria are getting
involved in the current
tenure-promotion dispute at the
University of Victoria.
Eugene Kaellis, 41, a former
assistant professor at the
University of Saskatchewan
(Regina), has taken the initiative
to form an ad hoc citizens'
committee.
The committee held its first
meeting last Thursday, and
gathered the support of 12
interested citizens.
"I would say we represent a lot
more than 12 people," Kaellis
explained. "I got a lot of calls
from people who wanted to come
but couldn't because of the short
notice or the snow."
The committee's primary
function is to attempt to make
sure that the opinion of the
community is considered in the
final decision at UVic.
Kaellis said he had written two
letters to administration president
Bruce Partridge but that he had
received no reply as yet. The
committee just wants to meet
with the representatives of the
administration, he said.
"Kaellis has aiso> written to
UVic chancellor Roderick
Haig-Brown.
"He is backing the
administration completely on
this," Kaellis said. "I think that is
a reasonable interpretaton of the
content of his  letters."
When asked what his
expectations are in resolving the
dispute fairly, he said: "We can
just try."
Bill Goede, one of the profs
involved in the dispute was also
not very optimistic.
"There doesn't seem to have
been anything done so far," he
said. "It looks like we just had a
minor earthquake."
Nels Granewall, recent
administration appointment in
charge of rumour central, the
information arm of the
administration's Ministry of Truth,
said it is not part of his duties to
comment on the citizens'
committee.
Granewall also said that he was
not responsible for detailing the
information surrounding
Partridge's exposition as consultant
to the Peruvian government. He
did, however, confirm the
president's consultant status with
that foreign government. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29,  1971
THf U8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ind not of the AMS or
the University administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
JANUARY 29, 1970
Ultimate failure
It had to happen sooner or later.
With its abortive attempt at a general meeting
Wednesday, the AMS reached the ultimate in failure.
No, we don't mean the fact that more than 95 per
cent of the students on campus found something better
to do than going to the general meeting — almost
everyone knew there wouldn't be a quorum.
We're not even referring to the fact that the
engineering army that has always dominated such events
was only a shadow of its former self.
The general meeting was such a failure that even
Jim Banham didn't bother showing up.
Jim Banham is one of the administration's public
relations men and editor of UBC Reports.
He and his ever present tape recorder are fixtures
at any campus event of even the most marginal interest.
In fact, Banham often shows up at some of the most,
insignificant events, just to show off his tape recorder (a
Uher4000 Report-L).
Yet, Wednesday was the first time in anyone's
memory that Banham was nowhere to be found at a
general meeting.
It's nothing new for the large majority of the
students not to give a damn about the AMS, particularly
the AMS constitution.
But the administration has always given its usually
compliant puppet more attention than it has ever
deserved. When the administration stops caring, the
AMS is really in trouble.
One would think that even the AMS could learn
something from a failure of such magnitude.
But no, president Tony Hodge says his prized
constitutional revisions will be presented again at the
March general meeting. Hodge seems to have adopted
the philosophy of UBC football coach Frank Gnup:
"keep running that play until you get it right." (Hodge
also seems destined to wait just as long for success.)
Maybe, just maybe, at some point in the hazy
future, the truth will penetrate the skull of someone on
the AMS executive.
Perhaps during a discussion about which rock band
to hire to draw a quorum, someone will realize that no
one cares about their constitution.
It may dawn on them (and we're talking about
long odds here) that students at UBC just might have
more important things than the structure of student
council to worry about.
When that happens, the AMS may begin to
seriously confront issues like housing, employment and
the nature of the university itself.
But don't bet next year's tuition on it.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Glnny Gait'
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis-
Sports  Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
After two years, Mike Finlay, local
poet, bookpeddlar and fishmonger, was
?iven another chance on city desk. His
irst attempt, which came in the first
month of the year of the Birnie, ended
after two weeks.
Remembering why he quit the first
time, Finlay stalked off the wilds of
the pit without leaving the names of
those who worked.
Following is the emergency, reserve
masthead commissioned following the
rejection of John Andersen's first
excursion into the field of literature.
(Seems his mother once told him that
all   great   authors  — Harold   Robbins,
Jacqueline Susanne, Harvey Nussbaum.
all the biggies — began their careers
with three-inch short stories in
newspaper mastheads and be's been
wanting to try it ever since.)
However, reactionary forces in the
publishing industry insidiously
suppressed the document, which must
now await discovery by generations
yet unborn.
On a more pedestrian literary level.
Dick Betts, David Schmidt, Nettie
Wild, Sandy Kass and Josephine
Margolis  gave   the  news to the eager
masses.
Ken lassessen, Mike Sasges and Jim
Davies did nothing in particular, while
Jenny Ladner and Nathalie Apouchtine
(gesundheit) helped on news desk.
Shane McCune and John Kula never
showed up.
David Enns, David Bowerman and
Maureeen Gans took it into the
darkroom but just couldn't get off on
it. Meanwhile, jocks Steve Millard and
Tony Gallagher tried to analyze it but
didn't.
And after it was all through, nobody
knew where it was at.
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DAVIES' RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
From ashes to ashes?
According to Greek mythology, the Phoenix
was a huge bird-god that was reborn, rising from its
own ashes.
According to the Arizona road map, Phoenix is
a big blob.
The fraternities of UBC combined both of these
factors into their Wednesday night fiasco, also
known as Phoenix. Like the city of the same name,
Phoenix was crowded and rather dry, but unlike the
bird-god, Phoenix only served to enable its
participants to make ashes of themselves.
The question of the hour is why did the frats
change the name of their annual debauchery from
Mardis Gras to Phoenix?
I really don't think it could be that these
upper-crust young gentlemen might be trying to
forget some of their memorable Mardis Gras
"happenings" of the past.
I know I'll always remember how those
wonderful wacky fellas utilized the "Down the
Mississippi" theme a couple of years back. It was
neat to see that great bunch of zany guys pretending
to lynch blacks, joke about John Kennedy getting
shot and all those kind of fun things.
"We're different now," I was told by an irate
frat man.
"Just look at us," he continued. "We don't
bother with all that conforming nonsense any more.
"See. I have long hair and a moustache. I don't
conform to the establishment and neither do all the
rest of the fellas in my frat."
He was right. All the members of the glorious
fraternal brotherhood had long hair and a
moustache — non-conformists to the last man.
He had me convinced. I was now ready to
defend the brotherhood against any and all comers.
Against women's lib, I was ready to defend
their M.C., who to the gleeful shouts of those
present, said it was "too bad we couldn't have this
chick as first prize."
Against the S.P.C.A., I was ready to defend the
fraternity whose booth featured two white mice
scampering about on a whirling board.
Against the administration, I was ready to
defend the wholesale gambling at the event.
Against Amy Vanderbilt, those fun guys who
were jumping up and down on the tables, flinging
beer bottles around.
And, against the janitorial staff, the poor, sick
lad who threw up all over the washroom.
I will not put up with anyone who makes an
effort to depreciate the performances of these,
society's future leaders. They, after all, are the elite
of the university's social corps.
There's only one thing I can't figure out -
What will they call Phoenix next year?
LETTERS
Corrections
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Please correct the statements in
your Tuesday article about
International Week.
Correction 1. I did not say,
"The general feeling of the
committee is that International
House has failed to make itself
truly representative of
international ideas and problems."
I said that if International
House has failed to make itself "a
truer representative of
international ideas and problems"
(quotation from Steve McField's
article in last Friday's Ubyssey), it
would be because it has failed to
impress the general student body
that action belongs to the people.
The International Student
Program Committee does feel that
I.H.   is   truly   representative   of
international ideas and problems.
International Week will feature
diverse events such as slides on the
Peruvian earthquake, inimigration,
cultural shock, and problems
faced by the Spanish community
in Vancouver and the Angola
crisis, just to name a few.
It was hoped that through the
co-operation of The Ubyssey in
helping to promote International
Week, more people would become
actively involved with the
international scene ... especially
those who always self-righteously
complain but never have the guts
to back their mental exertions
with practical involvement.
Correction 2. International
Week is not being held
Monday-Friday next week. It will
be held M onday-Saturday
February 8-13.
How could you possibly garble
all the information when I showed
the reporter a written statement
in regards to dates, etc?
JUDY YOUNG
International Student Program
Committee Chairman
What's this?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It has been with keen interest
and pleasure that I have read the
editorials in this year's Ubyssey.
They, like many of the articles,
have displayed a depth of thought
and a degree of uncompromising
criticism of the status quo which
is refreshing in light of the general
political indolence and myopia
which seems to grip this campus
and its student government. I can
only hope that The Ubyssey will
remain a thorn in the side of the
establishment.
MICHEAL THOMAS,
arts IV Friday, January 29,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Prices and Incomes
comes to the people
In 1969 the Trudeau
government set up a prices and
incomes commission to study the
causes- of inflation and to find a
remedy to a growing economic
crisis.
The same year, John Young
resigned as dean of arts at UBC
and went to Ottawa. His new job
under the federal government was
to chair the commission.
The purpose of the commission
as defined by the federal
government was to "discover the
facts, analyse the causes, processes
and consequences of inflation and
to inform both the public and the
government on how price stability
may be achieved."
The magic formula to end
inflation was the control of prices
and incomes.
These statements by Young
give the commission's direction in
its attack on inflation:
"Higher profits leading to
stepped-up wage and salary
demands. Price increases to cover
the resulting pay increases. Higher
taxes, rents and interests leading
to more price increases. Still
higher wage and salary demands.
Yet more price increases..."
The blame
eventually falls on the
worker who tries for a
salary increase. Yet
what about corporate
profit itself? From
1961 to 1967 the total
profits of corporations
in Canada after taxes
increased 56.3 per cent.
In a few individual
cases the profit was
much higher. The
reported profits for
Falconbridge Mines
increased 86 per cent in
1969. Overseas trade by
corporations increased
some $500 million
from 1969 to 1970.
In line with its war
against labor the
Commission proposed a
six per cent wage
guideline in 1970. Up
to this point there were
28 per cent. That of workers has
risen 14.8 per cent. In terms of
salary after deductions this means
$142,000 plus dividends for Clyne
By John Andersen
and Dick Betts
per year and $4,000 for a worker.
In addition to expecting
working . people to pay for
inflation the commission and the
federal government have had a
pronounced e f f e c t on
unemployment throughout
Canada.
Through a decrease in
government spending plus
corporations' policies of lay-offs
to cut down on wages,
unemployment has risen to its
highest proportions since the
depression of the '30's.
At present, over 500,000
people are unemployed in Canada.
And those are the usually
conservative official figures. They
don't include people who don't
bother registering at manpower
because they have given up.
Particularly  hard hit are the
been   no   real   decrease   in   the
unemployment rate?
The pattern of rising profits
and expanding trade on the one
hand and lower wages and
continuing unemployment on the
other, point to the obvious bias
of the prices and incomes
commision. We are told now that
the commission has been
abandoned and inflation has been
licked.
Yet unemployment is still as
high as it was three months ago
and higher than the summer when
THE RECORD OF CONSUMER
PRICE INCREASES
Annual Percentage Increase
KOREA
J...lllll.llll
 I    '	
thousands  of students failed to
find jobs.
Diverse sources, from
university economists to trade
union research bureaus, agree that
the United States' spending on the
Vietnam war is the major cause of
inflation. Each year this spending
is in excess of 30 billion dollars.
rfrW&KEKf PERPETUAL
ireoSPERrty MACH/NE
zmz:
gyj.v.qy,vi
THE MORE YOU WORK THE LESS YOU GET!
Tied as we are to the
U.S. war machine we
can have no hope of
solving the present
crisis of capitalism
(caused by international expansion, or
imperialism) until the
war is ended and until
we have the means of
directing our own
economy.
The liberal
government's frame of
reference is consent to
U.S. imperialism in
Canada and throughout
the world. Capitalism in
Canada means further
takeover by the U.S.
and further economic
and political difficulty
due to U.S. foreign
policy.
only recommendations of profit
and price controls. The cost of
living continued to spiral. Young,
who proposed the wage guideline,
said nothing about profit control.
The discrepancy between the
wages of workers and the
management share of profits grew
during the life of the prices and
. incomes commission. J. V. Clyne
of MacMillan-Bloedel makes 33
times that of a worker in the same
company. Clyne's salary increase
over the last eight years has risen
young.
Students without summer jobs
this year can place most of the
blame on the federal government's
anti-inflation "policies".
The government has reacted to
this with band-aid solutions such
as building youth hostels and
adding the paltry sum of
$45,000 to its youth job program
for this year.
If the anti-inflation policies are
working, as the federal
government claims, why has there
Wages, Production and Productivity,
All Manufacturing, 1949 to 1968
(Indexes, 1949 = 100)
.-#e
OUTPUT KR MANH0UR, ANNUAL AVERAW     ^ *
.*'
:**•—>
19S2     '    1963
CHARTERS 71
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Charter to Britain or Europe
Please Remember to Reserve
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Call for your Passport
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ON CAMPUS 224-4391
B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization
s"»rV\/WI«\«WSrt/WSrts^WV^VVVW%s%rVVV\s"tTVVV\rts,WW\fW
The prices and incomes
commisssion and John Young
ignored this aspect and tried to
make Canadian working people
pay for an unjust foreign war.
The future of this policy and
others like it depends on the
ability of the federal government
to fool the people most hurt by it,
Canadian working people and
prospective workers, students.
John Young is going to be
speaking on campus in Buch. 106
at 8:00 p.m. on Saturday. In the
interests of the Liberal
government's desire for
"dialogue" come and tell Young
what you think.
Materials and graphics
for this article were taken
from the files of the B.C.
Federation of Labor
Research Bureau.
Additional material was
taken from the Reports of
the Prices and Incomes
Commission and from the
Canadian Union of Public
Employees Research
Facilities.
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT
METRO-GOU3WYN-MAYER presents'BREWSTER MCCLOUD"
starring BUD CORT • SALLY KELLERMAN • MICHAEL MURPHY
Co-starring WILLIAM WINDOM and RENE AUBERJONOIS Written by
DORAN WILLIAM CANNON Directed by ROBERT ALTMAN Produced by LOU ADLER
Filmed in PANAVISION®and METROCOLOR mgm^
"WARNING—Swearing and Coarse Language"
-R. W. McDonald, B.C. Director
CAPITOL 12:00,2:00,4:00,
683-2634 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
LOUGHEEO   Ibriue-Jn  298-7848
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1SS7    '     1SS8
WU^m*h^W^r^±^^-^^+mVm^V*mmWnrVVmm+m**Mi^MniV Page 6
Motion
has no
relevance
from page  One
Said Irving Fetish, arts 4: 'The
AMS has already set this
university back about a century."
Graduate student council
representative Evert Hoogers
summed up the political
significance of the failure to pass
the revisions.
"Irrelevant motions get
insignificant response," he said.
"The whole executive should
have forgotten about
constitutional revisions and the
other bureaucratic shit they revel
in and started to address the
serious issues students at this
university are faced with.
"These include jobs and
university democratization,"
Hoogers explained.
"These is a group of students
on campus which is going to take
the initiative on the vital issue of
summer jobs and jobs after
graduation," said Hoogers.
"Obviously the AMS is not
interested in this problem."
Secretary Ann Clarkson
explained that the vice-president
was to look after the problem of
employment.
"You cannot leave that issue to
one person," replied Hoogers. "It
must be an AMS priority or
nothing will happen."
Regis Debray, agriculture 3,
interjected that a coup d'etat
would probably work even better.
IT'S THE
REAL THING
BLOOD
IS
WHEN IN DOUBT
DO ... .
do give a pint
of your life-stuff
THE LUTHERAN CAMPUS
CENTRE at UBC is crediting its pints
to Dr. "Jack" Gower, Geology Dept.
Join us.
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This issue of Synch is devoted almost solely
to the art of translation.  It is a Very
important aspect of Uterature and one
which is often overlooked, bat without it,
the English-reading world would have to do
without the masterpieces of Albert Camus,
Franz Kafka, Gunter Grass and Jorge Luis
Borges, to name a few. Those who do not
read French, German, Spanish or whatever,
have to rely on that special breed of writers
who translate the works of others. Some
translations are presented herein, as well
as information about the translation program
at UBC and the publication of translations.
Also in this issue, a review of a very special
first novel by a recent M.A. graduate at
UBC's Creative Writing Program. JOB HUNTING?
Write, telephone or stop in for
your copy of our Resume Form.
We prepare professional
employment resumes.
Dunhill Resumes
No. 220—1155 W. Georgia St.
Vancouver 5, B.C.
685-0261
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An important outlet for shorter works of literature has
always been the little magazine, which has the task of
providing a continuum in which writers can publish without
putting out a whole volume at once. One of the best of these
can be found at UBC.
Prism international magazine is published by the
Department of Creative Writing, and has as its editor-in-chief,
Jake Zilber. It was founded at a time when the eye could scan
Canada's literary landscape from Vancouver Island to Ontario
without detecting a single little magazine, and has since grown
to an important journal of international prominence.
In 1959 the first issue of Prism appeared. Independent,
and financed by donations, subscriptions, sales and ads, it was
edited by Jan de Bruyn, with help from Elliott Gose, Jake
Zilber and Heather Spears.
The magazine committed itself at the beginning to "all
possible range of forms, techniques, themes, and styles:
recognition of talented youjp**wfrB5|s; and above all, 'we
intend to make Prism lit^^ar^^r^ in Joyce's phrase
chalkful of master-plasters.' TT A       * <.» |
Henry Kreisel's storyf "The jFra^elling Nude," later
received theUniversity of w|s|grn Ontario's President's Medal
as the best Canadian storyl3| the*year. "Other contributors
were two relatively unknown^te^S'-H-.Alden Nowlan and
Margaret Laurence - both of jsiO^iSfpuld become winners of
the Governor General's Jlwarl. Earle Birney, Dorothy
Livesay and Raymond iSouster were the best-known
contributors.
Under de Bruyn's ed#§>rsf«p, Prism published a number
of writers for the first rirAe . .v George Bowering, Lionel
Kearns, Tom Grainger, Jc%n Newlove, among others. And
award-winning material by other authors.
In 1964 the magazine was brought under the
sponsorship of the Creative Writing Department with a more
explicit policy of literary intejfnationalism.
Prism thus expired, an|f was immediately reborn as Prism
international. Earle Bimerf editor-in-chief; (liose Rimanelli
and Zilber associate edijpr; Shuji Kato of !|sian Studies,
foreign editor; de Bruyn,pdvisory editor. SajLjtirney, "We do
not believe, in the world o^^M^^kSh^t^fan;
made for thinking that jnterlfationalism
consideration. We warn all leaders aid intern
1st of ou:
f authors,
[d be an
i will co
fexcellen
m by Bii
j writers
|d Cesan
lation, h
that this may well be the :
outnumber   non-Canadiar
possible that our next cojj
basis of our editjinil choi
of the contribuailiiit tfi
Since
by sucfj
Valery
:ed to trani
ions need to be
a  paramount
contributors
'hich Canadians
it is equally
mber. For the
lot the address
sends us."
:ernational has
ge LuiiBorges, Georg
se, an« although not
ie muchtbr that art in
ssues in
|nd   y
Canada
tie to b
fwhat
Jrism i:
published
Brittling, Pa
totally dev
this countr
LatxJL Acorn, jiacEwen,f PuJjy, Gusfcfson, Nichol,
Lowry — ithese werejra few off the Eanadiarl whose work
appeared Bong with* growinglnumler of fifreign authors;
Saba, StaHprd, Lirid#ren, Attila, 1m rmre.
Prism mteriuponal is one orVl0BUiterd|y magazines
chosen bm-the KifcgJBfiDrmt Corporation\i£..I|ew York as
making a signirfcant c»r7trimiuoTT%!nf?Mlern hterature, and so
deserving of being made available to libraries and collectors in
reprint form. It is also available on microfilm through
University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and appears
internationally in book and magazine exhibitions. It has
readers in most countries of the world. Its editors read
approximately 17,000 submitted items annually, out of which
less than 1% are published. With its book arm, Prism
international press, which has brought out a poetry volume by
Walter Bauer, a novel by Bill T. O'Brien and a collection of
writings by Charlie Leeds, it has established itself as one of the
best-known literary magazines in Canada, and earned itself a
growing reputation abroad.
In 1966, Jake Zilber succeeded Birney as editor-in-chief,
with Bob Harlow and Dorothy Livesay as associate editors.
The policy established by de Bruyn and Birney has continued
under his editorship, and with the help of associate editors
Harlow, Doug Bankson, Mike Yates, Mike Bullock and George
McWhirter, and editorial assistants who are in the graduate
program of the Creative Writing Department.
Synch 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971 Poems by
Pierre Reve
rdy
(France)
Translated front the French by
R. W  Stedingh
PIERRE    REVERDY    (1889-1960),    a
French poet of international importance, was
born in IMarbonne. He first arrived in Paris in
1910   and   was   befriended   by  Juan  Gris,
Picasso,    Braque,    Apollinaire    and    other
painters and poets. He was a founder of the
Paris literary magazine IMORD-SUD and was
known  variously  as the  poet of Cubism,
Surrealism, Realism, and Mysticism. All four
Dark
Starlit Sky
classifications  are  at  once  misleading  and
appropriate. Although a contemporary of the
A long needle-pierces the distance
A tree directed toward the sky
Surrealists, he remained independent of the
A tree
This dark procession
group, and his theory of the poetic image.
A finger
It lights up the world with candles
quoted   by  Breton  in the  First Manifesto,
The blind moon
All wait too long and in the shadow
became part of the Surrealist credo: "The
A window looking through us
The noise of footsteps clouds the night
image   is  a pure creation of the spirit.   It
Money cast among trees
Your face is a block of marble
Slowly the wall crumbles
And its darkness spreads a stain
cannot spring from a comparison but only
from the juxtaposition of two realities more
All the birds have flown past
The night
Over the sinking earth
or less different."
Noise
By the river where one hears
Someone makes a sign to fall silent
The crystal laughter of stones
You walk down the lane of a small cemstery
A white ray hangs above
Night sways a moment
Something falls into the water
A hail of stars
Fixed Hours Of Death
The sun whirls past
The cobweb tears
The wind passes under the wing
As it goes down
A whisper in the air
The tree is in a better position to see
Within hearing
The spider walks on the sky
The day falls flat on the earth
And at night you see all the dead planets
Caught in the web
The stars
And the moon that lulls them to sleep
All Shores
Space white and swarming props up the sky
Water trembles at the slightest sound
Matinee
The bird on the path
The cage in the room
And the hand that writes
The shadow leans further to the right
Behind the curtain
Under gleaming gold
A face
In a sky that falls into a thousand folds
And the shadow of a cloud
Blue air
In the middle of the meadow
An unreal fabric
The land stretches to the limit of the trees
Perhaps another weave
The crossing
At the window
And the river
Which blinks like an eyelid
Where it drains
In the wind
Air
The Name Of Wings
Sunlight
Summer
The same bird that built its nest
The features of the season are nearly erased.
Between ladder and tree
The echoing bell tower
The voices that remained caught between
two windows
With watches hanging from gold chains
striking noon
And the gurgle of gutters rising to the roof-tops
Between two sidewalks
To the car headlights
Dust trembling
And already the evening air
He is the one stopping in front of the sign
asking where he is going
Beyond the town
To the tranquil
Or eastward
The clouds' door turns and covers the sky
Darkness we have never glimpsed behind the stars
And the shining name that remained unknown
A boat under sail
Friday, January 29, 1971
THE      ,U,B Y,S S E Y
S>i><-h? Poems
by
H. C Artmann
Translated from the German by Reinhard
H.    C.    Artmann,   the   father   of   the
VIENNESE GROUP, is today probably the
most important lyricist writing in the German
language.   His   poems  are   usually   created
spontaneously and yet they are of the highest
formal artistry. Artmann's lyrical alterego is
hidden   in   hundreds  of  disguises.   He  has
written over a dozen books of poetry, a book
of drama, and two volumes of short prose. He
now lives in Berlin. He was born in 1927.
Reinhard is an illegimate gypsy, a poet.
translator   and   sometime  artist  who   loves
in my garden
travelling and women.
out of geometric fountains
the brain is round
the thrushes of insanity
plays night and day
bleed to death
with dark instruments
the thrushes of insanity
naked belly
in my garden bleed to death
tally-ho
out of geometric fountains
the brain is bullet round
out of geometric fountains
the mouth a verseorgan
the thrushes of insanity
and mice
bleed to death in my garden
already nibble
in my garden fountains of insanity
at the tongue
bleed to death
tally-ho
out of geometric thrushes
with their
the geometric thrushes
sharp mice teeth
in my garden bleed to death
One thing is still a calm oscillation
hullo
out of fountains of insanity
between the summer's breasts
and who
out of geometric insanity
is asparagus pulled out of the earth
can't pay the toll
in my garden your thrushes
and extravagant vegetation
with a good pound
bleed into fountains
hovering bird-like in space
of sulphur
a vacuum turned ripe-green
tally-ho
life- prey of sterile ducks
pays it with
carried from tree to tree
the open door
as if no one would rise any more
hullo
to the constant supervision of time.
yes with the open door
the flight may pass away carefree:
however something always disappears
out of hollowed hands.
i fly before the rain,
water and lightmingled,
redthroated, tiny,
a bird like a grain of wheat,
each drop could kill me,
not one touches me ...
on the brows of barns,
i search the skulls
of slaughtered cattle and stags:
i fly in through one eye,
and through the other i fly out;
this way i save hours,
this way i gain days,
this way the rain can't go on ...
the feathers in which i fly
have the colour of the meadow-saffron
only the throat is like blood.
behind me is fall,
baptizer and slayer of flowers,
he hounds me ...
so against my will i bring
cloud and snow,
i am the feathered y
of the end of time.
the voice of cannons
is governed by a god.
the approach to broom
bridge and stream
the drowning
spin of the rain
disintegrates in the colour
of dusty weeks.
the night is just
through sleeping
by the river.
the king mute
in the evening's combat
and brave.
meanwhile
in the peacockgarden of tents
the past struts
a glittering navel
on the moon
that occasionally
freshens
the tulips of blois...
Synch 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971 Poems by Sandor Weores
(Hungary)
Translated from the Hungarian by
Gyorgy Porkolab
Sandor Weores (pronounce: Voe-roesh)
was born in 1913 in Szombathely, Hungary.
He studied at Pecs University and received
there a doctor's degree for his literary-
psychological work The Birth of the Poem.
Between 1941 and 1950 he worked as a
librarian first at Pecs, later at Budapest. Since
1951 he has made his living by writing. His
first book of poetry Hideg van was published
in 1934. For his poetic achievement he was
twice awarded the Baumgarten Prize, Hungary's highest literary award before 1948.
Weores is an excellent translator; his collected
verse translations were published in a separate
volume in 1958. Weores has travelled widely;
since 1956 he has visited China, England and
the United States. Only a few of his poems
have been translated into English; now Penguin is preparing a selection of his poetry in
the translation of Peter Redgrave and Edwin
Morgan.
The Speaking Spring
the ineffable begins to speak
but cannot express itself
the handless acts
but only with your hands
the legless starts out
but only with your legs
the senseless comes to consciousness
but only with your brain
the flowerless flowers
but only with your flowers
the fruitless bears fruit
but only with your fruit
the ungiveable gives
but only with your giving
the merciless has mercy
but only with your mercy
the prayerless prays
but only with your prayer
the lightless lights up
but only with your light
the ineffable begins to speak
but only in your heart
The Face
It is easy to lock up your face
with a smile, or with a beard,
like a living little coffin.
It is painful to leave it open,
if there is no power yet in your awkward
youthful lines
to forge a lock.
It is best to open wide
your weather beaten rusty face,
like an open baby mouth,
let anyone laugh;
" and the void, the unknown,
who has no form,
let it come and go through it
and all the more lift you
on your beautifully spread wings.
Lute Passages
i.
Every life's and death's channel is mutual.
If you goggle your eyes on pace,
what is the layered torrent of incessant surge:
you see foam-swirl, not life or death.
The weather is foggy, cannot see across above the crevasse,
where the lovers' tears spiral on the smooth mirror.
But when night comes, the space clears
and the eye fathoms the field's black-crystal mass.
II.
It is good to tear away from the body
roaming across alien lights
and every bend and drift of the earth's landscape
like a dead song of past ages
floods from memory
but oh a hunch guards itself.
III.
Darlings, sleep,
dawn will not wake for you,
only the clock-skulled prince
thinks of you,
who runs his head the full night,
but does not advertise, that my morning
how many milleniums pass.
Warriors Of Old
Not to sleep, not to eat, only to drink ...
In our flasks the rum is low already.
Lime water drips from the cliff fissure
constantly, like the ticking of a clock.
Only a watch, hugging the rifle ...
A hundred strong around the mountains stand.
In the silence, which is a city with a population of a thousand,
there are four of us living men.
A shot: roof. Bread, bed.
Does my lover see this way from the house?
If you came out, perhaps I'd show you
your fiance's splashed brain.
I did not kill him in revenge. It was an order:
either we die or the traitor.
His brain is a tawny painting on the rock
and the lime plashing splits it.
The board-thin corpse covered.
Behind his face no skull.
He is twenty like L I could like him:
his angel white happy smile.
Albeit I could be a guest at his wedding
and my finger on the weapon's trigger:
let the two siskin fly! I would not shoot him,
let him rob my grapes, surely he's a bird!
But for a traitor there is no consideration.
You will step out of the house, my lover.
A swig of rum yet! Then my bible
will knit into your caressed skin.
Friday, January 29, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
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Review
the ufterpeople, a patheticon, by george payerle
House of AnansiPress. 1970 Toronto. Softcover $2.50
George Payerle will play solitaire with anybody; sitting in the
gutter, on the bus, or before fornicatioa Throughout the
entire book no character is fixed into one definite easy role;
they change and merge; become part of each other, always
manifesting a mystery but never forcing unnecessary solutions
on the reader. This isn't meant to confuse or con, but to take
people into realms they may not get to on their own; or allow
followers at their own indin.iti«lmThr"fhjrnr>r t- frcr the form
is free; there is plenf. "l traffic and a pi'pii %w un... ibr
continuity and keys; «licltocr cops stalk a d.j. oi U i- '->isy
cutting himself up inio little boxes to escape rm luuu.il ihe
sex is clean and the narrative looks good in its metaphysical
strides which dissolve in the iojn. \i> ■■ne thing is central "■■ ;he
book; each person, incident iwim i- initial t" 'ivlf and each
other, related by varij.'ioti iiul uui-nuhlcd In rf■■ newsparvis
and seminars.
The action takes plac
between here and thei
both ways all the tint
tarantula   will   open.
v imewhere between B (    11 id Australia,
;. On a bridge where 11 ■   <i .ifk is heavy
■ and one nevei kii"\\   aIi ■. il,^ next
The    bridge    ■     underground;   the
transpacific subway sjsiem Ihnt Iran p-i. all of Ironstem's
friends, or B's friends ci Groin's, if he h i- .uy, friends, so that
they can be together higher than a«y authority. *It seems
necessary."
A bank robbery happens. The intrepid jobbers withdraw a
bank teller named C. who is somebody'$;Wi£e some of the time
and who sleeps in bear skins every^cfiipce she gets. The
robbers are not punished even tho thff fciH everybody in sight
including themselves and ridjs BSA^.fMaek ones. Even the
impotent traffice cop, Gibin, is powerless against such
inconsistency. He loves i<> make friends, but can't take the
heavy pressure of old Indian ladies and extinct rabbits.
Sergeant Duclos is brought in, Skinner is brought in, and R.
leaves. ffone of these people share the same payroll, but all in
their o^ffcftway touch oil the nerves of interesting and obscure
derails tftadf deepen (he colors of the fiction. N. is a rabbit
hunter who tides a Rolls Roycefnot the sacred Black Rolls of
Ironlem's people). He.grow*rabbits in Australia and ships
themte Canada: hence ihe birth of the P.&D.
The author and his friends spend a lot of time on the horizon
watching ships and clouds. "I went that day to see the ships.
Many people had gathered. It was an unprecedented event for
our port. None I think had anticipated what they saw;
effortless montage of bulk, a brief white synapse in thirty
thousand minds." Close by, selling ear-plugs to the sea, Zonk,
or Lethargio, or Jock, rape any sensible females. He finds a
blue bowler hat growing in the dunes, dyes his balls and waits
for the next cloud. And again Duclos is alerted and he finds
work in the sand. "R. and I often go to the sea now, diving for
sharks."
Ironstem, that frustrated geologist, divides his time between
the reservation and the city, burning hospitals and selling his
dreams to drive-in movies. He's old, red and a liaison for
Skinner who thinks he's John Wayne's son. He also shares the
screen with Jock, who when he changes underwear, changes
himself, and with Shamble, an architect. Ironstem almost
stuffed Groin down a semaphore. "Ironstem's psyche,
however, is not to be taken lightly."
This is the first book by George Payerle, Vancouver born and
raised writer. Not a novel, a collection of short stories, or
poetry; it's a book, a geography of the author's head, his
friends, his neighbors and the unders of his insides. There are
several different pieces introduced by their own titles and
separated by blank pages, as there are on each page several
sections, sometimes contradictory, sometimes deflationary,
sometimes neither. The work is whole; but not the solid dead
type where everything is eternally glued together and all the
reader has to do is open his eyes and say aahh. All the parts are
there but you may have to muzzle your clock if you want to
follow this unpredictable trip.
"Once, walking down a snowy road, I wondered at the will to
live. This in fact had nothing to do with the snow. Or very
little. There was snow."
by Avron Hoffman
Cont 'd on next page
Synch 6
*       * I V ' u   \     11
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971 cont'd
George Payerle was born in 1945 in Vancouver to
Hungarian parents. He has a BA and MA from the UBC
Creative Writing Department and The Afterpeople is his first
published noveL
Payerle says the book came out of about the last 10
years of his life here plus travels to Montreal and S. Dakota.
One of things he says about the book is that he gets the feeling
it is a prototype; it will probably take about 10 years to work
out the possibilities it presents in other books.
"The Afterpeople, written during the winter 1968-69
presents multiple realities of identity, event, dream, cognition,
memory and understanding, wherein all points are relative to
one another and the only absolute remains the T of whatever
narrator is speaking, whether character or 'author.' The time is
present, the geography internal, the spirit surreal, the purpose
epistemological, the structure episodic, the function intuitive,
the method filmic."... is also what Payerle has said about
the book.
He is currently working on his second novel which has
the working title Fane.
Translation
There is a Translation Program for students proficient in
foreign languages and writing* Started in 1969 with the arrival
of Michael Bullock — an eminent translator of more than 100
books and plays — the Translation Program now offers two
workshops. One is a final year undergraduate workshop and
the other is for MA students. Students can also take advanced
tutorials from Bullock solely within the CW department or in
conjunction with the Comparative Literature Department
Bullock says more students now are doing all their graduate
work in translation and more and more demand is being made
for it as a separate program.
The  languages  being  translated  in  the  program  are
extremely varied, says Bullock, the students working in it are
either working in languages Bullock is familiar with -German,
French or Italian — or are working in their mother tongue.
The object of the program is to train translators to bring
in work from foreign countries. As Bullock says, any country
needs to read books from abroad simply to enrich its own
cultural life. He adds that translation is extremely good
exercise for those who want to write their own work as well,
as the training they get in working in detail will obviously help
their own writing.
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Friday, January 29, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Synch 7 CLIT
Contemporary Literature in Translation is the only
all-language magazine solely devoted to translation in Canada,
and since its beginning in 1968 has been responsible for much
of the fast-growing interest in translation in this country.
The magazine comes out three times a year, and, like
Prism international comes under the wing of the Creative
Writing Department.
C.L.I.T. has run translations from the Spanish, Polish,
German, French, Japanese, Arabian, Chinese, Bengali,
Portuguese, Greek, Russion, Czech and Kamba (African)
languages, featuring work by such writers as Garcia Lorca, G.
Apollinaire, J. L. Borges, Jehuda Amichai, Pablo Neruda and
Yevtushenko.
It has also featured such translators as Willis Barntone,
Theo Savory, Harold Enrico, Henry Beissel, George Jonas,
Rainer Schulte, A. P. Schroeder and Michael Bullock.
The magazine is currently under the editorship of
Andreas Schroeder and J. Michael Yates and has as its guiding
credo the following statement of purpose which it publishes
every issue:
About the translator's view of the relations of his
"translation" or "imitation" to an orignal in another language,
CONTEMPORARY   LITERATURE   IN   TRANSLATION'S
policy is that it hasn't one. Or C.L.I.T. ignores whether a
translation is as literal as R. K. Gordon's translations from
Anglo-Saxon, as liberal as Robert Lowell's "imitations."
Such matters, holds this periodical, are the responsibility
and prerogative of the translator.
What CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION does trade in is literature—poems, short fiction, parts
of novels, drama, essays, (whole or excerpts) in poetics, etc. -
in literature, literary (in the broad, best sense of that term)
English.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971 Friday, January 29,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
U of T strike plans dim,
other steps contemplated
TORONTO (CUP) - The strike movement at
the University of Toronto appears to be fizzling
following the narrow defeat of a strike referendum
Tuesday,
The record 66.5 per cent of 13,000 eligible
students who voted turned down by a 54 vote
margin a strike to back student demands for
student-faculty parity on decision making bodies at
the university.
Students are now looking for new ways to put
pressure on administrators.
The issue of student-faculty parity is a concept
supported by the Commission on University
Government in a report published a year and a half
ago. The report has since been buried in the U of T's
bureaucratic quagmire and by faculty opposition.
An arts and sciences student referendum last
fall saw 88.5 per cent of those voting in favor of
parity. However, a faculty meeting this month
rejected parity by 285-192.
An educational festival in Sidney Smith Hall,
the major arts and science building, is going on full
blast despite the vote with live jazz and rock as well
as sessions on student unemployment, the
educational opportunity bank and policies of the
university.
The strike committee, which has been calling
for a three day symbolic strike action on the
strength of more than 4,000 yes votes in the
referendum, called off a sit-in at the main
administrative offices in Sid Smith Wednesday
night.
Students closed down the offices early
Wednesday morning, by occupying the corridors in
front of them. Employees arriving for work were
sent home by the administrators to avoid a
confrontation.
Commenting on the sit-in Wednesday arts dean
G. A. B. Watson said: "They look radical but act
jovial," and added there was little to fear from the
students.
Hardliners in the administration had their way
however, and following a closed meeting of the
president's co-advisory council, there were reports
that U of T was prepared to seek injunctions to have
students obstructing the offices Thursday morning
ejected  and  arrested.
Heated discussions have been going on in
classrooms where students have turned up. Even on
normal days, hundreds of students stay away from
classes anyway.
Sympathetic faculty converted their classes into
political discussions or cancelled them. Pro strike
students attended some classes in order to challenge
the profs and their fellow students to discuss the
issues.
Most classes continued as usual, however.
Administration president Claude Bissell may
still be forced to intervene in the dispute if students
can show that busines cannot continue as usual in
arts and science unless he does something.
A general committee meeting of the faculty
council is set for Monday and chances are it will be
significantly disrupted.
Other possibilities being explored include:
• Continual recalling of the faculty council
into session. To call a meeting of the 1,300 member
body requires a petition of only 15 names.
• A call for a convocation of the entire
university. This is an assembly which would include
not only all faculty and administrators but also all
living alumni of the university, some 150,000 in all.
Such a convocation can be called by 25
alumni. The convocation has no supreme powers
but it can m ake recommendations to the board of
governors and the senate. It would cost the
administration at least $50,000 to organize such an
event.
The student council has appealed to the board,
which met Thursday to hold a two-day moratorium
on classes and elect a new university-wide body to
consider implementation of the CUG report.
There is no word yet on what action the board
decided on in its closed meeting.
And townhouses too ...
from page One
The road will be financed
jointly by federal and municipal
funds and is expected to cost
$308,000.
A department of national
defense spokesman said recently
that townhouses will be
constructed on a portion of the
land still in federal jurisdiction,
just south of Fourth Avenue.
"To make such developments
accessible to the public a new
road will have to built, as we
already agreed to," said Broome.
Broome said rezoning of the
area had already been approved,
but a spokesman for the city
zoning department denied that
any applications had been made
to rezone the area in question.
Broome called residents'
protests "neither here nor there"
and cited the only delay as the
purchase of the few still privately
owned homes along Marine Drive,
needed for construction of the
road.
Clarke and Clarke Reai Estate,
suspected developers of another
townhouse complex at the present
site of Haddon Park, is working
under the name of Vancouver
Management and has already
purchased property in the area, at
1775 Trimble Street.
While VM spokesman James
Clarke said his company "strives
to deal in a position of trust",
area resident Betty Delmonico
suspects they are pushing the road
proposal for their own financial
gains.
"VM put a lot of money into
the purchase of this land, which
they are now paying interest on.
The longer they have to pay the
interest with no remuneration,
the more money they stand to
lose " she said.
Clarke denied any future
developments are in the offing.
Haddon Park was donated
by Captain Jack Haddon to the
municipality of Point Grey 40
years ago to be used as a public
park only.
Parks board member Art Cowie
is reviewing the board's previous
proposal to develop land
surrounding the proposed road
and feels changes in the present
ideas are inevitable.
"We plan to put an appeal in to
the city engineers, if the present
proposal is accepted," Cowie said.
"I do not feel the present road
location is a sound one, and unless
changes are made soon, there is
going to be the biggest citizens'
upheaval this city has ever seen,"
he added.
"We want to preserve the
natural parks and beaches and are
bitterly opposed to any kind of
'Coney Island' developing."
He admitted a proposal for a
public marina is still undergoing
serious consideration.
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I       !  *  :  # # . Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29, 1971
The mt^nat Triangle:
BRUCE CURTIS examines
the Socred manoeuvring in
Victoria over an 87-square-
-mile piece of proposed
parkland on Vancouver
Island.
VICTORIA (Staff) - The Nitinat
Triangle is causing the B.C. forest industry
concern.
The triangle is an 87-square-mile tract of
land which the Sierra Club and the federal
government feel should he included in Phase
Three of the West Coast National Park.
The park was created in April, 1970, and
was to be developed in three phases.
The first phase, Long Beach, is already a
well-used section of beach lands, known for
its high Pacific surf.
Phase Two of the project involved the
closure of the Effingham Islands group north
of Bamfield in Barkley Sound for a wildlife
preserve for indiginous fauana as well as
migratory marine birds.
Large herds of sea lions and seals also
gather on the islands.
There are one or two good harbors on the
islands which may be developed in the future
as marine park harbors. Plans are not as yet
developed for the area.
M. he third phase of the national parks
project is the preservation of what is known
as the Shipwreck Trail or the Lifeboat Trail.
This trail is a half-mile-wide strip of land
extending 35 miles ffrom Bamfield to Port
Renfrew. It was built by the provincial
government in 1920 to facilitate the
evacuation of shipwreck victims along the
coast.
But it is the Nitinat Triangle that is
causing the concern amongst the forest
industry officials.
The area involved, which includes
Nitinat Hobiton and Tsusiat Lakes, is
generally held to be of major importance as a
sockeye salmon spawning area. It is presently
under 'sustained yield forest mangement' by
B.C. Forest Products and MacMillan Bloedel
Ltd.
According to a Council of Forest
Industries press release last Wednesday, "the
forest land in the Nitinat Triangle is some of
the most productive forest land in B.C.
B.C. Forest Products holds tree farm
licence No. 27, which was issued twelve years
ago and 90 per cent of it lies within the
proposed triangle.
The licence was issued in 1958 by then
minister of lands and forests Robert
Sommers. Later that same year, Sommers was
convicted in B.C. Supreme Court on four
counts of accepting a bribe and one count of
conspiracy.
R hat trial, which caused a scandal that
rocked the six-year-old Socred government,
was the longest and most expensive (almost
$250,000) trial in B.C.'s history.
In the same trial, B.C. Forest Products,
Evergreen Lumber, and other forestry
companies were convicted of offering up to
$12,000 each in bribes in order to ensure the
granting of tree farm licence concessions.
MacMillan Bloedel also has some tree
farm licence land in the triangle but it is a
small portion of the licence.
In response to demands for the single-use
national park, the forest industry is
responding with what it calls an alternative
proposal.
The CFI proposal is that the area shoud
remain under the control of the two
companies and that they would designate the
land as multiple use forest areas.
The multiple-use concept provides for the
continued logging of an area but with the
addition of special recreational services.
Such an arrangement would allow for the
general public access to the area as well as
providing camping and picnicking facilities.
The problem with this arrangement is
that the access to the area is restricted by the
industry except during non-working and
non-hazard hours.
Industry spokesman, opposing the park
plan at the press conference Wednesday, said
B.C. Forest Products currently plans for the
recreational development of the Nitinat
Triangle as a multiple use forest area.
Plans released Wednesday provide for an
access road from Lake Cowichan to the head
of Nitinat Lake.
The future continuation of that road
would complete access to the Hobiton River
sockeye salmon run.
In addition, CFP is planning to provide
free picknicking and camping facilities, boat
launching ramps, and nature trails.
The company also said it would leave a
natural forest belt around all waterfront
property to preserve the esthetic value of the
land.
"The industry has built 10,000 miles of
roads," said Gordon Draeseke, president of
CFI, "and gives access where otherwise there
would be none.
"In 1970, CFI member companies
approved a common road access policy with
the restriction applied only for the safety of
the visitor or the protection of the forests."
R^.FI   opposed
grounds as well.
the   plans   on   economic
Draeseke argued that the removal of the
triangle from productive forest management
would "result in a direct loss of about 250
jobs in the Cowichan Lake, Alberni, and
Victoria areas." Friday, January 29, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 17
Does the land belong to the people
or to the lumber barons of B.C.?
'raeseke went on to say that each
industry job supports two jobs outside the
industry in service and related areas.
Howard English, a director of the B.C.
Wildlife Federation, had another view:
"If you take all the environmental
advantages and say that we're going to lose
jobs, all we're going to have is jobs and no
environment to live in."
"You're going to destroy the
environment," he said. "We won't sacrifice a
few dollars profit in order to safeguard our
environment."
"I'm all for multiple use," English said,
"but there have to be some areas. Just as we
don't use the logging mills and plants for
recreation, there has to be some single use
areas that they don't use for logging."
The CFI also seems prepared to wield a
big stick on legal grounds.
"Under the terms of the licences, no
more than one per cent can be withdrawn (by
the government for parks purposes without
the consent of the licencee," Draeseke said.
Recreation and Conservation Minister
Ken Kierans agreed. "Once we go beyond that
(the one per cent) the companies have the
right to compensation by equal land and
money.
"Our problem here is that this think is
growing and growing and growing and every
time you add more acreage to the project you
displace something.
"We are opposed to the great incursions
on productive land for single use," said Fred
Moonan, vice-president of CFI.
"We have a legacy to live down in certain
problem areas," said Jerry Burch, of BCFP. "I
think we are becoming socially motivated."
B.C. Fprest Products stands to lose 90
per cent of the tree farm licence 27 if the plan
goes through. The area has an able annual cut
of 4.2 million board feet but English charged
that the timber in the Nitinat Triangle is not
commercially of any value due to the high
cost of transportation.
K
ten Farquharson, president of the Sierra
Club of B.C. agreed, saying, "We figure this
Nitinat Triangle isn't as attractive as they say
it is, otherwise they'd have been in there years
ago.
"Farquharson stated that BCFP had
barely begun to log the area and that now was
the time to act to preserve it as a natural park.
"This is the last bit of wilderness in the
south end of the island," he said. "The
addition of the triangle would bring in all
sorts of people who won't be fit enough to
walk in."
Farquharson was answering allegations
made by CFI that the area would only be
available to about one per cent of the
population that is physically fit enough to
make the 55-mile walk along the coast.
"If you include the triangle any elderly
person would be able to drive to the head of
Nitinat Lake and take a day trip down the
lake without any physical exertion," he said.
Hugh Murray, a Sierra Club member,
added that the inclusion of the triangle would
provide a chain of lakes that could be used for
canoeing similar to the Bowron Lakes chain in
the central interior of the province.
Farquharson said that the Sierra Club was
formed last year to act as a conservation
lobby because "the mining and forestry
lobbies have virtually dominated for too
long."
Presently the club is involved in the
production of a booklet to inform and
educate the governmental officials involved in
the decision.
"This area is relatively unknown by the
people who are being asked to make the
decision - mainly the politicians," he said.
"We back the federal government
wholeheartedly on this."
The federal government has selected the
Nitinat triangle as a national park site and
presently is involved in negotiations   with the
provincial   government   and   the   industry
representatives.
O
RErfe
'fficially, however, it is a different
matter. The federal government under the
West Coast Park Act has its hands tied.
The province must assemble the land and
pass over a clear title to the land before the
federal government can act.
It is just another case of Socred
mismanagement.
As early as 1926 the provincial
government has had set aside the Nitinat
Triangle as a parks preserve.
Farquharson pointed out that even in
those days when governments thought the
lands were unrestricted and the resources
indepletable, the government thought enough
of the area to place it under a park preserve.
The area's park status was removed by
the Socreds in 1958 when it was reclassified
in order to turn it over to MacMillan Bloedell
and the B.C. Forest Products companies.
When questioned, Kiernans said he did
not know if the area was one of the tree farm
licences bought by B.C. Forest Products with
a bribe.
"I was not in charge of the recreation
department at that time," he said.
Elton Anderson, a member of the B.C.
Federation of Naturalists is also in favor of
the preservation of some of the west coast
natural wildlife.
"The forest industry is out of line in
proposing multiple use," he said. "I think
they look forward to logging in all parks." Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29,  1971
Faulty beams crack up arena
Story and Photos
by
KEITH DUNBAR
Ubyssey Sports Editor
There is more to the Winter Sports Centre than
what meets the external eye.
Inside the building events are in turmoil.
Since its incorporation approximately one year
ago. the new sports centre addition has had it's
share of problems. The latest chapter of the saga
could be termed "lack of support".
Two weeks ago it was noticed that one of the
structural beams which supports the roof of the
building had a long crack running along one of the
laminations. This beam is part of the roof which
covers one of the sheets of ice in the new addition
of the Winter Sports Center.
The two sheets of ice were then closed to
public or student use. Since this time another crack
has been noticed in another beam. Both beams are)
now supported by telephone poles as a
precautionary measure against the remote chance
that the roof may collapse.
The beams have reached a proper temperature
as well as humidity content for this operation to
take place. So far, the business has not been
attended to.
Telephone poles support beams,
while propane ventilator supplied heat. . .
Propane blowers have also been installed with a
ventilating tube running to the two beams. These
were in operation this week drying out the the two
beams in possible preparation for re-glueing of the
laminations.
. . . and transformer to close building . . .
A meeting was held yesterday to plan the
future of the damaged structure. The whole concept
has become quite complicated, explained building
manager Stan Floyd.
Basically the responsibility of re-opening the
new addition will rest with the insurance company
which works in conjunction with the university. The
clearance to open the number one sheet of ice in the
building will come only after the insurance
company will accept the risk. The number two sheet
of ice would stay closed pending the repairs to the
beams.
Floyd then explained that the whole problem is
one in which a number of fields are concerned,
including "engineering, legal, architectural, and
insurance."
The structural affliction of the beams is not the
only problem the new addition has had.
Last October there was power trouble in the
complex when a transformer failed. The building
was without power for a few days while a
temporary set-up was established in order to supply
power to the Center.
The building is to be closed on Tuesday
morning, four months later, when the now
corrected faulty transformer is to be reinstalled.
The problems have also financially hurt the
operation of the Winter Sports Centre. Floyd stated
that there has been "about a 500 dollar per day
. . . but curlers still throw rocks.
revenue loss" during the present crisis.
He feels the Winter Sports Center is one of the most heavily used
facilities of it's kind in the city.
It is being run now at full capacity, but some events are suffering.
There is a slight possibility that the center may go on 24-hour
operation.
UBC students in general, however, are not really suffering to a
great deal.
Highest priority to the remaining operative space is going to the
competitive teams of the university, such as the T'Bird hockey team
and the women's figure skating team.
Second in line, because of its high student content, is public
skating. AMS sponsored clubs and the Intramural program are next in
line.
Following them are such student groups as fraternities and
sororities.
Faculty and staff, groups making capital contributions to the
Center, and the general public follow in that order.
In short, the Winter Sports Center is a popular place on the
campus. Although it is well used and activities are well attended, Floyd
stated that students are always encouraged to come to the Center to use
the facilities.
Curling handball, squash, and the activities take place in the
main rink have been largely unaffected by the closure of the new
addition
Intramurals
Bowling — Preliminary Round starts
Tuesday, Feb. 2. Check with Intramural
office Friday for the schedule. Teams
are five men each. You must pay for
your own shoes. Report to the Intramural office and pick up a pass card
which verifies that you are on a team
and enables you to get in to bowl.
Snooker—Starts Feb. 2 from 7 to 11
p.m. All registered players must report
at 7 p.m. on this day. Tables are free
but you must pick up a pass card from
the intramural office room 308 War
Memorial Gym.
Basketball — Snowed out games have
been rescheduled and posted. It is your
responsibility to   check the   schedule.
Wrestling — Weigh-in is Feb. 4, 12:30
Memorial Gym. Everyones must be
there. The wrestling meet is Feb. 8, 9,
and 12, in War Memorial Gym.
Skiing — The ski meet has been
changed from Sunday. Feb. 7 to Saturday, Feb. 6, but is at the same place.
Seymour Mt. at 1 P.m.
Rugby and Two-Mile Walk — Sign-up
deadlines for these  activities is Feb. 4.
Volleyball and Softball — Registration
for these activities will be accepted on
Friday.
Co-Recreational Volleyball — Unfortunately volleyball has been cancelled
for Feb. 8 only. It will continue as usual
every other Tuesday at noon. The nets
will be set up and everyones is welcome.
Women's Athletics
The UBC Figure Skating team is holding a dress rehearsal Monday, Feb. 1
from 4:30 to 6:00 in preparation for the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate meet
in Edmonton. There they plan to uphold
their Canadian championship for the
seventh straight year.
The synchronized swim team is having
its final splash for the weekend before
competing Feb. 5 and 6, also in Edmonton, in the Western Canadian meet.
Womens speed swimming team travels
to Seattle Saturday for a meet against
the University of Washington. Last
weekend they handily defeated both
Washington and Portland State in a
tri-meet.
The Thunderettes basketball team
Friday and Saturday are playing the
University of Alberta in the War Memorial Gym.
The UBC women's curling team, who
last weeeknd won the zone 2 curling
championship for Vancouver for the
first time in twelve years, are this
weekend playing in Courtenay for the
District playdowns. They are competing
for a berth in the provincial playdowns
in Duncan.
The UBC ski team races in the Revel-
stoke slalom derby this weekend. High
hopes are placed on Joy Ward, who
has made the B.C. team for the Canada
Gaines.
The Vancouver Racquet Club hosts
the Vancouver District tournament in
Badminton Saturday. Competing for
UBC are Sue Kolb, Kathy Henry and
Marg Fallot.
The UBC Gymnastic teams won their
meet Saturday against Calgary and Edmonton. Just wait for the next one.
ASKETBALL CIRCUX
The  Fabulous
HARLEM
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SHOW
MON., FEB. 1st
PACIFIC COLISEUM
7:30 P.M.
Harlem Globetrotters
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PLUS A GREAT ADDED
VARIETY PROGRAM
Tickets at Hick's Ticket Bureau, 610
Dunsmuir St., Peterson's Sporting
Goods, 575-6th St, Richmond Mail,
Argyle Shop, 2174 W. 41st. U.B.C.
Athletics Office, Memorial Bldg.
$4.50, $3.50 & $2.
- JQM TIME ONLY!
Different
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Drop in anytime and have your bindings checked and adjusted for 50°
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732-6426 Friday, January 29,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
SPORTS
Puck Birds
head east
The University of B.C. hockey
Thunderbirds are on the road for
two games this weekend.
Tonight they play the Brandon
University Bobcats and Saturday
it's the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies in
Saskatoon.
'Bird coach Bob Hindmarch
doesn't have to worry about
curfew breakers on this trip. A
Friday in Brandon and Saturday
in Saskatoon has never been
anybody's idea of a great
weekend.
Brandon should be the tough
one. For one thing the Bobcats
are an improving team. Their
record is 5-5, two games out of
the fourth and last playoff spot..
In addition their fans are
usually worth a goal to the home
team. It seems collegiate hockey is
a social event of sorts in the
Wheat City. A time when friends
meet at the rink to scream
obscenities and spit at the visiting
clubs.
It turns into a gala affair for all
 visiting players excluded.
While neither game will be
easy, the torrid scoring of Bob
MacAneely and Co. should be
enough to win both games.
Thunderbirds are currently tied
for second spot in the Western
Collegiate league with a 9-3 mark
— the same as the University of
Calgary and two games behind the
University of Manitoba.
AGAIN    THIS   WEEKEND   the
University of B.C. Thunderbirds
will call upon their top guard,
Ron Thorsen, to perform
acrobatic feats with the
basketball. Here, in action against
first place Manitoba, Thorsen
snarls his way past two Bisons
while driving to the basket.
Action takes place this weekend in
War Memorial Gym on Friday and
Saturday nights at 8:00 p.m. and
Sunday afternoon at 2:00 p.m.
FOR GOOD FOOD
At Prices
You Can Afford
THE DINER
4556 West 10th
Phone 224-1912
speaking
frank Iff
Tony BaMmgkmr
The University of B.C. basketball Thunderbirds have this
problem.
To a pessimist, this is the way that it might look.
To repeat as WCIAA champions, and eventually as CIAU champs,
they must first win a semi-final series, probably against the University
of Winnipeg Wesmen, and assuming that they get by that series, defeat
the Manitoba Bisons in the finals. It would now appear that only a
small miracle can stop the Bisons in their quest for the first spot in
league play.
The problem arises when you consider the improbability of
winning on the road in collegiate basketball. The visitor has at least
three solid factors to overcome.
Initially they face the psychological inertia brought on by the
knowledge that the opposition, in this theoretical case, the Bisons, have
already beaten them twice during the regular season.
Then there is the officiating. Although coaches will often say that
the officiating is not a factor in whether they win or lose - they're
lying. The referees are usually good for up to 10-15 points per game
purely on the change of officiating style and interpretations of the
rules.
Combine this with the third factor, a capacity partisan crowd,
you have all the makings of "homer jobs" far worse than some of the
classics seen at War Memorial Gym.
Then one must consider the playing surface, backboards, and
other environmental disparities.
And although these minor changes should not bother a first rate
college player, they often do.
So what could best aid the Birds in their hope of beating the
Bisons? Clearly the best thing that could happen would be the demise
by act of god of the Manitoba Fieldhouse.
CLOSING OUT SALE
EVERYTHING MUST GO
COSTUMES FOR
MEN & WOMEN
Formal Wear
Gay Nineties Dress
Hats, Etc.
CENTENNIAL FASHIONS
INTERNATIONAL COSTUME DESIGNERS LTD
4243 DUNBAR at 26th
228-9112
GET IT ON
AT THE PNE GARDENS     6:30 &
SUNDAY, JAN. 31 10:00 P.M.
TirVCTQ      AT THE BAY 3.50
I H-IVt ID     AT THE DOOR 4.25 ONLY
DON'T LET YOUR FRIENDS TELL YOU
THAT YOU MISSED A GREAT SHOW!
BIRD CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
NOW Vi PRICE
ONLY 50*
. (STUDENTS & FACULTY)
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
AT
THE BOOKSTORE
THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
BIRD CALLS
The Handiest Book on Campus
PEOPLE
An Experience in Human Relations and
Human Sexuality
Monday, February 1 - 7 p.m. Sharp
WOMEN'S CAUCAS
SUB BALLROOM
PLEASE DRESS CASUALLY
U.B.C. CENTER FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION PRESENTS
COURSES ON CONTEMPORARY
SOCIAL ISSUES
Propaganda Canada  1971
MR. MACDONALD BURBIDGE,
Educator/Author, 8 Tues., 7:30 p.m., beginning
Feb. 2. Kitsilano Library Auditorium.
Americanization of Canada
DR. MICHAEL E. ELIOT-HURST, Geography
Dept., SFU. 8 Mons. 8:00 p.m., beginning Feb.
1. Room   222, Old Auditorium Annex, UBC.
Racism and Sexism
MRS. RENEE KASINSKY, Grad. Studies, U. of
California. 8 Weds., 8:00 p.m., beginning Feb.
3. Room 3252, Buchanan Bldg.
Man and the Primates
MRS. JOAN ABBOTT, Grad. Studies,
Anthropology, U. of Colorado. 8 Mons., 8:00
p.m., beginning Feb. 1. Foom 414, Henry
Angus Bldg.
Special Student Rates
For Info. Call 228-2181 Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 29,  1971
Skagit flooding
may be illegal
VICTORIA (Staff) - The flooding of the Skagit River Valley
may be illegal according to Dave Brousson, Liberal MLA for North
Vancouver-Capilano.
During the throne speech debate Wednesday, Brousson said: "It is
my opinion and that of my legal advisor that the agreement between
the B.C. government and Seattle is invalid."
Brousson pointed out that the agreement signed by the two
parties and the provisions for indemnity must be approved by an
international joint commission in Ottawa.
The agreements between B.C. and Seattle, while having been
received by the IJC, have neither been approved nor disapproved,"
Brousson said.
(The original agreement was signed by the Social Credit
government in 1954 and provided for the raising of the Ross Lake dam
by two feet.This would flood back into B.C. by about a half mile of
B.C. territory. This was an annually renewable agreement which
provided five thousand dollars annual compensation.
Each year the agreement was filed with the IJC but approval was
never formalized.
These agreements continued until 1966 when the final land lease
was signed which would raise the dam and back Ross Lake into B.C. by
eight miles.)
"I call on the attorney general as the chief law officer to review
the matter thoroughly," he said.
'The people of B.C. can clearly expect their government to take
immediate action to protect the rights of the province in the Skagit
Valley."
"If the provincial government really wanted to, they could do
somehing," he said.
Struck lettuce
to be boycotted
By JUDY McLEOD
The United Farm Workers have changed their target from grapes
to lettuce
The UFW has organized a boycott against California struck
lettuce and is asking Vancouver citizens to avoid buying non-union
lettuce.
"A boycott in Vancouver can be more effective than most people
realize," said Mike Burgess of the local headquarters Monday, "because
over seven percent of all California struck lettuce comes to Vancouver."
The farmers' struggle began before the last grape contracts were
signed in August 1970. Lettuce workers in Delano and Salinas Valley of
California began working toward benefits that the grape unions had
achieved and wanted to be first on the priority list of the UFW's
organizing committee said Burgess.
When lettuce growers received word that workers were planning
to organize for fair contracts, they secretly contacted the Teamsters
Union, Local 890 of Salinas and asked them to come to represent the
workers, he said.
'Teamsters' cards were distributed among the farm workers,
indicating a five year recognition between the Teamsters and farm
workers," said Burgess.
This lead to a situation in which the farm workers   had no direct
agreement with the growers, he said.
"Because the Teamsters had no real comprehension of the lettuce
workers'  situation the agreement was completely inadequate," said
Burgess.
'The two cent hourly increase offered did not keep up with the
workers needs or the cost of living."
"Nor did it ban child labour, or 2,4-D and other lethal
insecticides which cause birth defects and death," he said.
"The average life expectancy of these farm workers is 49 years,"
said Burgess.
"When the workers realized that the teamsters were doing
nothing but taking fees off the top of their wages, and that they had no
right to strike for five years, they struck illegally."
A Salinas court judge then served an injunction against the UFW,
saying that it was a jurisdictional dispute. Strikes were again outlawed,
and local leader Cesar Chavez was sent to jail.
"Vested interest could clearly be seen in this case also," said
Burgess.
"Bud An tie, one of the growers, owns a ranch with Dow
Chemicals. It is in Dow's interest that the farm workers do not outlaw
the insecticides which Dow produces."
The Salinas court injunction was overruled by the California
Supreme Court, but this still cannot force the Teamsters to get out of
the contract because the farm workers are not covered by labor laws, he
said.
"The only power that the farm workers have is to set up an
international boycott of lettuce not produced under fair contract,"
said Burgess.
'There are three types of lettuce in the stores," said Burgess.
"Sixty-five percent has the Teamster stamp on it, and 10 percent
has no signed contract. These are the ones to avoid.
'Twenty-five percent has been produced under fair United Farm
Workers' contract, and is not being boycotted," said Burgess.
FRIDAY
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Three speakers discuss topic "We
want jobs" at 1208 Granville St. at
8:00 p.m. also a meeting held in SUB
lounge with Phil Cornoyer speaking
on "Help defend Quebec's political
prisioners,"  at  noon.  Free.
ECO
Annual  meeting  at  noon  in  Bio-Sci.
2000.  All welcome.
LEFT CAUCUS
Unemployment protest meeting in Bu.
202 at noon.
UBC  NDP
.   Executive   meeting   in   SUB   212A   at
noon.
UBC LIBERAL CLUB
Meeting with speaker Gordon Gibson
in SUB 119 at noon.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Meeting to discuss "Sense or nonsense
of present Canadian economic policy"
in 125 SUB at noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Practice for folk mass in music room
at St. Mark's College at noon.
HILLEL
"A way to the self beyond the ego"
Dr.   Ian  Kent  and  Prof.   William Nicholls will  discuss  their new book I
AMness at Hillel House, at noon. AU
■ welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK CLUB
Pre-marital counselor to answer ques
tions.   All   interested   come   to   SUB
10SA at noon.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN  FELLOWSHIP
Meeting in SUB Party room at noon.
SATURDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Celebration — Hugo Blanco freed at
1208 Granville St.  at 8.00 p.m.
CHINESE  VARSITY   CLUB
Wine   and   Cheese    Party   in   Clubs
Lounge in SUB.  8-12 p.m.  Come  and
celebrate Chinese New Year.
'tween
classes
LEFT CAUCUS
Meeting with John Young speaking in
Bu.  106 at 8 p.m.
SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
Harry Rankin will lead discussion
group on Vancouver political scene
in Union College Reception Rm. at
8 p.m.
NEWMAN CLUH	
Folk Mass at St. Mark's College
Chapel at 11:30 a.m.
MONDAY
VARSITY   DEMOLAY  CLUB
Meeting at SUB at noon.
EL   CIRCULO
Conversation   and   music   at   International House Rm.  402 at noon.
WOMEN'S  LIB ALLIANCE
Help  win  free   abortion   on  demand.
Attend    this    planning    meeting    to
build Feb. 13-14 cross-Canada protest."
SUB Rm. 117 at noon.
TUESDAY
PRE-DENTAL SOC.
Guest speaker Dr. Thordarson speaks
on Periodontics in SUB  113 at noon.
COMMERCE   U.S.
Finance option: Find out how to win
the world. Angus 410 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
ECO
"Vietnam — The Ecology of War"
Bu. 106 at noon with speaker Dr.
Orians of University of Washington.
TEAM CLUB
Identity Crises will be discussed at
noon in SUB III. AU welcome.
THURSDAY
COMMERCE   SEMINAR  COMMITTEE
Buy your ticket to "Green Door"
Monday-Thursday at noon in Angus.
Meeting at noon today.
SIFIED
1 day $1.00; 2 day. $1.75.
additional fines 30c; 4 days pries of 3.
tqt*phone and are payable in advance.'
BUOQv Dfahr. at BJtX, Vmeowtr 9, JCUC.
thm) dkxy oofora jpojwnMiBlPM>
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost fe Found
13
THE DEVIL, GOT THE GIRL.! SO,
what is "Rosemary's Baby?" Find
out in the SUB Auditorium Friday and Saturday 7:00 & 9:30,
Sunday 7:00. AMS Card Holders
50c.
LOST   GOLD   CHAIN   BRACELET,
will give reward. 736-0831.
Rides & Car Pools
14
STUDENT AND KID DESPER-
ately need ride to campus from
7th and Larch, 9:00 Wed.'s (10:00
other morning's). Please phone
738-3917 if you can help even one
morning.   Remuneration.
BLIND STUDENT WANTS RIDE
to and from Kerrisdale area. 5338
Cypress St. $20.00 per mo. Phone
Jeannie  Wright,   266-9023.
NEED   A   RIDE?   CONTACT   MR.
Tsang after 6  p.m.  738-6959.
Special Notices
15
THE TAURUS SPA, 1233 HORNBY
St. 687-1915. Guys only. Special
student rates. Best facilities.
TAKE A SKI BREAK — SKI
Whistler. Stay Alpine Lodge,
dorms or s/c cabins. Full facilities.
Amer. plan, available. Ratesj 13.00
& up. Ph. (112) 932-5280. Write
Apline Lodge, Garibaldi Station,
Garibaldi, B.C.
Photography
34
Scandals
37
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
WANTED: INTERESTED MUSI-
cians to form stage band to play
Jazz, Rock, etc. Phone Jamie,
988-7216.
FIRESIDE: ALDERMAN HARRY
Rankin will speak on Vancouver
and its politics. Union College
Reception Room (on Campus) 8:00
p.m.  Sunday January 31.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN — 1345
687-2855; 224-0087; 687-1244.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED TWO FRIDAY TICKETS
to Endgame in exchange for Sat-
urday's. Phone Frank at 879-1303.
AUTOMOTIVE
ALL. TYPES OF OFFICE WORK
can be done by Senior Secretary
now housebound. 732-6081.
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC., DONE
Quickly, Neatly and Efficiently.
30* per page. Phone 224-0385 after
5 p.m.
ESSAYS    AND     THESES     TYPED.
Experienced    Typist,    Electric
Typewriter.   731-8096.        	
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERVICE. Theses, essays, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.  Troche,  437-1355.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
CaU Mrs.  Ellis,   321-3838.
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED
neatly, accurately, 25f per page.
Carol Tourgis,   733-3197.
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates. Phone 263-5317.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST —ESSAYS
and thesis. Electric typewriter.
Mrs. A. Treacy — 738-8794.
STUDENTS! I WILL TYPE YOUR
term papers. Reasonable rates.
CaU Yvonne — 738-6874.
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPING.
IBM electric. 350 page. Call after
noon:  733-4708.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSIONAL
Typing Service IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone:
228-9304—30* per page.
EMPLOYMENT
Tutoring
64
WANTED TUTOR FOR GRADE 11
Chem. and Grade 12 Math student
in  West  Vane.   Phone  922-6592.
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3  p.m.
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & grammar, by qualified
ex-university teacher — native
speaker, group & quantity discounts.  Eves.   731-0156.
CHRISTMAS RESULTS Disappointing? Register at UBC tutoring centre and find some help.
Qualified tutors in over 50 subject
areas. SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-2
p.m. weekdays.	
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SONY TC-200 STEREO TAPE RE-
corder. 3—1800' tapes. Very little
use.   $200.00.   Pete  at 731-8625.
GIBSON FALCON AMP AND COV-
er. Good condition. Cost $315.00.
I   want   $200.00.   Pete   at   731-8625.
SONY TC860 TAPE RECORDER; 2
yrs. old, like new condition; $100.
Phone  Peter,   732-7820.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Help Wanted
51
Automobiles For Sale
21
>6 INT. TRAVELALL, V8, P.S.,
4 speed, radio, rebuilt R.E. and
brakes.   298-1996.
'69 V.W. WESTPHALIA CAMPER.
Sleeps family of 5. 19,500 miles.
Still  under warranty.   937-5873.
'53 ZEPHYR. GOOD TRANSPOR-
tation. $55.00. Phone 266-6672 or
266-2648.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care ft Baby Sitting    32A
WATCH "ROSEMARY'S BABY"!
With Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes in the SUB Auditorium,
Friday and Saturday 7:00 & 9:30,
Sunday 7:00. AMS Card Holders
50c.
GENERAL ARTISTS SECRETARY.
She must know what she is doing. Must be versatile. All appreciable inquiries appreciated. Benefits $250.00 per month and travel
to all parts of the world. Please
send letter with qualifications to
P.O. Box 136, North Vancouver,
B.C.
LOOKS FOR A STUDENT WHO
can give skating lessons to a ten-
year-old girl. Preferably a female.
But male student may apply.
$2.00 one lesson. Contact 228-9158
Batts.
BACK TO SCHOOL MEANS
extra expenses. Need extra income? Investigate SARAH COVENTRY OPPORTUNITIES. Call
946-2258.
EIGHT ATTRACTIVE GIRLS RE-
quired at two-day demonstration
of professional photographic lighting equipment. Call Mr. Wood at
228-4771   (U.B.C.   Photo   Dept.)
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
GRADE 12 GIRL AT ERIC HAM-
ber needs a tutor for Chem. 12.
Phone  (eves.)  JYinet,  874-0798.
VERY ATTRACTIVE PRIVATE
room. 4th and Alma. Private entrance. Share bathroom and kitchen.   228-9228   after   5:00.
ROOM FOR RENT, MALE, PRIV.
ent., priv. bath. 1% blocks from
campus. Prefer third or fourth
year. $40.00, 224-6389.
STUDENT TO SHARE BASEMENT
with same. Jt'tchen, living room,
private entrance, $55 per month.
224-6686.
Room & Board
82
QUIET, PRIVATE, FOR 1 GIRL.
Phone 224-3693 or visit 2425 Tolmie St. (1 block to U. Gates on
8th).	
MEN ONLY. LARGE CARPETED
rooms. Good food. Color TV. Large
social areas. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Manager, 224-9620.
GUYS! YOUNG COUPLE WITH
large home. Linen, great meals.
Days 266-6206,  eves.  224-4496.
Furnished Apts.
83
MALE 3rd OR 4th YEAR TO
share large suite with two others,
rent $58.  3527 W.  1st.	
ROOM - MATE REQUIRED. PREF.
male 4th yr. or grad student. Own
bedroom, nr. MacDonald & 4th.
75.00  mo.   Avail,  immedi.   224-0073.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.       86
BECOME 4th MALE ROOMMATE
in large house, available Immediately. Location: 57th & Oak.
Phone 263-4990 after 6:00 p.m. .

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