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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1965

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Array One   will
be   queen
HOMECOMING week's festivities will be capped by crowning one of these appealing coeds as Queen at Homecoming
Ball Sept. 30. Activities kick
off Monday.
Vol.  XLVIII,   No.   15   VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   THURSDAY,  OCTOBER 21,   1965
CA 4-3916
Referendum
will decide
march fate
By STUART GHAY
The Alma Mater Society announced Wednesday a
referendum would be held at UBC Monday to see if students are in favor of a protest march Wednesday.	
AMS president Bryon Hen
AMS   PRESIDENT   Byron   Hender  zealously tears   down   poster   promoting   unsanctioned
protest march  being  organised   by an  ad   hoc committee of students.
McGill and Marianapolis
may withdraw from CUS
der, said Wednesday the decision was reached after he had
taken a poll of several AMS
councillors.
"We are setting the minimum required turnout at
3,000," said Hender.
"A 51 percent student majority will be necessary to get
AMS approval of the march
on National Student Day."
The march plan was originated by the AMS sponsored
Education Action Program headed by AMS vice presidents
Peter Braund and Bob Cruise.
The march was later vetoed
by student council, but was
renewed this week by the ad
hoc March of Concern Committee, which is not sponsored
by the AMS.
Randy Enomoto, spokesman
for the committee, said "We
are opposed to the referendum
because it forces a decision on
the students before students are
aware of the issues involved."
"The problem with student
council is that it has been" alienated from the student body."
"We believe that a forced
referendum is to push the student body rather than lead it."
Publicity battle is on
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
student councils of McGill
University and Marianapolis
College have voted to seek
membership in the Union Gen-
erale Des Etudiants Du Quebec at the union's next congress Oct. 28-30.
The decisions, taken Oct. 13
at McGill and Oct. 19 at Marianapolis, could result in the
withdrawal of the two schools
from the Canadian Union of
Students in the immediate
future.
Student leaders at three
other English language institutions are considering following the initiative.
Sir George Williams University not presently in either
CUS or UGEQ, set up a committee Oct. 20 to consider
membership in either student
union.
The constitution of UGEQ
prohibits its members belonging to another national union
of students.
Unless the union is willing
to drop this rule, all English
language universities in Quebec could be forced to choose
between CUS and UGEQ.
UGEQ was founded last
fall, after Quebec's three
French language universities
withdrew from CUS. The 55,-
000 member union brings together university students,
classical colleges, technical
schools, and teachers' colleges.
The march is scheduled to
start at Sunset Beach and end
at the Bayshore Inn where the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada is meeting.
Meanwhile, the ad hoc committee's posters publicizing the
fee protest march are being
removed.
The posters are being torn
down by AMS officials and
members of he Circle K club.
IThe club has an agreement
with the AMS to help enforce
the policy of allowing only
AMS approved posters on campus bulletin boards.
This policy is designed to
stop free commercial advertising on campus.
Gabor Mate, a member of
the March of Concern Committee,   said   Wednesday   this
policy also squashes "freedom
of expression."
"When we aproached AMS
coordinator Graeme Vance, to
get permission to publicize the
march, they immediately refused".
"They wouldn't even look at
the posters," he said.
"Because we are against
AMS opinion, the AMS won't
let us put up the posters," said
Mate.
Gary Taylor, another member of the committee, agreed
with Mate.
He said, "The AMS harbours
only one view and they refuse
to recognize ours".
"Hender doesn't know what
the average student thinks,"
said Taylor.
NURSES PLAN TO ENGINEER UPSET
By KATHY HYDE
Nursing types plan to turn
the tables noon today and
wipe out the home ec girls at
the annual Tea Cup Game in
the stadium.
Home ec has sewed up the
annual game, which bears a
remarkable similarity to football, for the 'last two years.
But the dauntless nurses
have been practising for
weeks and are hoping for a
victory this year.
The reason for their recent
failures given by Art Stevenson, Engineering Undergraduate Society president.
"The nurses are only on
campus in their first and
fourth years and cannot keep
their team in shape like the
home ec girls."
Engineers will lead a cheering section for the nurses at
the game.
At half time, engineers and
sciencemen will race around
the track in Ben Hur chariots.
Les Porter, science II, said
science has a secret weapon
with which the black tide will
crush the big Red.
"If all else fails, science
shall cheat dirtier," said Porter.
Another noon event is a
cross-country   race   in   which
all fraternity pledges must
run but which is open to anybody.
Stevenson said, "If beer or
wine is available there will be
a boat race between four EUS
types and four members of
The Ubyssey."
Admission to the game is by
donation and all proceeds will
go to the Crippled Children's
Hospital. Page .2,
T.H E   .  U B Y SSiE.Y.
Thursday, October  21, 1965
REALLY RELAXED, Realist editor Paul Krassner puts down
pope, pills and Viet Nam war in auditorium speech Wednesday to  600 UBC  students.
DO YOU WANT
A protest group
to call your own
By DOUG HALVERSON
If you feel left out of life because you don't have a
protest group to call your own, things will look up Oct. 27.
Oct. 27 is National Students
Day when all universities
across the country are supposed to demonstrate in some
way their concern over the
rising barriers to higher education.
At UBC students have two
ways to show their concern.
They can march on the Bay-
shore Inn with the ad hoc
March of Concern Committee
or hand out leaflets at Vancouver shopping centers with the
Alma Mater Society's Education Action Program.
. The idea of students distributing pamphlets to shoppers
was put forward as a motion
1 to student council Monday
night by grad students president George Wootten to replace the EAP planned march
which student council scraped
Oct. 11.
Noon hour rally
The march has since been
taken over by a non-AMS
March of Concern Committee.
The official AMS agenda for
the day will start with a noon
hour rally.
Tentative plans are for speakers from each federal political party to give a seven minute speech on five or six questions pertaining to the education crisis.
A Canadian Union of Students representative will give
CUS' view.
AMS march
Following the rally, an official delegation of undergraduate society heads, faculty representatives, student representatives and student heads
from other B.C. universities
and high schools will march to
the Bayshore where the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada will be
meeting. The offical delegation
will seek an audience with the
administrative group and ask
for a speaker on higher education.
Pamphlets
After the rally the mass of
students will be sent out to
shopping centers to distribute
pamphlets out-lining the Education Action Program.
George Wootten said that in
this way the public that was
not downtown to see the officials would still be made
aware.
Meanwhile students n o t
wanting to travel to the shopping centers will be able to
march in the AMS outlawed
march, leaving Sunset Beach
at 2:30 p.m. and following the
official AMS delegation to the
Bayshore.
Realist editor rambles
from pope to B.C. pills
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
Pope Paul barely made the
scene Wednesday.
Paul Krassner, editor of the
New York magazine The Realist, came to campus to tell UBC
students whether success would
spoil Pope Paul.
The pope was mentioned.
"As you know, Pope Paul went
to the United States specifically to forgive Arthur Goldberg
for killing Christ.
"But nothing I can say about
the Pope's visit will equal in
absurdity what really happened
in New York."
In the broadcast of the pope's
visit, said Krassner: "Each network had its resident priest.
"In Yankee Stadium Pope
Paul was heading down the
third base line, then he went
out to right field. I expected to
hear that Cardinal Gushing was
warming up in the bullpen.
"When he got up I expected
him to say to the capacity
crowd: 'B-24, 1-13' — and someone from the back of the stands
to stand up and yell 'bingo'."
Krassner hit a variety of
topics in his rambling hour-
and-a-half speech to 600 students in the auditorium.
Some of his comments:
On four-letter words: "Every
four-letter word ever used in
The Realist was used because
it was apt."
Industry
needs more
graduates
The shortage of graduate
students to fill positions in the
nation's industry is causing concern among industrial firms.
The October issue of the Imperial Oil Review says 3,220
jobs were offered to 2,427
science and engineering students at the University of Toronto last year.
This disparity has helped
raise the level of starting salaries offered by an average of
three percent says the Review.
Every year, it said, swarms of
recruiters from business descend on universities seeking
fresh talent.
One recruiter said, "If you
really want a man, you give
$5 extra for summer experience, even $5 for just graduating. Then, to make sure you've
got him, you add another $5
for his curly hair."
The Review said public
utilities and the civil service
capitalize on youthful idealism
and others try to take advantage of the popularity of their
particular products.
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE  FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
On protest campaigns: "I got
a button in the mail saying
'equality for homosexuals'. I
wore it once on a crowded bus
and got a seat."
On birth-control, referring
to the controversy at UBC:
"The philosophy behind not
giving pills out to unmarried
girls seems to be that if they
don't have them, they won't,
rather than where there's a
will there's a way."
On signs at UBC: "I saw a
sign advertising a lecture
'heterosexual sex is for keeps'.
The implication is that homosexual sex is for lends."
On consistency: "I like people
who were against capital punishment for Caryl Chessman to
have been against capital punishment for Adolf Eichmann."
On non-violence: "I am willing to die in the cause of self-
defence. Other than that I'm
non-violent."
On U.S. President Lyndon
Johnson's operation: "The real
reason Johnson had his gallstones out was to end the New
York newspaper strike. He
knew how anxious they were
to report trivia.
"But just imagine if he'd had
hemorrhoids?"
On protests against hydro
and telephone companies:
"Punch another hole in your
billing card. That's the lowest
form of protest."
On Viet Nam: "You have to
stop the brutality and inhumanity before you think up an alternative. A kid who has just
been burned out of his village
doesn't care about a teach-in.
We have really become callous
in the United States."
On Viet Cong strategy:
"They hide when the bombers
come."
Canada needs Communists
—Kashtan tells us so
Do you know why Canada needs Communists in
parliament?
If not, William Kashtan, federal leader of the Communist party of Canada will have the answer for you today
at noon in Bu. 106.
He is sponsored by the UBC Communist club. An
informal reception will be held later at International House.
Some companies say
bachelor graduates
are a dime a dozen.
We dOn't. Because we
are involved in almost every phase of economic
life in Canada, we're looking for men with a
broad outlook. Consequently, we don't restrict
ourselves by any means to graduates with
specialized backgrounds.
Banking has become both a highly competitive
and fast-changing business. The Royal Bank's
decentralized operations provide many
active management positions to men of diverse
inclinations and talents.
We'll be on campus soon. Meanwhile, why not
have a word with your placement officer today?
ROYAL BANK Thursday,  October  21,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
WOULD-BE PRESIDENT GETS SAWDUST SEND-OFF
—powell  hargrave  photos
If IRS T FEATHERS, then 15
pounds of sawdust shower
republican candidate for
Canadian      presidency      in
i auditorium Tuesday. UBC
grad Peter Baxter, seeking
presidential nomination in
Comox-Alberni riding for
Nov. 8 election, said
he wanted an attention-
getting campus reception.
Special events impressario
Murray Farr (backstage, ]
left) obliged.
AT REGINA
Student day
protest to hit
housing lack
LONDON (CUP) — A lack
of residences, now a major
student concern at the University of Western Ontario, will
be a focal point of protest
there on National Student Day
Wednesday.
The existing severe shortage of residential accomodation has produced a "serious
problem to find housing for
this year's enrolment", according to a student council report.
This shortage will be aggravated when an estimated 1,340
more students in 1970 join the
3,570 now forced to seek off-
campus accomodation, since
only 956 new residence places
are planned for the next four
years.
The report says the increasing demand for private housing has already caused rents
in private homes- and apartments to rise this year.
An editorial in the campus
newspaper, The Gazette, complains that many students have
been forced to rent on the
outskirts of London, an hour's
bus ride from the campus.
University President G. E.
Hall has indicated that residence fees would likely be
raised at least $100 next year
to pay for more student accomodation on campus.
Viet views caused
ouster, editor says
REGINA   (CUP)   — The editor of the University of
Saskatchewan newspaper has charged he was fired because
of his editorial policy on Viet Nam.
Students' Representative
Last voting list chance
offered out-ot~towners
The last chance is here for out-of-town students living
in UBC residences to get on the voting list for the Nov. 8
election.
The Court of Revision will be held at St. Anselm's
church on University Blvd. today, Friday and Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. each day.
Council president Graham Kelly said John Conway editor of
The Carillon was dismissed
from the Regina campus position Oct. 15 because of inadequate campus news coverage
and financial mismanagement.
But Conway said he was
fired because SRC disagreed
with the paper's editorial policy on the Viet Nam war.
"I am personally and editorially against the American war
effort and involvement in Viet
Nam and I am willing to argue this on intellectual, moral
and empirical grounds." he
said.
Conway holds a position on
the National Council of the
Student Union for Peace Action.
At a council meeting Oct. 18
Kelly said: "The Carillon has
become the organ of a particular group on campus trying to
use a $6,500 student investment to further its own aims.
"The trouble was that the
information (in the paper) was
coming from sources outside
the campus, mostly American,"
he said.
Kelly said the paper had refused tobacco and liquor advertisements "because tobacco
and liquor were dangerous to
health".
He  said   the  refusal  would
have caused the paper to cease
publication for financial reasons, before mid-November.
The paper used $2,200 of its
$7,650 budget in its first month
of publication.
Canadian University Press
has appointed two representatives to investigate Conway's
dismissal.
They are the editor of the
University of Manitoba paper,
The Manitoban, and a representative of The Gauntlet, University of Alberta at Calgary
newspaper.
b Grad Photographs
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Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THUSDAY, OCT. 21, 1965
"The tigers ot wrath are wiser than the horses
ot instruction." -Wm. Blake.
Referendum
It takes a certain special kind of AMS council to
admit it might have been wrong.
r    It's true the AMS waffled all over the landscape in
/ deciding to oppose the march of concern to the Bayshore
I next Wednesday. It's true they passed the thing at an
emergency meeting Oct. 11 and then shafted the march
\pnce and for all at a regular meeting the following night.
It's true they've been guilty of the most petty kind
of bureaucratic red tapism in trying to prevent the ad
hoc march group from putting up posters and literature
about the march.
But despite all this, it takes a certain special kind of
AMS council to admit their once-and-for-all decision
might have been just-a-bit hasty.
And now they've decided to call a referendum on
the march.
Mind you, this doesn't mean council is showing
the enthusiasm demonstrated at Victoria, Montreal,
Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax or St. John's.
There, the student governments have already decided National Student Day shouldn't go by without a
tangible display of student concern over higher education.
Last Monday, council tried to sluff off organizing
anything by adopting some vague plan about having
interested students pass out a few pamphlets in shopping
centre parking lots.
Their new plan still gives them an easy out, of
course. If, say, 3,000 students are interested enough in
the problem to vote in favor of marching, and 4,000
don't, then obviously council can claim student opinion
is against any march.
And often human nature makes people vote against
doing anything out of a sort of innate lethargy, as
council knows.
"If we said there would be a. march, there would
be one," sniffed one AMS official in considering the
referendum idea. "But we just don't choose to hold one."
Okay. But now council is giving the campus at
large a chance to express its opinion. With the proponents of the march muffled by bureaucratic regulations, with no direction from nominal student leaders,
with the voting scheduled for two days before the
march, the referendum is on.
But vote, anyway.
IN THE EAR
■>c?
&-|WHKRW<X3LM
Thisis Byron Blunder.
He likes to sit.
He doesrft like to walk.
Colour hhnyellow.
Yellow is nice and inoffensive,
I^^Ms-.-t^^M^^SSt^
BAXTER BARKS
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Many thanks to you and to
Special Events as well for
pulling in a fairly reasonable
crowd and for the improptu
stunt.
It was excellent and I appreciate it very- much. Thank
you.
Now, if I can have a grim-
faced, serious sort of consideration from you, plus SFA,
say, the nominations will flow
if the boys and girls get a
straight pitch.
Now, The Ubyssey gets all
serious about some nut throwing a bomb in a post office
box in Montreal and so please
give me the same serious
treatment as far as possible
for the sake of the nominations.
Give them a chance to feel
responsible over  nominating
me.
Let them decide on their
own but give them a good
atmosphere. I can play it
straight as well and until I
get 25 nominations at least—
and there's not much time. I
must get them by Friday
noon.
I hope to get them Friday
noon, and once in the bag, the
Engineers can pull off a real
stunt and throw me off the
high board at Empire Pool.
PETER BAXTER
Mr. Baxter, who is running
for president of Canada, needs
25 nominations in order to
contend the Comox-Alberni
riding for the Republican
party. During his speech at
UBC Tuesday, he was bombarded with 10 pounds of
feathers,   and   15   pounds   of
sawdust.—Ed. note.
•      •      •
REDS REPLY
Editor, The Ubyssey, Six:
I wish to correct any false
impressions which may have
arisen from the statement in
"This Week has 2 Columns"
that Jerry LeBourdais is a
"Communist candidate" in
Vancouver East for the Nov.
8 election.
The Communist party of
Canada is fielding two candidates in the Greater Vancouver area, Bill Stewart is
seeking elections in Vancouver South, and Charles Caron
in Coast-Capilano.
Mr. LeBourdias is not a
member of the C.P.C. and is
not running for the C.P.C.
RON FORKIN
Arts III
Student Communist Club
:>+j'*w-2i«~"*z.
BY IAN CAMERON
It's irresponsible! Let's stab Cruise
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News   Hon Rlter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City       Richard   Blair
Photo —   Bert   MacKinnon
Sports . Ed  Clark
Ass't News .._   D?n  "ullen
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
Asst City Al   Donald
Page Friday   John  Kelsey
Managing     Norm   Betts
Features Mike Bolton
CUP Don   Hull
Party details now in Ubyssey
office. Working Wednesday were
Rosemary Hyman, Kathy Hyde,
Bruce Benton, Pat Hrushowy, Susan Gransby, Joan Pogarty, Sheila
Dobson, Fearon (blade) Whitney,
Smart Gray, Peggy I-don't-re-
member-your-surname, sorry, Betty Lebedoff, Kriss Emmott, and
Anne Slipper. I hope and pray
that's all, but I'm bloody sure it
isn't.
Students on this campus
this year have a marvelous opportunity to see a figure that
is almost extinct today: a real,
live, walking talking scapegoat.
And the ironic part of the
deal is that this particular
scapegoat got the position by
trying to help
the people
who are
throwing
rocks at him.
Just so you
won't be held
i n suspense,
the name this
s c a p e g Oat
used to go by (before it was
changed to mud) is Bob Cruise.
Cruise's story is typical. He
graduated from the kindergarten   of  UBC   bureaucrats,
CAMERON
Magee High, and, as does every
would be success in the Vancouver law scene, got involved in as many committees
as possible at UBC.
Moving swiftly up the ladder of success, he became
chairman of various committees, then Arts treasurer, and,
finally, the holder of the exalted position of AMS first
vice-president. Then, during
the summer, he somehow got
in on a committee dedicated
to the proposition that education should be available to
all, later known as EAP.
•      •      •
One minor move proposed
by this committee was that
there should be a march to the
the Bayshore Inn to show that
the students at UBC are concerned about fees.
As   time   passed,   however,
this march became more important, and started taking more
time and more space, until
finally the AMS, peturbed by
the publicity received by
what they considered an irresponsible move, said they
would not back it.
This led to formation of an
animal called an 'ad hoc' committee, which is a reverse
medusa, in that it has many
heads with the body of a
snake. This particular snake
saw a good chance to get out
and wow the proles by marching.
Then it called Cruise and
said, "Say, Bob, we'd like
your help with this march."
So Cruise, being a responsible member of the AMS
council, (as responsible as any
AMS type is), said no go.
So  the   committee  decided
he was giving them a run-
around. So somehow the word
got around ihat Cruise was
behind them all the way. So
council became perturbed and
told him to cut it out. Which
he couldn't do, not being involved in the first place.
•      •      •
So now everyone is convinced that Cruise is a backbiting no good, that he hasn't
got the courage of his own
convictions, and that he
doesn't really care what happens torhis brain child, the
EAP. This last also makes him
a poor father, which is the
only thing worse in our
society than a poor mother.
So there you are. From nice
guy to bum in one easy step,
courtesy of your friendly local
committeemen. Thursday,  October  21,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FORECRO UND
Ex-military cops, RCM cowboys,
control campus  traffic, crime
By GORDON McLAUGHLIN
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
The University Patrol was
formed in September of 1962,
when the need for more than
just tow-truck supervision and
traffic control was recognized.
The Patrol consisted of 16
patrolmen in 1962, and now
has 19.
The University Patrol works
with the RCMP in all aspects
of university security and
traffic control. Its duties run
24 hours,a day.
The Patrol is financed from
the parking fee paid by students, faculty and staff at
UBC, and from money from
the university administration.
of justice.
The work of the Patrol has
reduced the towing bill at
UBC from $12,000 a year, to
about $1,000.
Qualifications for patrol officer are grade ten education
or better, height over 5'9",
and age between 40 and 50.
Assistant supervisor John
Kelly says the ideal person is
someone with considerable experience in the military police;
a person with sufficient experience to command respect.
Director Sir Ouvry Roberts
sees no future for the Patrol
as a policing force.
"The students are our responsibility, but we do not
mete out punishment. The
AMS has the responsibility
for student offences, and the
RCMP handles any criminal
offences," said Sir Ouvry.
The University Patrol investigates any incidents on
UBC and involving UBC faculty, staff or property. It is
responsible for the security of
buildings and protection of
UBC property.
• •      •
All these duties are in addition to traffic control.
The Patrol averages 1,200
traffic warnings, 1,000 offence
notices, and 25 car impoundments a month.
The Patrol investigates ar
average of 39 incidents a
month, including auto accidents, theft, breaking and entering, property damage and
miscellahous  complaints.
There are about seven incidents of property damage a
month, and each involves
about $200 dollars for replacement of damaged property.
The Patrol answers about
10 emergencies per month.
Each Patrol officer is a fully
qualified member of the St.
John's Ambulance Corps.
In addition to the duties of
security and investigation the
Patrol is involved in fire calls,
lost and found property, the
transportation of money on
campus.
Traffic office policy dc-
not allow offender to appeal a
fine until after it is paid. And
the appeal must be in writing
to Sir Ouvry.
• •     •
Assistant   supervisor   Kelly
said the criminal element at
UBC is practically nil.
"Theft of purses and wallets at UBC are not done by
students," Kelly said.  "They
are people from off campus.
We apprehended two last year
and turned them over to the
RCMP."
Kelly said the University
Patrol gets good suggestions
from students. "If there is a
way around something, the
students are the first to show
us," he said.
The RCMP detachment at
Point Grey consists of six officers and a stenographer.
This detachment is responsible for a population of about
30,000 people, most of it transient.
An RCMP spokesman said
that thefts are difficult to investigate at UBC because of
the mobile population.
"It is like 20,000 people at a
football game. If there is a
theft, where do you start to
investigate?"
The spokesman said there
is little or no bad behavior on
campus.
The RCMP work closely
with the University Patrol in
any incidents on campus involving security, traffic, or
theft, he said.
DISSENT:
Ubyssey forgets
certain facts'
By PETER HYNDMAN
President, Law Students Association
Criticizing The Ubyssey is suicide. So here goes—because
it is about time that someone went to bat for Byron Hender.
A PILE-UP last winter, one of the many over the year, is promptly attended to by the
efficient members of the university RCMP datachment.
The Ubyssey appears to be
suffering from a severe case
of selective amnesia. By presenting only parts of the story
on the Education Action Program — overplaying or underplaying them accordingly —
there is now widespread confusion and misunderstanding.
The absurd result is that
your student council must
now spend more of your money
to buy advertising space in
your newspaper (which is published in the first place with
your money) to outline a policy
which has been adopted in accordance with your views.
Ubyssey impression: Student council, a bunch of gutless somnambulists, peremptorily squashed the poular idea
of a protest march into downtown Vancouver.
• •      •
Fact: After hours of debate
at several meetings, council
opposed the march on the basis
of a sampling taken by faculty
representatives of their students — which revealed that
almost all students were adamantly opposed to a march.
Ubyssey impression: A widely supported "March for Concern" Committee has sprung
up to fill the aching void left
by council.
Fact: This "group of seven"
sent a letter to council urging
such a march since it would
be "a participatory experience
for all those students willing
to manifest their conviction in
a coherent, tangible act . . .
And broad participation, we
feel, is the basis of the democratic process".
• •      •
Council's reply was to invite
the seven to participate in the
major programme of door-to-
door canvassing (unreported)
adopted by council as the most
effective means of presenting
the case for higher education
to the public. The canvassing
would provide the "participatory experience" sought by the
seven.
However, so far the seven
have been reluctant to help.
Ulterior motive?
Also unreported toy The Ubyssey was evidence raised at
council indicating that a small
self-appointed committee o f
students on campus has apparently tried (1) to misappropriate AMS funds for unauthorized printing, (2) to illegally
canvass students for funds, and
(3) to misrepresent the AMS
to B.C. Labor Council.
It's about time for some fair
and accurate reporting. The
first function of The Ubyssey
should be one of service to the
student body. Freedom of the
press is one thing. Politics is
quite  another.
What ho, ad hoc!
Three questions:
By GRAEME VANCE
AMS co-ordinator
This column has three questions. •
In the interests of being informed, I asked myself three
questions.
Being unable to find the
answers I make the following
observations. All students may
•be prompted to do the same.
1. Who is represented by this
ad hoc committee ? So far
no tangible evidence has
been produced to show
that 'thousands' of students :
want to march t
Undoubtedly many stu- -
dents are concerned about
the questions of higher ed,
but no evidence that they
wish to manifest this concern in a march is visible.
In fact, rather, than being
representative, this committee represents a very
close-knit hard core of
opinion.
A second AMS councillor
moved to put pen to paper by
the current march-or-not question, is AMS co-ordinator
Graeme Vance. He claims his
comments do not represent
council's opinion, but his own.
Most members have been
active in picketing the
bookstore, S.N.C.C, End
the War in Vietnam Committee, etc.
2.1s this Committee willing
to devote the time and effort on the less glamorous
task of 'hoeing the long
row' on the way to equal
opportunity for all ?
Do they intend to make a
big play for one day and
then retire from the scene
and return to their other
diverse activities.
3. If   question   2   is   in   the
affirmative, why have we
not   seen   any   evidence,
printed or oral, on the way
in   which   you   intend   to
handle   National   Student
Day    and    the    program
ahead.
Why have you not accepted
the offer of student council to
print  in  this  paper free  of
charge,  your views on the issues involved in N.S.D. and the
EAP.
Surely no fairer way could
be found to inform the student
body that there is a minority
group concerned over a vital
issue, and to present these
views to the student for his own
decision.
It seems that there have been
enough red herrings dragged
across the path of the real
issues at stake in the EAP.
Gentlemen,   no   effort   has
been    made    to    provide    an
answer to any of these questions.
Why? Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21, 1965
Special AMS Referendum
YOUR DECISION IS NEEDED
MONDAY, OCTOBER 25th
Do you support the organized
program of action for National
Students Day as outlined by
your Student's Council, or a
mass march from Sunset Beach? Thursday, October 21, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
SUPPORT
National Student Day
WEDNESDAY.   OCTOBER   27th
1.
PURPOSES
l.To publicize the principle of universal ace
secondary education. This principle was d
Congress at Lennoxville, Quebec as the r
to post-secondary.
2. To publicize our demands to the Board o
1964-65 level, i.e, that the present fee incr
has still not publicly answered our reques
August, 1965.
3. To publicize our desire of getting a comm
the University Administration for a polic
ultimate elimination.
essibility or equal opportunity to post
efined by the Canadian Union of Students'
emoval of all financial and social barriers
f Governors of a return of tuition fees to the
ease be considered as temporary. The Board
t since the presentation of the AMS Brief in
ittment from the Provincial Government and
y of reducing tuition  fees With a view to
PROGRAMME
DELEGATION  AND   BRIEF  TO  MEETING   OF   UNIVERSITY
PRESIDENTS  AT   BAYSHORE   INN.
The following have been invited to form the delegation:
STUDENT COUNCIL S.F.U. FACULTY
UNDERGRAD SOCIETY EXECUTIVES U. VICTORIA FACULTY
U.B.C. FACULTY B.C.I.T.
LOWER MAINLAND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT COUNCIL PRES.
Presentation of Brief: "The Case for the Elimination of Tuition  Fees."
2.   FORUM - ARMOURIES - NOON
TOPIC: "Party Stands on Tuitionless Education and Bladen Commission Report."
SPEAKERS: Liberal Dick Hayes Socred to be named
Conservative
NDP
Howard Green Communist William Stewart
Dr. Parkinson CUS vice-president Richard Good
Chairman: Byron Hender
The speakers will answer these questions:
1. Do you think student tuition fees should:
a. increase   proportionately   with  annual   university   operating costs ?
b. remain the same ?
c. be reduced and ultimately eliminated ?
Why?
2. Do you agree with the Bladen Commission's request for
more direct Federal aid to post-secondary institutions?
Will you raise the present $2 per capita grant if elected ?
a. to how much ?
b. and when ?
3. Do you believe that universities should be free from
government interference, even though the government
is providing most of their funds ? If not, how would you
have  this  government control exerted ?
4. To obtain an education, do you think a student should
be forced to go into debt? Why or why not? If so, how
much?
5. If your party favours the Bladen Commission's recommendation of massive increased federal government
assistance to post secondary education by 1966, would
your  party  direct these   monies for  the   purpose   of:
a. covering  university operating  costs?
b. increasing   professors salaries?
c. increasing  capital  investments ?
d. freezing, reducing or eliminating the tuition fee ? In
what order of priority do you place methods of using
this  increased federal  aid ?
3.   COMMUNITY  PAMPHLET  BLITZ
In the afternoon, students will be organized by their undergrad society executives to
distribute to homes and apartments in the Vancouver city area a flyer entitled: WHY ARE
WE CONCERNED?
This flyer will contain: The Whys and Hows of:
1. Purposes of National Student Day, (as outlined above).
2. The trend of increasing fees is affecting both present
and future post-secondary education students.
3. How we students propose to alleviate the problems
brought  about by this increasing  trend.
NOTE:
THESE TWO PAGES WERE INSERTED BY THE AMS TO PRESENT STUDENT COUNCIL POLICY
FOR NATIONAL STUDENT DAY. THE AMS AUOCATED AMPLE SPACE, FREE OF CHARGE,
TO  THE AD  HOC  COMMITTEE,  BUT  THEY HAVE   DECLINED   TO   PRESENT   THEIR   VIEWS. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 21, 1965
IDEAS
AT
LARGE
By NORM BETTS
A question arises in these
times of stress and the fight
for the abolishment of fees.
Where are pickets when the
battle's won?
Who runs the activities for
Joe and Jessie Student during the rest of the year?
How many hours do the
demonstrators work on committees to organize charter
flights, to administer the running of Brock, to raise money
for the crippled children at a
noon-hour football game?
* *     ¥
How many beards do we
count at a football game, supporting a team supposedly representing you?
Was it a Ban-the-Bomb button we saw in the lapel of the
engineer herding the group
of deaf and blind kids around
the campus Saturday last?
At other universities the
same question has to be asked.
At the University of Sask.
was it the 'new student left'
which organized a complete
new bus service for students
and now has it carrying students to the campus more
often and at better prices?
* ¥      *
No. It was the student councils, or those shiny-shirt-and-
tie types we love to bait.
The guys who wash their
necks because it's daily habit
and not just that time of year
again.
They're the guys to whom
you owe so much of your
good time at university, the
guys who organize the dances,
who sweat blood trying to
arrange concerts, speakers
and all the other bumf.
When's the last time you
took your date to a campus
function with thousands of
other guys and found the
whole great show was put on
by the peaceniks and not by
groups of what some of us
call petty bureaucrats, the
guys who actually attend
classes, study and use one hell
of a lot of their own time
working for you?
NEWMAN MASQUE
swing with
Blues Upmen Combo
Fri.. Oct. 29, 8:30  p.m.
(Newman Center)
Couples   1.50
Single   1.00 Costumes
Written to the family at
Home lately? If not
send a few flowers.
FROM
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555   West   Blvd.
AM  1-7271
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.   8th  (at  Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Fearn,
Minister
11 ajn. Morning Service
"THE DEArTH OF GOD"
7:30 p.m. Evening Service
UBC library has
uncommon problem
They  don't  know  how  to  spend
three  million  lonely  dollars
By IAN CAMERON
What would you do with
What would you do with
three million dollars?
Sound like the kind of problem you'd like to have? Believe it or not, the UBC library has just such a problem.
Ernest MacMillan, the lumber magnate, donated $8,000,-
000 to the university, three million of which was earmarked
for the library.
"This has complicated all
plans for expansion that we
have been talking about," said
John Harris, head of the circulation department.
"We no longer know what
we are going to do with re-
guard to the future expansion
either as far as books are
concerned, or space for
books," he continued.
This is probably the only
time in its history the UBC
library has been faced with
this problem. Up to now, the
only problem it has had has
been finding enough money
keep up to the size of the
campus.
And the problem now is
not how to spend the money,
but where to put whatever
the money is spent on.
If the money goes for books,
where  do   they   go?   The  li-
three million dollars?
brary doesn't have enough
space to house all the books
they have now, let alone the
ones they would have if they
have now, let alone the ones
they would have if they
bought another million or so
dollars worth.
And the thought of putting
up another extension is all
right, but where? Unless it's
put off in the boondocks with
Woodward library, in what
used to be C lot.
And on top of all this, no
matter what is done there are
going to be more people to
hire, which means more people to employ, which means
more money out of the admin-
means higher fees, which
means . . .
But these problems will
have to be met, because the
library is one part of the campus that has to expand along
with the size of the student
body. Students can get along
with overcrowding in lectures, inadequate residences,
and poor food, but there isn't
much you can do when there
is an essay due tomorrow
and no books on the subject
on the shelves.
IBM machines  help
At the present time, circulation from all branches of
the library is well over 6,000
books per day. By 1968, this
should be over 10,000. Fortunately, these logistics don't
present as much of a problem
as they would seem to, due
primarily to the 1031 IBM
system that is now being installed as part of the library
system.
The IBM will speed things
up about 400 per cent as far
as borrowers are concerned,
and even more from the library's point of view.
There are, at present, about
70,000 books with the IBM
cards in the pockets, or about
10 per cent of the total. It
seems this aspect of expansion
will cause little concern.
The; new micro-filming process that has recently become
economically feasible, and is
being used more and more
in libraries throughout the
US and Canada, will also
help.
With this process, whole
volumes can be put into space
no larger than that occupied
by one newspaper page, and
a newspaper occupies no more
space  than a postcard.
Unfortunately, this technique presents difficulties of
its own. How do students read
this stuff? Outside of microscopes in place of eyes, a
machine is needed. More
money. More space. And do
you read them at home?
As well as more space for
books, more space for other
things is needed. Study, for
instance. Study conditions are
overcrowded, and some of
the space now extant is unsuitable, being poorly lit,
noisy, and so forth.
Along with the main stacks,
the library has a 7,000 volume
record library, with individual listening booths; a reserve section, where books
specifically required for any
given course are to be found;
a curriculum section in the
education building, where
budding teachers can find
school texts and lesson aids;
the Woodward library, containing medical references; a
Government publications division, a map section, and
other sections covering everything that could possibly be
of interest to any student.
And it also has $3,000,000.
Any suggestions?
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications now available in A.M.S. office
Subject — Commitment and Beyond
Place — Roserio Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Price — $6.50 per person — all inclusive
Date — November 12, 13, 14
Deadline — November 10.
WARMING UP for today's teacup game between nurses
and home ec homewreckers are two nurses: one of
the quarterbacks—the Lions should be so lucky—and the
centre. Game goes at noon today in the stadium . . .
proceeds  to  the  crippled children.
Coming Next Week
R S I T Y     OF
OLUM8IA
STUDENT  TELEPHONE  DIRECTORY
1965 - 1966
Know "Who's Who"
-where they live
-their phone number
- faculty, year, etc.
Only 75c per Copy
All the information you need about
UBC Students
RESERVE  YOUR COPY  TODAY Thursday, October 21, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
A"
You
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70,  1965
LOYOLA C^/—
Vol. «• No- 1
Student
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1965
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VOL. LVI,
1, UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
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, SEPTEMBER 22, 1965, TWELVE PAGES
:iH0l sttdem te,B''Wi/oOWo||
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"f        , OTTTTttJF.KnAY, SEP	
Congress
IS**?* JS^L Protest
\)JirV^ i Day of Awareness To Support
,SfcS Concept of Universal Accessibility
free
90s Page 10
BYSSEY
I
THE
FRAT
RAT
By GORD TAYLOR
Gordon Taylor. Ubyssey
fraternity columnist, writes
another whimsical piece on a
pledge's problems.
Well, I made the fatal step.
I pledged a fraternity. And
now I'm regretting it.
I'm also sleeping less because the favourite sport at
this time of the year is grabbing pledges.
Grabbing? That's when a
few actives say come along
and you don't want to go.
But who can resist as you're
being carried away?
• •      •
I'm now sleeping with one
eye open. Unfortunately it
doesn't work. As soon as my
eyes shut, I dream of beir
grabbed in my sleep to Brockton Point and left there tied
to my bed.
It's not that actives are unfriendly and unobliging.
They'll even leave me a
mickey of rum.
But they won't do anything
if I have a date. I've got a
standing date with my girl for
the next two months.
• •      •
All I have to do is have the
actives phone her and she'll
say we're going out. But I
wonder if they'll swallow this
when they try to grab me at
3 a.m.
I also play volleyball for
the fraternity in the evening
and must leave the gym by
the back door — the actives
you know.
One pledge entered the
showers and we haven't seen
him since.
Now they have come up a
new activity not mentioned
during rushing—work parties.
I'm lucky. All I did last week
was cut the grass with a pair
of scissors.
Strike
splashes
over
Thursday, October 21, 1965
ITS EITHER the nurses or the home ec girls  being   psych'd  up   in   the  Thunderbirds'
dressing   room   for   today's   annual   Teacup Game. Admission to the game, which also
includes the legendary chariot races betwee n engineers and sciencemen, is by donation.
All  proceeds to aid crippled children.
Flash ... or maybe that
should be splash right into a
big vat of beer.
That's right, beer. B-E-E-R.
The long drought is over, and
that lovely pale gold liquid
will soon be sold again.
The beer strike is over.
After an absence of almost
two months and much switching between Rye and Kelowna
Red, the beer-drinking students
can now go back to their favorite haunts for a tall, cool one.
Late Wednesday night, the
brewery workers voted two to
one in favor of returning to
work, effective Friday.
Brewery officials said beer
will be available to the public
Monday.
It may seem like a long time
to wait to go back to the Cecil
and the Arms, but at least
we're going back.
Quebec
by UBC
By SUE GRANSBY
Two UBC students who attended a Canadian travel
seminar in Ontario and Quebec this summer spoke Wednesday noon on separatism in
Quebec.
Sue Wakely, Arts IV, and
Carol Chertkow, Med. I, were
part of a group of 36 Canadian and foreign students who
made the government-financed
tour.
Dr. L. S. F. Upton of the
history department directed
the discussion before 70 students.
Miss Wakely said the Quebec people "were determined
to improve and no longer on
the defensive but on the offensive and, proud."
She feels the struggle has
united the French-Canadians
and made the English-Canadians aware of French Canada.
"Quebec cannot undergo
separation. She would lose
the Canadian market, the
capital of foreigners not wanting to invest in a fledging
state, and her Canadian
image," she said.
She said English Canada
also needs Quebec.
"We have to turn to French
Canada. We needs its mineral
and forest products, and its
culture which is the only culture Canada has."
separatists hit
student tourists
Miss Chertkow said: "Separatism has become a faith to
many French-Canadians. They
don't argue it from the textbook point of view as English-
Canadians do."
"The  world has  outgrown
the type of separate identity
that Quebec wants to maintain."
She said internationalism is
necessary and possible in a
Canada with "few common
ties and no concern for national identity."
Students
heckle
Pearson
FREDERICTON (CUP) —
About 50 university students
heckled Prime Minister Pearson on his arrival here Oct. 15
despite pressure by Liberal
Premier Louis Robichaud to try
to prevent the demonstrations.
When Pearson's plane landed
at the Fredericton airport he
was met by a crowd of Liberals
who cheered as he appeared.
He was also met by the protesting students, who complained that they had been dis-
fanchised and made other
criticisms of the Liberal administration.
The sign read: "We Want
Our Vote," "Universities Need
Aid," "Pickpocket Pearson"
and "Weak on Communism."
The students said there
would have been many more
demonstrators from the University of New Brunswick if a
bus they had chartered had not
been mysteriously cancelled at
the last minute.
They said UNB President
Colin MacKay had told them
that Premier Robichaud had
objected to the proposed demonstrations.
Willmott tabs teach-in
— disappointing'
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By BRUCE BENTON
A critical evaluation of the
teach-in at UBC Oct. 8-10 was
made Tuesday by teach-in
chairman, Prof. William Willmott.
Willmott told about 15 persons at an evaluating session
in Bu. 218 that the teach-in
only accomplished part of its
purpose and could have been
better.
He said: "The poor turnout
was due the to lack of student
planning and participation, and
the fact that the campus was
closed for the long weekend
and many of the students had
gone home."
He also criticized The
Ubyssey for not taking the
teach-in seriously.
He said: "There was also a
need for discipline on the part
of the radicals in the audience.
Willmott said the program
was also weaker than planned
due to the last minute changes
in the Toronto teach-in. But,
he said CBC broadcast gave
the teach-in tremendous scope.
This Year's
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At AMS business office and totem office BE 168 Thursday, October 21, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
THE
BIRD
CAGE
By KEN ATKINSON
The UBC Junior Varsity
basketball team has height,
experience, and shooting
ability — all ingredients for
success.
At least that's the way Jay-
vee coach Norm Watts sees it
as his team prepares for its
Junior Men's League opener
Oct. 30.
Watts has more of these
essential qualities on hand this
year than in the past because
the Jayvees will comprise all
non-Varsity players under 21.
Formerly, players were
divided between the Braves,
made up solely of freshmen,
and the Chiefs.
In the race for starting posi-
tionse at guard are Mike In-
man, Al Quinn, Joe Kainer,
Glen Carter, and Phil Langley.
Kainer, a freshman, is the
bet to win a regular pob. The
five-foot-eleven graduate of
Lord Byng High School is an
all-round performer. Watts
has been especially pleased
with his passing.
Quinn (6-2) and Inman
(5-10) are veterans with plenty
of hustle.
"It'll be hard to leave either
of them on the bench," Watts
said.
Langley, from West Vancouver High School, is a fine
offensive player who needs
only to add playmaking to his
steady shooting to crack the
starting lineup.
Carter has his work cut out
for him in trying to win a
starting post, but Watts has
been impressed with his attitude so far.
"He's definitely still a contender," Watts said.
¥      *      *
Returning forecourt men
Dave Rice (6-3), Rein Blumen-
scheit (6-3), and Ken Kern
(6-3), face competition from
newcomers Sam Vandermeu-
len (6-3) and Bob Molinski,
also 6-3.
Vandermeulen starred in
basketball and track at Ab-
botsford High School.
Towering Mark Churchland
(6-5) brings experience into a
battle for starting slots among
the big men.
Watts said the Junior Varsity will probably use a fast-
break offense.
"At this stage,.though, planning has to be fairly tentative," he added.
YOUNG MEN
END IAN DONALD practices form he hopes will help
Thunderbirds defeat Portland State College in football
game at   Portland Saturday.
UBC shows class
in field hockey
By NIGEL HAWKESWOBTH
UBC's three field hockey teams have made an impressive start in Vancouver League play, winning seven of their
first nine games by shutouts.
Last weekend all three teams were victorious.
The Thunderbirds, seeking their fifth straight first
division championship, are once again league leaders.
They haven't lost a game since March, 1964.
Saturday, the Birds showed crisp passing form in defeating Pitt Meadows 2-0 on goals by Glen McCannel and
Diederik Wolsak.
Four Thunderbird players recently represented Canada
in a tournament in Jamaica, where they placed second to
Argentina in a seven-team round-robin tournament.
The players were: Warren Bell, Keith Harrison, McCannel and Lee Wright.
The third division Braves show promise of turning into
a very strong team this year.
Saturday they shutout India 'B' 1-0 while playing without players.
Tomahawks, of the Fourth Division, beat a weak Vancouver C squad 2-0, both goals scored by Lome Brown.
Anyone interested in joining UBC's most successful
sport should turn out to practices at noon Thursdays on the
playing fields behind Brock, or contact coach Eric Broome
of the Physical Education branch.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 196S-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*    Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov.  19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —   Students .35*   Adults .60*
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:   The  Centre  will  be  closed  all  day  Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further information:   Call 224-3205  or  228-3197
Canadian hockey
goes to Italy
CUS 'jumps gun'
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students is
planning to send a hockey team to Italy this winter if they
can get the money.
The Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association thinks
CUS is "jumping the gun."
CUS has been invited by the international student spori
federation, FISU, to send a team to the 1966 Winter Universiade in Turin, Italy, Feb. 5-13.
FISU is so eager to have a Canadian hockey team that
they have agreed to pay all expenses in Italy. CUS has
undertaken to get a government grant to pay half the travel
fare, with the other half to be obained locally.
The team will be chosen in November by a national
selection committee now being set up by CUS.
CIAU Secretary W. J. McLeod, protesting that the CIAU
wants to co-operate with CUS, says' "any government grants
would come only as a result of a request by the CIAU."
The government may say otherwise.
According to Roger Dion, director of the federal government's Fitness and Amateur Sport Directorate, its advisory council is still debating whether to extend recognition
to CUS.
An international body has already done so; CUS is now
the recognized member of FISU for Canada.
In any case, a missed deadline will force CUS to bypass
the advisory council, whose channels of procedure take 2
months to wind through various government organs.
CUS will go directly to the minister of Health and Welfare, according to Paul Ladouceur, CUS international affairs
secretary who doubles as "sports director." Funds to send
a team to the August student games in Budapest were also
obtained by ministerial discretion.
The CIAU, formed in 1961 was planning to wait another
year before entering the international field.
Now they may try to move faster. If they are to send
the Canadian champions to Turin this winter, the decision
will be made at a national meeting Dec. 15.
Although CIAU policy is to choose teams only as a result of national championships, they might send the Loyola
Warriors who will be touring Europe in any case.
But McLeod said he "doubted very much" if this would
occur, due to an adverse decision by the Canadian Amateur
Hockey Association.
McLeod threw cold water
on the new role of CUS in
student sports, saying "they
have no organization."
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
Mr
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAK.S - MORNING
COATS — ACCESSORIES
McCUISH
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
2046 W. 41st
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
PH. 263-3610
GSA   NEWS
A Message from the GSA Executive
In view of the recent controversy on campus concerning the policy of student action in regard to the
recent fee increase, particularly as expressed by the
Education Action Program, (EAP) your executive has
decided to issue a statement of its policy regarding
the EAP. The following is an excerpt from the minutes of the regular executive meeting of the GSA
held on October 12, 1965: "That whereas the G.S.A.
Executive is in favor of the concept and principle of
universal, accessibility and the Education Action Program, be it resolved that the G.S.A. Executive does
not support the demonstration of its concern in the
form of a mass student march in Vancouver on Oct.
27, 1965." Further to this, the Executive defines
"Universal Accessibility" to mean that it must be
ensured that people with the academic qualifications
have access to a University education without unreasonable financial stress. This does not necessarily
imply the complete elimination of fees.
Graduate students who wish to express their opin
ions to the Executive on this matter may do so by
sending a letter to, "Mr. George Wooton, GSA President, c/o The Koerner House, Graduate Students
Center, Campus. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  21, 1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
NDP candidate speaks
George Trasov, NDP candidate for Vancouver Quadra,
will speak today at noon in
Bu. 204. He is sponsored by
the UBC New Democrats.
SAILING CLUB
Party Saturday, Oct. 23. See
notice in Hut B-3 for details,
AQUA SOCIETY
General   meeting   Thursday
noon in Bu. 219.
UNION COLLEGE
THEOLOG SOC
Rev.    Clarence    Ferguson    at
noon in Rm.  103, Union College.
RAMBLERS
General meeting today at
noon in Bu. 214. Elections and
football  organization.
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
Important meeting noon today in Hut L-5. All members
and beginners who want to
join please attend.
FILM SOCIETY
Experimental films on film-
production group shown noon
today in Brock Ext. 357. All
welcome.
SKATING SOC
Skating from 3-4:15 p.m. today. All interested meet at
Thunderbird Arena.
UBC COMMUNISTS
William Kashtan, federal
leader of Communist party in
Canada, speaks today at noon
in Bu. 106 on "Why Canada
Needs Communist M.P.'s."
DEMORAPHIC   SOCIETY
Election meeting today at
noon in Bu. 231.
Jobs waiting
in Europe
Earn, learn and travel in
Europe.
That's the offer of the American Student Information
Service.
The ASIS is offering jobs
including lifeguarding, office
work, hotel jobs, camp counselling, farm work, and tutoring.
Wages range up to $400 a
month and travel grants are
also offered. In most cases,
neither previous experience
nor knowledge of a foreigr
language is required.
Students interested send $2
to Dept. II, ASIS. 22 Avenue
de la Liberte, Luxembourg
City, for further information.
BAY
STARTS TOMORROW
Captain  Newman,  M.D.
Gregory Peck, Tony Curtis
and Angie Dickenson.
Plus:
A Stitch In Time
Norman Wisdom, Edward
Chapman
DELTA
Acren Fraser St. Bridge, Richmond
STARTS TOMORROW
October 22 and 23 only
Night Creatures
Peter Cushing
Kiss of the Vampire
Clifford Evans
Dr. Terror's House
of Horror (Adult)
Peter Cushing
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
General meeting today at
noon in Bu. 202 to elect additions to steering committee,
evaluate results of International Days of Protest and consider possible future activities.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Poetry reading by Wayne
Nyberg noon today in Bu. 102.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets for "Oh
What a Lovely War"  can be
obtained at Playhouse box office for $1.50 and AMS card.
BRIDGE & CHESS CLUB
Meeting for all interested in
playing bridge and chess in Bu.
223 Friday at noon.
ALPHA OMEGA
Important member to discuss
party, concert and banquet on
Monday.
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting Friday at noon in
Bu. 2201. Dean Richardson
speaks on "The Problem of
Salvation in Non-Christian Religions."
NEWMAN CLUB
Alti Fitzgerald, slides and
discussion on "Northern Mission" Friday at 7:30 p.m. in
Newman Lounge. Refreshments
following.
IH
Student members invited to
attend opening night of "Street-
Car Named Desire" at Metro
Theatre Friday at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets available at IH.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Meeting with Mr. Watt Friday at noon in Bu. 205 for all
interested  in   volunteer   work
at Oakalla.
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK
Important meeting Friday
noon in back room, Women's
Gym.
EL CIRCULO
Mr. Bartroli speaks on "The
Spaniards on the Pacific Coast"
today at noon.
UBC QUAKERS
Meeting of worship in Buchanan penthouse Sunday at 11
a.m.
EATON'S
Expect the Most from
AQUASCUTUM
It's just about the best all-weather coat you can
put on your back. You can shrug into a field
model with full raglan shoulders with fly front
and slash pockets, or settle into a half raglan
Aintree style with hacking pockets. Sizes: Regular
36 to 46; tall 38 to 46; short 36 to 42.
Cotton Gabardine
each 65.00
Cotton    Poplin
each  57.50
Wool Gabardine
each  85.00
CUS follows UN lead
in condemning Rhodesia
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students
has climbed on the world bandwagon in condemning a possible unilateral declaration of independence by Rhodesia.
The union joined the United States, the Soviet Union,
and 105 other powers in a stern message to Premier Ian
Smith Oct. 12.
The telegram read: "Canadian Union of Students representing 140,000 students condemns possible unilateral
declaration of independence by Rhodesian government.
Majority rule by all Rhodesians must precede independence. CUS supports United Nations resolution calling for
force against Rhodesia if necessary."
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ada on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock  Hall,   Ext.  26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost St Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
FOUND — FROSH — have located
some misplaced Engineer's coats.
Enquire AMS Office in Brock Hall.
Thanks!
FOUND — SHEAFFER PEN on the
path from "C" Lot, Monday, Oct.
18.  Phone 224-7214.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE at Totem
Park Dance Oct. 15, 1 Navy blue
duffle coat. Could owner please
contact YU 8-8500.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE — Navy blue
and white strip bag with running
shoes. Do you have mine? War
Memorial  Gym.   Phone  RE  6-9590.
FOUND AT PHI  DELTA  PLEDGE
Party pair of girl's glasses. Phone
929-1575.
FOUND — 2 ENGLISH TEXT books
in Ladies' washroom of Educ. Bid.
Call 255-9198.
FOUND — TEXTBOOK "Selected
Prose — T. S. Eliot", AMS Publications (Ubyssey) Office, Brock
Hall.
FOUND. 3 Ttext Books. Call at the
AMS Office, Brock Hall.
LOST — ONE BLACK KID GLOVF.
with pink flower on back. Please
phone  YU 7-7883.
LOST — ON MONDAY, ONE CUFF
Link with initial "A". Phone 266-
0745,   ask for  Norm.
Special Notice*
13
STUDENTS INTERESTER in shooting rifle or pistol, phone W. Jant-
zin,  FA 5-3531.
ATTENTION! RUMMAGE SALE to
be held in Acadia Camp Hut 85,
Sat. 23, 2-5 p.m. Come out to
browse or buy.	
BOB LUNDGREN — PLEASE come
to Coordinator's Office on Thursday or Friday noon about your
application for Games Room Supervisor. 	
INTERNATIONAL FALL FAIR '65.
Song and Dance of Faraway Lands
are just a part of the Fair, Nov.
5 & 6, Armories. Tickets AMS
Office   and  Int'l.   House.	
CURLERS WANTED! 3 mixed or
mens' rinks needed for Friday
nights at 6.15 p.m. Individuals
accepted. Call Soren at 733-1713 or
John at 261-6479.       	
GIRLS! Football! Girls! Football!
Girls! On Thursday, Oct. 21 at
12:30 in Stadium. See nurses and
Home Ec. bash heads in Teacup
Game for crippled kids hospital
Donation at gate. ^^
TONIGHT. The Showmen appearing
at Fort Camp Masquerade Dance.
Admission 50c with A.M.S. card.
(9-1 p.m.)	
MASQUERADE Dance Thurs., Oct.
21 at Fort Camp. Showmen playing. Admission 50c with A.M.S.
card (9-1 p.m.)	
IT'S HERE "COMPLETE GUIDE"
to Chem. 101 Labs. Your Experiments will be easy with your new
Chem. 101 Guide. • This book is
written as your experiments should
be written up. • Shows how to
work    calculations    step-by-step.
• Complete with theory, procedure, data, calculations and discussion.
• If you would like the rewarding thrill that Chem. Labs can
bring drop into The College Shop,
Brock Extension, for your complete Guide to Chem. 101. Labs.—
$2.50.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED from 25th and
MacKenzie, 8.30 Mon. Wed. Fri.
RE   6-0968.
SECRETARY. WORKING 9-5, needs
ride from Oak along Marine Drive.
Phone AM 6-6381.
NEW WESTMINSTER — 1 OR 2
Drivers needed for East End car-
pool leaving Mon.-Fri. for 8.30's.
Call  Terry  after  6,   521-2765.	
RIDE WANTED— LEAVING UBC
5 p.m. Monday to Friday, to No. 4
Rd. & Steveston Highway, Richmond. Call BR 7-6646 after 6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   It MARINE
Automobiles For Sal*
21
'59 VW, good condition, 59,000 m.
51525 President's Row, Acadia $725,
any   time.
1959 TR 3 HARDTOP, TWO HEA-
ters, Michelin tires, new engine,
radio,   other  extras.   AM  1-3616.
53 HILLMAN HDTP. excellent condition.  Best  offer.  CA 4-6521.
'50 AUSTIN A-40 FOR SALE. Needs
valve   job.   $25.   Dave,   RE  8-6162.
FANTASTIC! '54 FORD 4-door, automatic trans., V-8, $125. Call 224-
6804 after 3.30 p.m.
1961   MORRIS   MINOR,   Convt.   Excellent     condition.     Call     Marty,
224-9986.
Motorcycles
27
'64 HONDA 55c.c. SPORT ONLY
2,350 miles like new $195. AM 1-
6279.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters fc Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, fit
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone KB
1-1322.
EMPIRE ARISTOCRAT PORT-
able, 1959 model, $25. Phone Dave
Young, CA 4-9853.
Typing
TYPING     (HOME),     ALL     KINDS,
.Mrs. Wood 985-5086.
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK HE-
vlews, Notes typed on electric machines, A R D A L E GRIFFITHS
LIMITED, 70th and Granville.
Phone   263-4530.
EXPERT   HOME   TYPING.   Essays,
termpapers,   theses.   Prompt,   efficient    service.    Reasonable     rates.
Mrs.   L.  More,  RE  1-7496.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
BI
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,  701  Beach.
INSTRUCTION
Tutors Wanted
66
MATH   202   TUTOR.   Phone   Craig,
731-3441.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 76 cents.
FOR SALE — One trial refractor
set by American Optical Co. —
approx. 200 lenses. Two only radiation meters. Satellite Electronics
Co., 985 Howe St., Van. 1, B.C.
Phone MU 3-0035.	
Ben's Carpet Centre
UBC   STUDENTS   SPECIALS   9x12
rugs   $29.50   up.   Desks   and   bookcases, $9.95-$23.95. Open Fri. 'til 9.
Cor.   4th  & Burrard.   RE  1-8913.
1943 EDITION OF ENCYCLOPEDIA
Britannica with 144-145-146 Supplement Year Books. Excellent to
mint condition.  Phone  684-9934.
K&E DECITRIG SLIDE-RULE,  $18.
Eric  Spratt,  224-9845  after  6  p.m.
OLDS    AMBASSADOR    TRUMPET,
three   years   old,   $100.   Dan,   AL
5-1917.
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR RENT on Dunbar St.
Is available at present. Phone
RE   6-9590,   Mrs.   Behnsen.
WANTED — Grad or Senior student to share one bedroom apt.
roll  Bob.  681-0894.
SINGLE OR DOUBLE accommodation. Large room, use shower,
washer, dryer, kitchen, lounge.
$65 single, $80 double. RE 8-3440,
2741 West Third.
Board 8c Room
82
BOARD AND ROOM FOR THREE
male students—dinners not supplied—$45 mo. Ph. RE 3-5529 evenings,  or call at 1776 W.  6th.
Furn. Homes & Aprs.
83
WANTED — ROOM MATE. Three
room furn. apt. Near UBC. Phone
228-8353. One male student, rent
$40.

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