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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1974

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Array Meet UBC's breadwinners
This is another part of The
Ubyssey series "Know your prof" or
"How much does he/she make for
putting me to sleep?" The figures
come from UBC financial statements
and are accurate to six decimal
places.
Pharmaceutical sciences dean
Bernard Riedel $35,875
plus expenses $ 2,911
Electrical engineering prof
Lawrence Young    $30,250
Forestry dean
Botany prof
-
Registrar John Parnall,;/.v. $32,400
Joseph Gardner    $35,800
G. H. Towers	
.$32,100
History-prof."
plus expenses $ 1,645
Metallurgy head
John Norris  ..;    A . $30,900
Electrical engineering prof
Edward Teghtsoonian ..
. $33,400
Classics head"--.
Nan Yu $30,150
plus expenses $ 2,419
Malcolm McGregor ..... $36,070
Economics prof
Social psychology head
plus expenses $ 1,058
John H. Young $32,400
Peter Suedfeld  	
.$31,025
Chemistry head
Geological science head
Head librarian
Charles McDowell $36,575
Hugh Wynne-Edwards  .. $33,000
Basil Stuart-Stubbs	
. $32,325
plus expenses $ 4,005
plus expenses $ 2,798
plus expenses $ 4,071
Music head
Physics prof
History head
Donald McCorkle $30,575
John B. Warren $33,075
Margaret Ormsby	
. $35,550
plus expenses $ 1,066
THE UBYSSEY
IVol. LVI, No. 24       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1974    °@°48        228-2301
WINTER'S COMING and mid-terms are almost over, so remember, as you gaze at photograph you are seeing
some things you won't see any more in week or two — bicycles, leaves and students entering library.
UBC hires 'smart' security agents
UBC students planning riot and
mayhem can rest assured they
won't be up against The Brute or
Gene Kiniski when the revolution
comes, a campus security
spokesman said Monday.
University of Montreal officials
recently admitted hiring
professional wrestlers as "security
agents" but UBC security
supervisor D.S. Hannah told The
Ubyssey this campus is more
"civilized."
"We don't hire a man because of
his muscle ability but for his
brains, his ability to think,"
Hannah said.
"We're a little more civilized
here I hope," he said.
Hannah said the traffic and
security department has no contingency plan should a major
uprising break out at UBC. "We
just go  along  and  watch  what
happens," he said.
But Hannah said he imagined the
RCMP  does have such  a  plan. ,
"They would if they are an efficient police force," he said.
However, a campus RCMP
spokesman said there is no such
plan under formulation and there
never has been. "We've never had
any problems in the past and don't
expect any in the future," Cpl. Ron
Mangan said Monday.
Mangan said the action in
Montreal was probably prompted
by the computer burning at Sir
George Williams University a few
years ago. In the unlikely event
there is a major disturbance at
UBC, Mangan said, the force would
probably rely on reinforcements
from RCMP headquarters at
Thirty-third   and   Heather  and
Vancouver police.
"We have a number of men at
our headquarters and they could be
rushed in to help our members," he
said.
Hannah said the job of UBC
security forces is "not to go ahead
and bash people."
"There never has been any need
for strongarmings and there never
will be," Hannah said.
U of M students recently identified five professional wrestlers
among security guards who battled
them in a parking fee protest two
weeks ago.
Luc Turgeon, the man responsible for U of M security, has been
charged with assault after being
identified by eight witnesses as the
man who threw a student through a
plate glass window during the
protest.
il exports make
imports likely
By MARK BUCKSHON
Canada will begin importing
more oil than it exports in two
years because its oil wells are
beginning to run dry.
The oil companies say the
solution to the impending shortage
is to pour as much oil as possible
through pipelines into the U.S.
while raising prices (and profits)
astronomically to pay for more
exploration.
But Carleton university geology
prof Kenneth North says the
companies, and government officials who support them are
selling phoney facts and figures.
"It is now impossible to avoid the
crisis. There is nothing we can do
about it. Canada has no right
course left," he told a Vancouver
Institute meeting at UBC Saturday.
To prove his point, he displayed a
chart prepared by the Canadian
Petroleum Association, (CPA) the
oil industry's federal and
provincial government lobbying
organization.
The chart shows oil production
from known reserves will begin
dropping in two years at a rate of
93 million barrels per year.
It is included in a pamphlet,
Canada's Energy Future,
published by the CPA and the
Independent Petroleum
Association of Canada in September for. distribution to MP's
and other government officials.
The companies say in the
pamphlet that there are plentiful
"potential reserves" (marked on
chart with question marks) that
can be discovered and put into
production if the government stops
taxing the companies and allows
them to increase exploration with
all the new profits they will be
making.
Additional exploration capital
can be raised by exporting oil to
U.S. markets, they say.
North, who has fought for five
years with oil company executivies
and Liberal cabinet minister
friends of the executives, said the
"potential" reserves are based on
false assumptions that the fields
have the same geological qualities
as American ones and that the oil
would be economically feasible to
remove.
"No other nation besides Canada
habitually expresses potential
reserves as real reserves," he
said. And the only Canadian industry that bothers documenting
"potential" reserves is the oil
industry, said North.
The two allegedly major
potential reserve areas are the
Alberta tar sands and massive
Arctic sea fields.
The oil companies say the
potential is in excess of 300 billion
barrels and it will cost at least $30
billion to discover these potential
reserves in the next 10 years.
"The required amounts won't be
available if governments continue
to increase the share they take
from industry revenue," they warn
in their lobbying paper.
North said this amount of money
might need to be spent, but not
much oil is going to be found with
it.
He said even the most optimistic
predictions about apparent
promising reserves in the arctic
Balfour Sea show exploration and
development costs to be more than
$6 billion.
And   while   the   development
might be completed by 1985 and
produce more than 500,000 barrels
per day, Canada by then would be
See page 2: NO
For BoG contest
Faculty named
Ten faculty members have been
nominated to run for two seats on
the board of governors.
Under the terms of the
Universities Act passed this year
the board will be enlarged to 15
members from the current 11. Two
members will be elected by
faculty, students also will elect
two, and non-academic staff will
elect one member.
The remaining members
comprise the chancellor, the administration president and eight
persons to be appointed by the
provincial cabinet.
Nominated for the faculty
positions by Friday's deadline
were: Cyril Belshaw, anthropology
prof and former anthropology and
sociology department head;
chemical engineering prof Stuart
Cavers; Cyril Finnegan, zoology
prof and associate faculty dean
science.
William Gibson, history of
medicine  department   head   and
current TEAM park board candidate; Charles McDowell,
chemistry department head;
economics prof Milton Moore;
Assistant education prof Mark
Rose; economics prof Gideon
Rosenbluth; anatony prof William
Webber, associate medicine
faculty dean; and Hugh Wynne-
Edwards; geological sciences
department head.
Mail ballots in the faculty
elections must be returned by Nov.
29 and results are expected Dec. 3.
Nominations for the two student
seats close Wednesday with
elections to be held Dec. 4,5 and 6.
Non-academic staff nominations
close Nov. 12. Staff elections also
will be held by mail with ballots
due Dec. 10.
Meanwhile, the last position open
in elections for student
representatives on faculty committees has been filled. Landa
Bartram was elected by mail
ballot as student rep for political
science. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1974
No easy oil solution
From page 1
short at least 150,000 .barrels per
day.
The Alberta tar sands are
equally unpromising, he said.
"If the proven reserves in the
McMurray tar sands were dug out
and brought into market, they
would extend oil use for four years
only," he said.
Most of the tar sand oil is buried
so deep that it would take more
energy to remove it than the
reserves could produce. And, in
any case, shortages of manpower,
money and materials such as steel
platforms make it impossible to
put more than one massive tar
sand field in production every two
years, North said.
To keep up with the shortage, it
would be necessary to open two
giant open pit holes every year, he
said.
North said that while he
disagrees with the oil companies'
'Natural'
cereals
still junk
NEW YORK (CUP) — An
examination of the five best-selling
"natural cereals" reveal they
contain five times the amount of
sugar than cornflakes and cost up
to four times more per unit of
protein.
Pressed by increasing numbers
of people who refuse to eat the
traditional junk produced by the
big three cereal manufacturers,
the companies have moved into the
natural breakfast cereal market.
The big three — Kellogg,
General Mills and Post — control
80 per cent of the U.S. $900 million-
a-year breakfast cereal industry
which has become notorious for
nutritionally unsound cereals that
contain 40 to 50 per cent sugar.
Observors have noted that such
high sugar content promotes tooth
decay and develops bad eating
habits in children since they
develop a "sweet tooth."
Of the fivelargest selling brands,
four; General Mills' 'Nature
Valley", Kellogg's "Country
Morning", Pet's "Heartland" and
Quaker's "100% Natural Cereal",
contain at least 20 per cent sugar.
Pet Kellogg, Pet and General Mills
all refuse to divulge the protein
content of their cereals.
Colgate's "Alpin", with a sugar
content of 13 per cent is the lowest
of the five big "natural cereals"
tend to contain less minerals and
vitamins than other ready to eat
cereals which tend to be vitamin
fortified.
See you there!
$1.00   off   any   large
size pizza with this ad.
ooooflBoaooBeoa
"solution", he doesn'thave an easy
answer himself.
One solution is to allow the price
of natural gas to rise substantially,
he said. Large gas fields which
don't have oil in them could be
discovered if gas wasn't as un-
derpriced as it currently is.
Other solutions involve nuclear
power and increased use of coal, he
said. The most effective solution
may be for the government for
force conservation measures on
the people, even though such
austerity would be difficult in a
democracy. "Without optimisim
the petroleum industry can't
survive," North said. "You can't
manage exploration without optimism."
But,   "optimism   has   become
irrational", he said.
NOTICE OF A.M.S.
INDOOR POOL REFERENDUM
NOV. 6th (Wed.)
and
NOV. 7th (Thurs.)
Polls will be held
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
S.U.B.   .    BUCHANAN BLDG.
CIVIL ENGINEERING   •   EDUCATION
WOODWARD LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY •MacMILLAN BLDG.
WAR MEMORIAL GYM •  LAW BLDG.
HENRY ANGUS BLDG.
Advance Polls will be held from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., Nov. 6 at Totem
Park Common Block plus Vanier Common Block and Gage Common
Block.
Graduates
Phone 732-7446 now for your appointment at our
studios. Get your free portrait now before the big
rush starts.
NATURAL COLOR
PORTRAIT SPECIALISTS
3343 West Broadway, Vancouver
732-7446
CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSOR
Dr. J. J. Harwood, one of the most prominent metallurgists in the
United States, will give the following public lectures on the
campus as a Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professor:
THURSDAY, November 7, 12:30 p.m. 'The
Automobile as a Natural Resource." Lecture Hall No. 2,
Instructional Resources Centre.
SATURDAY, November 9, 8:15 p.m. "Mavericks,
Malthus and Materials." Lecture Hall No. 2,
Instructional Resources Centre (co-sponsored by the
Vancouver Institute).
THURSDAY, November 14, 4:00 p.m. "Physics,
Materials and Automotive Power Plants." Room 201,
Hennings Building (general physics colloquium).
Dr. Harwood is Director of the Physical Sciences Laboratory,
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Michigan. He is a past-president of the
Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining and
Metallurgical Engineers.
These free lectures are being presented through a gift from Dr.
Cecil H. Green, a former UBC student, and his wife Ida.
m-~g%3Z~~~_~r^ .o cookbook
-ftcr0£5^r^Gs Tuesday, November 5,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Prof blames media
Vices of big cities blown up
By PAT McKITRICK
Traffic congestion, pollution,
high crime rates and the stress of
living in big cities have been overemphasized by the media, a
professor of urban economics said
in a lecture at the Vancouver Art
Gallery Monday.
"People have been bombarded
by the media about (cities') social
costs," Harry Richardson said in a
guest lecture at the Vancouver Art
Gallery sponsored by UBC's
Westwater research centre.
The benefits of large cities are
often underestimated, he said.
Traffic congestion does appear
to increase with city size,
Richardson said. However, if the
city is large enough it becomes
economically viable to bring in
rapid transit.
"City size is not an important
determinant in pollution," he said.
Climate, industry and vehicle use
are far more important.
"There is a possible but weak
relationship between crime rate
and city size," he said.
The differentials in crime rates
are greater within cities than
between them, he said.
"In the U.S. the racial factor in
crime is more important and obscures the city-size effect," he
said. Crime rates are characteristic of the problems of society
as a whole.
Big city growth is a universal
phenomenon, Richardson said.
Currently, 50 per cent of the
world's urban population lives in
cities with population of greater
than half a million.
Forty world cities have a
population greater than 2.5 million.
Twelve have a population of
greater than five million, he said.
"How can it be that if big cities
and their quality of life is so bad
that they continue to grow so
fast?" asked Richardson.
He said it is often overlooked that
the growth of big cities is
associated with improved standards of living.
"The elements of social costs
and benefits are not measurable in
quantitative terms," Richardson
said. The choices and weights of
costs and benefits vary among
individual people.
It is for this reason that the
theory of "optimal city size" is
invalid, he said.
Population density has a more
direct effect on social costs than
city size, Richardson said.
Alteration of the spacial
structures in cities is an important
long-term policy, for lowering
population density, he said.
Decentralized urban regions
with satellite communities are
projects which policy makers
should investigate, he said.
He added that governments
should ensure that the benefits of
rapid urban growth do not accrue
to one group, such as land
speculators.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
"Nothing ever happens here that
anyone can ever understand,"
chief blorg sage Chisely Luger told
a huge crowd that roared
agreement. "I say it is the fault of
our scribes."
Luger proposed replacing the
entire staff of the Daily Blah with a
slick, new crew which formerly
edited the alternate newspaper
Pango-Pango Reports.
This proved impossible when the
PP Reports crew was discovered
to consist solely of continuous-
repeat tape recorders plugged
directly into a typesetting
machine.
Mounties eliminate
bookstore staff prints
—marise savaria photo
CHOOSING WALLPAPER for combination bar and anthrax clinic in planned $4.5 million covered pool, Bob
"Fins" Angus and Doug "Snorkel" Aldridge — often mistaken for one of the Irish Rovers — prepare to
defend their Students' Coalition porkbarrel to the death. Fate of gleaming concrete structure — which
includes wombat dry-cleaning terminal and submarine net — will be decided in a student referendum
Wednesday and Thursday.
The total value of the calculators
stolen last week from the UBC
bookstore is between $1,100 and
$1,200, an RCMP spokesman said
Monday.
Thieves broke into the store
through a roof skylight Oct. 27 and
stole calculators worth about $200
each.
RCMP Sgt. Stan Nowicki of the
UBC detachment said RCMP are
still investigating the weekend
break-in.
He said the Mounties are now
eliminating the fingerprints of
bookstore staff in order to isolate
the prints of the burglar.
Bookstore director Bob Smith
said the store will fill in the
skylights in order to prevent
further similar breakins.
He said the bookstore is a
"pretty secure store by all
reasonable standards." The
bookstore has been found acceptable by security experts who
had inspected the store previous to
the theft.
He said the store does not have a
burglar   alarm   but   he   is   considering installing one.
Smith said the bookstore carries
insurance against theft and will file
a claim.
He said the break-in was the
bookstore's first burglary aside
from the shoplifting which plagues
the store.
There is a "hell of a lot of
shoplifting" going on, he said.
Smith said he is more concerned
about the shoplifting than about the
burglary because of the
humanitarian aspects of the
shoplifting problem.
He said he worries about naive,
unsuspecting students who enter
the bookstore and think it is an
easy place to shoplift.
The bookstore is well guarded,
he said. Students simply cannot
shove a book under a coat and walk
out without being caught.
He said he pities students who
have to go through the "frightening
exercise" of being arrested for
shoplifting.
Soapbox
"... the counterculture revolution on the
campuses of the late 1960s and 1970s has
pretty well dissappeared. I am pleased to
report that students across North America
are once again seriously interested in their
studies."
With these words UBC president
designate Doug Kenny reassured a Kelowna
audience that radical activists are gone
from campus and that money spent on UBC
is once again well invested.
On the face of it Kenny's statements seem
suspect. Who could ever picture Walter
Gage in the good old socred days stomping
around the province to drum up popular
support?
Kenny knows the universities will be in
trouble with the provincial government
unless they branch out into the community.
So his trip to Kelowna comes across as a
handshaking piece of theatre designed to
show people in the hinterland that the
university's function is to help grow better
tomatoes, and therefore universities should
get more money.   .
But Kenny means what he says. He really
is pleased that students are spending all
their time in the library and none in rallies
on the SUB plaza.
And on that attitude hangs a myth which
needs a little clarification.
The myth says that politics does not apply
to the university. It says that students come
to university to gain basic knowledge and
the acquisition of this knowledge as such has
no bearing on political issues.
Therefore, say the adherents of the myth,
don't tamper with higher education and
don't ask the university to take a stand on
political issues. If you do you will ruin
higher education and so destroy that fine
objective discernment which the university
gives its graduates.
This liberal notion of total objectivity is a
false one. By the nature of the courses it
offers the university does take a stand on
political issues.
By teaching students to build bigger and
more complex high-rises, airplanes and oil
refineries it has taken a stand in favor of
building such things.
By installing the TRIUMF nuclear
research system it has given legitimacy to
nuclear energy. All of these things are
currently political issues.
by joke van der kamp
Of course, the members of senate who
control the university can argue that
nuclear energy and huge jets are good
things. It's their right to do so and no one
will stop them.
But if they do they've lost their neutrality
and have taken a stand on a political issue.
And in fact they cannot avoid taking a stand.
They can be for oil refineries, against
them, or plead neutrality because of
ignorance. But they cannot plead neutrality
in offering courses. The courses exist or
they do not.
The only time that any large number of
people on campus realized this was back in
the late 60s and early 70s. Those people were
the "counter-culture" students, the students
who Kenny would have us believe were not
seriously interested in their studies.   -
They realized that on some issues there is
no middle ground and that senate members
were lying or deceiving themselves when
they said they had taken no stand.
The members of senate can of course
claim they are not called on to take a stand
on some issues. If there are open courses in
which   students  can   study   apartheid  or
American imperialism then senate has done
its job and can leave opinions on these issues
to its members as individuals.
Basically there's not much wrong with
that view. A course covering American
imperialism does not promote imperialism
as a "how to do it" course on nuclear energy
promotes nuclear energy.
But if individual senate members can
form their own opinions on imperialism and
band in groups outside of senate to give their
views more weight, why can't students do
the same?
Doug Kenny, you tell us that you're
pleased students are interested in their
studies "again".
But why should you find it so displeasing
that a number of students in the height of the
"counter-culture" era took a few hours off
classes to protest nuclear bomb tests on
Amchitka island.?
Are bomb tests good and not to be
questioned? Should students not be interested in politics? Does missing a few
classes constitute some great sin?
Doug Kenny, please tell the students at
this university what you omitted to tell the
jf?|sidents of Kelowna. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1974
Vote "yes" to defeat pool
Like the sign says "Yes means
no."
So The Ubyssey urges students to
vote "yes" on the up-coming pool
referendum in order to stop pool
construction.
Proponents of pool construction
argue too much money has been
spent already to stop building the
thing right now. They say a "yes"
vote will mean about $56,000 in
student money will go down the hole
in preliminary architect's fees.
But what's $56,000 placed against
the money students will have to
continue spending in the future?
Students are now committed to
spending $925,000 plus interest
payments which, depending on the
interest rates, could stretch out over
20 years.
And pool committee members
Bob Angus and Doug Aldridge admit
that if interest rates teach a certain
percentage, students will stop paying
on the loan principle and start
paying interest, possibly in perpetuity.
In an interview last week Angus
said this would happen if interest
rates rise another one per cent —
although he is quick to point out
that interest have fallen .75 percent
in New York during the last week.
All this means a lot of student
money is committed to building the
pool. Beside it, $56,000 is pretty
insignificant.
And for financial buffs, there's
one more fact to relate.
The provincial government and
outside sources have been asked to
contribute .one-third of the pool
cost. They have in fact been
budgeted for that amount — all
without any commitment from
government or outside agencies.
This means that the pool funding
is shaky right now. After all, there's
no guarantee the outside sources are
going to come across with the
money. And we won't know if they
are coming through or not until
some unspecified future date —
February, anyway.
This means the $56,000 could go
out the window anyway. But in this
case, not only the $56,000 already
spent.
If the referendum is defeated and
the pool goes ahead, more money in
architect's fees will be committed.
This money too could be lost if the
government doesn't come through.
And in this case, the amount lost will
reach $100,000.
That's a lot of money.
Too much, in this case.
Isn't it better to stop the thing
now?
Okay, those are the financial
reasons. Pile on top of these
philosophical objections to continuing with the pool.
In the first place it's the beginning
of empire building (no pun intended)
plans which spin merrily in Alma
Mater Society president Gordie
Blankstein's pointed little head.
Gordie and Co. would like to see
an underground shopping concourse
connecting the library and the SUB.
This would contain a movie theatre,
food stores, restaurants and whore
houses, for all we know.
Now really, is this the job of the
AMS?
The answer is an unqualified no.
The AMS should be concerned
with raising the quality of education
on this campus.
This means bringing in good
speakers, starting discussions on the
quality of education on this campus.
It means stirring up some shit — and
if this brings a counter-reaction, well,
and good. At least people will be
considering the issues.
The job of building things on this
campus should be left up to the
administration. And if the
administration is deciding to build
the wrong things or building the
right things badly, students should
fight for representation on the
committees making priority decisions.
Students on no other Canadian
campus have been responsible for so
much capital construction — and in
such crummy deals.
Students built Brock Hall — it
reverted to the administration. Students built War Memorial Gym — it's
run by the phys eel department for
students of their faculty with limited
access to others. The Thunderbird
Sports centre — have you tried to
book into there lately? And SUB
with its short lease.
So now there's the pool, with a
better deal but still not the best. The
administration should pay for it and
students should ensure they get on
committees seeing that it's done
right.
Aha, say the pool proponents, but
the administration doesn't consider
the pool a priority. Well it isn't.
Rehabilitation medicine students
might agree proper buildings to
replace their huts would be appreciated. So would oceanography.
So ail in all, the pool's a bad deal.
The AMS stands to lose more money
if government funding doesn't come
through.
The AMS shouldn't be involved in
the thing in the first place.
The administration should fund
buildings.
And until then, everyone can
swim in the new Vancouver aquatic
centre.
So vote "yes," meaning stop the
pool, Wednesday and Thursday.
And then maybe we can get on to
more important matters.
Letters
Schmuck
yourself
You schmucks! You
meshugginas! You utter
scheisskopfs!
After railing and breast-beatin'
and bitchin' about the high food
prices for so long, you finally got
some action, eh? The Gross
Gourmets down in the SUB caf
have finally answered your
fevered call for cheap grits.
The result is that horrible excuse
for a burger that has appeared on
the poison list at the trough. Shades
of the Almighty Mac, it's finally
breached the last bastion in this
city, complete with wormy little
pickle in the centre. You have
asked for cheap food and you have
been rewarded.
Let's take a look at the numbers
game you bandied about in your
sheet. Succumbing to statistics,
those dullers of reason, you proved
that food prices in our misty
campus-by-the-sea have risen at a
higher rate than in the real world.
Even a pinhead mathematics
ignorer like myself can see that a
five cent raise on a 30 cent sandwich is a higher percentage rise
than a 10 cent raise on the same
sandwich which might cost 70 cents
or more in the real world.
So now the Golden Breasts have
made their inroad, causing quality
to drop still further.
It is time for strong action.
A guillotine is being prepared, a
little old lady is sharpening her
knitting needles, carts are being
spattered artily with red, and two
look-alikes are being taught their
speeches. At the first sign of World-
Famous Shoe-String Potato-Chips,
instigators of this crime against
the stomachs of the people will
have their heads permanently
removed, rather than just on press
days.
Remember our cry: Next time
you pass by the El Cheepo burger
stand in the caf, do your stomach a
favor — and keep right on going!
[No relation]
V. McDonald
educ 2
You're carrying around a lonely
placard — that's your battle cry for
'cheap grits', not ours.
Rather than speak with your
eloquence of pickles, pins and
potato chips, we took a simple,
hard and close look at food service's prices and our money.
We raised serious questions and
voiced, as yet unanswered, concern over a rapidly deflating
campus food dollar. And in doing
so, we challenged the meaning of
service, in questioning whether or
not food services continues to
provide a 'service' to the students.
Consumer concern over value for
their dollar is the complete antithesis of your argument for
'cheap food'.
And we might add, while we
excuse your 'pinhead
mathematics', we cannot accept
your implicit apology for food
services. The real world is not
outside, V. McDonald, it's right
here—Staff.
Marriage
I am constantly amazed by the
consistently irresponsible and
immature "journalism", exhibited
in The Ubyssey. Lately, I have
tried to limit my reading of your
paper to announcements of events
and services, on the assumption
that there would be a minimum of
editorializing in this type of information.
Now I see that you can't even
relay simple information without
subjecting it to gross distortion.
I gave you a one-paragraph
announcement that simply conveyed the information that marital
and pre-marital counseling is
available through the department
of psychiatry. Its no wonder I
almost missed that announcement
when I look for it in your Thursday
edition since you headlined it
"Bedpost Sex" and started the
article with three insane questions
that tied in with your headline but
had nothing to do with the information I gave you.
I was told that my notice would
be reworded in order to "maintain
literary consistency". I was not
informed that this rewording
would include such questionable
items as "Does your fiance(e) fuck
like a bedpost?"
Needless to say, I will avoid
dealing with  your  paper  in  the
future. I hope others can learn
from my experience, and find
alternative ways to get information disseminated in an
honest and straightforward
manner, since your newspaper is
obviously incapable of fulfilling its
primary function.
Barbara Jacobson
"research assistant,
department of psychiatry
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 5, 1974
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Editor: Lesley Krueger
"So you want to be reporters?" leered managing editor Kini McDonald.
"Yes," said Lesley Krueger and Jake van der Kamp. "You betcha," said
Gary Coull and Berton Woodward. "Uh huh," said Mark Buckshon and
Doug Rushton. "Not particularly," said Marise Savaria and Peter
Cummings. "Nope," said Dan McDonald from his sickbed at 4404 West
Fourteenth (letters requested) . "Perhaps," said Pat McKitrick and Carl
Vesterback in bored voices. "I might consider it," said Gary Lenney and
Cedric Tetzel. "No way," said Tom Barnes and Ralph Maurier. "Quite
possibly," said Chris Gainor and Sue Vohanka. "Yes," said Reed Clarke.
The ME glarred at the crowd. "You're all fucked," she declared. "Except
you, McDonald. You're   hired. I like your looks." Tuesday, November 5,  1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Page Tuesday
Harrison no $10 Beatle
By BERTON WOODWARD
It was a night when even the
scalpers were scalped.
Weeks in advance, tickets for
George Harrison's opening concert
here of his North American tour
were advertised in classified ads
for $60 a pair.
By 8:30 p.m. Saturday night,
tickets were selling for 75 cents
each.
It was a suitable irony that we
had turned up outside the Coliseum
as the concert began at 8 to check
out for a downtown newspaper a
possible disturbance among
concert people squeezed out of the
Coliseum because large numbers
of phoney tickets were floating
around.
As we made the walk toward the
Coliseum, the ticket priced
dropped in stages. It was $10 at
Hastings and Renfrew, $2 near the
door.
There was no riot beyond this
riot of bargain price tickets. The
simple supply and demand laws
had asserted themselves once
again. At these prices, we had no
choice but to go in.
Inside the laws proved their
worth. It was a fine concert, but it
was not a $10 concert.
The audience, and the
promoters, clearly saw George
Harrison as the Beatle he hasn't
been for years. The crowd was as
much a group of Beatle fans as it
was a crowd that came to see
Harrison for what he now is.
Instead of presenting himself as
a high-powered superstar,
Harrison was simply a good
musician with a good, tight band.
Harrison refused, or perhaps
was incapable of, any projection of
the superstar image. He remained
low-key throughout the show and
was easily upstaged by his rambunctious sideman Billy Preston.
Generally he confined his song
introductions to simple statements
of fact, though never without a
committed enthusiasm for his
music and that of those playing
with him.
It was not a performance one
might expect Paul McCartney or
even John Lennon to give, although
Harrison, as the most successful of
the solo Beatles, was certainly
entitled to provide more of the
spectacular than he did.
He was not without droll humor
about his Beatle accomplishments.
He introduced Something as "a
song you can hear on every
elevator in the world."
It was a measure of the crowd's
expectations that response
reached a near-pandemonium
level for Something that was not
reached again during the concert.
But the high point of Harrison's
part in the concert had to be an
incredibly energetic,^ stirring
version of While My Guitar Gently
Weeps. For me, this song, with its
gentle, sad symbolism, is the best
of his career.
It was an indication of how he
views things these days that he
amended the titled line several
times to "while my guitar gently
smiles."
The only non-Harrison Beatle
song he did was a rock
arrangement of John Lennon's In
My Life, introducing it as a visit to
"memory lane" and praising
Lennon — I think I heard him say
"I love him" — at the end.
Harrison's singing was throaty,
to say the least. His voice was
hoarse, incapable of range  and
ni mcdonaM photo
occasionally squeaked. He briefly
apologized for it at one point,
saying he had been doing a lot of
singing lately, despite Vancouver
being the first stop of the tour.
Despite Harrison's obvious
enthusiasm for his and Billy
Preston's rock style, his heart was
clearly with the Indian music of
sitar master Ravi Shankar who
shared the concert.
Shankar brought with him about
a dozen musicians, playing, as
Harrison said, "instruments
you've never seen before."
Shankar conducted two women
vocalists singing with crystal
perfection to the sublimely complex accompaniment of the ensemble.
Shankar played one sitar
composition, beautifully, of course.
Later East and West met as
Shankar conducted Harrison's
band and his own ensemble
through three compositions that
gave in more to the East than the
West.
Harrison was clearly elated
with Shankar, calling him "my old
pal" and kissing one of the
vocalists. He said he loved Indian
music.
"I'd die for it and I wouldn't die
for this," he said, tapping his
guitar.
It was a pity the audience didn't
concur. There were loud shouts of
"Rock on!" and considerable
applause during one pause for
boogie advocates.
It might have been expected. The
fans had come to see a rocking
Beatle, and a $10 Beatle at that.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13th
12:30 p.m.
FACULTY
OF FORESTRY FILM:
"Limits to Growth"
This film takes a look at various sectors of our
economic and social activities, and (true to the plot)
their unhappy conclusions. Pollution Probe Toronto
considers the film a powerful argument for a change
in values and objectives.
Room 166, MacMillan Building
Auditions for the Theatre Department's Production of
THE PHILANTHROPIST
BY CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON
to be presented January 15-25
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
will be held on
WEDNESDAY, November 6    19.,09.,n„m
THURSDAY, November 7       ]2-3°-2-30 Pm-
AND
FRIDAY. November 8—1:30-3:30 p.m.
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
Auditions Open To All UBC Students, Faculty And Staff
UNIVERSITY
HEALTH
ACCIDfiT
PLUS
LIFE
National
Student Programme
EXTENDED HEALTH CARE
• Prescription Drugs • Private Duty Nursing • Dental Accident
• Dismemberment Benefit • Private or semi-private hospital
not covered by prov. plans • Plus Other Special Services.
PLAN I
Accident and Sickness
Extended Health Care Plus Life
(Includes $2,000 Life Ins.)
SINGLE
$11.00
MARRIED
$19.00
r
PLAN II
Accident Only up to 5,000.00
as per Schedule
SINGLE
$2.50
MARRIED
$5.00
For Information and Brochures
Please Call
Don Kopplin — 685-1638
24 - 640 BURRARD ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.
M. H. Ingle and Associates Insurance Agency Limited Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 5, 1974
ffl
Hot flashes
Clam bake
here Thursday
Municipal politricks come to
UBC Thursday in the form of an
all-candidates meeting which, fortunately, will not feature quite all
the candidates.
The three main mayoralty,
candidates and one or two aldermanic candidates from each party
will clash Thursday at noon in the
SUB ballroom.
A meeting will be held Thursday at noon in Buch. 202 to elect
two undergrads to act as representatives at departmental
meetings. All honors and majors
students are welcome to attend.
Book buy
Jazx
Polisly
Political science undergrads get
to do some field work Thursday.
There will be a free jazz
concert today at noon in the SUB
auditorium.
In an effort to promote "campus content", UBC radio CITR
will present Quadrant, a UBC jazz
group. The concert will be held to
support the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation.
'Tween classes
TODAY
HILLEL
Rabbi    Solomon    on   Judaism   and
capital punishment, noon, Hillel.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Film:   Two   women   on  the  peace,
Ruth  and  and   Harriet,  7:30   p.m.,
SUB auditorium.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly        fellowship,        noon,
conference room, Lutheran Campus
centre.
UBC MY JONG
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,   5   p.m.   to   7   p.m.,   SUB
party room.
HISPANIC AND
ITALIAN STUDIES
Film    on    southern    Brazil,    noon,
Bu. 220.
GERMAN CLUB
Conversational German, 7:15 p.m.,
IH.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Supper    and    plans    for    skits    for
Chilliwack,  6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
STUDENT LEGAL AID
Free   legal   aid   by  law  students for
staff, students and faculty, noon to
2:30 p.m., SUB 234.
PRE-MED SOC
Dr.    Graham    on   application    and
admission  to  medical school, noon,
IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
SRI CHINMOY
MEDITATION GROUP
Film   on   Sri   Chinmoy,   7:30   p.m.,
Bu. 106.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 217.
SAILING CLUB
General       meeting,       noon,      SUB
207-209.
MUSIC
Recital,   Music  of Barber,  Debussy
and   Mozart,   noon,   Music   building
recital hall.
CLASSICS CLUB
A.  Dalzell on the literary circle of
Messalla,   8  p.m.  2967 West  Forty-
third Ave.
ONTOLOGY
Bill Wilkinson   on   peace: an  inside
job, noon, Bu. 216.
CAMPUS CYCLISTS
'   Meeting   about   cycles,   noon,  SUB
215.
GERMAN CLUB
Film and meeting, noon, LH 406.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
THURSDAY
PHILOSOPHY
Election of student reps to department, noon, Bu. 203.
CCCM
Journey into personhood with Phil
Thatcher, noon, SUB 212A.
AMANDA MARGA YOGA SOCIETY
Discussion   on   socio-spirftual   practices of yoga, noon, SUB 224.
MUSIC
University  choral   union  concert,  8
p.m., music building recital hall.
UBC KARATE CLUB
Practice,  7:30 p.m., Gym E, Winter
Sports complex.
ALPAH OMEGA
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
PRE-DENTALSOC
Dental material demo by Dr. Royd-
house, noon, reception area of
MacDonald Building.
FRIDAY
UBC SKYDIVERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
MUSIC
University choral union concert, 8
p.m., music building recital hall.
Want to buy books cheap?
You can after Nov. 12 in Brock
Hall.
Of course, there's a few
catches.
Such as that the books are
usually the ones you needed for
last year's courses or are the same
titles as the ones you already own.
Or they're out of date. Want a
1965 physics text or a math book
that's full of theorums that are
now proved false?
Or they're rotten. You might
pick up a good buy on a badly
written academic story of a boring
aboriginal tribe in Africa.
Or they're really rotten, with
pages missing, upside down type
and odours of warehouse mould.
Or, underneath, they're
"perpetual sale" Christmas sale
books. Phyllis Young, note.
Still, among 300,000 titles are
bound to be one or two gems.
And what can you get for as low
as 19 cents these days?
SOUNDTREK
DENIS BROTT, Cellist,
winner of the 1973 International Cello
Competition, student of the legendary
Gregor Piatigorsky, and one of Canada's
brightest stars in the international
music scene, plays the Walton Cello
Concerto
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 at 8:30 p.m.
in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
SIMON STREATFEILD conducts
The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra also
performs Hindemith Nobilissima Visione <
Richard Rodney Bennett Aubade •
Harry Freedman Tapestry and Jerome Summers
Kaleidoscope
TICKETS on sale now at all Vancouver Ticket
Centre outlets.
You can charge them to your Eaton account.
ONLY $6, $5 or $4 — STUDENTS $1 OFF
This series Is sponsored by CP Air L
HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL
and it has a lot to do with
projecting a man's personality.
LET US LOOK AT YOUR HAIR AND BONE STRUCTURE
AND BRING THE BEST OUT OF YOU
Ask us about our protein body waves and any information on how to take care of your hair and skin. We also
retail the very best products on the market for the needs of your skin and hair.
We are located on the U.B.C. Campus. Come and see us. By appointment only —
call 224-5540.
2144 WESTERN PARKWAY. UNIVERSITY SQ. (The Village)
Nobs Parlons Franqais
SOUTHERN COMFORT
THS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional tines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $ 1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
10 —For Sale — Commercial
SCIENTIFIC   CALCULATORS— Now  in
Co-op Bookstore SUB basement Kings-
point SC-40. Now $159.95.
11 — For Sale — Private
INEXPENSIVE FURNITURE for sale —
Must sell by Nov.   8.   874-6745.
FOR    SALE    —    Armstrong    104    flute.
Excellent condition, phone 985-2659
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
CORD BOARD OPERATORS—Fart time.
Weekends and holidays, will train.
Call 681-7256.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
BOY AGE 11 and girl age 8 require
tutor to teach, demonstrate, experience WOODWORKING AND
CRAFTS Hours to be arranged
and fee negotiable. Please reply
to P.O. Box 3480, Vancouver V6B
3Y4 giving a resume and recommendations.
85 —Typing
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC typing, my home.
Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate
work.   Reasonable   rates.   263-5317.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING—Kits area.
IBM Selectric. Reasonable rates. 736-
5816.  Special rates for long papers.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, November 5, 1974
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS
Quit Canada West league
Pull out 'Birds
By STUART LYSTER
Some people at Thunderbird
Stadium Saturday would have said
it was the University of Alberta
Golden Bears that beat the 'Birds
46-0 in Canada West Football
League action.
I would prefer to put the blame
on athletic director Bus Philips and
assistant director Buzz Moore.
Their reasons may be good ones
for keeping our football team in the
CWUAA, but as long as the 'Birds
remain in the league, you can
expect more scores like Saturday's.
Alberta dominated the game
throughout, piling up a total of 689
yards offence and holding UBC to
140 yards.
They also scored touchdowns the
first three times they touched the
football putting together drives of
73, 74 and 94 yards.
UBC's best chances of scoring
Hockey team
dump two
tie one
The hockey 'Birds played three
games away on the road this past
week and the results,' though bad
on the surface, are inconclusive.
Thursday, UBC lost to Calgary 5-2.
In two exhibition games in
Brandon Friday and Saturday,
they came away with a 4-4 tie and a
3-1 loss. Not an overwhelming
record, by any means. But coach
Bob Hindmarch defended his
team.
"This has been the worst year I
can remember for injuries," he
said. "Almost half our line-up is
injured, and most of the affected
players are veterans. It means that
most of our healthy players are
relatively inexperienced. We've
even had to move a defenceman up
to the forward line to fill in the
gaps."
The results left the 'Birds tied for
first place, but all other teams
have played less games than UBC.
Hindmarch remained doggedly
optimistic.
"As soon as we get our injured
players back and get a bit more
experience, we'll be a really good
team," he said. One hopes that the
season will not be over by that
time.
The next games for the 'Birds
will be this weekend against the
University of Saskatchewan at the
Thunderbird Arena. The Friday
game starts at 8 p.m. and Saturday's game begins at noon.
were snuffed out by the bigger,
more experienced Alberta defence.
Late in the first quarter, on third
and nine from the Alberta 21-yard
line, quarterback Dan Smith rolled
out on a fake field goal try and hit
Digby Leigh for only a five-yard
gain.
And early in the second half,
UBC took advantage of a fumbled
punt reception to have first and 10
from the Alberta 20. Three plays
later defensive halfback Gary
Wilson stepped in front of a Smith
pass on the goal line to kill that
drive.
Despite the showing on the
scoreboard, not one UBC player
could be faulted for giving less
than 100 per cent.
Middle linebacker Greg Smith
was particularity sharp in
knocking down two passes in the
fourth quarter. Jim Baker also had
a knockdown and Pat Fiander
recovered second quarter Alberta
fumble.
Ten Hon Choo gave a fine performance at defensive halfback
against an almost unstoppable
Golden Bear offence.
It is because of the players efforts that Bus Philips and Buzz
Moore are cited for the loss.
Moore has been quoted as saying
that the students asked for
Canadian content and don't want to
play against American  regional
Right on
Campus
Directly Behind Bank
of
Commerce
Gabriel's
Village Coiffures
Newest Cutting and
Styling by
Miss Betty and
 Miss Maija	
No app't necessary!
Special Student Prices
224-7514
2154 Western Parkway
(in Village)	
teams, although they would
provide more equal competition.
He said he is only trying to
represent the students views.
Frank Smith has a point when he
says UBC would be better off
playing those smaller U.S. colleges
because they have generally the
same difficulties in recruiting as
the 'Birds.
He compares the outcome of a
UBC game with Alberta, with a
game between Alberta and
Washington State. The recruiting
difficulties and available player
talent, relative to each team,
would be reflected in the final
score.
If the primary purpose for any
extramural sport at the university
is the enjoyment and satisfaction
received ,by all people connected
with it, then the athletic committee
should quit playing politics and get
an accurate picture of participant's needs in a particular
sport.
Continuation of the present
course can only result in the withdrawal of the team from the league
because of frustration and disinterest of players and coaches.
UBC's next game is against the
University of Manitoba Bisons 2
p.m. Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium. The 'Birds dropped their
first game with Manitoba, 41-15
five weeks ago.
—sucha singh photo
JUMP BALL actions freezes for a moment during action in Friday's
games between varsity team and grad students. Varsity beat one group
of grads 68-56. See story below.
Grads, grads and more grads at game
Watching two meaningless
basketball games Friday probably
isn't anyone's idea of a good time.
It isn't mine either, but someone
has to do it.
So be advised that the first game
saw a group of Really Old Grads
beat a group of Moderately Old
Grads 50-48, while the second
featured the Thunderbirds
defeating yet another group of
grads 68-56.
Of the two games, the first one
was the better. For a fan steeped in
basketball history, it was good to
see players like Mike Potkonjak
and Dave Way emerge from obscurity to put their venerable.
talents on display.
Nostalgia buffs will be glad to
hear that the Really Old Grads
affected an upset, defeating the
Moderately Old Grads 50-48.
The game was highlighted by the
Running team wins all
The UBC cross-country team came up with grandslams in both the
men's and women's sections of the Canada West championships at
Victoria Saturday.
John Wheeler, Chris White, Gerry Lister and Duncan Klett were the
top finishers in their section, while Sheila Currie, Leslie Stubbs and
Linda Rossetti ran away with the top honors in their race.
The other UBC runners, John Currie, Ken Gibson, and Bruce McRae,
finished eighth, ninth and eleventh respectively in the longer men's
race, while Sheila Hutcheon and Jean Sparling came in eighth and
eleventh for the women's team.
This gives the UBCjteam its second consecutive Canada West team
title.
The strong UBC team will represent western Canada at the National
championships at Guelph, Ont. this weekend. They will leave for Ontario Thursday and will be meeting the winners of the Quebec, Ontario,
Great Plains and Atlantic provinces regional finals Nov. 9.
excellent shooting of Neil Murray,
playing for the ROG's and by a
great half-time show which helped
keep the fans awake.
The second half was truly exciting, with the outcome in doubt
until the final whistle. The fans
were up and screaming as the lead
changed hands several times, and
by the end of the game, everyone
was in a good mood, and eager for
the main event.
Unhappily, the main event was a
complete bore. The Grads were
never   in   the   game   with   the
Thunderbirds and lost for the 10th
time in a decade. The 'Birds shot
well, passed well, and rebounded
well. The Grads, despite a power
packed bench, did most things
poorly. The 'Birds pulled steadily
ahead, to no one's surprise.
At the end of the boring match,
the crowd got up, yawned, and
went home in a confused slumber.
The next game for the Thunderbirds is Nov. 8at War Memorial
gym, when they go against a Senior
A team out of Burnaby. Game time
8:30 p.m.
Chartered
accountants
We will be on campus November 8, 12, 13 and 14 to interview 1975
graduates interested in pursuing a career as Chartered Accountants.
B. Comm. (A.M.I.S.) M.B.A., Licentiate in Accounting and M.Sc.
(Bus. Admin.) candidates are ideally suited for these positions. It
would expedite the interview process if those from other faculties or
divisions furnished the interviewer with an ICABC evaluation of
your C.A. student course requirements upon graduation (guidelines
on educational requirements are available in the Placement Office).
Detailed information on the Firm, its objectives, training
programmes; etc. are available in the reading room of the Placement
Office. Interviews should be arranged with the Placement Office.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
ARTS AND CRAFTS TYPES,
CARD PLAYERS,
MUSICIANS AND OTHER
KIND AND GENTLE FOLK
are urgently needed as volunteers with the Vancouver
Resources Board, Health Care and Aging Division, call
Susan Poulos 733-8111 for more details. Expenses
reimbursed.
WIN $100 OR MORE
AT THE
BINGO AND BREW NIGHT
—Thursday, Nov. 7
—8:30 p.m.
—SUB Ballroom
—10 Games
—$100 for the top prize
Sponsored by U.B.C. Intramurals Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Campus enrolment up
Tuesday, November 5, 1974
OTTAWA (CUP) — Most
Canadian universities have
reported an upswing in the number
of students on campus this autumn.
Many spokesmen attribute the
increases to a revived interest in
higher education and to the current
economic situation. They say
students are taking courses that
will guarantee them a job after
graduation instead of the unemployment line.
Many of the new students are
taking professional courses
because of the inflationary spiral
and the uncertainty of the job
market.
An exception to the general trend
appears to be Memorial University
in Newfoundland where total
undergraduate enrolment this fall
dropped to 5,500 from 6,048 last fall.
However, Memorial spokesmen
say that first year enrolment is up
over last year.
Some spokesmen are attributing
the increases to the rising interest
of women in obtaining an
education. The registrar at the
University of New Brunswick says
there are about 5,650 full-time
students at the university this
year, an increase of about 50 over
last year. He attributes the increase to more women.
A spokesman for the University
of Victoria also expected
enrolment to be higher than last
year's 6,069. Victoria's enrolment
record of 6,341 was set in 1972-73,
the year that many other Canadian
universities registered a drop in
students.
An admissions officer at Ottawa's Carleton University said
the number of non-high school
graduates wishing to enter Ontario
universities this year is up 15 per
cent from last year.
At McMaster University, total
1974-75 enrolment is estimated at
8,850 and the number of first year
students 2,750, both records.
The University of Toronto anticipated a record total enrolment
of 43,772, about 1,225 more students
than last year.
Estimated enrolment at some
other Canadian universities this
year: Dalhousie, Halifax, recorded
7,544 students last year and applications "a little ahead of normal" this fall; St. Mary's, Halifax,
previous record 1,750 in 1971-72 and
an official said, "I guess that we
are headed for a record" this year;
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Acadia, Wolfville, N.S., estimated
2,600 this year, previous record
2,552 in 1973-74; Universite de
Moncton, N.B., 2,625, almost 300
more than last year.
University of Montreal, 4,600
first year students accepted, 300
more than last year and total
enrolment expected to be a record;
University of Sherbrooke, 3,200
first year students compared with
2,990 last year and record total
enrolment expected.
Carleton, first year students
2,345 compared with 2,211 last
year: Laurentian, Sudbury, Ont.,
2,200 compared with 2,092 in 1970-
71, the previous record year.
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