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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1989

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Array the Ubyssey
ill
III Irrelevant
■I      Drivel
jgj|       throughout
Founded in 1918
Vancouver, Friday, October 27,1989
Vol 72, No 15
by Carol Hui
"Holy hell, are you people really university
students?" one student wrote after examining
racist remarks which were written on the door
of a bathroom stall.
Bathroom graffiti is by no means the most
intellectual forum for discussion. But it nevertheless expresses the opinions of the writers.
In the bathrooms ofthe Student Union Building, Buchanan blocks, Commerce building,
Engineering buildings, and the libraries, UBC
students have expressed their resentment of
the Chinese on bathroom walls.
E Canadians are going to make living here very
miserable for you money grabbers" and "Leave behind in Hong Kong your obsession with money and
material goods and be concerned with Canada's environment," students wrote in the women's washroom in SUB.
Male students were not so much concerned with materialism. "All Chinks, go back to fucking gook-land!" "The USA
should have nuked the whole far east, not just some measly
little Japanese town like Hiroshima," a vitriolic user wrote in
a Buchanan A block washroom. Similiar comments were reported to decorate the bathrooms of other buildings.
"I am shocked that these people can be so narrow-
minded. In universities, you are supposed to be open-minded
and learn new things," said Josephine Law, president ofthe
Hong Kong Exchange Club (HKEC).
On another wall, another writer puts the onus on the Chinese, "Racism stems from the Chinese. Look at their clubs,
HKEC, CVC (Chinese Varsity Club), and CCS (Chinese Col
legiate Society), etc. They are 100 per cent
racist against all other Canadians. I have yet
to see Anglo-Saxon or East Indian clubs."
But according to Sanju Sukul, currently
the senior advisor ofthe CVC, "How racist can
a club be if the members elected an East Indian
vice-president for the past two years?"
"CVC was first established in 1937 as a
social club for Chinese students who were
socially sanctioned from joining other organizations," explained Sukul.
"It's funny how people are always asking
me, or Andrew Ranger, or Derek McLaughlin
[other non-Chinese executives] whether we
are part Chinese. You don't have to be Chinese
or speak Chinese to join these clubs."
Though some might dismiss graffiti as
spontaneous outlash, these remarks are echoes of criticisms by many in the general community as well. The influx of Hong Kong Chinese has triggered widespread concern
amongst Vancouverites.
HKEC president Josephine Law is organizing a student forum concerning the treatment of Hong Kong immigrants, to clear up
misconceptions about Chinese immigrants,
and to provide an arena where both sides can
voice their feelings.
AMS president Mike Lee fully supports a
forum concerning racism on campus. "Some
members of council have been trying to make
racism a priority. Unfortunately, other issues
have taken precedence."
The presence of the Hong Kong Chinese
has also provoked resentment on the part of
Chinese Canadian students.
"Hongers are the ones who sit, smoke and
play cards all day. They have too much gel in
their hair, wear funny glasses and
drive BMWs," said one Chinese
student who has lived in Canada
all his life.
"I can understand why the
Hong Kong Chinese stick together. I have lived in a foreign
country before and it's really hard
to fit in when you don't speak the
language and don't understand
the culture. Therefore, I hang out
with other Canadians and Americans," said one sympathetic Arts
student.
Another common complaint
found on male bathroom walls is
that Chinese people are hard to
date because their parents are so
prejudiced against non-Chinese
people.
"My ex-boyfriend always
complained that my parents
hated him because he is white. I
think my parents have this stereotype that Caucasian people don't
have very good manners, and my ex-boyfriend
lived up to their image," another Chinese
student explained.
"My ex-boyfriend rationalized that my
mom and dad didn't like him because of his
colour when really, they didn't like the way he
acted," she explained.
"My parents like my current boyfriend,
even though he is white, because Dave is
polite. My sister's boyfriend is Chinese but my
parents aren't crazy about him because he
doesn't go to university. I think my parents
have this conception of what "a good boyfriend" is like. They just happen to think that
maybe more Chinese guys fit into that image,
but if a white guy has the same qualities, they
also like him.
Some ofthe concerns of female students
are "Why do Chinese girls dress up so much
for school? I always feel ugly next to them with
their little outfits."
"I don't know why we are singled out and
criticized for the way we dress. I see sorority
girls, Jewish girls, who dress well. Maybe we
are conspicuous because of our colour. Why do
they hate us just because we like to look nice?
Maybe I get jealous of people just because
they look nicer or have more money than me,
but I don't hate them," a Chinese girl replied,
upset at the offense directed at her.
"Canada has no race, we are supposed to
be a multicultural country. Asian immigration is not going to threaten Canadian culture. People keep forgetting that everyone in
this country except for the Native population
was an immigrant or descended from one,"
stated Ron Hamilton, a student and lecturer
on multiculturalism.
Quorum question in a quandary
by Martin Chester
The Student Recreation
Centre debate over quorum has
moved to Student Court.
AMS vice-president Sarah
Mair has asked the court to interpret the AMS constitution code
and bylaws regulating quorum for
referendums and to decide
whether or not the director of
administration, Andrew Hicks,
acted properly during the process
of establishing quorum for the
SRC referendum.
"The whole process of deciding quorum was very poorly
handled," Mair said.
The court met last Tuesday
but were unable to come to a decision. This Tuesday there will be
another open session in order to
reach a final decision.
The court was asked to interpret what is meant by "supporting
the referendum" in Bylaw 4 section 4(b). Mair suggested that
supporting the referendum means
to vote, not just to vote "yes'.
"Based on precedent on all
referenda dating back to 1986,
"supporting' has always been a
vote "yes'," Hicks said.
The court also has to decide
what part of the student body
should be considered when calculating quorum.
The bylaw states that quorum
should be calculated based on the
number of "active members ofthe
Society (AMS) who are day members at the Point Grey Campus of
University."
There are many students,
including medical, education and
graduate students, who are not
"enrolled in classes which are
regularly held between the hours
of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m." The
debate is whether these students
will be counted in the quorum calculation.
Mair asked if students on
practicum off campus, such as
second-year  education   students
and third and fourth-year medical
students who were included in the
quorum count, should be when
"during the referendum there was
no polling booth" for them to vote
at, and they were "not informed of
what was going on."
Hicks said that when the
quorum figure is established it
should include students, such as
grad students, who are regularly
on campus during the day to work
on their theses, but may only have
a night seminar.
The decision the court has to
make will be precedent setting
which is why it is such a difficult
issue, according to ombudsperson
Jessica Mathers.
"There has never been such a
contentious issue which has resulted in such a close result," she
said.
Mathers will advise the AMS
in the future that quorum "should
definitely be decided before the
referendum is started."
On a more clear cut, but no
less contentious, matter, the Student Court has also been asked to
rule on whether Hicks acted properly during the establishing of
quorum.
Mair is concerned that Hicks,
as "an interested body involved,"
and who has "vocally supported
Rec Fac," should not have been
involved in the process.
Hicks has said that as quorum
continued on page 3 CLASSIFIEDS 228-3977
Classified Advertising
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines 60 cents,
commercial -3 lines, $5.00, additional lines 75 cents. (10% Discount on
25 issues or more) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4&0
p.m,. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T
2A7, 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
1968 LOTUS EUROPA S2, very good cond.
Unique & very special 90% 6tock, $10,000,
272-4995.
1975 MUSTANG GHIA-SILVER - "V8".
Like new!!! $4,500 OBO. 270-8146 or 534-
8696 message.
COMPLETE WORD PROCESSING
PACKAGE: 128 Commodore computer,
Panasonic printer for $1,000. Call 224-4167
aft. 7 p.m.
ONCE IN A LIFETIME OFFER.    4th
Haida clearance centre is selling their sister
floor, 3rd Haida. Unbelievably low prices.
No offers refused. Trades considered. Ph.
224-9045, ask for Rm 492, 472, or 470.
FOR SALE! 1979 DATSUN 310 -hatchback'. New all season radials - sunroof -
Pioneer stereo & amp. Great on gas - engine
& interior in excellent shape. $1,100 firm.
Call Tim at 222-0210 soon!!!
3 1/2X8 FT. DESK with matching 3 level
bookcase. Oak finish - $225. 266-6046.
1975 VOLVO, white, good condition,
100,000 miles. $2,300 OBO. Call 224-9142
or ans. machine 736-9498.
S.E.RJ?. THE HOME OF LOW PRICES.
Wang AS & Micom word processing equipment. Call 228-2582.
1983   TOYOTA   CELICA   GT   Coupe
loaded, 5 spd. asking $7700 obo 224-1239
1981 TOYOTA CELICA GT 5 spd. HB,
cruise, gauges, asking $4300 obo ph. 325-
8429 after 6:00 pm (Michael)
20 - HOUSING
ROOM FOR RENT, Kits, Non smk. fern,
pref. $350+ Inutility. Call732-7425. Nov.
1/89.
Between
Deadline for submissions: for
Tuesday's paper is Friday at
3:30pm, for Friday's paper is
Wednesday at 3:30pm. LATE
SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.
Note: "Noon" = 12:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 27	
Film Society. Films - Oct. 27-29:
7:30, Good Morning Vietnam;
9:30, Roadhouse. SUB Theatre,
Equality For jAII Bzzr Garden -
come drink with those striving for
social change. 4:30 -12 a.m., SUB
Party Room.
Students for a Free South Africa.
Genera] meeting. 12:30, SUB
205.
Badminton Club. Recreational
Play ($3 drop-ins welcome). 7-10
p.m., Lord Byng, 3933 W. 16th.
International Relations Students'
Association. Model United Nations Information Meeting. 3:30
p.m., International House.
Musician's Network. Bzzr garden/jam night - all welcome. Paid
members only onstage. 7 p.m. -
midnight. SUB 207/209.
Graduate Student Society
Zen Meditation Instruction
12:30 noon, Penthouse Graduate
Student Centre
THE DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT
HOUSING & CONFERENCES has vacancies for women in Totem Park & Place
Vanier residences. These residences offer
room & board accommodation in single or
double rooms. Pis. contact the Student
HousingOffice during office hours (8:30 a.m.
- 4) weekdays or by calling228-2811 for more
information.
FEMALE   ROOMMATE   NEEDED   for
beautiful Kerrisdale house at 41st & Granville. $240 incl. utilities, W-D, no pet, N/S.
Call 261-6944 (Tom).
30 - JOBS
P/T HELP REQUIRED. Autoplan insurance, will study for level I license. First or
2ndyr. student preferred. Call Graceat 433-
7748.
ATTENTION SWIM COACHES
We are accepting applications for the position of HEAD COACH for the 1990
summer season.
We will challenge your:
- Organizational skill
- Communication skills
- Coaching skills
The successful candidate will be provided
with a competitive salary plus training
allowance. Submit your resume to the
POCO Marlins Swim Club Coach Committee. P.O. Box 3, Port Coquitlam, B.C.
V3C3V5. Deadline Nov. 13,1989. Please
detail your experience, qualifications and
coaching goals.
Jobs in Alaska
HIRING Men - Women • Summer/Year Round.
CANNERIES, FISHING, LOGGING, TOURISM, CONSTRUCTION up to $600 weekly,
plus FREE room and board.
CALL NOW! Call refundable.
1-206-736-0775, Ext 10934
Graduate Student Society
GSS Beer Garden
4:30 - 7:30 Garden Room Graduate Student Centre
Graduate Student Society
Walter Zuber Armstrong - World
class flutist
5pm Fireside Lounge Graduate
Student Centre
International Relations Student
Association
Model United Nations Information Meeting
3:30 pm International House
SUNDAY, OCT. 29
United Church Campus Ministry.
Informal Discussion & Study
Group. Newcomers welcome. 7:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Communion Service. 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Uzume Taiko. Musical performance - demonstration of the demanding art of Japanese drumming. 2:30 p.m., Museum of Anthropology - Great Hall.
St. Mark's College. Worship. 9:30,
11, 7, St. Mark's College Chapel.
MONDAY, OCT. 30
UBC Dance Horizons. Come try
our ultra-modern dance class!
Now with live music! 5 - 6:30 p.m.,
SUB 200 - Party Room.
Classic SUBfilms. Film: Rocky
Horror Picture Show - the ultimate Hallowe'en flick. 7 & 9:30,
SUB Theatre.
EARN $15,000 THIS SUMMER. College
Pro is accepting applications for 1990. The
business skills you would require, will give
you an edge over other applicants in the job
market. Apply at the Campus Canada
Employment Ctr. or call 879-4105.
RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS
StudentSprinklers is now hiring on campus!
We have 45 manager positions available
nationwide. In 1989ourtopmanager_ gross
profit was $45,000. Join a winning team -
apply now. 681-5755.
DONT GET A JOB THIS SUMMER, get
a business. College Pro is currently accepting applications for 1990 Summer Outlet
Managers. Have a great summer learning
valuable business skills and earn $15,000.
Call 879-4105 or apply at the Campus Canada Employment Ctr. today!
40 ■ MESSAGES
WORK STUDY
STUDENTS
Several students authorized for
Work Study Program
needed NOW.
($9.25/hour)
• Handling bulk mail
• Assembling course material
Easy work, flexible hours.
Can include evenings/weekends.
Contact Bob Gobert 228-3250
continuing Education Health Sciences
VOLUNTEERS. Healthy non-smoking
males (19-25 yrs.) are needed for study of an
antiarrhythmic drug, Mexiletine. Blood,
saliva and urine samples will be collected
over 72 hrs. A $70 honorarium will be paid
on completion ofthe study. For info, call Dr.
McErlane (228-4451) or Mr. Kwok (228-
5838) in the Pharmacy Faculty, UBC.
MESSAGE OF ISLAM 9: You are invited
by God to search in the open book of nature,
to use your own reasoning power, and to
reflect on the teaching of the koran to find
the truth.
70 - SERVICES
RACQUET STRINGING - 40% to 60% off
standard retail prices. All types of racquets.
48 hr. service. 6 yrs. professional exp. Kevin
- 261-8677.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Typeityourself... simplified instructions,
spell check, and laser printer make your
work look top quality. $7/hr. and 15c/
page. Friendly help always available.
SUB lower level, across from Tortellini's
Restaurant; 228-5496.
ON CAMPUS WORD PROCESSING
Need the professional touch? ... have it
done for you - you can even book ahead.
$27/hr., 6-8 double spaced pages of normal text per hour, laser printer. SUB
lower level, across from Tortellini's Restaurant; 228-5640.
75 - WANTED
35 - LOST
LOST: white and yellow ring, wide band,
$200 reward, no questions. Reply Box P200
this paper.
HELP! Lost gold lady's watch. Reward! If
go home without at Xmas mother will serve
me instead of turkey!!! If u have take pity!
Call 723-5123.
REWARD! for return ofgold medallion with
Chinese Dragon in the middle. Lost Oct.
20th. Great sentimental value. Call Rina,
224-9813/224-9060.
TUTOR-EDITOR NEEDED for Master's
Thesis. Please call June at work 660-2000 or
home 875-1383.
80 - TUTORING
SPANISH TUTOR AVAILABLE. All levels, reasonable rates. Call 737-1404.
IMPROVE YOUR verbal English skills.
Emphasis on conversation, pronunciation
and comprehension. Ph. 734-5917. Reasonable hourly rates.
FRENCH TUTOR AVAILABLE eves./
wknds. Low rates. Martin, 224-9962.
85 ■ TYPING
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word processing/typing. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
TYPING UBC VILLAGE, 24 hr. service.
Tapes transcribed, essays, papers, resumes,
letters, editing/proofing. 224-2310.
ACCURATE REPORTS WORD PROCESSING, WordPerfect, laser printer, dictation. Student rates avail. #16-1490 W.
Broadway at Granville. 732-4426.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.50/dbl. sp. page.
APA, MLA, CMS. Computersmiths, 3726
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
TYPING QUICK right by UBC. All types
$1.50/pg. dbspc. Call Rob, 228-8989, any
time.
U NEED OUR SERVICE. Documents &
term papers, presentations & spread sheets
professionally prepared at reasonable rates.
Call 272-4995.
TYPING $1.00/pg. Call 732-0204.
TYPING/WORD PROCESSING.
Experienced/competent typist with computer, available for typing reports, term
papers, thesis, etc. 943-1582.
TYPING TIGERS. Low, low rates, computerized. Word Perfect 5.0. 273-1420 or 645-
6934 (24 hr. pager).
JB
WORD PROCESSING.
Fast, accurate, dependable.
224-2678.
WORD PERFECT, professional computer
typist/editor, low rates. Deborah 734-5020
or 734-5404.
WORD PROCESSING & typing essays,
term papers, theses, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
UBC Tools for Peace Committee
is holding an organizational meeting. Friday, Oct 27th at 12:30, Buch B224
Nursing Week starts with the
Nursing Health Fair in SUB Concourse. Come have your blood
pressure taken and learn about
other interesting healthy things!
History Students' Association.
Jack the Ripper - nature and identity - panel discussion featuring
crime historians and a forensic
psychologist. Noon, Buch A 204.
Graduate Student Society
Ballroom Dance Lesson - the Jive
Drop ins $5.00 • Fireside Lounge
Graduate Student Centre
TUESDAY, OCT. 31
Pre-Medical Society. Lecture -
Cardiology. Noon, IRC Wood 1.
Lutheran Student Movement. Coop Supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Lutheran Student Movement.
Bible Study. 10 a.m., Lutheran
Student Centre.
Photo Society. Opening party,
"The Last Romantics". Costumes
recommended. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.,
AMS SUB Art Gallery.
UBC Dance Horizons. Learn to
tap dance like Gene Kelly! (Wear
hard-bottomed shoes.) 4 - 5 p.m.,
SUB 200 - Party Room.
UBC Dance Horizons. New! Ballet I/II Dance Class! 12 -1:30 p.m.,
SUB 200 - Party Room.
Students for Forestry Awareness.
Lecture Series: Dr. Bill Carr-Soil
Scientist, Terrasol. Title: Forest
Soil Disturbance: Degradation
and Rehabilitation. Noon,
MacMillan Room 166.
Classic SUBfilms. Film: Rocky
Horror Picture Show - costumes
welcome - people too! 7 & 9:30,
SUB Theatre.
UBC Lesbians. Lesbian Discussion Group. Topic: Internalized
Homophobia (again). Noon, SUB
130.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Famous Hot Lunch. 12:30
p.m., Hillel House.
AMS Student Environment
Centre. Informational meeting
describing our projects. 12:30
p.m., BUCH A104.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1
United Church Campus Ministry.
Dinner, Film, Discussion. All
welcome. Meet new friends. 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Women in Development, film and
lecture series. Jean Swanson of
End Legislated Poverty will be
speaking on "Women and Poverty
in Canada". 12:30 p.m., Asian
Centre, Auditorium.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel- Torah Discussion Group.
12:30 p.m., Hillel House.
Scandinavian Club. Let's make a
viking hat! General meeting -
info, on our upcoming wild "Viking
Voyage" (Nov. 4th), everybody
welcome! Noon (12:30), SUB 212.
THURSDAY, NOV. 2
Annual T-Cup Football Game between Nursing and Family &
Nutritional Sciences. Maclnnes
field (behind the SUB), 12:30
p.m.
Campus Crusade For Christ.
Fellowship Meeting. "Prime
Time For Fellowship." 12:30
p.m., Angus 215.
Le Club Francais. Conversational meeting (from now on,
every Thursday & Friday). 12:30
p.m., French Department
Lounge, 7th Floor, Buchanan
Tower,   'a a
Chinese Christian Fellowship.
Join us in praising the Lord.
Noon, Scarfe 206.
Jewish Students' ^Association/
Hillel. Israeli Folk Dancing. 7
p.m., SUB 207/209.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel. Hebrew Conversation
Group. 12:30 p.m., Hillel House.
AMS Student Environment
Centre. Recycling Group meeting. 12:30 p.m., SUB 119.
AMS Student Environment
Centre. Transportation Group
meeting. 12:30 p.m., SUB 215.
FRIDAY, NOV. 3	
Nursing Dance. City Sounds
play the SUB Ballroom, 8 p.m. -
12:30 a.m. Let's party!
2/THE UBYSSEY
October 27,1989 smwmfi&m
Land war
rages on
It was roller coaster volleyball Wednesday night
at War Memorial as the Estonian national team—in
their second visit ever to a western country—edged
the UBC varsity men 11-15 15-3 13-15 15-6 15-13.
"I'm excited about the last game when they
(UBC) could have rolled over and died," said Ohman.
"We kept coming back. John (setter Keleris) kept
rethinking strategy."
The T-Birds were led by their most experienced players, power hitters Rob Hill and Dave
Farrell who collected 26 and 24 kills respectively.
This weekend at home, UBC takes on Canada's top three universities, Pepperdine U. from
California (whose coach took the USA team to gold
in the Seoul Olympics) and the U. of California in
Santa Barbara which won the '88 NCAA title.
UBC scoops funding
by Steve Conrad
The University of British Columbia has been awarded three of
the fourteen projects funded by the
federal government under the
Networks of Centres of Excellence
Program.
In addition UBC will be involved in nine of the remaining
projects.
"When you put it all together
what it means is that, without a
doubt, UBC is the fundamental
winner in the overall announcement ofthe centres of excellence,"
said university president David
Strangway at Thursday's press
conference.
Minister of State (Science and
Technology) William Winegard
announced the final selections
Thursday morning. Of the $240
million to be made available under
the program over the next four
years, the three projects led by
UBC will account for $55.7 million.
Dr. Michael Hayden of the
department of Medical Genetics
and his team of 39 investigators
received $17.5 million to study the
genetic basis of human disease.
"We are hoping these methods
will lead us to ways to screen populations for various diseases, to
prevent the birth of many affected
children and, for some, to devise a
treatment or a cure," said Hayden.
The   team   headed   by   Dr.
Robert Hancock ofthe department
of Microbiology will be given $18.2
million towards the study of disease-causing bacteria.
"What this program will
mean to us is that we will now have
the resources to take our work
from the lab and take it all the way
to the industrial level," explained
Hancock.
Twenty million dollars were
awarded to the team headed by Dr.
Michael Smith of the Biotechnology Laboratory to work on the
rapidly emerging field of protein
engineering.
Among the proteins Smith
hopes to see his group develop are
improved therapeutic agents for
cancer, new kinds of enzymes and
new ways of utilizing biomass in a
more environmentally sound way
by usi ng en zyme processors rather
than chemical ones.
The UBC annual research
budget of approximately $80 million is surpassed only by that ofthe
University of Toronto, placing
UBC in a tie for second place along
with McGill in the competition for
research funding.
Asked if Thursday's decision
would put UBC in the lead as a
research institute, Dr. Strangway
said he had not yet been able to
determine the effects of the funding from the off campus projects
with which the university is involved.
The fourteen projects were
selected from the 160 submittedin
response to the initiative announced about one year ago by the
federal government. The choices
were made by a peer review committee of 23 leading international
scientists and an advisory committee of prominent Canadians.
continued frontpage 1
was being established at such a
late hour it was necessary for
him to use the "weight" of his
office to obtain information from
the registrar's office.
"It wasn't me working
alone...trying to find a number,
perhaps a wrong number," he
told the court.
Hicks admitted that he "was
not a neutral body," but said that
he was also not active on the
elections committee.
Student Court will sit again
next Tuesday. Submissions are
necessary for the court to operate. Anyone interested in making a submission should make
themselves known to the Court
Clerk, through the Ombudsoffice, by noon Tuesday.
Dr. Rozmin F. Kamani
Family Physician
M.D., C.CF.R
is pleased to announce
the opening of her new office
at
JERICHO VILLAGE
on Alma at 4th
Suite 304 - 2083 Alma Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 4N6
(604) 222-9998
GSS Poetry
Sweatshop
How long does it take you to write a
poem? Have you ever written a
poem? Do you scorn poetry
because your high-school English
teacher made you write verse? If
you can answer any of these questions, come on out to the Garden
Room, Grad Centre at 6:30 Nov. 3/
89 and sweat it out with the rest of
Vancouver's budding poets. Next
Friday listen for the music quizz.
Everyone Welcome!
by Laura Busheikin
Like a David fighting two
Goliaths at once, the Gitksan-
Wet'suwet'en native people are
battling both governments and
industry for jurisdiction of their
land.
Since May 1987 they've been
waging a court battle against the
B.C. government, asking for recognition of their claim to 22,000
square miles of territory—land
the Gitksan-Wet'suwet'en have
occupied for centuries.
In the meantime, they are
taking direct action to protect
natural resources of those lands.
The Gitksan-Wet'suwet'en have
five permanent blockades set up to
keep companies or individuals
with government-issued fishing,
hunting or mining licences out of
the land they lay claim to, explained Penny Singh in SUB auditorium on Wednesday.
"It's projected that the end of
the trial will bein 1992. Even if the
Gitksan-Wet'suwet'en achieve
legal jurisdiction, they could go
back to barren land," Singh said.
Singh spoke briefly when the
two hereditary chiefs scheduled to
speak cancelled in order to attend
court.
A non-native involved with
the land-claim struggle, Singh
said helping out on the blockades
is one of the best ways for non-
natives to actively support natives.
Singh spent time on a blockade last October. She described it
as "a peaceful gathering, direct
political action, people who own
the land taking responsibility for
their land.
"The blockades have put a
halt to forestry in the area," she
said. "It's pretty much a shutdown."
Eight different companies
have interest in the land in Northwestern B.C. around Hazeltown
and Smithers.
Last spring in what Singh
calls a "landmark decision," the
Gitksan-Wet'suwet'en won an injunction against Weststar Logging company.
Singh encouraged people to
donate money, food and camping
equipment to support the blockade. The cost of the court case is
estimated at $5 to $6 million.
People without material resources to donate can help by
spending a morning or afternoon
in court, Singh said. This gives
strength to the witnesses and
lawyers for the Gitksan-
Wet'suwet'en, and also shows the
judge there is public support for
native people's rights to juridic-
tion of their own land.
Rowers sweep silver
in Boston regatta
by Sandra Stephanson
Participating in the biggest
one-day regatta in the world with
over 200,000 spectators looking
on, UBC teamed with the Vancouver Rowing Club represented
Vancouver, successfully this past
weekend at the Head ofthe Charles Regatta in Boston.
National team calibre and
veteran crews from clubs and universities across North America
braced the cold winds and choppy
water to challenge the grueling
5km course.
In the lightweight women's
eight, the Vancouver crew, rowing
as CARA, (The Canadian Amateur
Rowing Association) were beat out
by a mere .47 seconds by the Boston Rowing Club who captured
first place. The CARA crew included five UBC alumni and students competing in a tough field of
sixteen shells.
"It's always difficult racing
against the clock, but we knew we
were moving when we were passing two boats at once," said UBC's
Amy Stuenberg."At one point we
clashed blades with a crew that
wouldn't give way."
The crew was the top Canadian finisher, beating out rivals
St. Catharines Rowing club and
the University ofToronto.
The heavyweight women's
coxed four allowed the Boston
Rowing Club to squeak by with
only a three second margin. The
crew which included national
team and national development
team rowers raced from behind,
passing an unprecedented seven
boats.
UBC stroke Danita Sepp explained, "We knew we were in the
running, the possibility was there,
but we weren't cocky."
The UBC lightweight men's
eight placed 17th in a field of 40
shells.
!
Perspectives on:
THE STATUS OF WOMEN AT UBC
Panel Presentation
Tues. Nov. 7, 1989
12:30 - 2:30 p.m.
 IRC #5	
■ Vanessa Geary       Coordinator, External Affairs, AMS
> Sharon Kahn Director, Employment Equity Office
< Mary McBurnie Co-ordinator, Women's Centre, AMS
• Margaret North Senior Instructor, Geography Department
• Valerie Raoul Chair, Women Studies Department
> Suzanne Young Director, External Affairs, Graduate Student Society
6 Presented by The Office for Women Students Tel:  228-2415
!
%
October 27,1989
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LOCATED IN UBC VILLAGE
NOW HIRING DELIVERY DRIVERS
by Greg Davis
and Effxe Pow
Spirit. It is the essence of Chinese art, and has been captured
through the xieyi style of Zeng Mi.
Zeng, an artist and professor at
the Zhejiang Institute of Painting
in Hangzhou, China, has arrived
with his paintings at the Asian
Centre.
Xieyi, a translation of two Chinese characters^ fiseaning "to
paint, to write," and "idea," is the
free hand, expressionist type of
painting characterized by quick,
flowing strokes and the use of
empty space. The idea manifests
itself on white paper sooit after the
artist conceives of it. It is the
intrinsic connection between the
mind and the hand.
Appealing more to emotion
and feeling, xieyi style provides an
avenue opposite to gong bi, the
realist type of Chinese painting
finely crafted with meticulous
detail. The paintings are accompanied by a poetic saying written in
Chinese calligraphy, which is part
ofthe picture, not just scripture.
"Only the Chinese language
has preserved this pictographic
property and developed it into a
most unique writing form, the Chinese characters," said Zeng
through an interpreter.
Zeng gave a lecture and demonstration of his technique yesterday, organized by the UBC Pacific
Rim Club.
He presented his technique,
slowing down the tempo ofthe
strokes so the audience could follow. We watched as two strokes
and black smudges became a leafy
tree with two birds. The painting,
like all his work on display,
exerted a calm sense of purity.
Amain quality of this art form
is its sublime simplicity, relating
to the concept of "not showing."
What is implied is just as important as what is seen.
The show ends Sunday. The
experience is refreshing and elevating, and well worth the stroll
over to the Asian Centre.
Rose Ann Janzen, wil
display with Bombay
Street Studio, 2130'
Bloody, take two
by Nadene Rehnby
and Robert Studer
Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe
Shelley, revolutionaries
of their time, exiled from society
for their beliefs, become the focal
point of Bloody Poetry, a play
about poets and the world they
strove to change with words.
THEATRE
Bloody Poetry
Fredric Wood Theatre
Ends Saturday
Peter Wilds plays the neurotic, eccentric Shelley, not only
with charm and wit, but also with
energy and ferocity, the perfect
foil to Barry Levy's Lord Byron.
In Lord Byron's character,
Levy demands our attention each
time he walks on stage. His casual
callouaness and indifference to the
people he destroys is played convincingly and with humour.
Robert Gardiner's innovative
set creates spaces that allow for
full exploration. The stage comes
alive with movement creating
appealing environments—be they
canals in Venice, an English
garden, or a beach on Lake
Geneva. The bluish-green marble
that fills the stage works perfectly
whether reflecting the ocean or
the interior of a Venetian estate.
In addition, Gardiner uses many
interesting theatrical devices,
including good use of a revolve to
capture the graceful spirit of a
ship in movement.
Lighting by Don Griffiths accentuates this stage, and provides
tone for the action of the play. Soft
lighting is further warmed by candelabra in a love scene, contrasting the harsh light on Shelley as
he quotes from the work that
marks the end of his life.
Mara Gottler's costume
design accentuates both set and
character, and flows within the
unity ofthe play, depicting the
poverty and decadence of the time
without distracting from the rest
of the play as period costumes
often do.
Director Gerald Vanderwoode,
a graduate student of the Department of Theatre, has good reason
to be proud of both cast and crew,
and also for the mastery with
which he has brought his vision to
the stage.
Beverly Bardall, as Mary
Shelley, plays the dry but deter-
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and French. An intensive spring sess
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Federal/Provincial student assistai
For information, call or write:
UNIVERSITE CANADIENNE EN FRAI
Laurentian University. Ramsey Lake
(705) 673-6513. Ontario (800) 461-4
UCF. 68 Scollard Street. Toronto. Om
(416) 964-2569. Canada (800) 387-1:
UNIVERSITEC^tiADIEN
4/THE UBYSSEY
October 27,1989 ENTERTAINMENT
one of her many cat paintings on
lack, Paintings of Cats, at The Yew
,w Street, until November 3
NADENE REHNBY PHOTO
mined counterpart to her husband. Playing the sister to Mary
Shelley and lover to both poets,
Michelle Porter graces the stage
with delight and movement as
Claire Clairement, the dreamer.
Her character is the vocal revolutionist who always wants things
to be better, but never succeeds.
Susan Bertoia plays Shelley's
haunting wife. She is a whisper on
stage that is definitely seen and
heard. Neil Gallagher as the
jealous Dr. William Polidori adds
a small but very entertaining
aspect to the play.
The Frederic Wood Theatre
does creative and energetic justice
to an interesting play—a Canadian premiere—and an admirable
job of portraying the ideas of
Howard Brenton's script.
This review accompanies
John Hudson's gorgeous little
piece on the play and it's history in
last Tuesday's issue...Ed.
FRANCE
Students can enjoy a unique
opportunity to earn university
credits toward a Canadian
B.A. while studying in the
south of France near Nice
The Universite canadienne
en France offers two programmes A full 8-month
session (Sept-April) offers
studies in Humanities,
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n in May-June features courses in
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An in forma lion session for
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 30. R.S.V.P.
The Rake progresses
by John Hudson
THIS production of The
Rake's Progress can be seen
as the culmination of 250 years of
creative intertext. Beginning with
William Hogarth's series of
paintings of the same title,
executed between 1732-33, and
ending with David Hockney's
innovative set designs.
OPERA
The Rake's Progress
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
October 28	
This is an opera with a great
sense of totality; its component
parts fit together in such a
balanced fashion that the work
maintains a sense of completeness
regardless of production values.
This is not to say that this
Vancouver Opera production is in
any way lacking. The cast and
orchestra perform admirably and
do adequate justice to the music
and words, but this is not a
singer's opera. There is only one
notable aria, in the final scene of
first act, and the piece is mainly
carried by its design and language.
British artist David Hockney's set cleverly makes use of a
repeated cross-hatching motif,
reminiscent of William Hogarth's
18th century woodcuts. It is as if
the characters are walking
through engraved illustrations.
This effect is mirrored in the
musical structure of the work.
Though Stravinsky employs
many neo-classical elements, he
chooses to break with certain operatic structures. The traditional
overture has been neglected in favour of a series of mini-overtures
which occur before each scene.
The long scene changes which
punctuate each act, far from
disturbing the flow of the performance, add to the sensation of
viewing a series of ilustrations in
a gallery. It was viewing such an
exhibition of Hogarth's works that
provided Stravinksy with the
inspiration for the opera.
The plot follows the sequence
of Hogarth's original series. Tom
Rakewell, a young countryman in
love with Anne Trulove, receives a
strange visitor, Nick Shadow, who
informs him of an inherited
fortune and offers to be his
servant. Tom leaves Anne with a
promise to return and travels
with Nick to London, where he is
introduced into a world of whores
and roaring boys, marries Baba
the Turk, a notorious bearded
woman, and loses his fortune on
an machine to turn stones into
bread.
To top everything off, Nick informs Tom the fees for his services
include Tom's soul. Though Tom
manages to cheat the gates of hell
through the memory of his love for
Anne, he is condemned to a life of
insanity. Anne visits him in the
Bedlam asylum but he, believing
himself to be Adonis, thinks she is
Venus. Having sung him to sleep,
Anne leaves, and Tom Rakewell is
left alone to die among the
madmen ofthe asylum.
Opera librettos are historically the work of near anonymous
hack writers, noted for neither
subtlety nor poetry. However,
when Stravinsky decided to
compose a full-length opera for
the English language, he
aproached the British poet W.H.
Auden, who readily agreed. The
result is probably the finest
libretto ever written, much of it
able to stand alone as a work of
poetry.
British Columbian baritone
Allan Monk is suitably dour as
Nick Shadow, and succeeds better
than some cast members in
wrapping his voice around various
metric oddities of Auden's text.
Wendy Hill, as Anne Trulove,
is a strong soprano, whose
presence is most keenly felt
during the long solo scene at the
end of the first act. Benoit Boutet
is in some ways a better actor
than he is a singer, and while his
voice was more than adequate, his
physical presence was most
affecting, particularly in the final
scenes. Sandra Graham played a
quite delightful and sympathetic
Baba the Turk, and the chorus
members provided some ofthe
most lively bits of the performance.
This production is thoroughly
recommended as a most pleasant
evening. Students should be
reminded that $5 stand-by tickets
are available half an hour before
showtime.
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Wednesday. November 1
12:30 PM
Torah Discussion Group
Hillel House is located across from
SUB & behind Brock Hall,
Tel: 224-4748
HiLUis
Famous Hot Luvich
TuEsdvy, OcTobe.71,
12:50 PM
Thursday. November 2
12:30 PM
Hebrew Conversation Group
7 PM
Israeli Dancing SUB 207/209
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Would you marry a bearded woman if this man told you to?
This Week's rock
by Randy Iwata
SUNDAY OCTOBER 29:
GABRIEL MB
AT THE WISE HALL
Gabriel Yacoub last played in town last in '88 at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre before a tiny audience. This year, he is playing at the W.I.S.E. Hall (1882 Adanac Street) as
part of the Rogue Folk Club series. From France, Mr. Yacoub is perhaps best known for
his founding the French combo Malicorne who played at the Vancouver Folk Music
Festival at 1984. Since the band's break-up in the mid-1980's, Mr. Yacoub has released
two solo albums, Trad Ait. on Green Linnet Records and Elementary Level of Faith on
Shanacie, anchoring himself as a major figure in French music. Opening is Saskatchewan's Brenda Baker.
SUNDAY OCTOBER 29:
CURIOUS GEORGE AND DIRT
AT THE TOWN PUMP
Together with local rawk 'n rollers dirt, that band that released Children of a Common
Mother just months ago is putting on a special Halloween party for friends and foes. You'd
best get there early so's to get in 'cause rumour has it there are thousands of free tickets
available just about anywhere in town. Costumes are optional but recommended.
Monday OCTOBER 30:
AT THE RAILWAY CLUB
Well, the first round semi-finals have come and gone and when the dust settled, Cartoon
Swear came out in first place by a nose. Round two blasts off on Monday with three more
bands fighting it out to win recording time and fame from local recording studios. The three
bands: Three Blind Cats, Migraine Blur and Sound Butchers. And don't forqet Jokes for
Beer!
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October 27,1989
THE UBYSSEY/5 - -'"y-'4
** V •*„
vc> ^•gw'.j*- '_^J     W», •***    £i<A%'" .. ^ 1
Graffiti
breakers
Here are the top Ubyssey responses to discriminatory graffiti. Because bathroom stalls do
not offer the medium for extended political discussion we have taken this opportunity to embellish some of our favourite points.
The worst shit in washrooms is not flushed
down the toilet.
Class is more a factor than race—the problem is the political and economic elite, people
who make decisions that dictate conditions of
our lives—conditions over which we have no
control. It's not the colour of their skin that
matters, but the power they wield. Those who
are shut out economically by new changes in the
financial landscape, instead of looking at inequalities inherent in the structure of our system, often choose groups weaker than themselves as scapegoats.
Hegemony is imposed institutionally; conformity is enforced on the personal level. We are
socialized as children by demands for conformity to masculine and Caucasian cultural models. These demands reflect larger societal relationships of power. Every one of us, as individuals, recreate these relationships at a personal
level.
We are all minorities—we are all marginalized at some place or point. And as minorities,
we are united into a majority joined by our
common position of powerlessness in the political system. Elites, both those based on power
and those on wealth—and they do interlock—
exclude us from the process of decision making.
The diversity which is Canada is enormous.
In Vancouver alone there are 1,390,000 people
from 62 cultural groups. There are over 70
languages spoken in this city.
The real crime is not the growing ethnic
diversity but the shrinking elite and their expanding wealth. Canada is the most corporate
concentrated nation on earth, having the highest number of corporations per capita. This
small nation has managed to place three individuals in the Forbes top ten list of wealthy
business MEN. Only the U.S. can match this
achievement.
In the global scheme Hong Kong is a minnow.
THEUBYSSEY
October 27,1989
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year bytheAlrpa Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those ofthe staffand not necessarily those ofthe
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k ofthe
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301;  advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
Yukie Kurahashi is a mighty nice girl, but not nice enough to make prison much fun.
Alter six months inthe same cell, Effie Pow, Carol Hui, Joe Altwasser, Franka Cordua-
Von Specht and Keith Leung were starting to regret the errors of their ways. At least
they weren't in the next cell over with Steve Conrad.Steve Chan, David Loh, John
Hudson, Laura Bushenkin.and Sandra Stephenson. Even in prison there are slums.
Nadene tried to bake them all a cake with a file in it.but she couldn't cook to save her
life—much less a vile rag. Luis Piedmont was getting hungry enough to eat the bugs
but the new guard, Tonya Zadorozny told him lo spit them out.
As David Loh slept unaware in the warden's office, Greg Davis, Joanne
Neilson and Deb Fuflon sneeked the keys off the hook. May Wong and Hao Li took
out the guards and the coast was clear. Asthe prison piped-in oozed the sweet sounds
of Robyn and Randy Iwata, Martin Chester and Michael Crazetas fumbled with the
key." Let us out," squeeled the jailed journalists," then we can come back to the Rag,
just Ike old times. We won! piss away the whole night any more."
But at the door, a voice was heard. "Not so fast!" It was the the hurry up gang-
Chung, Ernie and Ted—on a ruthless rampage of efficiency. Wong Kwok-Sum knew
he'd never make it home now.
Joe Altwasser
Keith Leung
EDITORS
Franka Cordua-von Specht
Rehnby • Chung Wong
Note* (iVX-io** *• ''^'eWW^e/^esiwu^s,
o<? v;il4 Hsfa**W RUT thft/w* -thefg
pmtjo*'* 'Codicil  -the LftST°IV
Letters
Mathers wants
SRC input now!
For those students who
are still interested in the
SRC referendum, there is
yet another chance to have
your voice heard. Student
Court will be convening for
another open session to discuss the determination of
quorum on Tuesday, October 31st, at 12:30 p.m. in
SUB room 206. All students
are welcome. However ifyou
wish to either speak on the
issue, or to make a written
submission, notice must be
given to the Clerk of the
Court through the Ombudsoffice (SUB 100A), by
12:00 on that day.
Jessica Mathers
AMS Ombudsperson
Reader
pontificates
on politics
Inher Oct. 13thletterto
the Ubyssey Carol Hui expressed her ignorance ofthe
meanings of words such as
communism, capitalism,
democracy etc. As a courtesy I would like to fill her in.
Communi sin/social-
ism/statism is essentially
the politico-economic system under which private
property is abolished and
the government owns and
controls all the means of
production. It is based on
the ethical system of altruism which holds that a person has no moral right to live
for his/her own sake, and
must, instead, exist solely
for the good of society.
Capitalism, on the
other hand, is the politico-
economic system that represents the complete opposite
of all forms of statism.
Under a capitalist system
there is complete separation
of state and economics and
all of society's means of production are privately
owned. Capitalism is based
on the ethical system of
egoism, which holds that a
person's   most  important
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
moral purpose is the
achievement of his/her own
happiness, and that any
benefits that may fall upon
others are secondary to this
purpose.
Democracy is the political system of unlimited
majority rule, i.e., the majority has the right to do
anything. This system is
not really based on an ethical code, which leads to
questionable contradictions. (Remember that the
Nazi party was voted into
power.)
With most, if not all,
countries around the globe
representing somewhat
failed attempts to implement variants of these political systems, the issue of
capitalism versus statism
remains one of the most
crucial issues of our age. I
say capitalism vs. statism
and not democracy vs. statism, because the issue is
essentially the choice between a free society and a
totalitarian state, and democracy, without proper
constitutional   limitations,
can be just as tyrannical as
any variant of statism.
Leith Lockitch
Science 2
Strangway
wonders if
Mike has ESP
I was pleased to read
the recent feature article on
waste disposal at UBC written by Mike Laanela. I
applaud the efforts of our
Surplus Equipment Recycling Facility run by Vi ncent
Grant.
It was with considerable pleasure that I was
alerted to his effort by the
article in The Ubyssey. I
was intrigued by the many-
references to my views that
appeared in the article. I
was intrigued because I was
not approached by the
writer to determine my
views on the issue. Nor have
I ever been approached by
Vincent Grant to inform me
ofthe nature of his program.
The article states that Vincent Grant still needs the
president's approval of the
pilot program. I have never
been asked for this approval.
I fully endorse programs that, as the article
suggests, are both environmentally sensitive and
show cost savings.
I look forward to learning about this program.
David W. Strangway
UBC President
Oops
In Leo Paguin's Tuesday letter, the Ubyssey's typiest
accidently typed the figure of 1650 for SRC quorum
when the true figure was 2650. En-are Humane Est
The Ubyssey letters co-ordinator
A tale of two
cities
By Charles Lugosi
Earthquake!
The mere mention of
that word ought to send
shivers down our spine.
But it doesn't, not even for
those of us who live in
glass houses.
If  you   think   this
week's   San   Francisco
quake   was
bad,     "You
ain't     seen
nothing yet."
Experts
say Vancouver i s going to be rocked by
a major subduction
quake, perhaps ten times
greater than what devastated San Francisco and
Oakland. The only question is when.
Until 5:04 p.m. last
Tuesday, people were
mercifully oblivious of
their tragic untimely demise.    Rush hour found
them crowding the freeways
and bridges, going home to
watch the third game of
baseball's World Series.
The next few seconds found
these same people crushed
in their cars, sandwiched
between layers of asphalt,
or providing dinner for hungry sharks at the bottom of
San Francisco Bay. We ask
why.
Rather,   we   ought   to
ask, "What does this event
teach us?" Only then, can
real healing take place, and
reconstuction occur in our
hearts, as well as in the
streets.
Yes, we must do everything we can to help our
California neighbours.
Now.
Can we prevent such
natural disasters, even if
our budget for emergency
response   is   unlimited?
It's doubtful.
There are some
things in life that are inevitable. Like the move-
mentof the earth's plates.
Like the consequences of
our actions or omissions.
Witness 250,000 dead
folowing the last major
earthquake in China.
Wi tness Sodom and Gem -
orr ah.
We must be prepared
to   pay   the
price for living  in   Vancouver.    Our
university is
vulnerable,
and students, staff, faculty and administration
must together meet the
challenge  of being prepared for the inevitable.
After all, we too live
in glass houses.
Donations to the Canadian Red Cross are
now being accepted to
assist the victims of the
earthquake.
6/THE UBYSSEY
October 27,1989 I      G      U      R
OUT
A
L
L
/
dog
if
the
friend
snooker
street
it's
clean
duck
proof
kitchen
Molson
cold
spot
stand
down
Canadian
taste
music
sport
empty
it's
of
hot
coin
over
gonna
genuine
photo
mugs
food
taste
Canadian
light
party
jump
great
beer
second
hour
i;i-y:lill^liHihTil_i;i*i;i^l1[iKl Read each column of words to yourself Then
close your eyes and repeat each column out loud. Score 5 points for
each column you recite correctly Score 10 points ifyou scream the
words out at the top of your lungs during a psychology lecture.
MOLSON CANADIAN. WHAT BEER'S ALL ABOUT.
October 27,1989
THE UBYSSEY/7 ENTERTAINMENT
by Michael Gazetas
For those of you not interested in crossing a picket
line to take in a movie this weekend, here are some films currently playing in theatres not experiencing labour disputes...
In SUB theater SUBFILMS
presents Good Morning Vietnam
and Roadhouse until Sunday at
7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. respectively.
Good Morning is tonight
For those (ew who have
missed Good Morning Vietnam,
it showcases the talent of Robin
Williams playing funnyman DJ
Adrian Cronauer, a rebel who infuriates his superiors and
delights the demilitarized zone
with sharp wit and good tunes.
The story built up around
Williams so that we can watch
and listen to his hilarious
monologues is weak and contrived, but worth sitting through
in order to watch Cronauer strut
his stuff before the microphone.
See dumb Pat
At 9:30 p.m., Patrick Swayze
stars in the textbook American
entertainment film, Roadhouse.
Loaded with ditzy girls, car
chases, explosions, a galore of
Ubyssey film picks
bar fights, slapstick humour, bad    usually end up on the short end
guys who need some courses on
moral ethics, and of course the
climatic life or death fight with a
happy ending. If your midterms
took a heavy toll on your brain,
maybe this movie, not to be
confused with a film, will restore
some enthusiasm for school.
Rocky Horror on Halloween
CLASSIC SUBFILMS is
having a special Halloween
surprise Monday and Tuesday.
They will be screening the
ultimate cult flick, The Rocky
Horror Picture Show at 7:00 p.m.
and 9:30 p.m. both nights, and
there have been rumours that a
midnight screening will happen
on the 31st. Ifyou haven't seen
Rocky Horror, it's a must. Dress
up and bring accessories.
Blood
On Wednesday, CINEMA 16
will show David Cronenburg's
Rabid. The story involves a
young woman who discovers she
has the taste for blood after
having an operation that saved
her life. Cronenburg examines
the morality of technology and
science and how human beings
ofthe stick.
Anti-apartheid film
At the VAN EAST CINEMA,
the anti-apartheid film Mapant-
sula from director Oliver
Schmitz will play tonight
through till Nov. 2, except the
30th and 31st. Billed as a
"Powerful, intimate political
drama, set in Soweto, that has
impressed critics everywhere."
Look for a coming review.
Repulsive
The CINEMATHEQUE has
a Roman Polanski double bill tonight and Saturday. First is Repulsion, a descent into insanity
with an isolated young woman
whose strong aversion to sex
leads into a twisted tale of
madness and murder.
Cul-de-Sac, reportedly
Polanski's favourite work, brings
together a pair of gangsters
escaping to a deserted island
where they meet an effeminate
husband and his sensual wife.
This juicy black satire is full of
humour, irony and tragedy as
the husband tries to assert
himself as master of the house.
Repulsion plays at 7:30 p.m. and
Cul-de-Sac at 9:30 p.m.
Repast
Also at the VAN EAST, is
the Japanese Literature on the
Screen series. At 7:00 p.m., the
film Repast plays. It is the story
of a woman married to a ruthless
and insensitive man, who
ultimately rebells against
domestic life.
The film at 9:00 p.m. is
Marital Relation, a comic love
tale about a spoiled rich kid and
a geisha who fall in love when
they find themselves having to
rely on each other.
Fire and scandal
The HOLLYWOOD THEATRE presents Great Balls of
Fire and Scandal Friday and
Saturday. Dennis Quaid plays
Jerry Lee Lewis, the hard
playing and drinking piano man.
The best thing in the show is the
music which was recorded by
Lewis himself, and Winoa Rider
who plays Lewis's teenage bride.
Scandal is a British sex-lies
and newspapers. Juicy performances and plot twists give this
political intrigue thriller enough
good gossip to enthrall any
National Enquirer junkie.
Showtimes are 7:30 & 9:20 p.m.
Bud Kanke. CA: President. Kanke Seafood Restaurunt Ltd.
The restaurant business for many is an expensive
lesson in risk management. Not so for Bud Kanke. In
1971. with a $900 savings balance. Bud and several
partners gave Vancouver diners the city's first upmarket
seafood experience. The Cannery.
Mulvaney's followed in 1975. Seafood with a dash of
Southern spice. Viva in 1979. A classic supper club. In
1984. The Ninth Ave. Fishmarket. Then Joe Fortes, in 1985.
Seafood downtown style.
The menu grows. And now Kanke Seafood Restaurant Ltd.. with some 300 employees, reels in annual sales
of nearly S10 million.
Along the way. Bud Kanke has earned the deserved
reputation of a man with the skills to transform the
most modest opportunities into prize catches.
He credits his CA for providing him the base to
develop his entrepreneurial strengths. "It gives me discipline ... going by instinct is one thing, but there's merit
in managing with good, sound numbers'.'
Bud Kanke. CA with a string of seafood restaurant
successes.
Ifyou think a future in chartered accountancy would
serve your career ambitions, write the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C.
Our standards are higher.
rr^^T   V Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
____r   A   ■  H')')H..I..:i] .Ci t   \!    r> i'  \'.'r   irr
1 lelephone:(b04)b,Hl-:,2b-l Toll-free l-SOII-l,6:i-2(,77
Bud Kanke's CA
helped him acquire
his taste in seafood
Walter Zuber
Armstrong
World
Class
Flutist
Last Album Recorded at
UBC's Museum of
Anthropology.
Catch Him on
Friday, Oct. 27/89
5:00 pm
Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre
EVERYONE WELCOME 1
Entertainment Writers
Meeting
Friday 12:30
Sub 241K
SILKSCREENING
(1 week delivery on stock items)
OYE SPORTSWEAR & DESIGN
" T-SHIRTS    7.35 EACH
•SWEATSHIRTS    13.50 EACH
* POLO SHIRTS    13.95 EACH
PLUS MANY MORE STYLES ...
(Based on 25 units per style/design)
PRICE INCLUDES: 1 colour print, garments, set
up, screen & artwork .... puff printing & flash cure-
ing (.33 extra)..., solid coloured fabrics may vary
in price .... additional colour printing by quotation.
Call: (Ask for Kenneth) 688-6879
Monday - Saturday    10 am - 6 pm
Open Saturdays/Sundays/Evenings by appointment
NEW STORE
OPENING
Burnaby Location
EARN $7.75-$10.00/HR.
Exciting promotion on
behalf of a major department store. Full and
part-time positions available. No experience
necessary. Complete
training provided. If you
are friendly and responsible, call Mrs. Boyce
Toll Free!!
1-800-668-3952
RED LEAF RESTAURANT
LUNCHEON SMORGASBORD
Unique Traditional Chinese  yt T
s~r-^*    Cookinj1 on Campus        j <*^
LICENSED PREMISES
10-., DISCOUNT
on cash pick-up order.
2142 Western Parkway,
University Village
228-9114   r —i'
[Marts--Con_^
8/THE UBYSSEY
October 27,1989

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