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The Ubyssey Mar 14, 1972

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Array Vol. UN, No. 61
TUESDAY,
MARCH 14, 1972
VANCOUVER, B.C.
"4S 228-2301
S«l
Court upholds
grad students
Student court has upheld the
right of graduate students to three
seats on the Alma Mater Society
council.
The court rejected Monday
night a claim by AMS treasurer
David Dick that grad reps Gina
Quijano and Julian Wake were not
entitled to vote at AMS meetings.
Dick contended that because
less than 1,000 grad students are
required to pay fees the Graduate
Student Association should have
only one voting council rep.
Quijano and Wake have
consistently voted against Student
Coalition-supported motions this
year.
Cops bust 18 at U of T library sit-in
TORONTO (CUP) - About 30 campus
security, and 24 Metro Toronto policemen
brolce ufr a sit-in staged Sunday by University
of Toronto students and arrested 18 of them
for trespassing and other charges.
Up to 100 students had been involved in
the sit-in but only 35 were around when the
bust came.
The students had been holding a sit-in in
the senate chamber in the main university
administration building since Friday. They
were   protesting   the   university's   refusal  to
grant undergraduate students use of the new
Robarts Library which was built using
provincial funds. The library will be used only
by grads and faculty.
Acting president John Sword was
responsible for issuing both invitations to the
cops. He told a hastily called news conference
Sunday that he ended the sit-ins because it
served no purpose and the occupiers would
disrupt office workers' routine work.
When the cops entered at 10:45 a.m.
Sunday without any warning, they broke in
the ornate oak door to the senate chamber —
which demonstrators have always taken care
to protect during the occupation.
The cops refused to talk or negotiate with
any of the people in the room and punched
Students Administrative Council president
Bob Spencer in the nose when he tried
persistently to negotiate with them.
Once students realized the cops meant
business they did not resist and in some cases
were violently removed from the chambers.
DOUG ALDRIDGE, GRANT BURNYEAT
— kini mcdonald photo
. . talk to reporters at council chamber press conference Monday.
Math profs teach again
as AMS condemns strike
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The UBC math department has voted to
support the actions of 10 math professors
who refused to teach engineering students
after the publication of the engineers' racist
newsletter.
In a Monday night meeting, with 50 of 70
department members present, a motion was
passed without opposition which supported
the dissident profs and deplored the actions of
the students responsible for issuing the March
8 edition of the engineering undergraduate
society newsletter.
At the same time the profs voted to start
the classes again today away from the
engineering building, on a recommendation
from science dean George Volkoff.
Math prof Colin Clark said this would
hopefully eliminate some of the high feelings
by taking the engineers out of their natural
element.
Asked if this indicated an end of the
protest, Clark said it represented a "cooling
off.
But, he said, "if I find Joe Schmidt in one
of my classes was responsible for the
newsletter, out he goes."
The 10 math profs suspended classes
Thursday to protest the newsletter which
featured anti-Semitic, sexist and racist 'jokes'
similar to those printed in the Feb. 22
publication.
But in a statement made Monday EUS
president Doug Aldridge denied responsibility
for the most recent newsletter. He said it was
issued by "four to six" fourth year civil
engineering students in an effort to discredit
the EUS executive.
He said the rift with these students
developed over their objections to the public
apology made by the EUS executive to those
who said they were offended by the "jokes"
in the February newsletter.
"They said they felt it was an internal
affair that should have been handled inside
the engineering faculty," Aldridge said.
Certain disciplinary measures are open to
the Alma Mater Society in handling these
students, AMS president Grant Burnyeat said
Monday.
But he said he would prefer that any action
should be taken by the AMS rather than the
faculty. He said these feelings prompted his
disagreement with the math profs' protest.
"I disagree with the profs who removed
their services from students," he said. "After
all, a right-wing professor might refuse to
teach Jewish students if the precedent was
set."
He said he preferred to use the powers of
the AMS to deal with the students involved.
However, no one seems willing to disclose
who these students are.
"I am not interested in conducting a witch
hunt," Aldridge said.
Aldridge also said he thought "few of the
engineering students regarded the jokes as
racist."
UBC's Jewish chaplain, Rabbi Marvin Hier,
said  in  an  interview  Monday  he   did  not
regard the statements as jokes.
"When the situations ridiculed in the
newsletter happened in recent history, when it
is a fact that people were made into soap —
and Vh million of these were children - then
this cannot be treated as a joke," he said.
Whether action will be taken against the
engineering students depends largely on the
decision of the faculty council.
A meeting of the 20-member council was
called for Thursday by applied science dean
Liam Finn "to discuss what measures the
university could and should take," an
administration press release stated.
If the administration takes no action, the,
AMS is prepared to, Aldridge said.
Aldridge said the AMS would take the
publishers of the newsletter to student court,
and exercise the court's right to take away
their "privileges" for the remainder of the
term.
Aldridge said the EUS executive could also
take away the civil engineering students' right
to have a study area in the engineering
building, although the AMS could take more
severe action against the civil engineers by
stopping the funding of the civil engineering
club, thus reducing the scope of their
activities.
But Finn instituted the first decisive action
Monday against the students by demanding
the removal of the EUS office from the
engineering building before March 19.
He also announnced his withdrawal of
financial support for the EUS. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 14, 1972
Deportation hearing delayed
OTTAWA (CUP) - The
deportation hearing for young
Puerto Rican independentist
Humberto Pagan Hernandez
which began before the
Immigration Appeal Board here
Wednesday has been adjourned to
March 27.
The three-member appeal
board decided Friday on the
adjournment because of full court
schedules  in  the  coming weeks.
Appealant lawyers Clayton
Ruby and Roberto Maldonado
will ask that extradition hearings
for Pagan, scheduled to begin
March 27, be postponed to allow
for a final decision on the
deportation appeal.
Maldonado, a Puerto Rican
lawyer, said he was afraid the
extradition hearings may be held
before the appeal board makes its
final decision on deportation.
The extradition decision will
be made by a Canadian judge who
will base his decision on written
statements which will attempt to
prove or disprove that there is'
enough evidence to have Pagan
sent back to Puerto Rico to stand
trial.
Since the United States has
made the extradition request, it is
expected that if the U.S. wins its
case Pagan would be taken to
Buffalo and put on a flight to
Puerto Rico.
However, if the extradition
warrant is refused Pagan could be
deported to friendlier countries
such as Chile or Cuba who have
already said they would be willing
to receive him.
Pagan, 20, is accused of
killing a police officer — the head
of the riot squad — during a riot
at the University of Puerto Rico
March 11, 1971 when two police
officers and an ROTC cadet were
killed and many students were
injured by bullets.
Pagan was not arrested for
allegedly killing the policeman
until eight days after the riot. He
was released on bail about five
days later and fled his country
after many attempts were made
by the police to kill him.
He arrived in Ottawa in
September via New York and
Montreal. He was arrested by the
RCMP here in September on
charges of entering the country
illegally. That charge was dropped
but by then the Canadian
government had ordered him
deported and his first hearing was
on Nov. 22.
Testimony given Friday
continued to build the case that if
Pagan is deported to Puerto Rico
he will be persecuted and
probably be killed by the police
or right wing extremists in the
country because of his political
independentist activities.
Ruby's first witness Friday
was Roberto Maldonado, a lawyer
and an independentist known in
Puerto Rico for his defense of
radicals and political prisoners.
He told the court how he was
beaten by police when he
attempted to get into a police
station to help his clients arrested
the day of the March riot.
Maldonado was not allowed
into the police station and when
he refused to leave more than 20
policemen beat him unconscious
until they thought he was dead.
He described the student riot
in March "as a military defeat in
the eyes of the police for the right
wing.
"They can't allow it to be a
political defeat as well. Somebody
has to pay for the death of a
policeman."
Roman Catholic Bishop
Antulio Parilla-Bonilla
corroborated Maldonado's
assessment. If Pagan returns, the
Monseignor said, "probably he
will be killed" before he reaches
trial.
"Independentists are like the
blacks or Indians or chicanos in
the U.S. We are a minority and we
are exploited."
There is often fabrication of
cases in Puerto Rico, he said,
although secretary of justice Bias
Herrero personally guaranteed the
safety of Pagan "not even the
governor of Puerto Rico can
control the police."
Pagan commented later in an
interview that since the safety
guarantee had been given the
secretary of justice had been
forced to resign his cabinet
position.
The final witness, Mercedes
St. Alis, Pagan's teacher and
friend, testified that while
postering in Puerto Rico late
Wednesday night, she and four
students were harassed, and a
young man arrested and beaten by
police at the airport police
station.
They had been attempting to
put up posters calling for liberty
for Humberto Pagan.
When she arrived at night
court St. Alis said "they
(uniformed police) told me not to
worry about Humberto Pagan
because they were going to lynch
him. They said that next week
they would have him there to kill
him. They didn't seem human."
There were no crown
witnesses.
WHY WAIT???
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AUDITORIUM - STUDENTS UNION BUILDING AT U.B.C.
TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 8:00 P.M.
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LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
HOW TO CONDUCT
A
JOB  INTERVIEW
Free Video tape showing Thursday, March 16 at 12:35
noon. Room 100 Education Bldg. Sponsored by the
Campus Placement Office (Office of Student Services).
Three television monitors will show real campus interviews of an M.B.A.
and a B.A. student by a steel company campus recruiter. No lecture. You
learn by observing. Duration of program is 50 minutes.
£&£<• TOP BRAND
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HUNDREDS OF OTHER GREAT
VALVES TO CHOOSE FROM!
YOUR CHOICE
69
C
WS 1733 — Association — Birthday
1^39 — Harpers Bizarre — Secret Life
1797 — The Great J. J. Jackson
1800 — The Association
1802 — Blue Velvet Band—Sweet Moments
1825 — Lawrence Reynold—Jesus is a Soul
Reprise 6277 — Nancy Sinatra — Movin' With
6326 — Vogues — Till
6333 — Nancy Sinatra — Nancy
6335 — Laugh-In — 69
6337 — Trini Lopez—
The Whole Enchilada
6339 — Sammy Davis Jr. —
The going's great
6347 — Vogues Memories
6355 — Mephistopheles —In Frustration
TFS 4202 — Joanna — Original Sound Track
SD 33-303 — Vanilla Fudge — Rock & Roll
SO 1523 — Hank Crawford — Mr. Blue
SD 9015 — Lord Sutch and His Heavy Friends
ST 151 — People — Both Sides
ST 2632 — The Outsiders — IN
ST 2906 — Human Beinz — Nobody But Me
ST 6296 — The Arrows — Wild in the Streets
CR 1336 — Fox — For Fox Soke
CR 1344 — Oliver — Again
DL 74920 — The Hobbits —
Down to Middle Earth
DLP 25974 — Compton Bros. Charlie Brown
DS 50027 — Grassroots — Feelings
DS 50049 — Rejoice
BDS 5042 — The 2nd Brooklyn Bridge
5058 — The very best of the Ohio Express
5059 — The Tokens — Both Sides Now
Poly 543075 — Fat Mattress
2447008 — Bee Gee —
Rare Precious & Beautiful
Sun 117 — Gentrys
TS 286 — Marvellettes — Soul
MOS 652 — Tammi  Terrell —  Irresistible
GS 926 — Martha Reeves and the Vandellas
BN 26338 — David Houston —
You Mean the World
HTS 35006 — Best of Bill Deal & The Rhondells
SE 4669 — Core of Rock
MFS 12003 — Central Nervous System
PLP 2 — Jeannie C. Riley — Yearbook
YOUR
CHOICE
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PAS 710 33 — Frigid Pink
PHS 600 231 — Mvstic Moods -
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SD 2 — Rascals—Freedom Suite
Collectors Guild 651 —
Rosenblatt — Sabbath
MS 7205 — Uday Shankar —
Indian Dances 1 Musicians
OS  3240 — You  Are What You
Eat — Original Soundtrack
DTCS 5103 — Hello Dolly —
Original Movie Soundtrack
Polydor 658094 —
La Harpe Indienne
YOUR
CHOICE
99
ABS 467 — Tommy Roe—
Something for Everyone
Bell 1201 — Cactus Flower-
Original Soundtrack
TA 5003 — One Tin Soldier-
Original Caste
BDS 5061 — The Stairsteps
CS 1000 — The Shocking Blue
CS 1001 — Tee Set —
Ma Belle Arnie
CS 1002 — George Baker—
Little Green Bag
CPLP 4504—The.Litter—Emerge
ENS 1009— David Porter-
Gritty and Groovy
KS8S 2017 — Jaggerz —
Different Schools
SE 4657 — Hank Williams —
Sunday Morning
RLP 8003 — Lawrence Welk—
Love Is Blue
RLPS 703—Gairsborough Gallery
Life Is A Song
SUN 113 — Roy Orbison —
Original
V 65066 — Rare Earth—Dreams
BELL 6047 — Rumplestiltskin
Poly 543-024—Cream—Goodbye
YOUR
CHOICE
1
.59
DM-l-2 — Charbonneau and
Le Chef
DLP 25963 — Mitch Ryder-
Trie Detroit Experiment
28969 — Billy Vaughn —
True  Grit
DS 5005 — Mama Cass —
Something For Mama
50079 — Coloseum —
The Grass Is Greener
LS 77613 — Canned Heat —
Hallelujah
600305 — Blue Cheer —
New—Improved
LSO-1162 — Jimmy-
Original Cast
V-6 5076 — Righteous Brothers
—Rebirth
237 462 — Gitarren — Cocktail
SE 4668 — Zabriskie Point—
Pink Floyd, etc.
PAS 710 41 — Frigid Pink-
Defrosted
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, March 14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tenure report expected on Friday
By SANDI SHREVE
Hopes are high among
members of the legislative
committee studying B.C.
university tenure conditions that
their report will be handed down
to the provincial legislature this
week.
"We only have about five
meetings left for this session and I
presume our report will be handed
down to the legislature after
Thursday or Friday's meeting,''
committee chairman John Tisdalle
said Monday.
He told The Ubyssey the
standing social welfare and
education committee would
probably "gear the rest of this
sessions' meetings to welfare
legislation discussions."
He said the committee has
made no recommendations as yet,
aside from several unsuccessful
motions to accept tenure systems
as they exist and be done with the
matter.
There is little likelihood the
report will contain any
recommendations that would
require changes in the existing
Universities Act, said Tisdalle.
But he said the committee
would study his summary of
major points presented in the
various briefs which have been
presented.
"My opinion is that we will
probably just recommend reform
within the universities
themselves," he said.
Tisdalle's summary report was
compiled and made available to
the public at an open committee
meeting last Wednesday.
Some major points to be
discussed include the use of the
word tenure, which some allege is
a deceptive term because it
implies employment until
retirement age but in reality offers
no real job protection; and
whether methods of deciding
tenure for individuals should be
formalized.
"We will also direct our
attention to what can be done to
reinforce better discipline and
teaching habits and to strengthen
student-administration
participation in tenure decisions,"
said Tisdalle.
A suggestion made by UBC
chemical engineering department
head Francis Murray will also be
examined.
In his March 2 brief Murray
proposed the implementation of
an "appointments without term"
system to replace tenure.
He said most jobs are run on
the basis of appointments without
term and that universities should
engage in the same practice.
"Tenure is more a liability than
an asset in the university
structure," Murray said Monday.
He said tenure tends to make
professors feel too secure.
"As a result they tolerate
incompetent administrations
because they don't threaten them."
He said a system of
appointment without term would
correct this problem.
The   committee,   although  it
decided February 29 not to hear
more briefs, is still accepting
written briefs.
Tisdalle said a brief submitted
to the committee by the
University of Victoria Alma Mater
Society charged the tenure system
is an inadequate means of
protecting academic development
and  deters  the   development of
good teaching methods.
Experimental college head Karl
Burau, in a brief sent to the
committee last Tuesday, said
tenure has to be observed in the
"wider context of university
reform,", rather than as an
isolated issue.
— rob klein photo
RAISED FISTS of Fred Quilt committee members express solidarity with fight for re-opening of inquest into Chilcbtin Indian's death last
November. Members are shown outside provincial archives in Victoria Friday after meeting attorney-genera I Les Peterson to discuss case.
Organizers reject U.S.-based union
Five campus
members of the
Employees' Union
OTEU  membership
organizing committee
Office and Technical
have repudiated their
after   investigating  the
U.S.-based union's constitution.
It is not known what the basis for their
decision is, but at a meeting last Wednesday
three of the organizers said they were going to
take a second look at the constitution.
On campus last week, labor organizer
Madeleine Parent told students and staff that
American-based unions often take more from
their Canadian members than they remit to
them in benefits and strike pay.
The five former OTEU organizers are
Alexis Clague (geology), Bobbie Gegenberg
(formerly in the law building), Eve Hamilton
(mathematics), Maria Orr (geology), and Lori
Whitehead (institute of international
relations). Also signing the committee's
statement was Nena Boax (medicine).
They plan a meeting on Thursday at 5:15
p.m. in SUB to discuss campus organizing
questions.
Other organizing committee members but
no union officials or salaried organizers are
invited.
Items under discussion will be the
OTEU's constitution, the Canadian Union of
Public Employees' constitution and other
organizing alternatives.
The former OTEU members say they plan
to put forward a proposal for an independent
UBC employees' union.
In other labor news, CUPE was rejected
last week by the provincial labor relations
board in its bid for certification at the
Tri-University Meson Facility, a nuclear
research project at the south end of the
campus.
CUPE organizer Ole Johnson told The
Ubyssey the board gave no reason for the
denial other than to say the unit was "not
appropriate for collective bargaining".
Johnson said the union has appealed the
denial of certification.
CUPE currently has several applications
for certification pending in the faculty of
medicine.
Exposure: a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
LETTER
The other day I had a lengthy and at
times heated discussion with Mr. Smith of
the UBC bookstore about prices.
The book that I had ordered originally
cost $1.95 — the price is printed on the
cover; "Books in Print" lists $2.50; I was
to pay $2.75.
I asked Mr. Smith to explain to me
how this price increase was effected. His
explanation — and I assume that it is true
since I have nothing else to go by — was
that the American publisher (Random
House) jacked the price up to $2.50; the
bookstore got the 25 cents.
Is there nothing we can do save refuse
the book?
In closing I would like to hold Mr.
Smith to the promise he gave me, namely
to   have   bookstore  employees  inform
students who are ordering books of the
possibility of price increase and to have —
as there is a cancellation date - a
cancellation price: just as one can refuse
to take a book after a certain preassigned
date, one should now be able to refuse to
take a book if it is above a pre-set price.
—Rudi Krause
It seems to me that when the
bookstore quotes the price of a book and
takes a deposit on it, it is obligated to
supply the book at the price quoted.
It is significant that Smith himself
decided to screw you out of 80 cents.
From my several encounters with him
it suits his personality.
CANADIANA NOTES
One of the more significant things in
the news these days is the big hassle going
on concerning proposed commercial
resort development of the Lake Louise
area of Banff National Park.
While the ecology-minded people have
been flooding the federal and Alberta
provincial governments with briefs calling
for a cancellation of the go-ahead, little
has been heard about the people behind
the project.
Village Lake Louise Ltd., as it is
affectionately known, is 50 per cent
owned by Imperial Oil which itself is 69.8
per cent owned by Standard Oil of New
Jersey. Standard Oil is in turn owned by
those well known Canadian
philanthropists and erstwhile bankers, the
Rockefeller family.
The other major owner of this $30
million project is a Mr. N. Watson of
Surrey, England - a 20 per cent
shareholder. Mr. Watson is well known in
Calgary financial circles as a hidden
backer of a large number of local
developments.
If indeed the park should be opened to
more tourists in the form of a resort in
the mountains and should the
government be able to deal effectively
with a new 750-square-mile pollution
problem, at least any economic benefits
should be derived by Canadians as a
whole.
The fact that the government can
afford to give a $70 milhon contract to
International Telephone and Telegraph
for the post office and in addition allow
large foreign commercial ventures to
exploit our national parks shows you who
is footing the political campaign
expenses at election time.
If you feel strongly about this
potential rip-off you can forward a letter
to a government hearing through the
Committee for an Independent Canada
(Kits branch) Box 4402. Station D,
Vancouver 9, B.C.
ADVERTISING
Where your AMS dollars go. About 50
per cent of the ads in this issue come
from the Alma Mater Society. They cost
us $418.13. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 14, 1972
*s-a
t%,"HT'
£_: r"/,\i-
One more
More commendations.
This time, to the 10 UBC math profs who
suspended engineering classes in protest against racist
engineering undergraduate society newsletters; and to
the math department, which took a stand in support of
the actions of these 10 people.
None of this garbage about 'setting dangerous
precedents' of 'violating the universities Act'; it's a
simple fact that the math profs who suspended classes
did the right thing.
We are even tempted to congratulate AMS president
Grant Burnyeat and his Students' Coalition cronies.
True, these kiddies made assholes of themselves at
their little press conference Monday afternoon. But one
good position did emerge — namely, that the executive
believes that neither the administration nor the faculty
council should be allowed to discipline the students
responsible for the offending EUS newsletters.
It seems now that there is only one group left for us
to congratulate — engineering students themselves.
As yet they have made no attempt to repudiate the
racist newsletter or to make it clear that such
publications are not what they want to see in the future.
We hope today's engineering meeting corrects these
errors, and that we will be able to report to the rest of
the campus in Thursday's paper that the engineers do
not condone the events of the past three weeks,
Grad money
The 1972 grad class will vote Wednesday on money
allocations to projects whose requests appear in today's
Ubyssey (a rash promise we made before we realized
how many applicants would be going for this money).
It is not our intention here to make any judgments
on the merit of these projects. Rather, we want to make
two brief points.
First, keep this copy of The Ubyssey for voting
day.
Second, this is necessary not only as a source of
information about the projects themselves, but also
because there have been more rumblings to the effect
that the grad class exec has been screwing around again
— this time with the ballots.
Every project whose name you see on the following
pages should be on the ballot, EXCEPT THOSE WHOSE
STATEMENTS SAY THEY'RE MEMBERS OF THE
COMMUNITY COALITION AND HAVE
WITHDRAWN FROM THE BALLOT SO AS NOT TO
SPLIT VOTES.
If any other groups are missing from the ballot,
however, the executive will be held accountable.
In the meantime, if you want to vote for a missing
group, write its name in on the ballot when you vote
Wednesday.
,*v
Letters
Nazis
MU8YSSEY
MARCH 14, 1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly, commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977,
Editor: Leslie plommer
And it came to pass that day that a multitude gathered in the council
chambers. "Forsooth, They cometh," quoth Sandi Shreve as the wise men
trod through the portals. "My sweet Lords," murmered Paul Knox. Mike
Gidora kneeled in awe. "What sayeth you?" questioned Lesley Krueger.
And They answered her. The wisdom flowed over the bowed head of Kini
McDonald. Sandy Kass surreptitiously took quill in hand to record the
Revelations. And Gord Gibson clasped his hands in fervent prayer. "My
Lords, you must spread this gospel to the farthest reaches of the
Kingdom," Jan O'Brien ecstatically cried. "Yes, and permit me to fetch
You a humble beast to carry You on Your travels," offered Art
Smolensky. "But nay," They answered. "We cannot use the donkeys in
this way. They are our brothers. Verily, we are the same. We Ourselves are
asses," they replied majestically. Leslie Plommer sighed, enraptured.
Although president Gage and
Mr. Burnyeat deserve
commendation for having
officially condemned the racist
outrages committed by a group of
sick punks belonging to the
Engineering Undergraduate
Society, I feel that the suspension
of teaching to the engineers by
prof. Bluman and several others is
a more effective means of
containing the spread of Nazi
ideology on this campus.
It is not enough to deplore
what has happened; in a centre of
learning there should be no room
for such hooliganism: the
goose-stepping perpetrators of
these racist outrages should not be
left unpunished.
Rene Goldman,
Professor of Asian studies
I want to get this point
straight, so that people will
understand that my attack was
against UBC food, and not against
any individual who sells or
prepares it. I am confident that
the staff members, once they
realize that just about everything
they sell has no food value, will
add their voices to the growing
demand for real, nutritious food
on campus.
One more point: my apologies
to the people who wended their
way up to SUB 207-209 on March
3, only to discover nothing
happening. Apparently God's
Kitchen decided to declare
bankruptcy a week early.
Peter Hlookoff,
Grad studies
Jokes
Food
Guts
The editing job you did on my
March 2 letter on food was fine,
and even helped to concentrate
attention on the main point.
However, I do object to one little
slice. While you did mention that
I was a friend of Lyle Osmundson
(although you tacked this
statement onto another sentence
in a totally meaningless fashion),
you omitted the part where I
mentioned that I was also friendly
with many members of the food
services staff, some of whom I
have known for several years.
There is one ray of light in the
otherwise bleak campus food
crisis — the Bus-stop-Bookstore
coffee shop.
It's fantastic what a cheery
smile, a "good morning what
would you like?", a freshly
cooked breakfast (which arrives
on clean dishes while it's still hot)
does for the palate.
Thanks ladies. You set a
standard which should be a
challenge to other campus "food"
outlets to at least match.
Name withheld,
Grad studies 7
I strongly commend the stands
taken by professor Bluman and
dean Gage on the EUS
newsletters. The "jokes" were
cruel and insensitive.
I am acquainted with a number
of people who survived the
concentration camps and I know
that any reminder of these
experiences is painful.
The malicious slurs,
particularly the recent ones which
were published in spite of the
protests of professor Bluman on
Feb. 22 and the close-following
apology of the EUS executive, are
offensive not only to members of
the Jewish faith but to all
thinking and feeling human
beings. It is the duty of every
member of the university
community to respond to this
outrage.
If in fact the majority of
engineers are opposed to the
newsletter's sick brand of humor,
as Friday's Ubyssey implied, they
should take action to repudiate
the guilty minority.
Since I trust that the majority
of us students find this humor
beyond the limits of fun, one who
excused the "jokes" on the
grounds that engineers offend
everyone equally has shown
himself to be unqualified to be
student president. It was this kind
of flippant response that
permitted the incident to be
repeated.
Phyllis Green,
Arts 3 Tuesday, March 14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Grad class bread
A number of the following
pages are devoted to reprinting
requests for grad class money. The
campus-wide grad vote on these
allocations will take place
Wednesday.
Almost all of the following
requests adhered to the 200-word
limit set by The Ubyssey. Those
that didn't have been edited, for
length, but only to the point that
their meanings are not destroyed.
Abortion
Few issues today have
aroused as much
misunderstanding as the issue of
abortion law repeal. Too often
this controversy hides the
suffering and mental anguish of
thousands of Canadian women
who are denied access to safe,
legal abortions, who face
economic hardship paying for an
abortion outside Canada,
mutilation or even death at the
hands of illegal abortionists, or
the prospect of bearing unwanted
children.
This situation must not
continue! The question of
whether or not to have an
abortion must be a matter of
individual choice. The abortion
laws must be repealed from the
criminal code.
Our committee has worked for
two years for this goal, but to
continue operating we need funds.
We are planning a whole series of
educational activities covering
legal, medical and other aspects of
abortion, including a survey of
campus women and their needs.
All information would be
published.
Our six-page brief to the
graduating class explains fully
how the $ 1,500 we are requesting
would fund the activities, and
explains that our previous limited
fund sources have dried up.
"Latest Canadian polls indicate
80 per cent for repeal.
We urge all grad students to
vote Wednesday for our request.
Gayle McGee,
Treasurer,
UBC Abortion
Action Committee
Asian
Help solve the space problem
for all who use the library. This is
the only suggestion that will
actually contribute to alleviating
one of the main problems facing a
student. The Asian studies
division of the library will be
moved from its present quarters
to the new building. Space now
taken by the Asian studios
division will be freed for uses of
stacks and carrells.
At the same time, a gift to the
Asian Centre will help erect a
striking building which will
complement the quiet beauty of
the Nitobe Gardens. The shape of
the building will symbolize what
goes on inside. It will house the
various parts of the university
which deal with Asia including
library, classrooms and space for
displays and demonstrations of
traditional Asian arts. In this way
it will also symbolize the
contributions of Asians to
Canadian life.
This is the only chance offered
to co-operate in a large, important
and much-needed building. Your
gift of $5,000 will help persuade a
number of Asian and Canadian
governments that this building
should be built. Here is a chance
to be really constructive.
Jackie Castellarin,
Arts 4
Braille
The project _that I propose to
the graduating class for the
disposition of the Grad Class Gift,
is the production of Braille text
from English text, using the
computer facilities on campus.
Motivation: I point to the
tremendous shortage of reading
material available to the blind
community at large, and in
particular, the often very great
difficulty that blind students have
in obtaining required texts. These
difficulties arise because there are
simply not enough production
facilities available. Nor is there
likely to be any commercial
investment in such production -
it's far from profitable.
Feasibility: There exist a small
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CHARTER FLIGHTS
STUDENT SPECIAL: DEPT. MAY-RET. SEPT.
VAN. LONDON   $239.00
Return Flights
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$145 Vancouver to London
$120' London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
$225.
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free list of flights.
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number of places in the world
where computer production of
Braille is done; such a system
exists in Atlanta, Georgia, for
which some cost/production
estimates exist. Factors of 4 in
cost and 10 in speed can be gained
over conventional methods.
Cost: using the figures available
from Atlanta, the estimated cost
of producing 50,000 pages of
Braille as a pilot project has a
crude cost breakdown as follows
(in consultation with the Crane
Library and the Computing
Centre): required hardware —
$650; computing costs - $950;
paper and binding - $3,000;
wages - $0. The total is $4,600,
the amount of the grant for which
. application is made.
At least we can see.
Pat Conroy,
PhD student, Computer Science,
Representing the Crane Library
Coalition
Members: Mental Patients
Association, University Day Care,
Women's Studies, Burrard Food
Co-op, Women's Place, Women's
Rights Booklet.
The Community Coalition is
made up of a number of groups
applying for grants from the grad
class. We have joined together
because the objectives of our
projects are similar, and we do not
wish to compete against each
other for the grad class money.
Each    Coalition    group    has
committed itself to pooling
whatever money it is awarded by
the grad class, and to dividing the
funds fairly among all groups in
the Coalition. Each group will
have an equal voice in determining
how the money is to be allotted.
The Coalition groups share the
following principles:
1. We are involved in
working with and serving people,
especially underprivileged and
oppressed people.
2. We are committed to
principles of democratic
participation in the running of our
groups.
3. We feel the good of the
community is as important as the
special interests of any single
group.
4. We oppose the funding of
"hardware" projects with socially
irrelevant goals.
The grad class executive has
structured the elections like a
sweepstake, with a few horses
running in the money and the rest
getting nothing. This serves the
private interests of a few groups
and ignores the valid needs of the
others.
We are not a closed slate. The
groups we were unable to contact
in time for the election will be
able to join us and to receive a
share of the money.
If you want your money to be
used for human purposes by as
many groups as possible, we ask
you to vote for Coalition groups.
So as not to split the vote, three
Coalition groups have withdrawn
from the ballot, leaving the
Mental Patients Association,
Women's Studies and University
Day Care to represent the
Coalition.
We ask you to vote for these
three groups.
Coffee
During the past few weeks, the
Family Council at the Lutheran
Campus Centre has done some
experimenting with a coffee house
at the centre. Since the middle of
January, we have operated such a
coffee house each Friday evening.
Entertainment has been provided
through films, local campus
groups and individuals.
The goal of such a coffee house
was to provide an alternative type
of entertainment for students and
their families on a Friday evening.
We have had some success in that
usually 40 students have turned
up during an evening and stayed
to sing, to listen, to talk, to play
games or to sit by the fire.
We do not wish to make this
into a commercial venture but
rather to see it as a service to
other students. The grant of
$ 1,200 would be of great help in
placing this on a financially
feasible basis so that we could
invite people to come free of
charge and ask them to pay for
food and drink only.
Besides    being   a   place    for
See page 6: GRAD
NOMINATIONS
ARE NOW OPEN FOR
GRAD STUDENT ASS'N:
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
GRA COORDINATOR
Nomination forms available
in Grad Centre Office.
Nominations close 5 p.m.
March 20,1972
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village) 224-3939
© BARTON BUCKS 0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
Good for Cash or Merchandise.
A general meeting??? . . . so what!!???
DO YOU SUPPORT
DEMOCRACY IN
AMS ELECTIONS?
THIS GENERAL MEETING WILL VOTE ON THE CLAUSE WHICH
BARRED THE YOUNG SOCIALIST SLATE IN THE LAST ELECTION,
AND WHICH BANS ALL POLITICAL CLUBS UNDER THE UNIVERSITY
CLUBS COMMITTEE FROM CONTESTING ELECTIONS.
• A vote to drop this clause means a vote for
democracy, for free and open elections at UBC.
0 Every student should have the right to run
in elections.
» Eligibility Committee and Students Council have
already voted to eliminate the clause - but it takes
a student quorum.
SO COME AND VOTE IT OUT!
COME TO THE GENERAL MEETING
Thurs. March 16 — 12:30
A quorum is needed! Pag* 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, March 14, 1972
Grad class bread
From page 5
people to meet and be
entertained, we see it providing a
good audience for campus
musicians and singers, film
makers, theatre groups and people
who want to try out things and
get feedback from students.
We think that the Lutheran
Campus Centre is an ideal place
for such a coffee house. It is not
too large so that intimacy
between people is possible. It has
enough space, however, to hold
over 150 people each evening.
We hope that our request will
be granted so that we can begin
again in September.
Lutheran Campus Centre
Family Council,
Dennis LLoyd, Chairman,
Garth Sundeen, Treasurer.
College
Five years ago, Experimental
College was founded to provide a
real challenge and alternative to.
the formalized educational
establishment at UBC. A major
concern was to provide an
intellectual forum for the free
exchange of ideas and the
confrontation of opposing views.
Another purpose was to promote
university reform whereby
students would have some
influence in developing a general
education curriculum with credit
courses open to undergraduates in
all the faculties.
From the beginning, operation
funds have never been
forthcoming from university,
private foundations, alumni, or
even AMS, although there have
been promises and tentative
commitments aplenty. Of course
the university can't afford
unqualified gad flies. The Ford
Foundation gave nothing so there
was no $5,000/year salary for
instructors who all left but one —
Karl Burau. He has remained to
organize   informal   forums   and
promote rational university
reform. That takes time and.
effort. For more than 10 years he
has lived off $70 a month taken
from his own savings; he has also
paid small expenses. AMS
stretched itself to spend $40 in
total.
We've spent many dollars on
entertainers, radical political
speakers, and for outside social
services. We've supported
alternative food services. What
about finally supporting
Experimental College with funds
from the grads this year?
Crossroads
Canadian Crossroads
International is a private
voluntary organization engaged in
promoting international
understanding by offering
qualified Canadians the
opportunity to live and work
abroad for three to six months.
Work assignments attempt to
satisfy a local need but serve the
more important function as a
cross-cultural experience.
Virtually any UBC student is
eligible. During the past years
Crossroaders from UBC have been
involved in some of the following
projects: youth work in the
Congo; agriculture and nutrition
surveys in India; medical programs
in Africa.
Crossroaders, on their return,
are required to involve themselves
in meaningful ways in the local
community.
This year 100 Crossroaders will
participate, five of which are from
UBC. They will bring with them
experience and insight gained
from a unique venture and will be
in a position to make a very
positive contribution to the life of
this university.
Crossroads is a non-profit
organization and as such, asks for
your help in sponsoring the UBC
participants. It costs more than
$2,000 to place one person, so the
UBC committee, on behalf of
Canadian Crossroads
International, would appreciate
your consideration of their
request for $3,000 in support of
the UBC participants.
CUE
On behalf of the Continuing
University Education (CUE)
membership I wish to present
their request for funds to:
1. Advertise Orientation
Week ($150).
2. Assist Needy Students
($2,000).
Orientation week can be
frightening for new students and
tiring for all, as they register. CUE
want to advertise the orientation
program in SUB, and their Open
House in the Mildred Brock Room
next September, 1972. Free
coffee is dispensed to all.
CUE collects no fees
(membership is free to all women
on campus). We feel the program
last September could have been
more successful with proper
media coverage.
Funds for Needy Students:
There are a number of women and
men students who are short of
funds with two months remaining
in the term. Current economic
conditions are affecting even
former donors of funds. .. they
can't give any more.
The number of requests for
help received by the Dean of
Women and President Gage
exceeds any previous year.
Help your fellow students to
finish the year. How can they
possibly write exams if they can't
eat properly or pay their bills?
The funds requested are to be
administered by the Scholarship,
Bursary and Loan Committee.
Day care
We   are   a   member   of   the
Community Coalition and agree
to democratic distribution of the
grad class gift.
The University Day Care
Council's purpose is to guide,
co-ordinate and initiate daycare
at UBC. Our members are mainly
representatives from the four
non-profit, parent co-operative
daycare centres at UBC.
We are asking $6,500 of the
$20,000 1972 graduating class
gift.
We need $1,500 to help pay
substitute teachers this summer at
the two centres for children under
three.
These two centres are the only
ones for children of this age in
B.C. and provide an excellent
model for further development.
Parents, who contribute a lot of
time, want the kind of
small-group care provided, with
the involvement of a parent co-op.
The province will not increase the
subsidy to help pay extra costs
such as substitutes.
We need $2,500 for equipment
for the new centre.
We are building a daycare
complex through a loan from
AMS, that will incorporate the
four existing centres that are now
in inadequate, temporary
buildings. Many people are
volunteering their time to plan a
place where the best possible
space is provided for children. We
need money for equipment. Some
examples are: piano, stove,
outside slides, swings, climbing
equipment, mobile storage
cupboards, regulation building
blocks ($200!), tables, chairs, etc.
On the ballot we are one of the
representatives of the member
groups of the Community
Coalition and will fairly distribute
the money among all Coalition
members.
ECO
Environmental Crisis Operation
(ECO) has become an intrinsic
part of the UBC community. We
have worked to focus attention on
environmental issues at a time
when they are most important.
The university is doing at best a
minimal job of providing this
information.
Here is a list of some of the
activities this year:
1. We have sponsored 15
lectures, discussions and movies
on campus. We feel that this series
was a valuable addition to the
campus and was more interesting
and informative than most courses
offered.
2. ECO members have talked
to UBC classes, school groups,
clubs, church and prison groups -
you name it. We have produced
slide shows on environmental
issues that have been shown
around the city and are being used
in several schools.
3. We furnish information
daily to people by mail and by
telephone; we help students who
are taking classes, writing papers,
or just needing information.
4. We try to solve problems as
they arise — disposable plates,
improper pesticide spraying,
inadequate garbage collection, and
a host of other unpredictable
issues.
ECO is in bad shape
financially. We cannot get support
from government, the university,
or private foundations.
Several of the gift applications
are from groups which are
student-run, oriented toward the
students, and beneficial to the
students. These are the groups
which students should support
(no one else will). We feel that we
are one of these groups. We hope
you agree.
Food co-op
The Burrard Food Co-op is a
non-profit society that sells food
at wholesale to low-income people
and to anyone who wants a
neighborhood store that is a
humane place to shop in. Within a
LET'S BUILD TOGETHER
CUPE has 162,000 members across Canada.
50,000 of these are women.
CUPE is made up of 700 Locals. Each one
is autonomous.
CUPE is affiliated to the Canadian
Labour Congress.
All funds stay in Canada, administered
by people elected at Local meetings
and conventions.
CUPE Local 116, UBC employees, has
more than 1200 members. Some of
these are women.
This union, in effect, speaks for all UBC
employees,organized and unorganized.
UBC has more than 1800 unorganized
employees.
With all UBC employees organized into
one unit, you would have a more
effective organization.
Go forward together with your kind of organization
For further information, contact your CUPE organizer —       L   N   Johnson
Sponsored by the Canadian Union of Public Employees
Suite 103
1965 West 4th Avenue
Vancouver 9, B.C.
Telephone: 736-9231 (Office)
522-2387 (Home) Tuesday, March 14, 1972
THE      U BYSSEY
Pag* 7
Grad class bread
few months of operating the store
will be able to provide wholesale
hardware and dry goods. People
can save up to 40 per cent on such
things as car tires, bicycles and
refrigerators.
We see the store as providing a
real alternative to the ways in
which we shop now. Safeway,
Super-Valu and the big
department stores downtown
offer a cold mechanical
atmosphere for people to do their
necessary shopping. A store run
by all of us (a co-op) will provide
us with the goods we need as well
as being a place for us to talk.
We have to date bought all the
equipment (coolers, freezer, cash
register etc.) and we are looking
now for a location. We will get a
store either on Broadway or
Fourth Ave. between Burrard and
Alma, so we will be centrally
located in the UBC student
neighborhood.
The Burrard Food Co-op is
asking the grad class for $2,500 to
help buy the first shipment of
food. The store has raised $3,000
so far by selling shares to the
members. The money has gone
mainly to buying equipment and
we need $2,500 to be able to buy
We support the Coalition's
attempts to reduce the
competition among worthwhile
community groups for the grad
class money. Our commitment to
the coalition has caused us to
withdraw    from    the    ballot.
frontier
Frontier College is an
independent federally chartered
(1922) educational' organization.
Each summer we place 100
university students (men and
women) in outlying areas of
Canada (fishing camps, mines, rail
gangs) as laborer-teachers. Each
laborer-teacher works alongside
the people of the community as a
laborer or factory worker, gaining
their trust and confidence. In his
off-work hours he sets up a
program designed to meet the
needs of the community-adult
education, recreation and sports,
libraries, does personal
counselling, acts as a liaison with
governmental or other agencies, or
in any capacity that is required.
The need for Frontier's services
are real. Forty-three per cent of
Canada's adult population has less
than grade 8 education, yet less
than five per cent of adult
education programs are designed
to meet their needs. These are the
people that Frontier College
works with.
Frontier College is applying to
the grad class for a grant of
$1,300 to cover the costs of
training and placing one
laborer-teacher this summer. This
is less than one third the cost of
placing one Company of Young
Canadian's worker. Three UBC
students are working for Frontier
College this summer.
Frontier College does not have
money to spend on pamphlets or
publicity, so this is the only
notice about our program that
you are going to see. However, if
you have any questions, please
feel free to phone me any evening
at 738-7661 (D. MacKillop).
Think about it.
Indian aid
Our project involves teaching
emergency   first  aid  and  safety
procedures to British Columbia
Indians. Our group is concerned
with the disproportionate Indian
accidental death rate which is five
times that of the non-Indian
population for B.C.
Our plans include travelling in
two groups to 14 communities,
with the first group going to
northern B.C. and the second
group visiting the southern
communities. We plan to visit
each band twice for about four to
five days at a time.
Before a project involving B.C.
Indians can proceed, permission
from the Union of B.C. Indian
Chiefs must be obtained. We have
this support as they realize the
need for such a project. We have
the support of the Canadian Red
Cross, which will train and help
supply our staff of university
students.
We feel that this project is
greatly needed and long overdue.
Our major expenses will
hopefully be financed through
Opportunities For Youth, but
more money will be needed for
health and first aid supplies, films
and teaching aids, and
transportation. We would
therefore like to ask the grad class
for $4,000 to help make this
worthwhile project a reality.
We consider this project a
viable and needed one and hope
you will give it serious
consideration. Thank you.
Victor Barwin,
Project co-ordinator.
MPA
Mental patients are one of the
most downtrodden groups in
society. Until recently, we have
relied on a small number of
professionals to help us with our
problems. As any patient knows,
the help we get is terribly
inadequate.
The Mental Patients
Association formed out of the
awareness that you don't need a
degree and large income to help
people coming out of hospital.
Support is especially needed in
the period following hospital
discharge. Most patients are left
entirely to their own resources.
Many just can't make it on their
own. Two-thirds of discharged
patients will be re-admitted to
hospital within two years. Fifty
per cent of ex-patients who
commit suicide do so within
three months of discharge.
We should point out that our
project is relevant tp the
university. The suicide rate at
universities is higher than at any
other institution in Canadian
society. Tragedies like these can
be prevented through the sorts of
facilities MPA is asking the grad
class to support.
We provide residential, drop-in
and crisis facilities where
ex-patients can find support 24
hours a day. We have set up four
co-op houses for people who
previously were living alone in
horrible housekeeping rooms.
MPA is run along completely
democratic lines. Every member
has an equal say in
decision-making. All positions are
elected and all co-ordinators
receive equal, subsistence salaries.
We are asking the grad class for
funds to operate a halfway house
for people being discharged from
hospital. This money will be used
to cover operating expenses on a
12-bed centre for one year.
As a member of the
Community Coalition, MPA is
requesting $6,500 which will be
democratically divided among all
Coalition groups. If you support
our objectives and those of the
Coalition, we ask you to vote for
the Mental Patients Association,
Women's Studies, and University
Day Care.
Place
The Woman's Place Society is
made up of about 60 women who
have been working and.
exchanging ideas collectively since
September, 1971. We wish to
establish and operate a womens'
house for Vancouver. The house
would provide a setting where
women can meet and participate
in various activities, to talk about
their lives and their common
problems. The centre would also
serve as the focus for the
development of several projects
relating to childcare, health,
information/resources and legal
aid.
We agree with Margaret Fuller
who said: "... women are the
best helpers of one another. Let
them think; let them act; till they
know what they need." (Report
on the Status of Women, Chapter
1, No. 61). We are asking the grad
class 1972 for $2,000 to help us
make this house a reality, to help
us    take    back    some    of   the
responsibility for our lives. This
money would be used for the
renting of a house.
We also agree with the
objectives and ideas of the
Community Coalition. The
people-oriented projects should
not be in competition with each
other for funding. This is why we
have joined with them, to try and
lessen the separation of self-help
groups committed to sharing of
funds made available.
Peel
Three years ago the grad class
granted this project $6,000 and
the AMS agreed to match that
grant. When technical difficulties
made the plan, as it was then
presented, impossible, the grad
class grant reverted and was used
to provide scholarships.
At this time a covered pool can
be a reality if a start is made now!
The $6,000 requested would be
used to undertake the necessary
preliminary studies and develop
the detailed plans for the scheme.
It is hoped that it will be
possible to include up to four
separate faculties within the
complex so as to allow for
swimming, diving, water polo, etc.
as well as for a separate wading
pool and therapy pool. Therefore,
in addition to its use as a
year-round recreational facility, it
will also be available for teaching
purposes for rehabilitative
medicine, and education.
UBC is one of only two major
Canadian universities which does
not have such a facility. The
facility would serve students,
faculty, staff and the community
and the $6,000 would start the
project towards completion. We
can have a first-class facility for
See page 9: GRAD
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Thea Koerner House
The Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday, March 16,
1972'at 12:30 p.m. in the Ballroom at the Centre.
All Members are invited to attend.
INTELLECTUAL ADVENTURES
AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the month of March, a group of eminent scientists and humanists is giving a series of public
lectures at the University of British Columbia. The lectures cover a wide variety of topics, including
science in the People's Republic of China, human psychology, and the current concern for the
preservation of an environment conducive to human development. Admission to all lectures is free and
the public is invited to attend. The lectures are made possible by a gift from Dr. Cecil Green, a former
UBC student, and his wife, Ida, and a fund established by friends of the late Dr. A.E. 'Dal' Grauer, a
UBC graduate and former chancellor of UBC. Brief descriptions of the lectures and the locations where
they will be given appear below.
Cecil H. and Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
DR.*    DONALD    O*    flEDD/    one  of  Canada's  best-known experimental
psychologists and Chancellor of McGill University, Montreal.
THURSDAY, MARCH  16 - "The Nature of a University Education." 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture
Theatre.
FRIDAY, MARCH 17 - "The Mind of Man." 8:15 p.m.. Lounge, Totem Park Residences, UBC.
LSK*    J»     lU&w     WILdV/PI/     one   of   the   world's   leading   geophysicists.
University of Toronto.
MONDAY, MARCH 20 - "A Scientist in China." Dr. Wilson spent a month in China in the fall of
1971 and will contrast his experiences at that time with an earlier visit. 8:15 p.m., Lounge, Totem Park
Residences.
WEDNESDAY,  MARCH   22   -   "The Mechanics of Plate Tectonics." A specialized  lecture for
geophysicists and geologists. 3:30 p.m., Room 260, Geophysics Building, Main Mall, UBC.
THURSDAY, MARCH 23 - "Earthquakes and Earth Sciences in China." A lecture for a general
audience. 12:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre.
Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
DK« wCvRvE W ALD/ Professor of Biology, Harvard University, and
winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology, 1967. Prof. Wald is perhaps most widely known for a 1969
speech at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in which he attacked U.S. militarism and analysed
the disaffection of young people.
TUESDAY, MARCH 28 - "Therefore Choose Life." 8:15 p.m., Lounge, Totem Park Residences, UBC.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 - "The Origin of Death." 12:30 p.m.. Old Auditorium, UBC. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 14, 1972
graduate
students:
ycu will be interested
in this!
89) VOW
THAT THE GRAD CENTRE DOES NOT RECEIVE ANY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM
THE UNIVERSITY?
w
DOUBTFUL
THAT THE GRAD CENTRE IS RUN BY A BOARD OF DIRECTORS?
WME&   tMl W
MAYBE NOT?
THAT ONLY FOUR OF THE TEN  SEATS ON THIS BOARD CAN BE HELD BY
STUDENTS AND THAT SIX ARE SPECIFICALLY FOR FACULTY MEMBERS?
^WM#lt@ITCa   M&WW  MW H
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
SPECIFIES THAT THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS IS TO CONSIST OF
3 FACULTY MEMBERS APPOINTED FOR ONE YEAR TERMS BY
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY, 3 FACULTY MEMBERS
APPOINTED FOR 3 YEAR TERMS BY THE GRAD STUDENT
ASSOCIATION, AND 4 STUDENTS ELECTED FOR 2 YEAR
TERMS FROM THE REGULAR MEMBERSHIP. THIS
CONSTITUTION WAS DRAWN UP AT THE TIME WHEN THE
GRAD STUDENT ASSOCIATION SPLIT FROM THE GRAD
STUDENT CENTRE AND AS A RESULT THE GRAD STUDENT
ASSOCIATION, AS SUCH, IS NOT REPRESENTED ON THE
BOARD.
THE PRESENT GSA EXECUTIVE AND MEMBERS OF THE
GRADUATE REPRESENTATIVE ASSEMBLY BELIEVE THAT THE
CONSTITUTION   MUST   NOW   BE   AMENDED   IN   ORDER   TO
CHANGE THE BALANCE OF REPRESENTATION ON THE BOARD
TO FAVOR SYUDENTS AND TO ESTABLISH COMMUNICATION
BETWEEN THE CONTROLLING BODY OF THE GRADUATE
STUDENT CENTRE AND THE ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF
THE GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION.
WE HAVE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION
WHICH HAVE THE EFFECT OF CHANGING THE NUMBER OF
PRESIDENTIAL FACULTY APPOINTMENTS TO TWO, CHANGING
THE NUMBER OF GRAD STUDENT ASSOCIATION FACULTY
APPOINTMENTS TO TWO AND LIMITING THE TERMS TO TWO
YEARS, AND OF SEATING THE PRESIDENT AND INTERNAL
AFFAIRS OFFICERS OF THE GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION ON THE BOARD FOR THEIR ELECTED TERMS OF
OFFICE.
These amendments will be voted on at the annual general meeting
of the Centre on
<WWWM&WMW    MAM
ia«##   WM    MM   WWW    BMM.M.M
2<SC CE US
MUST DE TUEDE
new it's up to ycu Tuesday, March 14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 9
Grad class bread
From page 7
your use if you vote the money at
this time.
Ad Hoc Committee
to Get a Covered
Pool for UBC
Rights
Our requests for funds for a
booklet on the legal rights of
women deserves funding as a
graduating class project for the
following reasons:
1. The booklet will focus on
marriage and its legal
consequences for women.
University graduates usually enter
into the marriage contract in as
much ignorance of what they are
doing as anyone else. There is a
need within the university
community for the kind of
information which this booklet
will provide.
2. The booklet will also
cover the other main trouble-spots
in the law relating to women —
criminal and civil. It is being
prepared (and is almost complete)
by three women law students who
have some experience with legal
aid work and has a practical,
problem-solving approach.
3. The booklet will also
reach many women outside the
university who really need the
kind of help it provides; the idea
of favoring university activities
which only serve the privileged
few who attend university runs
counter to what most people
within the university now claim to
believe.
4. The request is modest —
$1,500 will allow the printing of
at least 2,000 copies of
professional quality, which can be
given away or sold at a nominal
price to allow the printing of
more copies and revised editions.
Women's Legal Rights
Handbook is a member of the
Community Coalition. In order
not to split the Coalition vote,
Women's Legal Rights Handbook
withdraws from the ballot and is*
represented by Mental Patients
Association, Women's Studies,
and University Day Care Council.
Slipstick
As the editor of the yearbook
Slipstick 72 and a member of the
graduating class, I would like you
to consider donating a small
portion of the total graduating
class gift fund to help out a good
cause at our university.
Slipstick, the yearbook of the
Engineering Undergraduate
Society and the only remaining
large-circulation yearbook on this
campus, is in desperate need of
financial assistance to carry out its
service to this university. For
the past 22 years Slipstick has
been published on this campus
and is now the second oldest
student publication here, the first
being The Ubyssey.
In the past few years due to a
slowdown and some very tight
money conditions in many
industries that usually provide us
with advertising funds, the total
advertising revenue has dropped
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
substantially, causing a budgetary
deficit on our accounts held by
the Alma Mater Society.
Last year due to a shortage of
space in the electrical and
engineering building for graduate
students we were forced to move
our operations from an office
there to a small agricultural hut
nearby where we are presently
located. In the move we
encountered many unexpected
expenses and also directed
considerable labor.
We would like to complete the
darkroom that we have started in
the new office, carry out
overhauls and needed repairs to
our darkroom equipment, and
write off some of our
accumulated debt in the AMS
accounts.
I hope that you as members of
the graduating class of 1972 can
see fit to donate a small portion
of your fund to this worthy cause.
A donation of $1,000 would
adequately fund our operations
for the many years to come and
make sure that this campus still
had an annual produced. Thank
you.
D. Ross Lewis,
Editor
Speak Easy
Speak Easy is applying to the
graduating class for a grant of
$4,200 to provide a salary for one
person during the summer months
(at $90 per week) and to provide
an operating budget of $2,600 for
the drop-in, counselling and
information service for
1972-1973.
Since opening its doors in
1970, Speak Easy has attempted
to provide immediate short-term
counselling through an
individualized referral and
resource network. Speak Easy
distributes literature on
family-planning, drugs, medical
and legal problems as well as other
community information.
To accumulate more refined
referral and informational
material, and to permit
personalized contact with
community services, we feel it is
essential that a full-time
co-ordinator be employed over
the summer. Compilation of
educational literature,
establishment of a resource
library, preparation of an
operational manual, creation of
training seminars and preparation
of articles for publication in
campus media would fully occupy
the time of a paid worker.
The operating budget of
$2,600 would enable Speak Easy
to purchase and distribute
material — birth control and VD
handbooks, each at $45 per
thousand, as well as other less
costly literature. For a more
detailed breakdown of this
budget, drop by the Speak Easy
office on the main floor of SUB
and pick up an outline.
Station
An ideal gift to the university
is one that is practical,
aesthetically pleasing, and acts as
a memorial to the graduating class
of '72. It is the objective of a
Canadian artist to build a
meteorological station of
brilliantly colored plexiglass set
into a matrix of concrete and
See page 12: GRAD
732-0311
A.M.S. GENERAL MEETING-MARCH 16-12:30
Constitutional Amendments
I. MOVEMENT OF "NON-CONTROVERSIAL" PARTS OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION
INTO THE A.M.S. CODE.
WHEREAS the Student Council has recommended that
certain procedural sections of the Alma Mater Society
By-Laws be removed and placed into the Alma Mater Society
Code:
Are you in favor of the following sections being removed
from the By-Laws and placed into the Code?
By-Law 4 (2), a section dealing with the appointment of
honorary members of Student Council;
By-Law  4   (4)   (2),  that  is a  section   dealing with the
appointment of an Honorary President and his/her duties;
By-Law 10- (2) to 10 (7) that is sections dealing with the
procedure for the levying of a fee upon each member of an
undergraduate society;
By-Law 11 (9) and 11 (10), that is sections dealing with
procedure by which the Alma Mater Society Budget shall be
accepted and by which the A.M.S. Treasurer shall deal with
fees levied by Undergraduate Societies upon their members;
By-Law 12 (1) to 12 (3), that is sections dealing with
prohibition of gambling, the drinking of intoxicating liquors
and the approval of advertising and distribution of materials
on campus;
By-Law 14, that is a by-law setting out the procedure for
dealing with subsidiary clubs and organizations;
And all other changes necessarily incidental to the foregoing
amendments.
Effect of the change:
Provisions which are presently in the A.M.S. Constitution
can only be changed by a vote of all students by means of a
referendum vote where the minimum vote must be about
4,000 voters. On the other hand, the A.M.S. Code can be
amended by a 2/3 rds vote of the Student Council. It is
proposed that certain "procedural" sections would be better
dealt with in the Code and this change would allow those
sections to be removed from the Constitution and placed in
the Code.
The sections involved in no way affect the basic operation
and organization of the A.M.S. but rather they are procedural
details which should be placed in the A.M.S. Code so that
changes as they become necessary can be made more easily.
A bi-partisan Constitutional Revisions Committee of
Council met to determine what "non-controversial" provisions
could be placed into the Code and their recommendations
were unanimously accepted by the Student Council which
now presents this change for your consideration.
This "housekeeping" change can facilitate a much more
instant response to the changing needs of administrative detail
and you are urged to vote YES for these changes at the
MARCH 16, 1972 SPRING GENERAL MEETING.
II. CHANGE IN THE SELECTION OF THE EDITOR OF THE UBYSSEY BY-LAW 4(3)(i)
OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION.
BY-LAW 4 (3) (i) NOW READS:
The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board, who shall be an appointed and not an elected
member of the Council. He shall be appointed by a vote of the Incoming Students' Council before the
end of the spring term on the recommendations of the Editorial Board.
AMENDMENT WOULD REPLACE THAT WITH:
"The Editor-in-chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board shall have successfully completed his/her first
year or its equivalent. He/she shall be elected in the same manner as the Executive of the Students'
Council."
III. REFERENDUM (NOT A CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE)
In view of the performance of The Ubyssey staff this year, are you in favor of a cut in the present
budget allotment of $36,500? Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 14, 1972
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Meeting,     noon,    SUB     210,    all
welcome.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES—LUTHERAN
Film:   A  Very  Old Question with
Paul Keller, the Ingmar Bergman of
Lutheran Circles, Lutheran Campus
Centre chapel, noon.,
FINE ARTS GALLERY
German    choir    and    Instrumental
music of the  16th century, noon,
fine arts gallery.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, St. Mark's
music room.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
What to ask the Politicians?, noon,
SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Discussion   and   decision   on   final
banquet, noon, IH 402.
DANCE CLUB
General  meeting, noon, SUB party
room.
AMS EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Panel on Education and Freedom,
noon, Ed. 100.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES—AUCM
Wine 'n' dine: eucharist and soup,
noon,     Lutheran     campus    centre
chapel.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Dr. George Knox of Fine Arts dept.
conducts tour of Durer exhibition,
noon, fine arts gallery.
CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS
All welcome to testimony meeting,
noon, SUB 224.
FREESEE
Kenneth Clark's Civilization, noon,
SUB auditorium.
HILLEL CLUB
Live    recording    of    Meir    Kahane
Speaks, free, noon, Hillel House —
behind Brock.
Hot flashes
'Token inquiry' Proletarians
protest set
A protest against the public
inquiry into pollution in the
mining industry is being held
today outside the B.C. research
building on Wesbrook Crescent.
ECO and the Sierra Club are
sponsoring the protest which they
say is against "the token inquiry."
"Only technical briefs will be
heard and these briefs, submitted
in advance, have been edited," a
spokeswoman said.
A discussion of the role of
proletarian ideology and the
necessity for students to integrate
with the working class will be held
Wednesday noon, SUB 211.
Hearing
Vancouver City Council will
hold a public hearing on the
proposed Burrard Inlet third
crossing at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
in Eric Hamber Secondary School,
5025 Willow.
IL CAFFEi
Electron at next year's council; all
members  please  attend,  noon,  IH
stage.
VOC
General     meeting    and     elections,
-   noon, Ang. 104.
ONTOLOGY SOC
Awakening from the Dream, noon,
Bu. 216.
VANCOUVER STUDENT MOVEMENT
The     working    Class     in     the
Anti-Imperialist   Revolution,   noon,
SUB 211.
THURSDAY
CCF
Ralph  Borthwick, missionary pilot
in Peru, noon, SUB 211.
KUNG FU
General   election,   4:30   p.m., SUB
205.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES—AUCM
General meeting of Anglican-United
campus ministries, noon, SUB 215.
DEAN OF WOMEN
Spectrum '72: academic counselling
— representatives from all faculties
and schools, SUB ballroom, noon to
2:30 p.m.
ALPHA-OMEGA (UKRAINAIN
VARSITY CLUB)
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
NEWMAN CLUB
Film:   The   Committee,   discussion
with  Bernice  Gerard  on abortion,
noon, SUB 207-209.
AMS EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Panel: Mental Illness and the Right
to  be Different, noon, BioSciences
2000.
UBC WARGAMERS
Avalon     —     Hilland     Table-top
specialists    welcome,    noon,    SUB
207-209.
BAHA'I CLUB
Meeting, noon, Bu. 230.
FRIDAY
voc
Tickets for banquet at Coach House
Motor    Inn   must   be   bought   by
Friday.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Executive    elections,    noon,    SUB
205.
All Graduating Class Members
GRAD CLASS MEETING
TODAY - 12.30 NOON - SUB AUD.
This meeting will be held such that each organization seeking subsidy from the
Grad Class Gift may present their proposals directly to the members of the Grad Class.
A short discussion period will be held after each presentation.
APPLICANTS:    SEDGEWICK LIBRARY     CANADIAN WOMAN E.C.O.
UNIV. DAYCARE URBAN VEHICLE        CRANE LIBRARY
LIONEL THOMAS MENTAL PATIENTS ASSN.      SPEAK EASY
Voting will be done by a preferential ballot on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 75 be/ween  10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Nine Balloting Stations will be set up around campus.
GENERAL MEETING
THURS., MAR. 16 - 12.30
SUNNY DAY: S.U.B. MALL
ORDINARY DAY: GYM
REPORTS (ONLY A FEW)
SPEECHES (NONE)
HARANGUES (USUAL NUMBER)
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS (ONLY TWO)
AND A BAND ("SUNSHINE")
HELP — 4000 students needed for a quorum — HELP
LONGHAIRS!
CAMPUS STYLING
AND
BARBER SHOP
SUB Lower Floor- 9 a.m. - 5:30 Mon. - Fri. 224-4638
SPECIAL SHOWING
#r
JOE COCKER, MAD DOOS
& ENGLISHMEN"
HEBB THEATRE, U.B.C.
7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
Admission 75c
CL. ASSI FI ED
•tttt* Compos -3 Kn«, 1  day $1.00; * days $%SQ ■
.    Comm*rciot - 3 Kn«,  1  day $1.25; addtHonaf
Jfaww »tej 4 day* prim «f »,    >
Ptdtticatiam Office, Room 241 S.U.B., VBC, Via. 8, B.C.
mwmmmmmmtiiHmmMmmm
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Danes
11
POLKA PARTY: LAST ONE OF
the year. Friday March 17 I.H.
8:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.	
DANCE. SUNSET CAVALIERS
Steelband, Sat. March 18th. 9pm
-1 am. Admission $1.00 each. Everyone welcome. GRAD STUDENT CENTRE.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
REWARD: GOLD JADE RING-
heirloom. Chinese Inscriptions -
red wool 'on band — Lost Monday
women's washroom Educ Bldg.
Contact   Gail   876-6853.
LOST. BEADED NECKLACE
Egyptian turquoise and coral
beads, lost on Tesday March 7th
en route from Old Auditorium
to Buchanan inclusive. Reward
offered.    Contact   922-7435.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE-
ness — 1 day introductory workshop    —   Individual         Groups.
Psychologist.    One    year    Esalen.
929-3662   mornings.	
BIG BLOCK BANQUET TICKETS
on sale now at Memorial Gym
or from team managers. The
men's biggest athletic event of
year on March 16. Students $4.00.
Travel Opportunities
IS
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special (homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'62   FAIRLANE   500   NEW   PAINT,-
engine    overhauled,    very    clean.
See and make offer 943-1364.
'62 FORD GAL. 500 AUTO., 390 hp
New power brakes, steering, new
snowtires, radio. Come see &
make offer 263-5640. $10 reward
to anyone helping  to  make  sale.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating ft Copying
34
Scandals
37
HIGHJACK   THE    NEXT PLANE
to    Corky's    Men's    Hair Styling
4th    &    Alma    731-4717. They'll
make you fly  right.
Typing
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from.10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.	
"TPYED YOUR OOWN ESS AT
lass time". It's easier to call
Dari.   738-6498.
Typing—Cont.
40
EFFICIENT. ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone 263-5317.	
TYPING DONE — I.B.M. ELEC-
tric — Elite type, essays, term
Papers, Thesis etc. Stencils and
Mimeograph,   My   home   327-5381.
PROFESSIONAL BILINGUAL
typing, IBM Selectric. Open days
evenings, weekends. Phone
Madeleine at 738-3827. Reasonable rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
COUPLE TO MANAGE ISLAND
campground June lJrSept. 4. Salary $500 plus cabin. Phone 224-
0539.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early. Limited enrollment. G. Alfred, 261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT EXAMS? THE
UBC Tutoring Center has tutors
in nearly every course. Register
in   SUB   228   12:00-2:00   weekdays.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ENGLISH DRUM KIT. DOUBLE
side Toms on Ludwig Stand.
Cymbal, pedal, stands. Rod 876-
5406.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
ROOM, KITCHEN. $60/MO. ON
campus 5745 Agronomy Road, 224-
9549. Live on campus, exams are
coming.	
TWO LARGE SEPARATE ROOMS
for rent. Share kitchen and bathroom. Phone 224-1551 until 5 p.m.
Room ft Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
SUITE TO SUBLET MARCH 1ST
-Sept. 1st. Three large rooms,
good view, partly furnished. Near
Broadway and Oak. $110.00 per
month.   Call   Bill  873-2228.
ETAOI TA
Unt. Apts.
84
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, March 14, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 11
BnKH_H__MH_____H_HH_H_H
Highlights
Soccer
The UBC soccer team takes on
the University of California on
March 23 at noon, and not on
Thursday as was previously
announced. Half time show for
this game will be a battle between
the nurses and home ecers.
them  into  the AMS president's
office or to the athletic office.
If you would like to see an
indoor pool on this campus, the
committee would like you to vote
in favor of the grant from the
graduate class to help initiate the
project.
Pool
Track
The Ad Hoc Committee set up
by the AMS to look into getting
an indoor swimming pool for UBC
is nearing the deadline for its
presentation to the Board of
Governors.
If you have any petitions with
signatures, could you please turn
Patti Loverock and Penny May
jumped back into the track and
field spotlight on the weekend in
the Canadian junior
championships held in Edmonton.
Sprint specialist Loverock tied
the junior 50 metres record with a
time of 6.2 seconds, while May
was an easy winner in the
pentathlon.
A MASS OF BODIES and an elusive ball add up to exciting rugby action during Braves game. The Braves
lost the game 6-4 to UVic. —Mm adams and kini macdonald photo
Rugby 'Birds clobber Vikings
By JIM ADAMS
The UBC Thunderbirds
out-hustled and out-played UVic
Vikings Saturday to take the lead
in the Northwest Intercollegiate
Rugby Conference.
Playing the best rugby seen in
Vancouver this year, the 'Birds
used their better conditioning and
ball-handling to run a half-time
13-7 score into a 32-7 rout.
The play and score of the first
40 minutes closely reflected a
balanced game. The Vikings and
'Birds alternately attacked with
neither dominating any particular
aspect of the play.
UBC struck first at the four
minute mark. Eight man Leigh
Hillier picked up a loose ball
from a set at the Viking three
yard line and bulled over for the
score.
Minutes later the Vikings
quickly carried the play to the
UBC end where the 'Birds were
penalized for lying on the ball.
The Victoria penalty kick was
good to make the score 4-3.
A kicking duel continued for
the next 20 minutes with neither
team able to penetrate their
opponents' defences. Ray Banks
put a 30-yard off-side penalty
through the uprights at the eight
minute mark.
As expected, the Vikings
continued their spoiling strategy,
lying well up opposite the 'Bird
backs and attempting to force
mistakes.
Choosing not to retaliate, UBC
played their own game and simply
ran over their opponents.
After a period of testing Viking
defences, the 'Bird backs began
running instead of kicking.
UBC's and Hillier's second try
of the game, came at the 30
minute mark on a scrum rush by
Rob Burns, *Benj O'Connor and
Hillier. Banks converted.
_.In the continuous see-saw
battle, the next score, and their
only try of the game, was the
Vikings. Throwing the ball
quickly into their lineout at the
UBC 10, Viking forwards got the
ball to their winger and scored in
the corner.
The 'Birds played a man short
for the final 10 minutes of the
half when winger John Mitchell
twisted an ankle defending a three
on one break.
The final 40 minutes was all
UBC's. Tired by the UBC style of
play, the Vikings continued their
aggressive, spoiling tactics, but in
a losing cause.
After losing several of his own
balls in the first half, UBC hooker
Steve Owens improved his timing
to get a major share of the
remaining sets. Tight head prop
Warrick Harivel dominated his
man to give UBC more of
Victoria's sets than their own. In
the loose, Victoria's aggressive
hitting was no match for the
Birds' continuing ability to beat
their opponents to the ball.
First blood of the second half
came at the 10 minute mark on
the penalty goal that followed a
35 yard run by Mitchell and
Spence McTavish. Running
between his centres, Mitchell
raced for daylight between the
Vikings flat-lying three line.
Beating both men, Mitchell then
passed to McTavish who got to
the Vikings three. From there
Banks made good on a penalty
kick.
Five minutes later, running on
his own wing down the sidelines,
Mitchell beat his own man and
two others to score in the centre.
Banks converted.
The final 20 minutes was a
connoisseur's   delight.
Taking the ball from the loose,
the 'Birds ran it out to the wing
where John Mitchell passed back
in to Banks and Barry Legh who
got to the Viking five.
Minutes later, forward Rob
Burns got the ball from a three
yard lineout to score in the
corner.
The 'Birds' last score was from
the Vikings' own lineout in their
25. Doug Schick scored off the
resulting rush.
"We  were  a  better team all
round," said coach Donn Spence.
"We got most of the loose, more
than our share of the lineouts, and
drew on the sets."
Final score 32-7.
HILLEL PRESENTS
A LIVE RECORDING OF
"MEIR KAHANE
SPEAKS"
Place: HILLEL HOUSE
Behind Brock
Time:
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15
at 12:30 p.m.
Admission: FREE
Graduate Students
Notice of Extraordinary Resolution
On behalf of the graduate student body, the Graduate Student Association
Executive will present the following extraordinary resolution at the annual
general meeting of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre,
12:30 p.m. March 16, 1972 at the centre.
Move:
That by-law 12 clause 2 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two faculty members
appointed by the Graduate Students Association"
That the words "and one for a term of three years,"
by-law 12 clause 2 subsection (a).
be deleted from
That the words "three years" be replaced by
clause 2 subsection (b).
'two years" in by-law 12
That by-law 12 clause 3 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two persons appointed
annually by the president of the university during the month of but prior
to the annual general meeting of the centre, who shall hold office until the
anniversary of their respective appointment."
That clause 4 be added to by-law 12 of the constitution of the Thea
Koerner House Graduate Student Centre to read: "The president and the
internal affairs officer of the Graduate Students Association, to serve on
the board for the duration of their term as members of the executive of the
Graduate Students Association."
GSA Executive.
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
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MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address	
City
Year of automobile...
Make of automobile..
No. of cylinders	
Horsepower..
Phone: Home   Office..
Occupation-
Age     Married □
Separated □
Divorced Q     Male Q
Never Married □ Female □
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area,,,	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Date first licensed to drive  .  	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes n No Q (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?  	
Are you now insured? __   _
Date current policy expires   	
This coupon is designed solely to enable non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Car No. 1
...Days
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Yes O No n
Car No. 2
Days
.Miles
Yes □ No □
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
FPR UBC 49
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March1! 4, 1972
Grad class bread
From page 9
non-ferrous metals. It is also the
intention of the artist to employ
UBC students to help construct
this proposed focal point on the
campus.
The   photo   below   shows   a
sketch of the station.
>'*-*V^,";v
Studies
We are applying for $7,000
from the grad class in order to
carry on the women's studies
program for a second year.
This year's course, The
Canadian Woman: Our Story, was
held every Tuesday evening for 20«
weeks in the SUB ballroom. More
than 700 people registered for the
course; half of these were students
and the rest came from
off-campus. A minimal
registration fee of $2 was charged.
The purpose of the course was,
through lectures and presentations
(films, panel discussions, etc.) to
provide information on the
history and contemporary
situation of women in Canada.
Because of the overwhelmingly
positive response to this year's
program and the continuing
concern about the position of
women in our society, it is
obvious that a women's studies
course must be available again.
We operated the course this
year on a budget of $6,500. This
money came from two grants,
from the Alumni Association
($3,000) and the Koerner
Foundation ($2,000) and from
registration fees ($ 1,500).
We    feel    we    will    need
approximately $7,000 in order to
carry on the program next year.
These funds will be used for guest
speakers, duplicating costs,
equipment rental, advertising,
office expenses and minimal
part-time salaries for two
co-ordinators.
Should we be one of the
winners on the preferential ballot,
as part of the Community
Coalition we will put our money
in a common pool to be
distributed among the members of
the Coalition according to need.
Anne Petrie
Co-ordinator
Urban car
Tomorrow, you will be asked
to vote on the rejection or the
acceptance of a grant to support
the Urban Vehicle Project. We are
asking for a sizeable grant so our
project may survive. The decision
rests with you.
The competition:
—91 universities and schools in
Canada and U.S.A. are entered.
—the car will be judged for:
exhaust emissions, safety,
production cost, size, braking,
acceleration, parking, comfort,
fuel economy, noise emissions.
—there are no cash awards for
the winner. The only satisfaction
COME IN TODAY! I
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GOT
YOU
DOWN?
COMPLETE
RETURNS
Go to a nearby H & R
BLOCK office for a real
picker-upper. Competent
tax preparers will complete your return promptly and accurately. You'll
smile at the low cost, too.
H & R BLOCK-A good
place to place your confidence.
GUARANTEE
LIFE
1   It   R  HOCK   1071
We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return.
If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or interest, we will pay only that penalty or interest. *
H'R
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Canada's Largest Tax Service Wilh Over 6000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST.
3519 E. HASTINGS,
T
6395 FRASER
3397 KINGSWAY
1685 DAVIE ST.
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPQJNTMENT NECESSARYI
327-0461
is the prestige gained by the
universities.
—the vehicle, when finished
will be the property of UBC
students.
How do we stand:
—technically our design is
excellent. We are building an
entire car to incorporate our
ideas.
—if we continue with the same
momentum, our prospects will
look excellent for winning.
What can this project do for
you:
—this project has already
achieved favorable recognition in
Vancouver. The people of
Vancouver are impressed that
students are not just complaining
about urban problems, but are
working toward their solutions.
—fellow students are doing
work that will benefit you by
reducing vehicle air pollution,
increasing vehicle safety and
reducing city traffic conjestion.
-the outside world has a
favorable opinion of the
constructive attitude of students
as a result of this project. This has
already, and will continue to help
many benefit in their job search.
The Urban Vehicle Design is a
university student project being
done at the university, for the
university.
Yukon
This paper is being submitted
to you requesting financial
assistance for the Chooutla
Residential School, at Carcross,
Yukon Territory.
The school is being re-opened
by Bishop Frame of the Diocese
of the Yukon. The new school
would offer a completely
different type of educational
program for students who are
looking for more than what is
offered in the present school
system.
The bishop has said that the
program would not only offer
high school courses but would
make it possible for young people
to choose from a variety of
interests available in the context
of the community. The
community would require
teachers, social workers,
musicians, dietitians, seamstresses,
carpenters, steam engineers,
plumbers, cooks, mechanics,
agriculturalists and construction
men, athletic instructors, survival
experts, managerial and secretarial
staff — all willing to join them.
However, in order to open the
school, $300,000 is needed by
June. We are asking for a $5,000
donation towards it. Your help in
this would be greatly appreciated.
BOUTIQUE
Handmade Clogs
Local Pottery
Open 9-5:30 Mon.-Sat.
till 9 Fri.
4430W. 10th
224-4513
Selling your home?
Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
Rutherford-Thompson-McRae
733-8181
There's a plan that
can solve more than
just your money
worries.
It's called the
Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP).
It's a plan that pays
your tuition expenses
while you earn your
degree in Engineering.
Sciences. Or Arts.
It's a plan that solves
your summer employment
problems by paying you
every summer while you
train to become an officer.
It's a plan that
guarantees you an interesting, well-paying career
when you graduate. As a
commissioned officer in
the Canadian Armed
Forces.
It's a plan that gives
you 30 days paid vacation
each year.
Consider ROTP. Contact your local Canadian
Forces Recruiting and
Selection Unit at:
Building No. 104
4050 W. 4th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
Ph: 666-3136
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
THE ACADEMIC
SPECTRUM '72
S.U.B. BALLROOM
March 16th
12:00-2:30 p.m.
Take this opportunity to discuss academic choices for specific objectives
with advisors from the 21 faculties and schools on this campus. Discover the
wide range of possibilities available for you.
Have you questions for Counselling, Housing and Health Services? Are you
interested in Study Abroad and I ntersessional or Summer courses —seethe
International Education and the Centre for Continuing Education tables.
Sponsored by the Dean of Women's Office

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