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The Ubyssey Oct 29, 1963

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Array My ear
has wax
in it
THE UBYSSEY
Vol.   XLVI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1963
48
No. 21
Revamp
council:
Coleman
By  TOM  WAYMAN
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Charges that student council
is unrepresentative and ineffective were made in a report
issued Monday by Arts president Mike Coleman.
"The present system is atrocious,"  Coleman said.
"The larger undergraduate
faculties such as Frosh, Arts
and Science which comprise
well over half the campus population, suffer woefully inadequate representation."
Coleman added that only 30
per cent vote turn out for
AMS elections shows council
is ineffective in reaching the
majority of students.
In the four-page report
Coleman calls for complete
constitutional reorganization of
AMS as it now stands.
He recommends:
The position of second vice-
president be abolished and replaced with an appointed public relations chairman.
Position of co-ordinator of
activities should he abolished
and an executive assistant
hired. This would release the
elected executive from red
tape and clerical work that
now ties up policy-making.
The remaining vice-pres-
dent's duties be expanded to
include actual co-ordinating
work now handled by the red-
taped co-ordinator.
"The vice-president should
be responsible to council for
knowledge and information regarding the activities of the
less important committees now
handled by Council" the report goes on.
Coleman said that many undergraduate society presidents
feel schitzophrenic trying to
do two jobs: work with their
own faculties and the AMS
council.
"The present system is not
sociologically based on the
needs of the students," Coleman said-
Coleman felt further that the
new vice-presidency could also
act as ombudsman to the campus.
Coleman's council would
also include:
One member at large from
athletics, ex-officio and nonvoting as The Ubyssey's editor
is now. The athletic member
would increase AMS-Athletic
liaison, and would have further
duties assigned him by the
AMS president.
One member at large from
the residences, to increase
channels of communication between residences and AMS
council.
THE FACTS
ON SUB
SPECIAL SECTION INSIDE
—don hume photo
SPIRIT OF HOMECOMING was displayed by these two
students at football game between UBC and University
of Saskatchewan Saturday. Game ended with fist fights
in  the  end  zone.  (See  more  pictures,   Pages  2   and   6).
Negro novelist to speak
on American race problem
One of the most articulate spokesmen of the American Negro will speak on campus Thursday.
James Baldwin, who will be awarded an honorary
degree at the Fall congregation next week, will speak at
noon in the auditorium on racial problems in North America. Admission is 25 cents.
Baldwin, a 39-year-old novelist and essayist, was born
and raised in New York City. He has been leader in recent
Negro agitation for an end to discrimination.
12 injured
in melee
at stadium
A dozen engineers were injured Saturday and a $120
set of goalposts was torn down in a wild melee following the
Homecoming football game.
The engineers, with AMS approval, have demanded that
the Inter Fraternity Council pay $100 in damages for medical
expenses and torn clothing.
The engineers were appointed by athletic director Bus
Phillips to protect the $120 set
of goalposts.
They claim that most of the
mob, which frequently interrupted the final minutes of the
game and clustered around the
goalposts at the end, was composed of fraternity members.
Most of the mob had been
drinking.
AMS president Malcolm
Scott said the liquor was probably brought into the stadium
in cars.
Some of the fraternities used
cars in the parade, which earlier wound through the downtown area.
A squad of eight Pinkerton
security policemen was hired
by the athletic department to
check handbags for bottles as
students went in to the stands.
But the Pinkerton men stayed off the field when the scuffling started to break out at
the end.
Phillips said there were not
enough security policement to
be effective if anything serious
had broken out.
The engineers were able to
save the second set of posts by
holding off the mob for almost
an hour.
"We were burned up," said
engineering president Steve
Whitelaw.
"We agreed to protect the
posts at the request of athletic
director Bus Phillips, and we
didn't expect people to come
and  start throwing   punches."
Space waste
A capsule analysis
You can't take it with you.
So you burn it, you distill
it, or you quick freeze it.
You can even send it back
to earth in a rocket.
These were some of the answers to the tricky problem
of getting rid of human waste
when you are orbiting the
earth in a space capsule, given
by Dr. J. G. Herlocher of the
U.S. Air Force school of aerospace medicine.
He was describing the problems of disposal of human
waste in manned space flight
to a seminar on space at UBC
at the weekend.
"Collection of the waste is
a serious problem," he said,
"What to do with it after col-
CAPT. J. G.  HERLOCHER
.  .  . what to do
lection poses an even greater
problem."
There are no flush toilets in
space.
"Some suggested solutions
have been quick freezing and
storing, burning with a catalytic burner, destructive distillation, activated sludge
microbial systems, as well as
miniature rockets which fire
back into the atmosphere and
burn the waste on re-entry,"
he said.
If getting rid of it is difficult, eating poses a problem
for the astronaut as well.
"If he wants to drink soup,
he had best make sure all
transfer movements are
smooth, or he could drown in
the soup," he said.
MUSA LINCKE
. the new queen
Homecoming
crown rests
with Musa
Fine - featured, blue - eyed
Musa Lincke, beat out 17 candidates to become UBC's Home
coming Queen for 1963.
Miss Lincke, the 18-year-old
Frosh Queen, says her major
interest is painting but she has
done fashion modelling for
downtown department stores.
Also crowned Saturday
night were two pretty princesses, Mary Lou Copp, Miss Medicine, and Maxine Rogers, Miss
Acadia Camp.
A giant skate centered between the Olympic games torch
and symbol won first prize in
the Homecoming parade float
contest Saturday.
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity
teamed with Alpha Omicron Pi
sorority to make the award-
winning float.
Theme of the runner-up
float, co-sponsored by engineers and nurses, was also winter sports.
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity
and Delta Gamma sorority
produced the third prize-winner, which had a Fiji Islands
theme.
There were 28 entries in the
parade—a dozen floats and the
rest convertibles carrying the
homecoming queen candidates.
Former students flocked
back to the university in greater numbers than ever.
More than 1,600 alums took
part in the weekend festivities.
The   Alumni   Association
(Continued   on page 3)
SEE: BALL Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1963
That old Homecoming spirit . .
. . . capped by a brawl
*   i
"111
"is*   ,
1' x.'j.M^XiiJu'ij*.
CADES
'?H^r'!
jH^^H
i. * ■    * *    **•*****» Tuesday, October 29, 1963
THE    JU BY.SSEY
Page 3
Not for students
It was alarming
only for firemen
Students weren't worried
in Buchanan Monday, but fire
GERMAN CAMERA
. . . clue to murder
$500 reward
offered
for camera
A $500 reward is being offered by the RCMP for information leading to the recovery
of murdered French student
Henri Meriguet's camera.
Meriguet, a 20-year-old student from Annecy, France, was
murdered while hitchiking on
the Alaska Highway August 30.
The camera is believed to
have been sold shortly after the
murder.
Doug Thompson, head of the
Campus RCMP, advises that
any information about the camera should be relayed to his
office immediately.
The German-made camera is
an "Agfa" (Silette Model 35
mm), serial number 2.100/247,
case number 3437, contained in
a brown leather carrying case.
when the fire-alarm went off
officials were.
Monday at 11:15 a.m. the
fire alarm system was set off
when a student leaned against
one of the push alarms.
Several professors evacuated
their classes from the building
but most continued to lecture.
Firemen shut off the alarm
shortly after they raced from
the university fire hall.
"It is a major concern of
ours when students ignore the
alarms," said Fire Chief R. W.
Rowland. "This was a false
alarm but it could have been
serious."
Rowland said students and
professors who didn't leave
the building were breaking the
law.
"But it's an impossible law
to enforce,' 'he said. "We have
to rely on educating the public in these matters."
UNDERGRAD WRITERS'
Meeting 8 p.m. tonight, 4706
West Sixth Avenue. Acquire
MSS for discussion in Bu. 171.
V    "P    Tr
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Dr. J. Headley (History
dept.) will speak on "Martin
Luther — a critical analysis,"
today noon, Bu. 104.
v     •*•     *T*
NCE
Discussion of year's program,
Wednesday noon in Bu. 203.
ift      •}•      «J»
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Concert on music of Charles
Ives, the Concord Sonata for
Piano, Vialo and Flute; Phyllis Taylor, piano; Esther Gla-
zer, viola; and Carol Kin i e-
busch, flute; Wednesday noon
in Bu. 106.
BALL
(Continued from Page  1)
planned for 225 persons to attend the Alumni luncheon and
300 showed up to eat the university out of house and home.
And Friday night's opening
of the new Thunderbird Arena
was a sell-out.
More than 300 persons were
turned away from the door.
(But at Saturday's Homecoming football game between the
Birds and the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies only
2,500 turned out.)
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Panel discussion on censorship: Speakers — Morton Jordan (VPL), Dr. Jan De Bruyn,
and the Rev. Father Frank
Firth, today noon, Rm. 861, Library, South wing (upstairs).
ORDER YOUR
MONOGRAMMED
UMBRELLA NOW *
$2.66
regular $5.95
* 10-day delivery
UBC
HOME
SERVICE
Allison & Dalhousie
Phone: CA 4-3939
LES   JEUNES    COMEDIENS
OF MONTREAL
present
LE MARIAGE FORCE
by Moliere
THURSDAY OCTOBER 31,12:30 NOON
NEW FREDERIC  WOOD  THEATER
Admission at the door 25c
DR. JAMES TROTTER
... work with x-rays
Prof wins
top medal
UBC associate chemistry
professor James Trotter has
been awarded one of the top
international chemistry awards.
He will receive the Meldola
Medal from Sir William Slater,
past-president of the British
Royal Institute of Chemistry.
Dr. Trotter will receive the
award November 4 at 8 p.m. in
the Chemistry Building, for his
work in x-ray crystallography,
a field of chemistry concerned
with the structure of large
molecules.
Co-op  bookstore'
rolls to Seattle
UBC's first experiment at running a co-operative bookstore rolled into action at the weekend. And it was a
success. .—	
Student's of W. E. Wright's
political science 407 class,
tired of waiting two months
for a book on order from
UBC's bookstore, decided to
take steps themselves.
They phoned a private bookstore in Seattle and ordered
ten copies of the book, The
American  Polity.
Students pooled their funds
and gave them to Gary Hales,
Arts III, who was going to
Seattle for the weekend.
Hales then brought the
books back across the border
duty-free (books proved to be
on the curriculum of a regular university course are dutyfree).
Hales said he was impressed
with the bookstore, one of
three located on the University of Washington campus in
Seattle.
"They have about twice as
many books out on the shelves
and the building looks about
as big as our Field House," he
said.
AMS may
cut frosh
off council
Frosh may lose their seat
on student council at the Nov.
14 general meeting.
Jason Leask, Frosh president, said in an interview
Thursday he feared student
council would use the poor
turnout at frosh elections to
put frosh off the council.   ,
The statement came after
Dennis Browne, undergraduate
societies committee chairman,
charged that the election was
unconstitutional.
Browne told council Monday
that his rulings, as returning
oficer, were interfered with by
councillors. He also said the
election was poorly publicized.
Only 400 frosh voted in the
election.
Now on Sale •..
BIRD CALLS
'63
Available   Now   at  the   Following
Locations:
* BOOK STORE: ALL DAY
* COLLEGE SHOP: 11:30-2:30
* IN FRONT OF A.M.S. OFFICE - NOON HOUR
75c CASH SALE
OR PRE-SALE STUB
Buy Now — Limited Quantity Ordered THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA
4-3242, Lioc.  26.  Member Canadian University Press.
Authorized   as   second-class   mail   by    Post   Office   Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies (or general
excellence, news photography, editorial writing
TUESDAY,   OCTOBER  29,   1963
is*.'
Think the SUB
Every once in a while, students are faced with the
duty of taking a hand in the running of the Alma Mater
Society (your student government, in case you didn't
know).
In the spring, you are asked to vote for people (the
best of a bad lot) to run your bureaucracy for another
year.
In the spring, and once in a while in the fall, the
AMS calls a general meeting at which it condescends to
ask for various mandates from the people who pay the
bills.
Most UBC students don't give a damn about that
duty, though. They, like their counterparts out there in
the adult world, don't bother voting.
On November 14, students will be asked to attend
a fall general meeting in tihe armory. The few who show
up will be asked to consider, mainly, the issue of the
student union building.
It is the most important issue that has been presented to the students since the re-organization of student
council three years ago, and perhaps more important,
because it involves something that will directly concern
the average student.
The SUB will be a building with functions and facilities far different from anything the campus as yet seen.
It will not be like the present Brock Hall—something
which many students still don't realize.
Inside today's Ubyssey (over there by your right
thumb) you will find a fact sheet on the SUB—what it
is supposed to be, and what the plans are.
It is published by the SUB committee and student
council, not as propaganda, but as the facts—the facts
gained from student questionnaires and surveys held to
find out just what you wanted in your union building.
Now's your chance to read over the information, ask
questions, and think about the needs tibis building will
satisfy.
Then when you go to the general meeting in two
weeks, you'll know what you're voting about. You will
understand, we hope, the idea of the building, and the
plan of action.
Then you will decide to sink or to support the SUB.
If you've read the facts, asked the questions, and thought
about it, the choice, we think, will be obvious.
Face the Musa
Special congratulations are in order for Musa Lincke,
the Frosh Queen who topped 'em all at the homecoming
contest last weekend.
Miss Lincke, rare Frosh that she is, garnered a pretty
good chunk of the 4,000-odd votes, beating out the solid
block votes of the engineers, sciencemen, and fraternities.
Now if that isn't a victory over apathy, we'd like
to know what is.
Come to think of it, you know, Miss Lincke is far
more popular than the president of the Frosh Class.
In a farcical election, he got a seat on student council.   And only about 200 people voted for him.
We'd suggest that the Frosh president be thrown out
and Miss Lincke be put in his place on council.
It seems she is far more legitimate, democratically
speaking.
And besides, she's much better looking.
EDITOR: Mike Hunter Asst. City .... Richard Simeon
Editors: Senior Donna Morris
Associate .... Keith Bradbury Senior  Maureen Covell
News   Dave Ablett
„ _ _   ... REPORTERS AND DESK: Lorraine
Managing' — George Railton Shore,  Steve Brown, Don Hull, Joy
Citv Mike   Horsev Bradbury,      Tom     Wayman,      Ron
VMy       Mine   norsey RltOT|   Terry   Hillborn,   Janet   Cur-
Photo       Don   Hume       rie,   Bill   Willson,   George   Reams-
_  ... _        „., bottom.
Critics     Ron  Riter
„      .      _.      , TECHNICAL,:   Joan   Godsell,   Nicky
Sports   Denis Stanley     phiiiiPs
There's nothing nauseates me more than one of those
clean-cut slobs—especially when he happens to know
more about Kafka than I do.
. . . and other readers
rave about Jack, SFA
Chicken or egg ?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The only valid reason for
having graduate studies at
Simon Fraser Academy would
be that it has both the plant
and personnel to offer an effective program.
The reason advanced by
Dr. Shrum that "We'll have
to have grad studies at SFA,
otherwise we won't be able
to get staff," implies that
graduate students exist for the
benefit of the university, and
not visa versa.
His reason appears even
more specious when one notes
that Victoria College has
attracted a perfectly adequate
staff over the last few years
without the supposed benefits
of graduate studies.
GRADUATE STUDENT
Enthusiasm
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to set your
misinformed reporter straight
on a few points. In answer to
his charge of "lack of enthusiasm" let me state the following:
a) In all my campus experience I have yet to come
across another group that is
so willing to sacrifice their
own time for the benefit of
the whole student body.
b) Not only are they willing
to give up their time, but
they were also willing to pay
their own way to Edmonton
for the Nov. 2 football game.
This proposed trip fell
through only because there
wss not enough support from
the rest of the campus.
c) Finally, to cut down a
long list, what other group
contributes as much to the
outside publicity for athletic
events by posing for downtown (and Ubyssey) newspaper photographers? Being a
press man yourself, Mr. McAfee, I think you'll admit
that you would rather photograph one of the cheerleaders
than our illustrious but somewhat rotund AMS president.
Now I would like to ask
you,  kind   sir,  does  this  list
add up  to   a lack  of  enthusiasm?
You likewise slammed the
cheerleaders for a poor show
and equally poor results. On
the first account you are
partially right although I
wonder how good you would
be, Mr. McAfee, after two
weeks practice? Let's not get
carried away with premature
criticisms.
As to the poor results —
the blame is laid on the
wrong people. There seems to
be a long tradition to hide all
. show of enthusiasm and university spirit for UBC under a
staunch mask of apathy.
It appears to me that the
least the Ubyssey could do, as
a promoter of student spirit,
is to back up the small show
of enthusiasm there is on
this campus rather than pan
it for minor failings. Or maybe Mr. McAfee's article just
slipped by the scrutiny of his
editors!
G. STOREY
UBC Pep Band
Happy marriage
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was glad to see someone
like the 'science student' challenge Ornstein's statement,
"that there is no God". As a
nameless individual, the
'science student' represents
countless numbers (not exhibiting simple - minded ignorance, as suggested by Jack)
who believe in God.
Let's face it, Jack! God's
existence is absolute, not
something that can be questioned or denied. No debate
or investigation can settle the
matter, as often happens in a
law court, where right can be
called wrong,   or vise   versa.
Someday, if you should
marry someone who believes
in God, I hope you will see
her way of thinking before
it's too late. K you don't God
help your marriage and your
happiness.
CHRIS HICKS
Arts II
The girls
get some
support...
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am answering the question asked in the headline of
McAfink's article in Friday's
Ubyssey. This University has
twelve cheerleaders! And
they are about as far as they
can get from being "pathetic"
—which is a long way.
Apparently McAfink doesn't know the meaning of
"enthusiasm". If many long
hours of practise, appearing
at every game, and going to
pep meets, and many other
f u n c t i ons isn't enthusiasm,
then I don't know what is.
• •    •
I'd also like to explain the
main reason for the success of
Malcolm Scott and Jim Ward:
novelty. They make such unusual cheerleaders that the
crowd goes along with them.
This brings me to the main
problem — the crowd. They
either feel it beneath their
dignity to cheer with the
cheerleaders or they think
the girls are there just to
entertain them. Whatever the
reason, the cheerleaders are
not at  fault.
All they can do is continue
to give their all and hope for
a break in spectator apathy.
All I can say now is three
cheers for the cheerleaders !!!
MIKE STEWART
Arts I
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am one of those blissful,
simple-minded and ignorant
students that believes in God,
Mr.  Ornstein.
It seems to me that you
deny the existence of God for
two reasons. First, you wish
to be your own King and as a
result set out to justify yourself in disproving the existence of God. Secondly, you
decide that there is no God
out of your own ignorance.
• •    •
If you are so interested in
disproving God, why do you
read only books supporting
your own personal thesis.
Why don't you look into the
Bible and study God's word
for yourself. Here is where
you should search for your
arguments against there being
a God. How much of the truth
of life does the Bible reveal?
And when you are studying
the Bible, why don't you put
aside the bias of solely seeking to prove yourself right
and openly judge what truth
lies in God's Word for yourself.
• •    •
Sure, you may be able to
discount all these statements
as mental allusions or fantasy, if you wish to judge so
short-sightedly. Sure, you can
produce over-surmounting
arguments that seem to deny
the existence of God (If God
is real and I have no doubts
that He is, evolution and
other arguments will fit in
somewhere.)
As   individuals   it   is   our
right to believe what we wish.
And I will take my blissful,
simple-minded   and   so-called
ignorant   position.   In fact,   I
will base my life on it. I hope
that   you   are   satisfied with
your choice. I am with mine.
KEN MACLEOD
Science II Tuesday, October 29, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC students to compile
report on French Canada
By LORRAINE  SHORE
Five UBC students will compile a report for the Royal
Commission on Bi-Culturalism.
The report will incorporate
the -conclusions of the seven
universities participating in
the Canadian Union of Students seminar in Banff last
week-end.
The seminar, with the theme
"Western Canada and Confederation", was attended by 26
students from universities in
the four western provinces.
Each participating university
will send a report incorporting
the opinions of its delegates on
subjects discussed and possible
solutions to French-Canadian
problems.
•    •    •
These reports will be compiled into a single document by
the five UBC delegates, Lorraine Shore, Caroline Andrews, Chuck Campbell, Penny
Riorden and Beverly Bie, and
two students from Victoria
College.
The problems of bi-lingual-
ism and bi-culturalism were
the most frequently discussed
at the weekend seminar.
The alternative of multi-
culturalism to bi-culturalism
was proposed, mainly by Ukrainian students.
The existence or lack of a
Canadian identity and the complacency of Canadians was criticised.
The possibility of federal aid
to   higher   education   and  the
equalization of standards
across Canada were also discussed.
The three-day conference
was opened by Dr. Malcolm
Taylor, principal of the University of Alberta, Calgary.
In his speech on "Being Canadian in Canada's Century," he
said that Canadians were being
prepared to live as world citizens.
• •    •
He outlined the task of Canada in the world, including aid
to underdeveloped countries
and the training of specialists
and technicians for these countries.
Taylor stressed the role of
the university and asked for
faculties composed of many
ethnic groups and large numbers of foreign students.
He also felt that universities
should specialize in a particular field of teaching, such as
UBC's Slavonic and Asian
Studies Departments.
• •    •
Calgary business man, Ed
Davis, prophesied that nine out
of 10 students would disagree
with his speech.
He was right.
The self-proclaimed capitalist charged the federal government with having too much economic power.
"The federal government is
not set up to provide goods and
services, but should only protect the rights of its citizens,"
he said.
He criticized the powers of
the civil service and suggested
a long-term policy making
body, without authority and
with no responsibility to the
electorate.
The ultra-conservative Davis
also criticized the 52 per cent,
corporate tax and said that it
prohibited Canadians from investing in their own development.
Saskatchewan's Minister of
Public Health wanted more
equalization grants for provinces.
Alan Blakeney said the problem today is matching revenue
and responsibility.
•    •    •
"Consideration should be
given to demands from French-
Canadians, not only in Quebec,
but elsewhere also," he said.
He suggested more recognition of the French culture, a
bi-lingual civil service, and
more money to provincial governments to finance projects.
Dr. D. V. Smiley, from
UBC's department of political
science, said English-Canadians must recognize the different pattern of relations between Ottawa and Quebec, and
between the federal government and the other provinces.
"I believe if Confederation
is to survive we will have to
move towards a device whereby French Canada has a veto
on some federal policies," he
said.
I
WE ARE PLEASED
TO ANNOUNCE
THE
APPOINTMENT
OF
Paul Rirby
as our
Campus Representative
RE 1-4747
CONTACT PAUL FOR INFORMATION
REGARDING OUR SPECIAL STUDENT
RATES AND MEASUREMENT
AND DELIVERY SERVICES FOR
FRATERNITIES, CLUBS AND GROUPS
McCUISH FORMAL WEAR LIMITED
RENTALS AND SALES.
I
I
2046 WEST 41st AVENUE
263-3610
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
LAVAL CONFERENCE ON
CANADIAN AFFAIRS
Two students will be selected to attend the Laval
Conference on Canadian Affairs. The theme of the con
ference is "The New Quebec". Criteria for selection
are: interest in the theme and academic record. Further
information and application forms can be obtained
from the receptionist in the Alma Mater Society offices
in Brock Hall.
NOTE: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS I& 12:30,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 NOT OCTOBER 28 AS
PREVIOUSLY ADVERTISED.
BROCK HALL ART COMMITTEE
Information may be obtained from A.M.S. Secretary
Brock Hall.
CAMPUS CANADA
Requires a distribution manager. Information can
be obtained from Frank Millerd, WA 2-5624.
CHAIRMAN CONTINUING
COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION
Information can be obtained from George Boechler,
WA 2-4063.
HIGH SCHOOL CONFERENCE
CHAIRMAN
Information may be obtained  from  A.M.S. Secretary, Brock Hall.
Applications and Eligibilty forms for the above positions to be submitted to the A.M.S. Secretary, Box
74, Brock Hall, before 4:00 p.m., Monday, October 28,
1963.
SPECIAL COMMISSIONS
Application forms are available in the A.M.S. office
and must be returned to the A.M.S. office not later
than 5:00 p.m., Friday, November 1st, 1963.
Criteria for selection are: past experience in clubs,
committees, societies, etc., at U.B.C. and other uni-
verisities, incipient or continuing interest in and
concern with student government and finances, A
committee with a broad background is desired, the
commission will be selected by A.M.S. 1st vice-
president and treasurer, subject to ratification by
student council.
A brief elaboration of the issues involved will be
found in Tuesday's (Oct. 29th) Ubyssey. Page 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1963
GEN. GNUP BARKS HIS BATTLE ORDERS
SPORTS
EDITOR: Denis Stanley
Thunderbirds on the fly
after whipping Huskies
By  DAN MULLEN
The UBC Thunderbirds soared to a victory by air Saturday
afternoon at Varsity Stadium
by outclassing University of
Saskatchewan Huskies  22-0.
The UBC aerial game left
the Huskies panting as it accounted for 310 yards and three
touchdowns. Pass receivers
Tom Thomson, Robin Dyke
and Norm Thomas again had a
field day, combining for 17
receptions  and 244 yards.
Quarterbacks Roger Hardy
and Dick Gibbons, operating
behind fine pass protection
from the T-bird forward wall,
usually had ample time to find
their receivers.
The Thunderbirds scored on
their first play from scrimmage as Roger Hardy fired a
pass to flanker Norm Thomas
on the Husky 25. Thomas pulled away from two defenders
to put UBC ahead, the entire
play covering 56 yards.
Tom Thomson, trying his
hand at place kicking, booted
the extra point.
Later in the quarter Dick
Gibbons boomed the ball into
the end zone for a single point.
•    •    •
The Huskies appeared to be
coming to life in the closing
minutes of the half. They moved from midfield to the UBC
30 before Mel Petrie intercepted a pass to cut the drive short.
Hardy found halfback Dick
Gibbons standing all alone in
the end zone and tossed to him
for UBC's   second  touchdown.
Thomson converted, and the
Birds went to the locker room
with a 15-0 lead.
In the third period the Birds,
with a first down on the Husky
eight, wasted no time. Gibbons,
at quarterback, threw to end
Tom Thomson in the end zone.
Thomson fought off a defender
and made the catch flat on his
back. He arose to kick the
point-after, and end the scoring.
FRENCH CANADA   WEEK
November 4-8
presenting
PROMINENT SPEAKERS, SEMINARS, CULTURAL   DISPLAYS,   DRAMA   AND   FOLKSONGS
Sponsored by:
The Canadian Union of Students' Committee of
the Alma Mater Society.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Jail £iftttpcJiutn
Walla Walla Biological Research Station
8,9f 10 No., 1963
A Weekend of Academic Discussions on
"Individual in Mans Society"
APPLY NOW AT A.M.S. BEF'ORE 30th OCTOBER
General Gnup deploys his
battalions from the sidelines in Saturday's UBC
Thunderbird-Univer sity of
Saskatchewan football
game at UBC Stadium. But
despite UBC coach Gnup's
resort to extra sensory perception, Huskie end Len
Harapick managed to snare
this pass by outsmarting
Birds Mel Petrie. Gnup
shows his frustration in gestures. But it wasn't really
that bad, Birds copped a
22-0 win. Photos by Don
Hume.
tmMfdk (jib (W SiA
Glcnayr '»  /„—
0&L
MKDIUM WEIGHT
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You can't beat a combination of beauty and
brains! That's why knowledgeable gals choose
this Kitten beauty. A full-fashioned medium-
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SI2.()8. Pure wool fully-lined double-knit
skirt, matches perfectly. Sizes 8-20, $15.98.
Mew Kail colours...at good shops everywhere.
Without this label it is not a genuine Kitten
532/WU Tuesday, October 29, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Nat team
paced by
Dineen
By ROGER  McAFEE
Sparked by a six-point performance by Gary Dineen,
Canada's National hockey team
defeated the Edmonton Oil
Kings twice during the homecoming weekend.
Dineen   scored   three   goals
and assisted on three others as
the  Oilers   were   dropped   2-0
Friday and 4-2 Saturday.
2.300 FANS
Friday 2,300 fans, who turned out to celebrate the official
opening of the $500,000 Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre,
saw the Olympians play what
was probably the worst defensive game of the season.
Olympic goal keeper Ken
Broderick stopped 32 Oil King
drives on one of the busiest
nights he's had.
"Defensively we were bad,"
Olympic coach Father David
Bauer said.
"A team has to control the
puck to score. And our control,
especially in our own end was
not good."
"We were just too anxious
to score," Bauer said.
Dineen and defenceman Ross
Morrison scored for the Nationals Friday.
Saturday   Dineen  accounted
for half  the Olympic   scoring
while assisting Marshall Johnston on a third goal.
CLANCY SCORES
Terry Clancy got the other
Olympic marker, slapping in a
McDowell rebound.
The Victoria game was one
of the roughest the Olympics
have played this season.
SCOREBOARD
RUGBY
Rowing Club—11    Birds—3
Braves—3    James Bay—0
Physicial Education—9
Rowing Club  II—3
Richmond—8   Frosh I—6
Frosh II—12    Britannia III—0
Property wanted: Rich
maharajah urgently wishes
to purchase the entire province of B.C. (except Vancouver Island). Must include
mineral and fishing rights.
Principal only. Listen to
CKNW *odio*
'heretic   magazine   presents
SATIRE
arts   theatre  production   of
CARNIVAL IN
OUR TOWN
or
(SON OF BITTER ASH)
old  frederick   wood   studio
Friday, Nov. 1 at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 2 at 2:30 and
7:30 p.m.
Admish 50 cents
University Jazz Society
presents
This Thursday,  October  31
the
Glenn McDonald
Quartet
Brock Lounge —12:30-2:00
Members free.      Others .25
OLYMPIAN Al McLean didn't quite get his shot past Edmonton Oil King Goal keeper Russ Kirk (white jersey) in
Friday's game at UBC arena. Another Olympian Paul Con-
lin (11) is camped  near the net, hoping for a  rebound. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1963
'tween classes
Tug-o-war pulls
for Dimes March
Arts US has challenged the Engineers to a Tug-o-War,
Wednesday noon on the Main Mall.
Dennis Browne, USC chair
man, will be the judge. The
purpose of the effort is to publicize the March of Dimes. A
collection will be made.
T*        V        V
Dr. Malcolm McGregor will
give the premier lecture in the
Last Lecture Series, today
noon in Bu. 100.
Combined Arts executive
and council meeting, Wednesday noon in AMS Council
Chambers. A few council positions are still open.
•J* V •$■
SCIENCE US
General meeting noon today
in Chem. 250.
*    *    *
UNITARIAN CLUB
Meeting in Bu. 225, Wednesday noon. Free discussion.
•*•        V        V
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
General meeting for organization and elections Thursday
noon in Bu. 2201. Nominations
should be placed in Box 107,
AMS office today or Wednesday.
V V    *&
EL CIRCULO
Conversation group will meet
noon today, Bu. 212.
V V      V
NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT  *
General meeting today noon
in Bu. 217.
•f*       »ji       2ft
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Meeting Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in Brock TV Lounge.
•J"     *fr     •*•
PRE-MED SOC
Pre-Med Soc presents Dr.
J. J. Lederman speaking on
"Forensic Medicine," Wednesday noon, Wes. 100.
the attic
coffee house
Thurs. to Tues. Inclusive
JUBILATION  SINGERS
and
PEARL THUSTON
formally with
LIONEL HAMPTON
9:30 10:45 12:15
3607 West Broadway
RE. 8-0410
HAMSOC
Code and Theory classes,
every Tuesday and Friday
noon, start today noon, Brock
Ext. 358.
BLD?
Meeting today, Board Room
in Brock.
•£  •¥•  H*
ASSOC, of GRAD STUDENTS
John Porter, UBC's architect-planner, will speak on
"Campus Planning" Wednesday noon, Lassere 311.
v v v
DEBATING UNION
Resolved: That a line should
be drawn.
•JU     JU     *JU
INTERNATIONAL WEEK
Meeting in board room, International House, today noon.
All club reps please attend.
•t*    v    V
FOLK SONG SOC
Concert with Karen James,
Wednesday noon in Brock.
Members free.
AUTHOR'S   AGENCY
Bring your manuscripts, stories,
articles, books, songs, poems.
Free advice and help. Toronto.
New York, Hollywood sales contacts. 1065 E. 17th Ave. TR 6-
6362.
Essays,   theses   and   manuscripts  typed  at reasonable
rates. Experienced. 4732 W.
7th Ave. CA 4-7185.
12 3 4 9-1
Technocracy he.
prsents
A  Public  Lecture
"ADVENT OF
ABUNDANCE"
by
Milton Wildfong
Authorized   Speaker
3642 Kingsway
Sunday, Nov.  3rd
8 p.m.
Ptesctytion Optical
'ASK YOUR DOCTOR'
SPECIAL DISCOUNTS
TO UNDERGRADUATES
USE YOUR CREDIT
UBC  CLASSIFIED
RENT A FINK: For successful
parties, employ my insipid intellects, bland personality, gauche
behavior. iMake guests feel clever, superior, and "in''. Can tell
dull stories, sing off-key. Call
Jack,   WE   9-2057. 	
FOR SALE: 1960 Renault sedan,
34,000 mi.—good clean car—asking $500 cash. Phone Laurie be-
tween 5:30 and 7 p.m., CA 4-9052.
TO THE considerate gentleman
who told me how to find Miss
Tebo. I found her. Thank
you for your kindness. Lynne
Jones.
FOR   SALE:    Suzuko   50   c.c,   new
condition.   Call   731-6239   evening.
WANTED: 15 girls for "Bitter
Ash" type party. Phone Bill Arm-
strong.  MU  4-1895  after. 6  p.m.
LOST: A camera in Bi. 2000 on
Tuesday, Oct. 22 at 2:30. Reward. Call Betty Smith at 224-
9879.
LOST: Text and exercise books in
the Science Division. Could you
please return them to me or
burn  in  at  Lost and  Found?
LOST: Gold ring with silver coin
in it, Wednesday, Oct. 16, in
Brock Ladies Washroom. Sentimental value. Reward. Please
phone Musa, AM 6-2516, or turn
in   to   Proctor.
RIDE WANTED: Vicinity of 33r<3
and~ Ar.butus, 8:30's, Monday to
Saturday. Phone Karen, AM 1-
7119.
TUTORING:   Spanish   tutoring   offered   by   Argentine   student.   Call
Jack   at   CA   4-6685.
FOR SALE: 8 mm movie camera,
projector, screen ,etc. Versatile.
Good buy. Phone Dave, RE 3-
8522,   after   6   :30.
WANTED: Drivers with access to
car once a week to form carpool
from W!est Van. Phone WA 2-
0095,   8   to   10   p.m.	
LOST: Will_ the person who mistakenly toflk my black %-length
coat (with a belt at the back)
from the library coat hanger on
Tuesday, Oct. 22, please call
Phil, AL 5-3607. Hurry, I'm
freezing.	
LOST: Blue Sheaf fer's "snorkel"
fountain pen in library or vicinity Saturday noon, Oct. 19. Find-
er please call Local  712.	
FOR SALE: Kastle metal skis.
Must sell before October 31. New
$130. Will accept best offer.
Phone   Leigh,   WA   2-2270.
FOR SALE: 1960 Renault, excellent condition, best offer. Must
sell quickly. Phone Tom between
5:30 and 6:30 at CA 4-9052 or
come and see it at 2260 Wesbrook   Crescent.
LOST: Brown wallet, on campus.
Please return contents to Bookstore Lost and Found, or phone
Bud,   YU   8-5118   after   6   p.m.
RIDERS WANTED: Don't ride the
bus! Room for four living west
of Fraser, south of 41st, in Dunbar, or near gates. Large, warm
car. Campus centre drop-off. 8:30
to  5  every  day.  Call   876-2316.
LOST: English 100 notes in the
vicinity of Library. Finder
please   call   Helen,   RE   8-0628.
WANTED: "The History of Modern Europe" by R. R. Palmer.
Call   Jan   at   RE   1-3659.
LOST: Would the person who took
my briefcase from outside the
men's washroom in the Physics
Building Thursday morning, take
it to the  Lost and Found.
FOUND: Blue scarf in BU. 106
about 1:30 Wednesday. Owner
call CA 4-9956 and ask for Cecelia.
RIDERS WANTED: From Burrard
and 16th or along route. Will
make small detour—6 days a
week, 8:30 to 5:30—pay bus fare
or $7 a month. Call Mark Voelk-
ner at  RE  3-5300.	
FOR SALE: Gibson Electraharp
8 string steel guitar, 4 pedals,
sunburst finish, and case, for
$200. Phone Eric after 6 p.m.,
CA   4-0506.
Mobil
CAREER   OPPORTUNITIES
Socony Mobil Oil of Canada, Ltd. is one of the three largest
oil producers in Canada.
Discoverer of Pembina, Canada's largest oil field, and
Fosterton, the first commercial oil discovery in southern Saskatchewan, the company explores extensively throughout Canada
for oil and gas, and currently has exploration "plays" in the
Yukon and the Sable Island region off the Nova Scotian coast,
among other places.
Among 175 professionals on a staff of 650, most are graduates
of Canadian universities. They work in the company's headquarters at Calgary and in district offices at Calgary, Edmonton,
Regina and Dawson Creek, B.C.
The company recruits annually for graduates and undergraduates who possess satisfactory academic records and have
the personal traits necessary to handle the challenging situations
they will encounter in their work. Rewards and benefits are made
accordingly.
APPLICANTS FOR EMPLOYMENT WILL BE INTERVIEWED ON
CAMPUS ACCORDING TO THE SCHEDULE BELOW. APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE AT THE STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE.
November 1 and 2
Land Trainee—commerce or business administration (marketing
major).
November 1, 4 and 5
Junior Production Engineer—petroleum, mining, civil, jnechan-
ical, chemical _and electrical engineering.
November 4 and 5
Junior Geologist—honours geology, geological engineering.
Junior Geophysicist—physics, geophysics, engineering physics,
electrical engineering, general geology.
Junior Accountant—commerce or business administration
(accounting or finance major).
Economics Assistant—commerce or business administration
(finance major).
Summer openings exist in geology, geophysics and engineering.
Socony Mobil Oil off Canada, Ltd
BOX 800  CALGARY, ALBERTA ALMA  MATER  SOCIETY
STUDENT UNION SUPPLEMENT
' - " ; -t>
,... - .-^fe*^ V
i Page 2
STUDENT      UNION      SPECIAL
Tuesday, October 29,  1963
Editorials
Scott urges 'yes' vote
Within the next few years each and every one of us has
an important decision to make. The fate of the proposed
Student Union Building is now in the hands of the individual
member of the Alma Mater Society.
This is not a decision to be taken lightly.
Each of us must make up his own mind and then cast
his ballot. This is our responsibility, not only to ourselves,
but also to succeeding generations of UBC students.
Many of the facilities we use today; the Gym, the Brock,
and the Winter Sports Centre, to mention a few, were built
by our predecessors. They didn't build facilities for their
use, but ours.
Can we deny our responsibility to do the same for our
successors?   I think not.
We must still, however, consider whether or not the project is the right project for us to undertake. Will we be
endowing the University with a necessary and vital addition
to the academic plant or will we be building the biggest white
elephant in B.C.
This is something each one of us will have to decide for
himself.   This must be a personal value judgement.
But to be of any use even a value judgement must be
based on the facts. Seek the facts, don't accept others preconceived notions.
I will vote for the Student Union Building, I will do so
because I believe, after making my own survey of the facts,
that this facility is the most valuable contribution we can
make to the future of this University.
I do not urge you to vote "yes" because I am, but I
would urge you to consider my reasons for doing so before
you make up your own mind.
This is not a luxury facility, it is a necessity. There is
more to university life than the amassing of knowledge and
the completion of assignments.
The University should develop the whole man!
Our horizons must be broadened and our capabilities
developed. This University, by the very nature of its physical layout, militates against this.
We exist within sterile classroom blocks, among groups
of people with similar interests and, if anything, our horizons
are narrowed by specialization within our academic discipline.
The Student Union Building is designed to overcome tihis
physical barrier to the development of the whole man posed
by the University structure.
Its centralization of facilities and drawing together of interests is designed to create a University on this campus where
none now exists.
We are not concerned with the provision of better club
facilities or shiny new offices, rather we are concerned with
providing for future generations of UBC students.
A centre for their activities to revolve around. An opportunity for them to truly benefit from the University environment.   A chance for them to develop an identity.
Seek the facts. Form your judgement and vote in good
conscience.
What alternative?
What is the alternative if the Student Union is
not put in?
UBC in 1967 will have 20,000 students plodding one-half
a mile from the .parking lots south of Agronomy Road into
the academic area.
When they get on campus, they will be faced with .a
shortage of food services and lounge areas.
Why? Because the administration is not planning any
new food services in the academic block and Brock will not
handle the load.
Academic expansion is booming—the library will expand
across the road next to the proposed Student Union Building.
Engineering will at last be moved out beside the barns.
A ten-storey, multi-purpose classroom block will tower over
the Main Mall.
The medical complex and Woodwards Library will be
finished.   The Science complex will have expanded.
The Administration buildings will have been moved
adjacent to the Fraser River parking lot and the commerce
huts will be replaced by the new law expansion.
Nowhere in the area are there facilities for the students'
extra-curricular activity.
In 1957, the commissary will be over-crowded. Students
will be forced to eat their lunches in their cars even more
than they are now. (At present, the survey showed that 5
cent eat in their cars). Many more will be forced to eat bag
lunches in the lecture halls in which they sit for five hours
each day.
We must make the decision now to accept the proposed
Student Union so that the needs of the future students at
UBC will be met. Our forerunners planned ahead for us.
We must do the same for coming generations.
^Ss-^J^g.        "•
STUDENTS HAD to comer Ray Perrault in front of Brock after his speech because there
is really no facility in the building where students may take their speakers to get a
lunch after a noon hour speech. The new Union will provide private dining areas
for this  purpose.
Clubs problems solved
by new Union building
By  CLIFF  BOWERING
There are more than sixty
clubs at UBC and much time
and discussion has gone into
ensuring that their needs
will be satisfied in the new
Student Union Building.
Most clubs agree that a
Union must satisfy three
basic needs; administrative,
meeting  and social.
During the summer, club
executives met on a number
of occasions and decided
upon the. facilities that
would best satisfy these
needs.
The administrative needs
will be well taken care of.
The clubs will have, for
their exclusive use, a spacious work area that will contain desks, typewriters, telephones, and filing cabinets.
Around the periphery of
this general area will be four
unassigned offices that could
be booked on a weekly basis
by any club during a special
event.
In addition to this exclusive club area, a general
workroom with storage
lockers would be available
for painting posters and for
the repairing and storing of
equipment.
The club executives decided general meeting needs
could be filled by using
lecture theatres.
For executive and committee meetings however, the
smaller conference rooms in
the Union would be used by
clubs on a booking basis.
For     emergency    executive
meetings, a small conference
room for the exclusive use
of clubs could be booked at
short notice.
The social need was rather
more difficult to solve. Surveys showed that the small
offices in Brock Extension
are not being used, while the
huts behind Brock are often
overcrowded.
To provide each of the
sixty clubs with areas equal
to those in the huts would
cost nearly a million dollars
and was, therefore clearly
impossible.
It was decided that only
those few clubs with very
special needs (Dance, Camera, Filmsoc, Radsoc and
Hamsoc) would have their
own areas.
To take care of spontaneous discussions and coffee
parties after meetings, a
clubs lounge would be provided in the general club
area.
The concept of no club-
rooms is certainly not a new
one, even at UBC. The political clubs have shared a common room for years and have
used planned socials to build
their membership up to the
level they now enjoy.
Some of the larger clubs
which are presently situated
behind Brock rely almost exclusively on 'planned socials
to create a group spirit because even their comparatively large clubrooms are
much too small to accommodate their memberships.
There   is   no  definite  an
swer to the question of what
will happen to the huts. As
the clubs know they have
been on the verge of being
torn down for five years.
However to ease the transition between having a clubhouse and not, the clubs
have asked that the UCC
look into the possibility of
moving the huts. There is a
strong possibility however,
that the old huts could not
stand the move and would
be fit only for firewood.
Whether the huts can be
moved or not, the clubs
fully realize that their life
years and have taken this
fact into consideration when
deciding on SUB facilities.
The new Union will
change the club philosophy
at UBC somewhat. While
the clubs will still exist as
distinct groups of students
with common hobbies and
interests, there will be a
trend away from the little
cliques that the small club-
rooms have fostered.
The new philosophy in
keping with the entire building will be one of interaction
and exchange of ideas between clubs, accomplished
by the sharing of many facilities.
The club executives, facing the prospect of losing
their Brock offices to student committees, and their
huts to old age and parking
lots, have approved this part
of the facility list as a plan
best satisfying the diverse
needs of clubs at UBC. Tuesday, October 29, 1963
STUDENT      UNION      SPECIAL
Page 3
HERE'S
CROWDED facilities of the
Brock Cafeteria clearly indicates the need for more
food services available to
students on campus. Future
plans of development do not
include food services for
students in the academic
area. The new Union will
solve some of this problem.
THESE   PICTURES   show   the
overcrowding in the present
Brock Lounge forces students
into the halls to get out of
the rain. Students must eot
their  bag   lunches  standing
in   hallways   because   there
is no facility in Brock which
allows them to sit around a
table  to  enjoy  their  lunch.
The   new   Union   will   have
many areas and the Snack
Bars   in   particular   are   designed to  provide this facility for the students.  The design   of   the   new   building
will  eliminate  the  crowded
hallway problem.
—Don Hume photos Page  4
STUDENT       UNION       SPECIAL
Tuesday, October 29,   1963
FACILITIES
Food  Services
-€   Cafeteria 1, seating 600 in 8,334 square feet.
2 Cafeteria 2, seating 313 in 3,756 square feet, (not in
first stage planning).
3 There will be two meeting dining rooms holding 20-24
people which will occupy 835 square feet
4 Snack Bar 1, with 420 seating capacity and dance area
on the side which can be expanded for extra facilities
during the day. The whole area, with shopping centre
style service counters, is 7,230 square feet.
5 Snack Bar 2, will seat 370 people and is another facility
which will be added later when the need arises.
6 Vending Alcove which will accommodate  six units
now and six units when the second snack bar is added.
This will take up 160 square feet.
7 Lobby and Exhibit Area at the entrance to the cafeteria
to accommodate lineups — provided with 1,500 square
feet.
8Coatrooms with capacity for 500 coats will take care
of those wishing to check the coats before entering
the cafeteria. These need 800-1,000 square feet
9 The central kitchen which is self-explanatory requires
6,650-7,000 square feet. Al! figures for the Food Services have been approved by Miss R. S. Blair as her
requirements.
\ t\ Servery which is required for catering to banquets in
JL\j the Ballroom and Party Room requires 1,500-1,700
square feet.
n Miscellaneous food service area will be 3,325 square
feet for food storage, garbage and linens.
TOTAL  FOOD  SERVICES   AREA  will  be   30,334-32,354
square feet.
With the Administration supplying $775,000 towards tJhe
cost of the food services in the building this cannot be a problem area. It will be run along the same lines as the present
Brock.
Student Services
1 Lounge Room requiring 672-700 square feet for the
tired, sick, or commuter student.
2 Adjacent to this room will be dressing and shower
rooms for men and women so commuter students can
change for an evening at University without having
to travel home.
TOTAL STUDENT SERVICES AREA will be 320 square
feet.
Commercial Services
1 There will be six commercial firms to serve the students such as: barber shop (with eight chairs), beauty
salon, bank and college shop. These services require
5,500 square feet .
2 Included in this area will be 890-1020 individual lockers to help accommodate the shortage in the academic
block.
TOTAL COMMERCIAL SERVICES AREA will be 6,390-
6,520 square feet.
Games Area
1 Manager's office and games control area will require
200-230 square feet.
2 Bowling area of 8-10 lanes of automatic five-pin bowling in basement will require 5,762-7,186 square feet.
3 The card players will have tables set up in the Foyer-
Lounge at the entrance to the Games area, this will
require 450-600 square feet.
4 Another Vending Alcove will be built into the entrance
area.
5 A Billiard Room with 10-12 tables next to bowling
will require 1,900-2,100 square feet.
6 Popular table tennis will get 875-1,375 square feet for
for 3-5 tables.
TOTAL GAMES AREA will be 9,205-11,571 square feet.
Entrance  Facilities
IThe entrance lobby will house the receptionist and
ticket sales which will require 2,40/1-2,800 square feet.
2 Information desk including lost and found requires
140 square feet.
3 Fifteen phone and coin telegraph phones will be located
in the lobby. These will take up 170-200 square feet.
4 The main checkroom with 700 coat capacity adjoins the
information desk, will occupy 525-550 square feet.
5 General lounge area will be 4,000-4,300 square
feet.
6 There will be a television alcove off the general lounge
which will take 400 square feet.
7 The Men's and Women's washrooms in this area will
require 1,180-1,350 square feet.
TOTAL   ENTRANCE   FACILITIES   AREA   is   8,975-9,620
square feet.
Cultural  Facilities
1A reading lounge for the commuter student and others
along with a control desk alcove require 1,860-2,000
square feet.
2 Two music lounges for different types of music appreciation seating 10 and 20 people require 800-1,100
square feet.
3 The auditorium lobby which will serve as an art
gallery and display area requires 2,000-2,200 square
feet.
4 The small auditorium seating 400-450 students will
occupy 4,604-4,979 square feet.
TOTAL CULTURAL FACILITIES AREA required 9,264-
10,339 square feet.
Meeting Areas
Iand A These are committee rooms which are ideal for
*■ meetings of 20 people with dining facilities available. They require 325-350 square feet each.
3 to O There are eight public meeting rooms which
O will be multi-purpose; for such things as movies,
discussions, socials, special events, etc. They
range in size from 30 person capacity to 125. They
will require a total area of 4,190-4,800 square
feet.
9 and ^k £k are seminar centres with capacities of 40 and
JL"   60 people requiring 1,600-1,700 square feet.
U Miscellaneous   area   for   kitchenettes   requires   192
square feet.
TOTAL MEETING AREA required 6,440-7,200 square feet.
Administrative Areas
IFull time Administrative Offices including food services, mimeograph, etc., will require a total of 3,345-
3,570 square feet.
2 Student administrative offices require 1,240-1,280
square feet.
3 The Athletic  Office will be moved to  the  Student
Union and will require 440 square feet.
TOTAL   ADMINISTRATIVE   AREA   required   5,025-5,294
square feet.
Committee and Club
Headquarters
IThe Committee headquarters will have a general workroom, five offices and storage facilities as well as a
350 square foot conference room. The total area for this
facility will be 1,450-1,650 square feet.
2 The General Club headquarters as explained by Cliff
Bowering on another page will house general desk
space for 15 desks, files, lockers, telephones, and offices
for UCC Executive and four unassigned offices.
There will be a General club lounge 1,500 square feet,
and a conference room for 15-20 capacity in the area.
The total-area for these facilities will be 3,690-3,940
square feet.
TOTAL COMMITTEE AND CLUB HEADQUARTERS
AREA required 5,140-5,590 square feet.
Special Club Facilities
1 Camera Club with needs for a portrait studio and darkroom require 550 square feet.
2 Film Society needs 500-600 square feet and Cinema 16
which is a separate organization require 100 square
feet.
3Rladio Society who predict a full scale radio operation
in the near future require a total area of 1,450 square
feet.
4 Ham Society requires 220 square feet for their broadcast and engineering facilities-.
5 Party Room Extension whjch will be used by the Dance
Club during the day adjacent to the Party Room for
evening use.
6 The religious clubs will require special facilities but
they can be accommodated in the Reading Room. For
party preparations and making posters and signs there
is a General Workroom with lockers for clubs which
require 1,800 square feet.
7 Mamooks which is the student poster-making organization needs 830 square feet to house their equipment
and make their posters.
8 A new idea is the outing headquarters which will
house a 800 square foot lounge, equipment and work
room and storage rooms, and an attendant and rental
desk. This area will require a total of 2,100-2,300 square
feet.
TOTAL SPECIAL CLUBS AREA required 8,500-8,700 square
feet.
SEE FACILITIES: Page 6 Tuesday, October 29, 1963
STUDENT       UNION       SPECIAL
Page 5
REASONS
Food  Services
5
6
8
9
10
11
Because the University will lack food service facilities
in tihe future, more so than they are lacking now, students favored a number of services in the Student
Union Building. Cafeteria 1 is designed to fill the need
of part of this load.
Cafeteria 2 will be added when the need arises and is
not planned in the first stage. It must be provided for in
this facility list so that the architectural competition
can take it into account on the major plans. The Union
will be the major food service outlet on campus. The
food services of the Union aire designed to provide
service for the commuter and off-campus students.
The meeting dining rooms will provide a meeting place
for small groups of students who meet during the noon
hour and will avoid the necessity of carrying bag
lunches to meeting or grabbing a sandwich hastily before or following the meeting. They will be small private dining areas with cafeteria tray service. Waiter
service may be arranged in these areas by caterers
for small luncheons.
Snack Bar 1 is designed to provide area for the bag
lunch people who now have to sit on the lawn or inhabit the academic block during tihe lunch hour. Many
of the students (5%) eat their lunches in their cars.
This facility provides a place to grab coffee and refreshments between classes and will be conducive to
informal social gatherings. The snack bars will be open
during dances for refreshments.
Snack Bar 2 will provide the same service but like the
second cafeteria will not be included in the first stage.
Vending machines are becoming increasingly popular
on the commutor campus for students who simply
want a sandwich and milk. The vending machines
answer this problem and relieve the pressure on the
food services areas.
The lobby and exhibit area will serve as a trophy display area for various clubs and sports groups with
awards. It will be located at the entrance to the cafeteria to accommodate the line-ups.
The coatrooms provide a service of coat storage for
students while they are eating.
The central kitchen is drawn up to specifications of
the experts with areas broken down into detail such as
50 square feet for ice cream in the cold storage area.
This kitchen will prepare and provide food for all the
food service areas in the building.
The servery is not an eating area but rather an area
which the experts say is needed to set up tables and
materials to cater to banquets which will be held in
the Ballroom and Party Room which will be adjacent
and near tihe central kitchen.
The miscellaneous area is for food storage, box waste,
garbage, linen and food receiving to comply with the
needs of the experts.
Student Services
IThis Lounge room is not an area for general lounging. It will be provided with several cots and is designed to be a service to students who are hung-over,
ill or simply resting before a strenuous night at the
University.
2 The dressing and shower rooms, which are adjacent
to this room and will allow the commuter student to
change and shower before going out in the evening
without going home to do it. Locker space will be provided in the rooms for students to store their clothes
during the day. A similar service is being put into the
new Edmonton Union.
Commercial  Services
IThe Barber Shop will have eight chairs and will likely
be run in the same fashion as Peter Van Dyke's operation is today. Like the rest of the commercial services,
the Barber Shop will pay for itself within four years.
6) One of the better downtown firms has applied for the
Beauty Salon on campus. -
A Post Office branch was considered for the Union
because the future plans of the University will tear
down the present Bus Stop and Post Office. Students
will be able to buy stamps from vending machines
and the receptionist in the main entrance to the new
Union.
Locker space in this area, along the walls, are designed
to offset the lack of lockers in the academic block.
One of the major Banking firms has applied for privileges in the new Union. This service will be provided
and the returns for the rent will be very lucrative.
The College shop will be much the same as it is now
with extended service in specific areas of books and
clothing.
Revenue from all these services will pay for the
capital cost and will assist in covering the deficit operations in other areas of the Union.
3
Games Area
Students can relax between classes or in the evenings in
the games area located in the basement of the building.
IThe Games area will have a paid manager, who will
have a small office.
2 Eight to 10 lanes for five-pin bowling will be provided
which will replace the existing lanes in the gym.
3 The Foyer-lounge is really a card room with 20 card
tables for card buffs.
4 If you get hungry and thirsty after a strenuous game
of ping pong, 3 to 5 vending machines will supply
snacks and beverages.
C" Ten to 12 tables for pool sharks will be set up.
/• Students can play on three to five fold-away tables.
As well as giving relaxation, the games facilities will produce revenue to help pay for the building. Most lucrative
should be the bowling, but the billiard tables are expected to
produce about $800 per table a year, and the ping pong tables
about $200-$300 a year.
Entrance  Facilities
IThe lobby at the main entrance will provide a convenient meeting place for students to meet friends and assemble groups before going to eat or dance. An alcove
adjoining the lobby will be used for registration of
seminar and conference groups, special displays, voting
booth for campus elections, ticket sales and the like.
It can also be used as a convenient marshalling area
for campus tours.
The Information desk will have a receptionist to direct
visitors entering the building, answer queries about
coming events, and suply information on the University and the Alma Mater Society.
Fifteen telephones will be provided for the convenience of students and visitors. A coin-operated telegraph is also planned.
Space for hanging 7,000 coats will be provided in the
checkroom. Visitors will be able to leave coats, books,
umbrellas and briefcases there before going to dances
or using other facilities in the building. A lost-and-
found will adjoin the checkroom.
The comfortably furnished general lounge adjoining
the lobby will be used by visitors for talking, studying
and relaxing. However it will not be the main meeting place, because experience at other unions has shown
that students will use the cafeterias and special-purpose
rooms, such as tihe music and television rooms, for
their leisure-time activities. The general lounge will
also be able to handle the overflow from the lobby
when large parties ga'ther.
Students interested in watching T.V. will be able to
use a small television room. For major events, such
as the World Series and Grey Cup games, extra sets
will be set up in the lounge and other areas.
AND ID
2
3
4
Modern, well-equipped washrooms will be
provided near the main entrance.
6
7
Cultural  Facilities
IThis room is designed to relieve the load of study area
in the Library. Reading material available at this
facility will consist of books on loan from library,
periodicals, and hometown newspapers. Clubs with
special collections can store them in tihis reading room.
To control books and records, there will be attendant on duty all the time.
2 The Music lounges will operate from late morning until
the time the building closes. Students can use the
rooms for quiet relaxation for short periods. Records
will be handled by the attendant.
3 The Auditorium lobby will serve the dual purpose of
taking care of the Auditorium crowd and display area
for art and photo exhibits, as well as commercial displays.
4 The small auditorium will be used for large meetings,
lectures, alumni meetings, movies, chamber music,
play readings, rehearsals, forums, conferences, etc. It
will not duplicate the academic theatres, because these
are not available for daytime use because of lectures,
etc. This room could be used by students any time
during the day. The new Frederick Wood Theatre is
not available because the administration has it totally
booked for academic purposes.
Meeting Areas
1AND A The committee rooms are designed to take
«■ care of the small meetings of 20 people who
wish to eat during the meeting. Such committees as
Brock Management will meet in these. Other uses will
be for club executive meetings, editorial board meetings, etc.
SEE REASONS: Page 6 Page 6
STUDENT      UNION      SPECIAL
Tuesday, October 29,  1963
FACILITIES
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4)
Publications
1 Publications administration requires a total of 465
square feet for the advertising, secretary and business
director.
2 The Ubyssey requires 1,000 square feet for the newsroom, 280 feet for the editors' offices and 200 square
feet for the darkroom.
3 Totem also requires 400 square feet for the general
workroom, 180 square feet for the offices and 200
square feet for their darkroom.
4 The rest of the occassional publications on campus
require an office about 100 square feet.
TOTAL PUBLICATIONS AREA required 3,105 square feet.
Social  Facilities
1A ballroom which will accommodate 400 couples—
cabaret-style when opened into the Party Room which
is adjacent, asks for 5,500 and prefers 5,700 square feet
Besides the ballroom itself there will be a stage, two
dressing rooms and a projection and sound booth
which occupy 620 square feet total.
2 The Party Room which is adjacent will occupy 2,700-
2,900 square feet.
3 Men's and Women's washrooms and storage will occupy
1,000 square feet total.
M  The ballroom lobby will take 1,500-1,800 square feet.
TOTAL SOCIAL FACILITIES AREA required 11,920-13,020
square feet.
Auxiliary  Facilities
1 Facilities necessary for employees of the building
require a total of 1,230 square feet. This includes washrooms and lockers and lounge area.
2 General storage requires 3,400-4,100 square feet and
storage for mechanical equipment, etc., is 5,000-5,500
square feet.
TOTAL AUXILIARY AREA required 9,630-10,830. square
feet.
REASONS
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5)
3 TO O Meeting rooms have much larger capacity and
O will accommodate meetings from 30-125. such
things as special events, socials, general meetings, club
meetings, panel discussions, and a number of other
things of this size will be accommodated.
AND4 A are seminar areas, which will be designed
JL" and fitted for round-table discussions, such
as seminars need. They will have a capacity of 40 and
60 persons.
This area will be for Kitchenettes for warming coffee
and setting out do-nuts.
9
11
Administrative Areas
IThis area will be the business brain of the Union building. All the professional staff, such as Manager, secretaries, mimeograph, assistants, safe, storage, program
director and staff, food services, proctor, janitors, etc.,
will be here.
2 The Student Administrators and their assistants will
occupy this area. All elected officers will have an
office area. A conference chamber next to the President's office is provided for executive meetings.
3 The Athletic directorate, which is now housed in War
Memorial Gymnasium will be moved to the new Union
where they belong. Office space for Men and Women's
presidents, Athletic director, Public relations director
have been provided.
Committee and Club
Headquarters
IFor committees which do not function all year, one facility will be adequate. Some of the organizations which
will use this area are Open House,. AWS, Delta Sigma
Pi, Frosh Orientation, Homecoming, Grad. Classes, High
School Conference, IFC, Leadership, CUS, WUSC.
Along with the large general workroom, there will be
four unassigned offices with files, etc. Adjoining this
will be a conference room, which will provide meeting
place for the steering committee of the organization,^
with a capacity of 15-20 people.
2 This will house the executive of UCC and also four
unassigned offices. There will be a large working
area, where facilities to run the ordinary work-a-day
paper functions of their clubs will be provided. Typewriters, filing drawers and telephones will be available
for use of all clubs in this area. This area will also
provide a large Club lounge and conference room for
15-20 people.
Special Club Facilities
1 Because the Camera Club needs a darkroom and studio
to justify its existence, they had to be given special
consideration as a club. This area is approximately
the same as they now have in the Brock link.
2 The Film Society need special area for processing and
editing film. They, too, were given special consideration. Cinema 16, which is not the same organization,
needed an office to carry on its business.
8
UBC Radio is planning to become a commercial broadcast station in the near future. They will need added
facilities in order to make this a reality.
The Ham Radio Society, which cannot duplicate the
services of the Radsoc needed special area for their
equipment.
The Dance club, because of their membership today,
were given special consideration of this room between
9 and 5 each day. It will be adjacent to the party
room to be used for night parties.
The religious clubs will find the necessary accommodation in the Reading Room.
The general work area will be for the use of all clubs
to paint posters, repair equipment, make costumes, etc.
Lockers will be provided in this area for clubs to store
paint, banners, cloth, etc., for tihe year.
The outing headquarters will be a meeting place for
the outdoors clubs and gives them room for storage,
equipment rental, equipment repair, general workroom, lounge, and storage lockers and facilities.
Publications
4
The Publications administration office needs room for
the manager, advertising manager «nd his staff, the
secretary.
The Ubyssey will receive enough room to extend to a
daily in the near future. The area is not much different
to existing area.
Totem has asked for an area equal to what they have
at present.   It will include a general workroom, offices
and a darkroom.
Raven, Pique, Tuum Est, Telephone  Directory and
other occasional publications will have a 100 sq. foot
office for organizational purposes.
Social  Facilities
IOne of the most useful, and almost universally adopted,
rooms in a union is a fairly large multi-purpose hall,
with a stage which can be used for sizeable social
gatherings, dinners, lectures, receptions, motion pictures, skits, musicals, and other purposes. A large,
attractive dance hall is needed; at present only the
Brock, Women's Gym, Field House, Armory, can be
used for general dances on campus. This area can be
used for dances and mixers, parties, banquets, pizza
feasts, open house, square dancing, receptions, meetings, movies, rehearsals, fashion shows, variety shows,
conventions, demonstrations, musicals, etc.
2 The party room is adjoining the Ballroom and can be
used separately or together. It will handle many
events which would be too costly to handle in the Ballroom. It will serve as a second dance hall for those
which would be "lost" in the main ballroom. The two
facilities will handle 400 couples set up in Cabaret style.
3 AND  M  These facilities will provide storage, lobby
m.   space, and washrooms for the large events
which take place in the Ballroom and party rooms.
Auxiliary  Facilities
1 Employees  will need washrooms,  lockers,  cot room,
lounge area, and these will be provided in this area.
2 General storage for the building will be provided in
this area. Tuesday, October 29, 1963
STUDENT      UNION      SPECIAL
Page 7
STUDENT SURVEY
Based on 1564 Student responses
Weighted
Urban Co-ed
Score
Universities
Rank
77.7
(82.0)
1
67.7
(67.3)
2
67.4
(61.9)
3
66.7
(76.4)
4
65.8
(70.9)
5
63.8
(66.7)
6
' 60.6
(69.5)
7
60.0
(63.1)
8
52.9
(59.0)
9
50.7
(54.4)
10
46.6
(44.3)
11
44.1
(42.9)
12
43.7
(54.3)
13
43.1
(52.4)
14
.41.5
(58.7)
15
41.0
—
16
41.0
(32.4)
17
38.8
(55.7)
18
36.4
(34.9)
19
34.4
—
20
34.2
(44.1)
21
31.4
(75.7)
22
31.3
(37.8)
23
30.4
(35.7)
24
27.0
(47.4)
25
25.8
—
26
24.8
(51.3)
27
23.9
(28.0)
28
23.9
(47.3)
29
23.7
(30.2)
30
22.4
(24.0)
31
20.5
(36.7)
32
18.6
(40.5)
33
18.2
—
34
18.0
(26.6)
35
14.1
(32.3)
36
13.6
(22.5)
37
All
Stu-
Facility dents
Snack Bar     91.3
Cafeteria     78.8
Theatre  81.2
Bookstore  69.8
General Lounge      83.2
Ballroom     78.2
Parking        71.0
Information Desk      81.4
Browsing Library      73.9
Small Auditorium      68.8
Display Space     60.7
Private  Self-service Dining   Room  56.3
Party Room      56.3
Meeting Rooms     54.7
Music Room     58.8
Bus Stop at Union  49.6
Outing  Quarters  56.4
Bowling      ,.^ 57.0
Checkroom       52.6
Informal Dance Area  47.6
Post Office      48.5
College Shop     46.2
Kitchenette      41.6
Quiet Rooms     39.7
Table  Tennis  41.7
Squash, Handball      33.4
Television  Lounge  37.6
Dressing, Showers      34.8
Cards, Chess     35.5
BarberShop      !  29.1
Individual Lockers  27.9
Private Dining Room  29.4
Billiards     ."  25.9
Rehearsal  Room  24.9
Poster Workroom  25.5
Craft Shop  19.3
Photo Darkroom    :  17.5
Men
Students
Women
Students
Dorm.
Students
Fraternity
Students
Commute
From
Own
Home
Commute
From
Private
Home
Married
Student
Units
Grad.
Students
90
95
89
96
93
85
67
79
78
85
60
85
84
82
61
60
79
86
84
70
82
77
67
74
69
72
70
78
70
67
S3
80
77
87
79
86
85
78
50
63
78
79
82
93
78
72
61
54
70
74
46
74
78
67
28
51
79
86
79
74
82
78
67
80
74
75
70
74
74
74
55
53
68
71
72
70
70
60
60
74
58
66
61
63
60
61
56
51
54
63
38
59
64
68
45
39
55
60
67
63
54
53
50
47
54
60
58
67
55
51
33
44
56
65
56
67
58
61
39
49
43
65
61
78
46
53
33
46
56
57
72
40
51
58
45
44
56
61
65
52
55
56
33
30
50
60
47
44
55
52
32
35
46
51
56
30
49
40
5
20
47
58
63
67
40
57
72
70
45
50
55
63
44
42
44
39
34
61
43
37
41
42
28
39
33
55
21
21
45
40
17
31
45
34
39
44
41
44
22
32
41
15
32
67
35
56
44
32
42
38
40
63
40
41
39
30
36
31
18
32
38
36
17
20
39
27
38
26
35
31
11
23
41
2
40
50
23
23
56
40
25
35
19
85
31
29
17
17
28
33
26
40
32
6
22
44
36
3
28
70
26
21
22
17
21
33
25
40
26
22
11
21
21
36
26
30
26
23
9
16
17
24
26
26
17
20
11
29
22
7
22
19
15
19
28
27
(The above numbers are
in per
cent.)
Competition  produces
best possible' building
SUB will go to an Architectural Competition to get the
best results.
Warnett Kennedy, archit-
ectual consultant for the SUB,
says that like Simon Fraser
Academy, the best possible results will come by putting the
building up to Architectural
Competition.
•    •    •
"No .matter if you happened
to chose the best firm in the
country to design your building,   you   would   not   get   the
consideration which a competi-
tiom brings out.
"The expense is well worth
the results you will get," he
says.
•    •    •
The competition will have
several stipulations within
which the competitors will
have to work.
In the facility list the archit-
tects are given the space
requirements and the desired
floor space for each facility.
They will fit them accordingly.
Preserve this edition
until Nov 14 meeting
Keep this edition for the General meeting.
It will be a handy guide for you to follow when the
general  meeting reviews the Student  Union.
All the facts are here and only a fuller interpretation
will be made of problem areas at the meeting.
If there are any aspects of the Union planning which
are not included in this edition, you can discuss them at
the general meeting,  November  14.
At the General Meeting, students will be asked to
accept either a package deal for the Union or approve in
principle the idea.
If the second alternative is decided upon there will
be a referendum to follow in a week.
Students reading this section should compare the
facilities and the reasons. Pages 4, 5 and 6, are tied into
one another giving the full story on the facilities proposed and the reasons for the facilities.
Included in the facility list
are certain references to allocation of the food services in relation to the party room and
ballroom, etc. These requirements must be taken into consideration by the  designers.
"By putting the building up
to competition you get the very
best ideas from all the architects and in the final drawing a
lot of the better ideas of other
competitors could be used,"
said Kennedy.
• •    •
The competition will open
as soon as the students give
their consent to the building.
It will be an open invitational contest for all interested
firms  in Canada.
As well as making their
plans agree with the stipulations of the facility list they
will have to allow for the 500
car park, the transit loop, access to the front and back of
the building, the site, and the
second and third stages of the
building.
• •    •
Soil tests, photos and surveys of the Stadium site will
be included in the competition.
Kennedy is in charge of arranging the competition.
PORTER BUTTS was the man
responsible for compiling
the facility list from student
surveys. He has worked on
more than 100 unions and
formulated the UBC needs
from his experience. This
issue is a condensed version
of some of his recommendations.
New SFA plans
include union
Burnaby's new Simon Fraser Academy has a student
union in its first stage.
The architectural plans submitted to Chancellor Gordon
Shrum include a central Student Union.
Dr. Shrum agrees with the
planners that the Union is a
very essential part of a well
planned modern university.
Food service
allocated
20 percent
„ Twenty percent of the total
area of the new Union Building will be used by Food Ser-
For students wondering
what each area occupies, here
is a breakdown.
The Prafessional services,
working on a commercial basis
which will pour money into
the building to help offset the
operation costs will occupy
4.81 percent of the total area.
The total games area will be
6.06 percent of the area.
The entrance facilities such
as lobby, General, lounge, etc.,
occupies 5.91 percent.
The cultural facilities including the reading, music and
display lounges and auditorium
require 6.11 percent.
The total space for meeting
areas is 4.99 percent.
The student activity areas
including publications administrative offices, club facilites,
committees, workrooms, etc.,
will occupy 14.82 percent.
Social facilities including
the party room and the ballroom will occupy 7.86 percent
of the total area.
Auxiliary facilities total 6.36
percent.
Corridors and walls require
23.08 percent of the total area
which is normal for unions. Page 8
STUDENT      UNION      SPECIAL
Tuesday, October 29, 1963
Co-ordinator explains
booking inadequacies
BY  KEN LEITCH
"We're putting on a broad-
way musical. Where can we
hold auditions?"
"We want a place for our
executive with  a telephone."
"Our production requires a
place to sew costumes."
"Can't you do something
about the service in the Brock
cafeteria?"
These are samples of the
daily problems which face the
co-ordinator. They all have one
thing  in common.
They reflect the present inadequate facilities of our university, casting a particularly
dark shadow on that bastion of
student government, BrocK
Hall.
FEEBLE  EFFORT
At preseht, pur Hajl cum
Student Union is open 15 hours
a day, five days a week, with
a feeble effort at service Saturday morning.
The effective use of this
building is limited to a seven
hour day and caters to approximately 20 percent of the Student body.
One might well ask why
build a Union?—when they
survey the present usage.
This is not the answer—it is
the problem.
Brock Hall's design lends itself to one main function, a
center for student government.
CAVERNOUS LOUNGE
Secondary facilities such as
the single cavernous lounge
and the cafeteria are taxed to
the limit.
The Lounge is subjected to
many diversified tasks all of
which are met with only partial success.
Stadium site  history
shows it best choice
Student helped choose the
union building.
And many didn't even know
they were doing it.
The choice of 'D' lot —- the
corner of University Boulevard
and East Mall — was made
after a check of natural student
traffic patterns.
The information was correlated with results of an opinion
survey on site.
"D" lot is actually a second-
choice according to the study.
But the first-choice site, the
corner of University Boulevard
site for the proposed student
Kennedy
urges
acceptance
Warnett Kennedy, professional architectural consultant
for the Student Union .Building says that the students
would be "fools" not to take
the site which the administration has offered.
He says that he has filed
through and read all the information about the site since the
days when the Student Union
Building first became a dream.
In that time, he says, the site
has shifted from the present
offer to many others on the
edge of campus and back to
the Stadium site.
To not accept this site now,
he says, would be a drastic
mistake because the administration will never offer it
again.
They are making plans for
the academic expansion and at
present they include the Union
building in the Stadium location. If the students refuse this
area now, they will never get
another crack at it because the
administration will take that
area over for academic expansion because of its ideal setting.
There is no chance of getting the Main Mall site because
the administration have designed a ten story multi-purpose
building for that area.
and Main Mall is not-available.
So planners decided the East
Mall  site is the best  of  four
possible alternatives.
One of the biggest factors in
favor of "D" lot according to
the study is that it will allow
lots of room for expansion.
In addition, it is on one of
the main natural traffic paths
in and out of the campus, it is
close to points of arrival and
departure and is convenient for
students for noon hour use.
CLOSE LOCATION
It is also close to the main
classroom areas, has nearby
parking and future development plans would appear to
favor increased student traffic
at the site.
These, according to planning
chairman, Dean Feltham, were
the major factors on which the
SUB committee decided on the
present site.
Minor factors were that the
building is close to other buildings students use after hours,
it is easily found by visitors
and a service drive can easily
be put in.
The "T>" lot site is the site
that was originally suggested
for the building when planning
first began in 1960.
FOUR SITES
But four other sites, Main
Mall, the lot beside the Bio
Sciences building, "A" lot and
the Brock Hall site became possibilities when more intensive
investigation began.
Although the Main Mall site
would have been better in some
ways, the administration has
refused to make it available.
It is instead building a 10-
storey classroom block on the
site.
The rest of the sites are less
satisfactory  than the  "D"   lot
site.
SUB architectural consultant
Warnett Kennedy agrees that
the "D" lot site is the best of
those available.
He adds that students should
grab it before they have to
settle for something less satisfactory.
The Food Service outlet is
faced with a daily demand of
over 3000 students. The overflow must be content with a
peanut and coke lunch from
vending machines in the hallway.
These machines, last year,
were filled thrice weekly, now
they are serviced daily and
still are empty at 5:30.
The Brock Extension built in
1957 caters to only specialized
groups such as Totem, Film
Society, Camera Club and
Dance Club. The remaining 93
clubs and service organizations
are forced to scrabble for 10
foot by 10 foot offices.
STANDING  TRIBUTE
The extension serves as a
standing tribute to inadequate
stop-gap planning by unqualified people.
The problem of effectively
co-ordinating a program of
student activities on this campus is an impossible one.
The existing inadequate fa-
cilies constantly forces the coordinator and his assistant into
a role of pacifying student
groups rather than effectively
assisting them in their endeavors.
Three years ago the student
body of this campus decided
they wanted a Student Union
Building.
A building that would cater
to the student body as a whole
rather than specialized student
groups.
FINAL CONSIDERATION
The AMS struck a committee
to thoroughly investigate the
matter. This committee's work
is now complete and a detailed
plan of development now faces
final consideration by the
student.
In the words of Warnett
Kennedy, Secretary of the Architectural Institute of British
Columbia, "This building has
been subjected to a survey and
investigation program at least
three times as comprehensive
as that received by any comparable commercial venture."
The final report of the planning committee centers around
a 209 page brief compiled from
professional surveys of the
needs of the students at UBC
by Porter Butts.
EXHAUSTIVE REPORT
This report is the result of
three years of exhaustive investigation by the planning
committee coupled with the
advice of the best professional
consultants available.
This building has been designed by you—the student—
for you. When completed this
building will facilitate an integrated program of activities
which will recognize the needs
of 80 percent of the student
body presently ignored by
Brock Hall.
Students living on campus
will no longer have to give up
whole evenings for a "trip
downtown". Rather they will
be able to schedule an evening's activity in the Library
and Union Building which is
right across  the  street.
The delmma of the Co-ordinator will be solved. He will be
able to book the Musical society in a room where they can
hold auditions, use a telephone
and sew costumes.
—don hume photo
DIRTY WALLS, ugly radiators, cracked woodwork, wooden
floors, motheaten couches are what give the Chinese
Varsity and other large clubs social cohesion? The New
Union will help to make meeting areas and lounge areas
for these people much more conductive to discussion and
fellowship.
Two alternatives
for SUB finance
The total cost of building
$4,116,023.
This fact, was the summary
opinion of the Executive of the
Student Union Building Committee at a meeting last weekend.
The Food Services facilities
will cost $881,360 — $942,758
and the present administration
grant towards Food Services is
$775,000.
The committee has asked the
Board of Governors to increase
the University grant towards
food services to at least $881,-
360 to help defer the student
burden.
The executive has determined that it will take 15 years
to pay for the building if AMS
fees are raised $5 by consent of
the student body.
At present, students are pay-
Full use for
meeting area
Meeting room in the new
SUB  will  be social centres.
In answer to the questionaire circulated among selected
students 26 per cent said they
considered meeting rooms to
be essential.
Another 29 per cent said the
rooms were desirable.
Of the men polled 40 per
cent said they did not feel
meeting rooms were desirable.
Twenty-five per cent said they
were essential while 28 per
cent said they were desirable.
Seven per cent had no opinion.
Thirty per cent of women answering the questionaire said
they considered meeting rooms
essential, while another 30 per
cent said they were desirable.
Thirty-five per cent said meeting rooms were not needed
while five per cent had no
opinion.
the first stage is $3,742,992-
ing $10 towards building a
Student Union. At this rate it
will take 30 years to pay for
the Union. These facts are
based on a student population
of  17,500   students.
Profits from the commercial
enterprises in the building will
realize an income of $34,000
per year.
The Alma Mater Society can
borrow the needed funds
($3,742,922 minus $881,360)
under prevailing market conditions.
"It would seem best to increase the student levy to $15
and pay for it (the buliding) in
15 years", said Dean Feltham
Chairman of the SUB Committee. "But the students will
have to determine that for
themselves on the referendum."
There are a number of
potential sources for outside
help in financing the new
Union.
"We might be able to take
advantage of the Winter Works
Program like we did for the
Winter Sports Arena." said
Chris Hansen, AMS Treasurer.
COUNCIL GRANTS
He also noted that Canada
Council Grants might be a possibility because of the cultural
facilities which are included in
the building.
Individuals might be approached for contributions towards the cost of the building,
in an outright grant.
No decision can be made on
financing until the students
approve or disapprove the
building and the money referendum.
The Board of Governors has
been asked to continue the policy of providing maintenance,
heat, light, water, etc. for the
Union Building to keep the
overhead at a minimum.

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