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The Ubyssey Feb 15, 1968

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Array Parlex-vous
THE UBYSSEY
French?
Vol. XLIX, No. 47
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY  15,  1968
48
224-3916
— bob brown photo
DRIVER GALESLOOT from physical plant tallies  garbage weight of  used  light  bulb watched
by physical  pilant  assistant.   All   garbage  crap is being weighed by physical plant people.
(Story  page  2)
Second slate results
put radicals on council
By NORMAN  GIDNEY
Results of the Alma Mater Society second
ate elections Wednesday indicate a radical
mncil next year.
Carey Linde, law 1, and Jill Cameron,
ience 3 — who both ran on platforms of stu-
;nt involvement in university government and
?cision-making — were elected vice-president
id co-ordinator by a wide margin. A total of
437 votes were cast for vice-president.
Linde beat Bob Kleyn, science 3, and Hank
oulus, arts 3, with a total of 2,432 votes to
leyn's 1,742. Poulus was dropped on the second
iunt after getting 899 votes.
Miss Cameron, swept all polls except engin-
Ting to gain 2,744 votes to her opponent Roger
iested's 1,508.
Donn Aven, eng. 3, was elected treasurer in
close race between Blaine Kennedy, commerce
and Brian Burke, arts 3. Only 100 votes
parated the three after the first count. Aven
>t 1,498, Burke, 1,360 and Kennedy, 1,399.
Burke was dropped on the second count in
hich Aven won with 2,507 against Kennedy's
961.
Aven proposed in his campaign elimination
of some of the AMS red tape and bureaucratic
tangle, and decisive action on the present housing survey.
Bob Gilchrist, ed. 4, was elected ombudsman
— a non-voting council position — after an
hour of preferential counting in which candidates Scott Lawrance, arts 3, Mike Doyle, arts
2, Lome Shaw, science 4 and Clay Larson, arts
2, were progressively dropped from the ballots.
Gilchrist finally beat Larson by a vote of 1,922
to 1,590.
Returning officer Chuck Campbell termed
the 4,400 turnout as light. He said there were
no reported voting irregularities.
Upcoming elections include a referendum
Feb. 28 to decide on changing the two-year requirement in the AMS constitution for presidential candidates.
A presidential by-election will be held March
13 to fill the position declared vacant when
candidate Stan Persky, arts 3, was declared
ineligible by student court.
Senate lifts
language
requirement
By PAUL KNOX
UBC senate Wednesday night voted to abolish the present
foreign language requirement in the faculty of arts-
Senate approved a report submitted by an arts faculty dean's
committee which recommended abolition of the requirement for
students with grade 12 proficiency in a language.
It also suggested the requirement be shortened to one year
from the present two for students with grade 11 standing in a
language.
Senate passed the report's recommendations by a proportional margin of four to three.
The recommendations now require only ratification by the
board of governors before they go into effect. The board is expected to approve the decision at its next meeting.
Opposition to the recommendations came from English prof.
Dr. William Fredeman, who said increasing demand for bilingual-
ism in Canada meant the requirement should be left as it is.
"The university must be considered as part of the national
armament," Fredeman said.
However, dean of arts Dennis Healy said many students hotly
resent the present requirements. Several other senators said the
present system was not the answer to the problem of bilingualism.
Student senator Ray Larsen warned after the meeting that
students should not drop language courses until an announcement
is made by the faculty of arts.
"Graduating students especially should not do this because
there is a chance they will not be able to graduate this year without the requirement," Larsen said. "A dropped course is a mark
on a student' record and should be avoided if possible."
Senate also set up a committee to consider the question of
having an open gallery at senate meetings. The committee will
be chosen by UBC acting president Walter Gage.
A brief on the question of open senate was officially presented by an AMS delegation consisting of president Shaun
Sullivan and treasurer Dave Hoye. Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman and arts council president Stan Persky were present as
observers..
Copies of the brief had been circulated among senators prior
to Wednesday's meeting.
"This delegation is the remnant of a sit-in," Sullivan told
the senate at the start of his presentation.
He was referring to plans for a sit-in at the meeting which
were called off by student leaders after a student-senator meeting
Jan. 31.
"We believe that dialogue between students and other members of the university community is extremely important," the
brief said. "A senate with an open gallery and with press present
would improve communications significantly."
The brief said fears that senators would feel inhibited by an
open gallery were unfounded.
"People making serious academic decision should be articulate enough to state an opinion and sure enough to support a
position,'" it said.
The brief also refuted claims that The Ubyssey's coverage
of senate meetings would be biased.
"With full access to the press, both campus and downtown,
there would be sufficient competitive pressure to ensure that
The Ubyssey's coverage would be objective," the brief said.
"Differences between news stories carried in the downtown
press and in The Ubyssey would only lead to a general lack of
credibility of anything appearing in The Ubyssey."
Alumni senator Stuart Lefeaux said the committee would be
wasting its time.
"We have discussed this matter enough," said Lefeaux.
In answer to claims that Ubyssey coverage would be biased,
student senator Gabor Mate said he felt competition from The
Ubyssey would keep the downtown press's coverage accurate,
rather than the other way around. He asked Stoffman what
Ubyssey policy would be regarding senate coverage.
"Our policy would be simple: to try and tell our readers
what happened in senate," Stoffman said.
Other business considered at Wednesday's meeting:
• UBC's library, in a report to senate, asked that the
library's needs be given top priority and consideration from
senate. The report was acknowledged.
• Recommendations of the senate role and organization
committee proposing establishment of committees on long-range
planning and cademic building needs were accepted.
• Institution of pass-fail sixth courses in the faculty of
art was approved.
• Establishment of a department of computer science was
approved. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February 15,  1968
Restrictions odious for
Acadia Camp-Rohringer
By PAUL KNOX
Restriction of Acadia Camp residents' visiting privileges was an odious measure, says UBC
housing director Les Rohringer.
Rohringer made the comment at student
council meeting Monday. He discussed housing
problems, goals, and achievements for an hour
with residence representatives and councillors.
Last week Rohringer cut visiting hours to a
maximum of four hours on occasional Sundays
and ordered increased patrol of Acadia Camp
by dons and resident fellows.
"The action I took was no reflection on
residents of Acadia Camp," Rohringer said after
the discussion. "It was rather a result of weakness in leadership. I had certainly hoped it
wouldn't be necessary."
A committee of residents has been formed to
recommend a compromise on visiting hours.
Acadia Camp president Eric Brynjolffson said
earlier he would accept only that visiting be
permitted at all times.
"There is absolutely no reason why Acadia
Camp shouldn't get all its privileges back in a
short time."
Discussion at the meeting centered around
what Rohringer called a new concept in dealing
with residence problems.
"We think residents, especially girls, have
handled admirably the freedom we have given
them this year," he said. "We certainly don't
want different standards for girls and boys."
Rohringer said the presidential advisory committee on housing is studying the question of
late-leave regulations for girls. "We want to
change late-leave standards from a rule to a
principle."
Acadia Camp council Wednesday night accepted the resignation of former president Eric
Brynjolffson by a  16-11 vote.
Brynjolffson submitted his resignation at last
week's council meeting despite a vote of confidence by residents in the council executive.
He had earlier demanded that visiting be
permitted seven days a week at all times.
Turning to future housing plans, Rohringer
said Acadia Camp would be demolished by
January, 1969, and Fort Camp by 1970.
Fort Camp will be replaced by a residence
complex behind the new student union building on the site of an old radio receiving station.
New towers being built at Totem Park and
Place Vanier will replace the accommodation
in the two camps.
"The camps are extremely uneconomical,"
Rohringer said. In addition, the fire marshal is
screaming about Acadia Camp. It could burn to
the ground in two or three minutes. We'd need
to spend $5,000 to bring it up to accepted standards.
"We can't even put another electrical outlet
in any hut, because it would mean a complete
rewiring job."
Rohringer said the board of governors has
finally taken a positive stand on housing after
20 years of indecision.
"Their goal now is 25 per cent of the campus
population in residence," he said. "Our problem
is, of course, lack of funds. We're trying to improve the image of campus housing to increase
contributions from the community.
"Food services costs go up as well," Rohringer said. "But we have one of the cheapest
food services departments in North America."
In answer to a question by Alma Mater
Society vice-president Don Munton, Rohringer
said the AMS should be informed of housing
needs and developments.
"You should work to improve the image of
campus housing. We must know what our customers want."
Non-professional staff
seek 20 per cent hike
Non - professional UBC staff members are seeking a
20 per cent wage increase in a one-year contract.
UBC employee's union president Bob Black said his
union is seeking wage parity with those in the building
trades.
There are about 900 members in the union, he said.
Monthly rates for members range from $258 for a
bookstore clerk to $710 for an electrical inspector.
The union is also demanding a 30 cents an hour increase for employees  paid  by  the hour.
A waitress in the faculty club has the lowest hourly
wage at $1.55.   Laborers have the highest at $2.59.
The union proposals, including improvements in paid
statutory holidays, paid vacations and sick leave, have
been forwarded to UBC personnel director J. F. McLean.
The current contract expires March 31.
SUS executives
in by acclamation
Ballot petition filled
More than 1,000 UBC students have signed petitions insisting the ballots of the recent
AMS presidential election be
counted.
Wednesday morning more
than 750 signatures were collected on a legally worded petition to be presented to student council Monday, said student senator Gabor Mate.
Another 350 students signed
a second petition circulated at
Fort Camp Tuesday night, he
said.
Student council this week
voted 10 to nine not to count
the ballots cast in the Feb. 7
election between Stan Persky
and Brian Abraham.
Persky was found unqualified to run by student court
Monday. The same day student
council declared the election
null and void.
According to the AMS constitution, a referendum may be
called on any issue "by a petition bearing the text of the
proposed referendum and supported by the signatures and
registration numbers of 500 active members (of the AMS) delivered to the secretary."
The larger petition is in accord with the constiution's
wording and was written by
AMS treasurer Dave Hoye.
The Fort Camp petition is
not legally worded, but organizer Rik Visagie, science 2,
said the intent is the same.
Mate said Wednesday the
ballots must be counted regardless of the ineligibility of
any candidate.
"We will  present   the  peti
tions to student council on
Monday and try to get them
to rescind their motion not to
count the ballots," he said.
"We will tell them we don't
want a referendum, but give
them proof of what the students want. If they refuse to
count the ballots, then we'll
insist on a referendum.
Almost the entire science undergraduate society executive
was elected by acclamation
Wednesday.
The only position contested
is that of sports representative.
Kenneth J. Lott, sci. 3, is the
new science president. Ed
Shurtleff, sci. 1, is first vice-
president, and Mike McPhee,
sci. 3, second vice-president.
The new science treasurer is
William Lear, sci. 3, while
Christene Woodburn, sci. 3, is
secretary.
John Frizell, sci. 3; Blake
Hoffert, sci. 2; and Tim Tretch-
ikoff, sci. 2; are new science
councillors.
Competing for sports representative are Brian Mahood,
sci. 2, and Andrew Nagy,
sci. 1.
Lott said Wednesday the reason for the number of acclamations was that a ticket of
key people in the science faculty were nominated.
"We have been working together this year and will continue to do so next year," Lott
said.  "Next year we want to
have two events every 10
days."
A prime goal, he said, is unification of the faculty of science.
"We'll definitely support
clubs and speakers, also."
Crap analyzed —
weighted garbage
The department of physical
plant is trying to determine
just how much rubbish is at
UBC.
In an effort to put a new
$20,000 garbage truck to best
use, the department is weighing and analyzing all garbage
collected at UBC.
The truck will not arrive
until later this year but research is now underway with
two trucks equipped with
spring scales already at •work.
The types and amount of
rubbish collected will be determined so the new truck,
equipped to compress the garbage, will be used efficiently.
CAREERS IN PHARMACY'
"field with a future"
SPEAKER FILM TOUR
FACULTY OF PHARMACY
GEORGE CUNNINGHAM BUILDING
(at South End  of the Wesbrook  Building)
COME & SEE WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
TODAY
12:30 - Rm. 171
Education Committee of the
Pharmaceutical  Association  of  B.C.
410 Dominion Bank Building,
207 West Hastings St., Vancouver 3, B.C.
MAMIYA    SEKOR lOOO TL
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OUR PRICE DUE TO  SPECIAL
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The "thru-the-lens" meter reads
only 10% of the full picture
area. Engraved lines in the view-
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metered and allow accurate
metering of the most important
area of the picture.
Mamiya/Sekor; better known for their high quality
professional and press cameras have now come into
the amateur single lens reflex market in a big way.
The 100OTL incorporates some of the latest design innovations; "thru-the-lens" spot metering, yet uses all
lenses of the popular "Pentax" mount system. Of course
1 sec. to l/1000th focal plane shutter, sharp F1.8 lens,
auto diaphragm, delay timer and very crisp microgrid
focusing.
Kerrisdale Cameras
A.M6-8381 AM  6-2622
2170 West 41st Avenue
Open Friday 'til 9
RE   8-5717
2289 West Broadway
Open Friday until 6
WEST VAN 922-4921
1550 Marine Drive
Open Friday 'til 9 Thursday, February 15,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
COMMITTEES IN  10 FACULTIES
— chris blake photo
DAPPER UBYSSEY city editor Stuart E. Gray downs a few
before taking the plunge in first-ever boat race with a
difference—contestants were required to paddle an object
a length of the pool.
Beer babies test drive
in olympic pentathalon
It was a bacchanalian orgy of Olympic proportions.
It was also the pool capades, held Wednesday noon at
Empire pool in honor of education and physical education week.
The event started with a test of endurance similar to the
Olympic pentathelon.
Contestants guzzled two bottles of beer, then launched
themselves across the pool to the other side, using anything
buoyant except a boat.
The 1,000 spectators roared with approval.
As predicted The Ubyssey punsters won the race water-
wings down, leaving everyone else capsizing in their wake.
The losers; were science, phys ed., Aqua Soc and medicine,
drowning in that order.
Education week continues today with a noon variety show
in ed. 100.  Also at noon, a car rally will start at Brock.
Thursday will see the beginning of an art display in the
education lounge.
An education dance will shake Brock at noon Friday, while
at the same time in the education lounge a dean's forum will
De held on the difference between UBC and Simon Fraser Uni-
/ersity teacher training.
Sullivan studies reform
By  FRED   CAWSEY
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Students in 10 UBC faculties are using
varied methods to effect curriculum reform.
In a brief submitted to students' council
Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
outlined the results of a survey of various faculties' means of attempting academic reform.
Of the ten faculties which Sullivan surveyed,
all have established student committees to study
curriculum change.
Some of these committees have been functioning, for several years; other started only
this year.
Science students published anti-calendars in
1965 and 1966 and plan to publish one this year.
Student-faculty liaison committees to discuss
Totem students
hit 1st year arts
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Totem Park students Tuesday night turned
off the jukebox in the canteen to voice their
discontent with freshman arts courses.
They aired grievances and opinions to four
professors on a first year curriculum committee
in the arts faculty.
The committee meets at noon today in Bu.
102 to hear more students.
Chaired by economics prof. Dr. Robert Clark,
it is collecting opinion on freshman arts courses.
Its conclusions will effect changes in first year
curriculum at UBC.
Two years ago the same professors, appointed then by the dean of arts, researched freshmen around campus and in Totem.
The result was the Arts I program that went
into operation last September.
"We've sent a questionnaire to department
heads for factual information, and we've had
meetings with professors teaching first year
courses," Clark said. "Now we are meeting the
students."
At first, he and three other comittee members: Dr. Roderick Wong, assistant psychology
prof.; Dr. James Winter, associate history prof.;
and William Dusing, assistant classics prof, sat
on a temporary stage in Totem Dr. Alan Cairns,
political science prof., was absent.
When only six students appeared, the professors moved off the stage to hold the discussion in lounge chairs arranged in a circle. Later
the number grew to  18.
For over two hours the teachers listened to
student criticisms of UBC's first year system.
High school students aren't prepared for
university, said one freshman.
Large classes are boring, said another.
The students generally agreed on these issues.
They surprised the committee with their
unanimous opinion that they do not do enough
writing in first year arts courses.
"That's the great thing about this kind of
meeting — it gives the students the chance to
speak out and say what they think," said Totem
Park president Doug Ante after the meeting
broke up at about 10 p.m.
"We agreed that many classes are too large
and that many professors could improve their
presentation of material greatly. I think something will be done about these two points at
least."
general science course revisions and suggest
changes to the faculty curriculum committee
have also been created.
Several departments in the science faculty
also have student-faculty committees dealing
specifically with their own courses.
Commerce and arts have published anti-
calendars though neither have yet indicated
whether or not they will publish one this year.
For the past three years, engineers have
evaluated professors and courses without publishing the results. They give the results to the
dean, who discusses the survey comments with
each faculty member.
Each department also has student-faculty
committees, which recommend course changes.
These committees are chaired by the department
heads.
In education, the dean chairs a student-
faculty liaison committee which was set up
essentially to hear grievances.
The student-curriculum committee has collected information in questionnaires for use of
students on the liaison committee. The material
is not published.
General complaints in forestry are handled
by a student-faculty liaison committee. Representatives from each of the options also form
a student curriculum committee, which meets
with its faculty counterpart.
Students in pharmacy have found that the
small size of their faculty renders informal
discussions more effective in evaluating profs
and courses.
Their student committee concerns itself mainly with integrating courses with other faculties.
In physical education, where student-faculty
communication is reportedly very poor, a liaison
committee has been formed, Sullivan says.
Students formed a curriculum study group
in social work this year. They will deal primarily with long range problems.
Agriculture students review courses in cooperation with the faculty curriculum committee. The students seem satisfied with the progress being made, the report said.
Home economics students, although they
have a liaison committee, haven't published an
anti-calendar. They feel because they are a
small faculty personalities would be involved
if they published one.
Course and prof, evaluations raise one important question. Should they be published or
not?
"If the faculty is receptive to suggestions for
change," Sullivan says, "it seems it is only
necessary to compile an evaluation for their
information and subsequent action. If, however,
the faculty is not responsive, it would seem
necessary to publish the results of such an
evaluation to prod them into action."
UVic gets senators
VICTORIA (CUP) — Two students were
elected to the senate of the University of Victoria Feb. 2.
The third contest, to elect a grad student to
the academic body, ended in a tie. The senate
itself will vote to break it.
The students attended their first senate
meeting Wednesday.
Elected undergraduates were Jphn Thles and
Doug Adams. Ellery Litleton and Terry Grieve
were tied for the grad student seat.
This brings to 16 the number of universities
where student senators have been approved or
are sitting.
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Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press service's of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,  loc.  23;   advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex  04-5224.
FEBRUARY 15, 1968
*i\^*--i
End of apathy
That perennial evil, student apathy, is gone. So what
do the powers that be start doing? What else but hold
up their hands in horror and try to bring it back again.
Apathy has departed this year from two of its traditional strongholds — campus politics and campus
sports. Last year Alma Mater Society offices like treasurer, coordinator, and secretary went by acclamation.
This year there was a race for each office. And this year
all-candidates meetings for both first and second slate
elections were packed with interested students. This
happy situation compares with a crowd of 70 at last
year's presidential candidates meeting and with pictures
in 1961-vintage Ubysseys showing perhaps a dozen
students mingled amid hundreds of empty seats at major
election debates.
Similarly, the sports scene has rapidly gone anti-
apathetic. First there was the massive throng at the
UBC-Simon Fraser Empire Stadium football rout. Then,
last Saturday, an overflow crowd came to War Memorial
Gym to see the UBC and SFU basketball teams clash
for the first time.
Apathy, we repeat, is gone. But the officials, who
must thrive on apathy, are busily at work.
Saturday's basketball game, for example, was viewed by about 4,000 fans. But thousands more would
have seen the game if it had been played at Pacific
Coliseum. The prospect of a huge crowd at a UBC
basketball game, however, struck local sports czar
Robert Osborne as not quite right. Osborne wanted
some students turned away because a turn-away crowd
is "good publicity." Also, he wanted only "true fans"
at the game. All this, of course, is not merely silly
but shows extreme lack of consideration for the wishes
and welfare of students.
Even worse disregard for the student interest was
shown by our so-called student government in its arrangement for Monday's student court proceedings.
Hundreds of students, who felt vitally affected by
the decision of the court, were denied entry because
the undersized room was full.
Although the court could easily have been held in
an adequate location, AMS officials apparently did not
want student interest to get out of hand.
Both AMS and sports officials have long decried
the lack of student interest in campus events. Now
that such interest has arrived, we suggest the role of
the authorities is to encourage it.
Piles/ etc.
There's more happening these days than basketball
games and political games. Apathy is equally absent
from the arts scene. Let us, then, pile praise upon the
Contemporary Arts Festival, which finishes Friday.
The arts, believe festival organizers, are fun. And
so the festival was fun — from Superpile to the poets'
market. For these, and other festival events, many
deserve praise. Among them are the fine arts and
architecture students who showed that a happy environment can occur even in the dank, dusty armory. And
special thanks should go to fine arts professor Herb
Gilbert who did a fine job of coordinating the entire
two-week event.
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City    Stuart  Gray
News          Susan  Gransby
Managing         Murray   McMillan
Photo          Kurt  Hilger
Senior    Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike   Jessen
Wire      Norman Gidney
Page  Friday      Judy  Bing
Ass't. City    Boni  Lee
It was Valentines Day. Queuing up
to kill irresistible Steve Jackson were
Raquel Welch, Mata Hari, Ursula An
dress, Cleopatra and Lady Godiva, dismounted. Seated in a corner, Mike
Finlay looked disconsolate plucking a
Platypus. Tempted by Fran McGrath,
who offered him brownies, Paul Knox
stuffed himself until he felt inflated.
"That's quite a spare tire you've
got" quipped Oliver Hardy.
Irene Wasilewski rubbed noses with
Winnie the Pooh until she could bear
it no longer and left him, disgruntled.
Elgin Lee and Chow Mein shared an
egg roll. Linda Gransby sat on a tuf-
fet and watched Fred Cawsey go up
the hill for a bucket of Johnnie Walker. Judy Young twirled a baton, accompanied by Glenn Bullard playing
a tuba with a menthol filter. Gwen
Pym filed her nails to the point of
enticement, but too late—Fatty Ar-
buckle had gone fishing.
Hilda Hoopster spun around the jock
shop, pursued by Jim Maddin, swinging  on a vine.
Lawrence Woodd, Chris Blake,
George Hollo and Bob Brown, luckless in love, crammed 189 rolls of
film into  187 cameras.
One Thing after another.
Too many law students
make court legalistic
By  GABOR  MATE
Immediately after student
court announced its verdict in
the great Persky Eligibility
Case, I went to the chief justice
and pointed out to him that one
of the court's recommendations
was unconstitutional. To wit,
the election ballots may not be
destroyed until after the spring
general meeting.
"Oh yes,"  replied the  chief
pillar of constitutional morality, "we may have made a bad
recommendation."
WHO'S COMPETENT?
The question must seriously
be raised as to the justifiability
of our present concept of student court. Under the existing
system the court is composed
solely of students from the law-
faculty — it being argued that
they are the only ones competent to come to decisions on
legal matters. But what has
just happened? Our supposedly
competent judges brought
down a verdict which is at
least highly questionable, coupled with a recommendation
which is clearly against the
constitution.
The court met in a small
room into which no more than
forty spectators were allowed,
while more than 150 students
stood outside, frustrated in
their desire to witness the proceedings. The court refused to
consider a petition signed by
more than a hundred students
asking that the "trial" be moved to premises where more
spectators could be accommodated. One student was severely punched in the eye when he
tried to enter. (The court room
was protected from the peasants outside by three large
athletes who seemed eager to
revenge the humiliations gathered at the hands of SFU teams
on the heads of UBC students.)
DEEPER ISSUE
But aside from the questions
of the composition and procedures of the court, a deeper
issue must be raised. That is,
should a piece of paper (the
constitution) ever be interpreted in a way which interferes
with the political wishes of living people? Should a piece of
paper written long ago rule
our lives today?
While it is true that certain
constitutional safeguards are
necessary, it must be equally
true that these constiutional
safeguards can only operate in
a living political context.
According to this concept the
constitution cannot be interpreted from a strict legal point of
view; the legal aspects of any
given problem must be only
part of the considerations governing such interpretations. At
least equally important must
be the dynamic political situation in which the constitutional decision will take effect.
Only thus can the constitution
be made into a living document, and not just a dead letter.
REVISE COURT
These two arguments therefore — one, that law students
display no particular ability
to be the sole interpreters of
the constitution, and two, that
the constitution must not be
interpreted from a strictly legalistic point of view — these
arguments lead to the conclusion that the present concept
and organization of student
court must be changed.
The court should be enlarged
and members of other faculties should be included in it,
and its activities must be made
directly relevant to the existing political realities of the
campus.
LETTERS
Joe Workman
Editor, The Ubyssey:
While you are to be commended on your stand against
the frat-boys' racial discrimination, I think you would do well
to be aware of The Ubyssey's
own traditional brand of socioeconomic discrimination. While
even the most loutish student
is usually given the dignity of
his name under his picture in
The Ubyssey, Buildings and
Grounds people remain anonymous, or worse, "Joe Workman.''
DOUG MORRISON,
education 5
Compliments
Editor. The Ubyssey:
May I compliment those
people responsible for distributing "free" tickets to the
SFU-UBC basketball game.
The fine method involves AMS
cards. One ticket for each AMS
card presented. The approach
was easy — get as many student cards as possible and after receiving the first handful
of tickets return to the line for
a second and repeat until the
quantity desired is obtained.
The "free" tickets went at student rates of $2 apiece — no
AMS card required.
My impression was that one
ticket per person would be the
method of distribution. Unfor
tunately many of those who
suffered were Mr. Osborne's
"true fans", who would have
tolerated line-ups to get the
cherished admittance slips. On
the last page of Thursday's
Ubyssey, under Intercollegiate
Basketball, the ad states tickets
would be handed out at 12:15
p.m. and at 12:45 there were
none left.
May I extend my compliments to those shrewd businessmen who now have next
fall's tuition partly paid for.
ROY   VERBRUGGE
ap. sc. 2
Cheap pens
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In regards to the bookstore
manager's statements in regards to shoplifting, did it ever
occur to him that many students shoplift because they cannot afford to pay the outrageous prices demanded by this
store? It may be a great asset
to the campus as a whole but
financially it is a menace. Why,
the cheapest pen they sell is
about 39 cents, so if a student
forgets or loses a pen, he is
stuck with paying this much
instead of 5 cents or 10 cents.
It is time for a new, co-operative bookstore run strictly by
the university for the university.
TIM BOYES
commerce   1 Thursday, February 15,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO THE EDITOR
Court godly
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The editorial comment and
Saba cartoon of the Feb. 13
Ubyssey manifest a fundamental misunderstanding of the
vital issues and events of this
last week's presidential eligibility hassle.
First, the editorial speaks of
the student courts' apparent
disrespect for the democratic
process itself. This is unfounded nonsense. Anyone who
heard the court's pronouncement realized that they had
raised themselves above partial interests and directed
themselves to interpret objectively the meaning of the eligibility clause. The court realized that there was no way
that they could cut it to allow
Persky's eligibility under the
existant constutional rule. They
judiciously recommended that
the rule, bad per se, be changed and, in the same spirit of
public interest, that the results
of an election declared void
not foe counted.
There is really no point in
counting the ballots and to
create this as another issue is
whole attention needs to be
directed to other pressing issues — the referendum to
change the constitution and
the election of the remaining
candidates.
Now the Saba cartoon. That
wolf-dog out-to-zap Persky
image completely distors the
reality of the court's intention.
Furthermore. I think that Stan
Persky, who has clearly shown
himself to be the most responsible person involved throughout this fiasco, would agree
that the attitude reflected in
the cartoon greatly endangers
the possibility that the referendum remain non-partisan.
In other words, students
imust realize what treasurer
Hoye recognized in a moment
of truth Monday night, that
the two yesir residence is being
changed not because it will
personally benefit Mr. Persky's political position but because it is a bad rule and
should be changed regardless
of who is running. It is a bad
rule because it excludes candidates for president from all
four year courses except third
year. The new provision is sensible for it would both ensure
formally at least a minimum
familiarity with the university
and leave the issue of real
competence up to the student-
voters.
Thus I emphasize that we
must consider this constitutional referendum as a nonpartisan matter and vote in
accordance with good sense
and public conscience to eradicate a demonstrably bad rule.
And I hops also that The
Ubyssey staff and all of us in
future will not impose our
own rigid images on people
and events for it only occasions
self-deception to the changing
reality before us.
JOHN RICHARDSON
arts 5
tion which The Ubyssey attacked. It should be remembered that the court was asked
to rule on a clause of the constitution regarding eligibility.
It was not asked to dispense
its wisdom regarding the fate
of the election ballots. Aside
from being arrant nonsense,
the court's recommendation
was not in accord with the
AMS constitution. This fac:t
could give rise to some unkind
comments about the court's
competence to be the supreme
arbiter on AMS constitutional
problems. However, The Ubyssey will refrain from such
comment.
Vote no'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The upcoming constitutional
referendum on lowering the
requirements for candidates
student president is, in effect,
an attempt to see whether the
campus thinks Persky for president is so important that the
constitution should be changed
in order to allow him to run. I
proposed the referendum at
council because I felt that the
students should have the opportunity to decide this question before the by-election.
However, I agree with Persky
when he says the constitution
should not be changed for the
benefit of one individual. My
own feeling is that there is no
hindrances on any student's
eligibility to run for office; the
changes should be full, relating to all offices, and should
be voted upon at the AMS general meeting. And as Persky
made a public commitment not
to run even if the referendum
passes, I am sure he would
join me in urging students to
vote "no" — because students
are committed to democracy in
the university community, and
this change would not even be
half a loaf, but a mere crumb.
MIKE COLEMAN
UCC president
Legs
Ed. note: The court, gratuitously, recommended that the
ballots be (destroyed. It was
this uncalled! for recommenda-
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It has come to my attention
that there are up to ten rusty
nails sticking up in the air on
East Mall, where the wind has
blown the fence over outside
SUB. You may not think that
this is serious, but suppose a
one-legged man is hopping
down the street and he puts
his foot on a nail? ?
He might sue the university,
but he wouldn't have a leg to
stand on.
I strongly urge that the due
authorities take strong action
forhwith to remove aforesaid
rusty dangerous nails.
NAME   WITHHELD
arts 2
Political skill
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re, "A Personal Message" —
Sir, there is none so moral,
none so innocent, none so
"free" as he who has "right"
on his side. But I have been
active in "big time" politics
long enough to appreciate the
effectiveness of a polite, and
very   virtuous   campaign   that
tells the people the other side
are bastards while your candidate is a sweet, and hard working chap. I may not like the
image you portray but I must
commend you on your political
skill. "Human Government" is
the best thing I have heard
since "the Great Society." Getting involved, and I like that,
has been the catch phrase ever
since I have been at UBC.
There has not been a "decent"
campaign since Bob Cruise lost
last year. If you remember, he
was too honest, poor chap, had
no political skill. If Mr. Persky
wins his fight to preside over
the AMS, I can only wish him
luck. I will turn East and pray
for your sanity and also that
you don't become "square" as
many of us old time political
hacks, who have succumb to
reality, have become. Ride on
"White Knight", there is a rabbit round the corner.
So Stan, don't get involved,
don't tell the people who to
vote for, just ask them nicely
to come out and vote for your
side.
ANDREW  GATES
arts 4
Jack's guest
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
On Jan. 30 I happened to
hear the last hour of Jack
Wasserman's Open Line Show.
His guests were Mr. James
Dean and a representative of
the UBC senate (who's name
I have forgotten). I am not advocating either of the guests'
views, but I was infuriated by
the way Mr. Wasserman and
Mr. Dean ganged up on this
young man, whom I would
guess has had limited experience in public speaking. He:
was given small chance to
speak his mind and was constantly interrupted by rude,
uncalled for and STUPID remarks by Mr. Dean, which Mr.
Wasserman seemed to be enjoying to the fullest.
When someone queried the
right of either one of the guests
to appear, Mr. Wasserman was
quick to state that he had personally invited both of them. If
so, then he should have remained an impartial debate
leader, and not have been so
fast to side with the more famous of his guests. Also I noticed
Mr. Wasserman very sincerely
apologized to Mr. Dean whenever anyone opposed his views,
but always remained silent
whenever anyone challenged
the young man. With two professionals snarling at him, and
phone calls coming as well. I
can imagine how unnerving
this experience must have been
to make his point effective. I
repeat, I am NOT siding with
the young man's views. However I feel it is not asking too
much to just stop and listen
to what he has to say. How can
we judge the value of his ideas
if we cannot take time to
listen. Jack Wasserman's program today proved that the
young people are right in accusing their elders of being unable to listen, and this is a very
sad situation. Sad for all of us
. . . but especially for those of
us who have lost the ability to
listen and say, "Yes, this man
(young or old) may have some
thing here, and it didn't occur
to me first."
MRS. R. CHRISTENSEN
5661   Trafalgar
Ed.   note:   Wasserman's   guest
was senator Gabor Mate.
Free Friday, Noon
Tomorrow's Eyes
Look Ahead-Brock
TUTOR     WANTED
Elementary Business
Statistics
phone   266-5043
evenings 7-9
MEL
BORING
former
BERKELEY
CHAPLAIN
speaks   on
'A MODERN
PENTECOST"
ANGUS 212
Noon: Mon.-Wed.
Thursday Seminar
'Holy Spirit Today"
Lutheran  Student Center
4:00  p.m.   &  6:00 p.m.
Overseas
Forwarding
of
Household
Goods & Effects
Call 531-2931
Terry Turner [above] of San Jose,
Calif., working in a castle
Jobs in Europe
Luxembourg—American Student Information Service is celebrating its
10th year of successful operation
placing students in jobs and arranging tcurs. Any student may now
choose from thousands of jobs such
as resort, office, sales, factory, hospital, etc. in 15 countries with wages
up to $400 a month. ASIS maintains
placement offices throughout Europe
insuring you of on the spot help at
all times. For a booklet listing all
jobs with application forms and discount tours send $2 (job application,
overseas handling & air mail reply) to:
Dept. O, American Student Information Service, 22 Ave. de la Liberte,
Luxembourg City, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg.
VALENTINE DANCE
At International House
WITH
THE GEORGE CUBA BAND
i   FRIDAY, FEB.  16
|    From 9:00-1:00
i
$1.00
Per Person
FILM SHOW 8:00-9:00
HALF A
SIXPENCE
AUD. - FEB. 15, 16, 17
Last Student Performance
NOON TODAY - 75c
Public Performances Till Saturday Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 15,  1968
TWEEN CLASSES
Arts courses discussed
Open session for student discussion   of   first   year   arts
courses, 12:30-2:30 p.m. in Bu.
102 today.
ARTS  COUNCIL
Giant   arts   council   meeting
noon   today   in   Buchanan
lounge.
UBC SKYDIVING
Members interested in entering the skydiving competition Feb. 24-25 meet at noon
Friday in clubhouse behind
Brock.
HOUSING SURVEY
COMMITTEE
The  housing  survey  is  out.
If you received one, fill it out
and return it as soon as possible to the AMS office.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Field trip to Oakalla Prison
Farm leaving 6 p.m. from Bu.
ext. on east mall across from
law building.
'68 GRAD CLASS
Important   general   meeting
of the grad  class today noon
in Ang. 104.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today noon in IH.
DANCE CLUB
Today — pin classes; Friday
— open.
EL CIRCULO
Dr. Kobbervig will show
slides and answer questions on
Spain, today, noon, IH upper
lounge.
ARTS GRAD CLASS
COUNCIL
Meeting today noon in Bu.
104, all arts grads. Tickets will
Tuition-free
Que. college
set for 1969
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec students will attend a tuition-free junior college prior
to entering university, beginning in 1969.
Wynne Dickson, associate
deputy minister of education
for Quebec, made the announcement last weekend.
The College d'Enseignment
Generale et Professionel will
initially be run largely by the
universities. They will offer a
two-year course, following
which a three-year course at
the university will yield a
bachelor's degree.
The CEGEP will provide
terminal courses for teacher
training and technical training,
as well as preparatory work
for university.
The program is designed to
supplant the work being done
by the confused jumble of
technical schools, normal
schools (teacher training), public secondary schools, and
Catholic colleges  classique.
Out-in staged
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
A thousand chartreuse herbaceous blorgs today staged a
massive out-in on the incredibly flat desert terrain of this
island republic.
Early dispatches indicated
they were celebrating the annual emergence of middle-of-
the-road hero Flectus Parnof-
sky from his mountain redoubt.
be available for Johann Strauss
Feb.   21   grad  night.
NEWMAN CENTRE
General   meeting   today   in
Bu. 203 at 12:45.
GSA
Members — a painting and
college display by Pierre Cou-
pey and Gregg Simpson at
Thea Koerner House until Feb.
29.
FORESTRY US
Open house in Canadian Institute of Forestry, Saturday
from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Members present for discussion.
UN CLUB
Valentine dance Friday, 9-1
a.m. at IH. The George Cuba
Band. $1 per person.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Mel Boring returns Monday
to  speak  on   recent   Christian
renewal  through  the   Holy
Spirit. Ang.  212.
CIASP
Coffee house at IH,  8 p.m.
Saturday. Pizza. Admission 50
cents.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Club elections will be held
Monday noon in Bu. 203. Two
students from first year social
work will talk on placement
and opinions in the schools.
ALPHA OMEGA
General  meeting  Monday
noon, Bu. 223.
'68 GRAD CLASS
General    meeting    Tuesday
noon in Ang. 104.
1968 CRAP CLASS
General Meeting
Tuesday, Feb. 20th, Noon
ANGUS 104
All  graduating  students are  asked  to  attend  this  general
meeting  to  help  decide  several   important  questions.
IT'S MORE FUN TO
SEE WITHOUT GLASSES
Vent-Air lenses have no frames to slip or slide. They're virtually unbreakable while worn. They have four air vents for
better circulation of the eye's natural moisture and air so
necessary for proper wear. And best of all, they don't "hide"
your eyes.
NOW BY POPULAR DEMAND!-with every original pair of
Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare pair at no
extra charge . . . tinted grey, blue, green, or brown as
desired. LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS.
Vent-Air lenses are available only in our offices. Come in
for your no-obligation demonstration today . .. you may
see without glasses tomorrow.
KLEAR VISION CONTACT 1ENS CO.
HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Mon. to 8 P.M.
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg. TTRn „ ,.
1030 W. Georgia Street UBC 15
Vancouver, B.C. MU 3-7207
CALL
MU 3-7207
FOR
FULL
DETAILS
<«
Please send me your free Illustrated booklet
of Im	
and the cost
Mr.
Mrs.
Miss.
invisible lenses.
BIFOCALS, TOO!
Address-
City-
-Zone
-State-
OFFICES THROUGHOUT U.S.A. AND CANADA
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 day* $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
CARIBBEAN     WEEK     IS     COMING
soon!    Feb.   19-23.
DANCE TO PAPA BEAR'S MEDI-
cine Show on Feb. 17. 9:30-1:00 in
Place Vanier Ballroom. 	
•68 GRAD CLASS PARTY — AT
Johann Strauss, Feb. 21. Tickets
$2.50 per couple from A.M.S. or
Faculty Reps. Hurry — Supply
Limited.
DANCE THIS FRIDAY FEB. 16
with George Cuba Quartet at International  House.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
DOST   MON,   CHEM   BLDG.   BROWN
brief   case.    278-2414.
FOUND A SUM OF MONEY IN
front of Geology Geography on
West     Mall.     433-4100.
SUEDE JACKET TAKEN BY Mistake last Friday from Cecil Green
—Please return to receptionist at
Cecil   Green   Park.
LOST: SORORITY PIN ON FEB.
12 in vicinity of Library. Sentimental value. Please phone 224-
7184.
FOUND    —    GREY    FEMALE    CAT.
Contact   Sedgewick    Library.	
LADIES   RING   COLLECT   248   MAC-
Millan   Blldg.   or   phone   228-2536.
FOUND — BLACK FRAMED  MAN'S
glasses  in lib.   Claim  Pub.  office.
ANYONE WHO FOUND A TAN
purse Monday night. Brock extension please phone 266-4749 reward.
LOST   —    SORORITY    PIN.    PHONE
922-6768.
ONE PAIR OF MEN'S GLOVES
(found in Angus on 4th floor.
Identify to claim. Phone Jim at
266-2603.
LOST ONE PAIR OF WOOD GRAIN
glasses Tues. noon. Armouries.
Turn   in   to   pub   office   Ubyssey.
FOUND FOUNTAIN PEN IN SOUTH
Angus.     Phone     435-3595.
Rides & Cai Pools
14
THREE GIRLS NEED RIDE TO
Rossland or vicinity, mid - term
Break. Phone Jeanie or Gael 738-
8156.
CARPOOL NEEDED AFTER MID-
term break. Monday, Wednesday,
Friday, 8:30 and 5:30. Cambie St.
Bridgeport   Richmond.   Phone   Jerry
278-1337.	
RIDE WANTED TO VERNON-KEL-
owna area at Midterm. Share expenses.   Wendy,   876-1879.
Special Notices
IS
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSURANCE
rates? If you have a valid driver's
license and good driving habits you
may qualifv. Phone Ted Elliott,
321-6442.
PA  BEAR'S MED.   SHOW.
Vanier  9:30-1:00   Sat.   Feb.   17th.
3 RITUALS AT STAGE 2. 8:30 TO-
night through Feb. 24. Tickets at
Van. Ticket Centre, Eatons or Door
L.M.T'a $1.25. Stage 2 Theatre
Dunsmuir-Beatty. 	
RUMMAGE SALE — WEDNESDAY,
Feb. 21. Lions Gate Memorial Hall
2611   W.   4th   Avenue.	
SKIING. GROUSE. FRIDAY, 12:45
Reduction bus-lifts. Reservations
from Eric Broom. Room 202, Mem.
Gym.	
Automobiles Wanted
22
Motorcycles
26
DANCE TO THE MUSIC OF GEORGE
Cuba at the Valentine Dance at I.H.
from 9:00-1:00. Co-sponsored by the
African Student Association and the
U.N.  Club.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
GET INVOLVED WITH CAMPUS
activities! Work on the Homecoming   committee.   Applications   in
A.M.S.    Office.
AUTOMOTIVE tt MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
II
1961 STUDEBAKER LARK. GOOD
Condition. Owner returning England. Available early March. $550
or near offer. 733-4464 after 4:30
p.m..
$85 OR NEAREST OFFER. 1955
Dodge 2 - Door Hardtop. Reliable
Transportation. Call Norm, 224-7298
after  7:00 P.M.
'65 VOLKS DELUXE, RADIO, heater,
seat belts, 25,000 mi., new brakes,
excellent.   $1280.   or   ?  RE  1-3957.
SCIENCE COLOURED '54 AUSTIN
A-40; rebuilt mill, nice bod. offers?
Phone   Steve.   277-8369  after  six.
1953     CHEV.     EXTREMELY     GOOD
condition.    Phone    255-3036.
1965   V.W.   IN   EXCELLENT   COND.
31,000  mi.   Phone   224-6332.
HELP — BUY MY '69 CHEV. GOOD
rubber, body and motor excellent.
Call Fred,  945-4754 aft 6 p.m. please
HEALEY FOR SALE BEST OFFER.
Motor excellent. Body needs some
repairs. Room 3. Hut 28. Acadia
camp.
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators  - Utility Unit*
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
146 Robson H 888-1284
HONDA 50CC '65. PRICE INCLUDES
helmet and rain suit. $125. phone
Bryan,    922-6629.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Scandals
87
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.	
LA TROUPE GROTESQUE (SATIRI-
cal comediens) will perform at 8:30
p.m. in Room 100 of the Jewish
Community Centre, 41st Ave. &
Oak St. on Sunday,. February 18th,
Admission   50   cents   per  person.
SECOND TERM'S BIGGEST DANCE:
Place Vanier Feb. 17th, 9:30-1:00
with Papa Bear's Medicine Show.
ARTIE: LAST CHANCE, HALF A
Sixpence or else. Aud. Today at
Noon.   Ann.
Sewing - Alterations
38
Typing
40
EXPERT   TYPIST    -   ELECTRIC   —
224-6129   -   228-8384.
TYPING — 25c PAGE — DOUBLE
spacing, legible work — Call Mondays to Thursdays and Sundays
after  10:00  a.m.,   738-6829.	
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253	
ESSAYS     AND     THESES     TYPED.
Please     call     Dallas    Simkins.     926-
2741.
'GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
81
MODELS WANTED — Professional
photographer with camera group
requires photogenic girls for all
types of photographic modelling.
Part-time or occasional evening
work only. Previous experience not
necessary. Transportation provided
if required. Good remuneration to
suitable applicants. Write Plaza
Camera Club, 8138 Cambie, Vancouver  14.
Help Wanted—Male
32
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
LIFEGUARDS—CITY OF KAMLOOPS
Riverside Park. Positions open for
2 males and one female. Apply in
writing before March 15 to P.S.
Hall, Beach and Pool Supervisor,
Apt. No. 4, 2176 W. 40th, Van. 13.
263-6144.
INSTRUCTION
Instruction   Wanted
61
Tutoring
84
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY, RUS-
sian, Library Science tutoring given
by   B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE VI
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE   —
1963,   1965  &  1966  issues  50c.
Campus Life's  25c.   Publications Off.,
Brock   Hall
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
MOVE ONTO CAMPUS — ROOMS
available (M) 224-9662, $40.00 mo.
2250 Wesbrook. Meal Services close
at hand.	
LARGE PRIVATE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student. 4595' W. 6th.
Phone 224-4866.
Room & Board
•a
LARGE SINGLE ROOM & BOARD
for quiet male student, 4595 W. 6th
phone   224-4866.	
IT'S   UNANIMOUS!   BEST   ROOM   &
board on campus at the Deke House.
Phone 224-9691 for more information.
EXCELLENT    FOOD    —    REASON-
able   rates   on   Campus.   Phone   224-
9986.
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD.
Double room places for three men.
St.   Andrew's   Hall   224-7720.
Furn. Houses ft Aprs. 83
GIRL TO SHARE FUR'N. SUITE
with 3 others.  5th and Balsam. 733-
8058.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, February  15,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
CUP CROSS-CONTINENT  NEWS ROUNDUP
Student fee strike
gains faculty support
MONCTON, N.B. (CUP) — Students Monday
demonstrated outside the science building here,
calling for university education for those with
the ability to learn rather than those with the
ability to pay.
Students have set up picket lines, vowing
to stay out of classes until the government agrees
to freeze fees at their present levels.
Meanwhile, support for the strike has come
from several quarters. The faculty has supported
the strike, and has withdrawn the services of
faculty members by holding a continuing session to study and discuss the situation. Study
sessions such as these are common in Quebec
labor disputes by white collar workers.
Students:  at the   affiliated  Bathurst  College
No  sub-voting
mixes reaction
REGINA (CUP) — A reaction of caution and
reserve has greeted announcement by the Saskatchewan government that no sub-votes will
be taken on the University of Saskatchewan
budget.
Dr. W. A. Riddel, principal of the Regina
campus of the U of S, expressed pleasure that
there will be no interference with internal operations of the university and there will be no sub-
votes.
The joint action committee however intends,
to retain an attitude of vigilance regarding the
government's announcements.
The statement was the first official announcement of change in the government's intentions
since Premier Ross Thatcher announced Oct. 18
he intended to assume direct budgetary control
of the university.
Riddell told a community forum audience:
"There will be no interference in appointments
and no interference in the handling of operating
funds. The board of governors will not have to
ask permission from government in order to
transfer funds from one major section of our
budget to any other."
Debate continued on how the controversy
has affected university relations with the community.
The Joint Action Committee has "discovered
many in the community who genuinely respect
an autonomous and reputable university."
But board chairman Allan Tubby said that
the university's public relations had fallen and
put the finger on the student newspapers of the
Regina and Saskatoon campuses.
also held all-day study sessions Monday, but
returned to classes Tuesday.
The planned march to the Fredericton Legislature has been put off to Thursday to allow
students time to organize.
Saturday the National Society of Acadians
and the Acadian Education Society backed the
striking students. The latter called for universal
accessibility to education and the elimination of
tuition fees as soon as possible.
The same day student and administration officials met with provincial government officials
to discuss the university finance problem. One
student termed the visit a knock on a closed
door.
The administration is adopting a wait and
see attitude, according to university president
Adelard Savoie. He said the student demonstration would focus attention on the financial difficulties of both students and the university.
The Canadian Union of Students Monday issued a statement of solidarity with the striking
students.
"The indefinite boycott approved by a 95 per
cent vote in a campus-wide referendum demonstrates clearly that the Moncton students are no
longer willing to compromise the right of education when faced with unjustified government
austerity measures," the statement read.
Pot sentences hit
TORONTO (CUP) — A former member of
parliament has criticized the justice department's tightening attitude on marijuana first-
offenders.
Arthur Maloney, a Toronto lawyer and
former Conservative MP, said Friday, "With
marijuana you are dealing with an area where
there is too much uncertainty. Investigations
in a few years may show marijuana is no greater
menace than alcohol."
His comments followed an announcement
that drug prosecutors with the department of
justice will recommend jail sentences in future
when local judges and magistrates ask them for
opinions.
In recent months first-offenders have been
given suspended sentences with probation if
they promise to go back to school or find a job,
stay away from known pothead hangouts, and
adhere to a nightly curfew.
N. A. Chalmers of the Toronto district office
of the justice department said the new position
resulted from the rising number of marijuana
offenders.
Manitoba campus politicos
slated   for   party   system
WINNIPEG (CUP) — University of Manitoba students
are being offered a slate of candidates in upcoming student
elections.
The Student Reform Movement (SRN) has nominated
a full list of candidates for president and faculty rep
positions.
Horace Patterson, SRM's presidential candidate, said
the two-week old movement was created almost spon-
tanously by students who believed that the elections
should be based on issues and not on personalities.
The movement has three general aims:
• to politicize the process of student government;
• to ensure student government is sensitive to student
wishes;
• to encourage student participation at all levels in
the university.
Patterson said the aims of the SRM are based on the
principle, "A student is a participant and not a product."
"A party will face the students every election and thus
can be held accountable for its actions," a party spokesman
said.
CARIBBEAN
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
presents
AT  INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
MONDAY,  FEBRUARY   19-12:30  P.M.:    An address by a West Indian graduate
student, Patrick Alleyne, "The Role of
the scholar in the emerging West
Indian    nation".
TUESDAY,   FEIJRUARY  00-12:30   P.M.:    A paper by Bert Nepaulsingh, Graduate Student — "West Indian Literature
WEDNESDAY,  FEB.  21-8  P.M.
THURSDAY,   FEB.   22
In   English".
A Caribbean Revue—An Evening of
West Indian Entertainment, Featuring
Calypso, Folk - dancing, Steel-band
music,   etc.
11:30   A.M.:    "Cook   Up"  Lunch   Time.
8   P.M.:    An  Evening of West Indian Films.
FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY  23-8   P.M.
to  1  A.M.
LEGION   HALL-6th   &   COMMERCIAL
Calypso   Carnival   dance.   Music   by
Trinidad  Moonlighters  Steelband",  and
the   Caribbean   Natives   Combo.
Admission:   $2.00.   Tickets  are  obtainable at   International   House.
In   addition   to  the  above,  there  will  be   an   exhibition   of  Art,   Crafts,   and
Literature daily in  rooms 400 and 404,  International  House.
w
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
presents
3£
THE SCHOOL FOH Mil
Witty Comedy of Manners
by  RICHARD   B. SHERIDAN
ANNUAL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
FEBRUARY 20 ■ 24, 8:30 p.m.
Student Tickets $1.00
(available   for   all   performances)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
Thursday, February 22 - 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre Rm.  207 or 222-2678
Support Your Campus Theatre
■m^^bmFREDERIC WOOD THEATRE-——
iR Page 8
THE     U BYSSEY
Thursday, February 15,  1968
BIG WHITE MTN. NEAR KELOWNA offers some excellent
skiing conditions for Vancouver enthusiasts. If you're
planning a trip to Big White this weekend, see the weather
and snow conditions report in the sports shorts column
elsewhere on this  page.
The North American Gymnastic Championships offer UBC
students a chance to show some real Canadian hospitality to
the visitors from Cuba, Mexico and the United States. In fact,
their visit on March 1 could even give the university a reason
for a spring carnival.
The four nation tournament is being held in the Pacific
Coliseum on Feb. 29 and March 2 and at UBC's War Memorial
Gym on March 1.
The visiting gymnasts will arrive on the campus at approximately 11 a.m. Wouldn't it be a fine goodwill gesture if a
strolling Spanish band were there to greet them?
The Ubyssey could write special stories
in Spanish and RADSOC could play Spanish
music for the visitors to make the gymnasts
feel more at home.
The four gymnastic teams will put on two
performances the day they are at UBC, one
at 12:30 p.m. (to which students will be admitted for $1) and the other at 7:30 p.m. Herein
lies a problem.
Because the gymnasts are staying at a
downtown hotel, it will be rather difficult for
them to get any rest if they have to commute
to the hotel after their afternoon exhibition and then come back
to UBC at night.
The gymnasts will have only about two hours to eat and
commute between performances, leaving no time for a rest.
This corner comes up with the following suggestion which
would give the visting gymnasts a chance to rest and to meet
hospitable Canadians.
There are four teams and there are four residences on
campus. Why not have each residence take in one team between
the two shows?
The teams have to be separated during this time with the
men and women on each team separate as well. Residences
offer the solution since men and women are already separate
there.
The resident students could loan their rooms to gymnasts
for an hour or so if the visitors wanted to sleep. Or they could
just talk to them or take them on a tour of the campus.
I'm sure that the gymnasts would appreciate any favors
shown them while they are performing at UBC. It seems appropriate that they spend their free time here too.
Since most of the athletes are also students, their visit
provides UBC students with the opportunity to show some goodwill to their peers from other countries.
I think we should make the most of it.
JESSEN
IN TRACK AND FIELD
Team heading to a first
The UBC track and field
teams are going to a first this
weekend, the first Western Canadian Universities Indoor
Track Meet.
The team is strong enough
to be looked upon as the one
to beat at this meet which is
being sponsored by the University of Saskatchewan at Saskatoon.
UBC has fielded its largest
team in many years and from
the look of things—the best
balanced.
In the middle distance track
events Ken French, Tom Howard and Bob Tapping have
been running well in their last
few meets.
The return of last year's star
Chip Barrett, along with Bob
Morgan and Bob Brownsword,
means the sprints will be very
strongly contested by UBC.
Another UBC strength is in
the jumping events where Sam
Vandermeulen, Gordon Dong
and Ray Stevenson are all national class jumpers.
If injured Ron Haddad passes
SPORTS
SHORTS
SOCCER
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds climbed into first place
in the Pacific Coast Soccer
League with a 3-1 win over
the North Shore Luckies Wednesday night.
Sid Finney's goal gave the
Luckies an early lead but two
goals by Gary Thompson and
one by Jim Briggs gave the
Birds the win.
FOOTBALL  MOVIES
Calling all football fans.
Starting today, films of past
NFL, AFL or CFL games will
be shown in room 213 of War
Memorial Gym beginning at
12:30 p.m.
A different program has
been arranged for each Thursday for the next few weeks.
Today's   movie  shows   the
season   highlights   of   the   San
Francisco 49ers. Anyone interested in football is invited.
RUGBY
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds lost 33-5 Wednesday to
the UCLA Bruins in an exhibition game played in Los
Angeles, A try by Gordie MacKenzie which was converted
by Don Crompton accounted
for UBC's points.
SKIING
Here are the latest weather
and skiing conditions from Big
White Mtn. near Kelowna for
anyone heading up there this
weekend.
There is a base of six feet
but no new snow. The weather
is clear and sunny with a daily
temperature average range of
28 to 46 degrees.
The snow Is hard first thing
in the morning but softens up
later in the day to make conditions for skiing excellent.
Roads are in very good winter
condition. All facilities operate
daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
his physical fitness tests (achil-
les tendon) he will be supporting Craig Nixon in the 600 yd.
event and will also run in the
4 x 440 relay.
The women's team expects a
little more trouble, but will be
relying on experienced veterans Pat Mills and Joanne Heth-
erington for their points.
ANNUAL U[l
CAMERAS and ACCESSORIES
50% OFF
• Phone tor your FREE SALES BULLETIN •
I  CAMERAS  LTD.
4538 West 10th Avenue
Phones 224-5858 - 224-9112
UP
TO
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS   —
12:45 to.2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS —
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or  224-3205
UBC - SFU
at
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1968
Only 200 Tickets for U.B.C. Students
will be available at 50c each
Distribution will be as follows:  —
Every student attending the St. Martin's College -
U.B.C. Game of Friday, February 16th and Saturday,
February 17th will be given a numbered ticket. A
draw will be conducted each night and 100 tickets
will be sold to lucky ticket holders. A list of drawn
numbers will  be announced  at half-time.
Tickers must be claimed on the night of the draw at the
Athletic Office

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