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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 2014

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 II   ■!■!■
LAXING LIQUOR LAWS
Potential changes to booze rules would streamline D^
event licensing process 1^5
STAYIN'ALIVE
Men's hockey still in the playoff
picture — for now
PIO
PASSED UP
P4 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON t    THIS WEEK, MAY WE:
TUESDAY   11
A GREENPEACE DROPOUTS CONFESSION
5-6:30 P.M. @ BUCHANAN A103
Join for a discussion with Patrick
Moore about his career with
Greenpeace and the campaign
forGolden Rice. Greenpeace
opposed. Free
WEDNESDAY < 12
FESTEVOLVE2014
10A.M.-5P.M. ©BEATY
BIODIVERSITY CENTRE
Comejoin the Beaty Biodiversity
Museum for a celebration of
Charles Darwin and the evolution of life. Join the museum
tours, activities and crafts. Create your own fossils and watch
DNA extraction demos.
Free for UBC students and staff
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
=HOTO CPTMUJI/WIKIMEDIACOMMONS
THURSDAY ' 13
TODD ICE HOCKEY
CASUAL LEAGUE
8A.M.-9A.M.@SRC
Drop in for guaranteed playtime
with the structure of our traditional leagues. Participants will get an
official and game equipment. No
pressure to show up each week or
be responsible to a team.
Free
Davis will start his full professorship at UBC in fall 2014 and will be on campus starting July 2014.
Meet Wade Davis, the
afffable anthropologist
THE
COVER
There are 113 students on the cover and they represent the 113 who couidn 't see
UBCcounselling immediately. The inspiration for the dejected student icon was from
George Michael Bluth's sad Charlie Brown walkfrom the TV show Arrested Development. Design by Ming Wong.
Video content
Make sure to check out our coverage of
the AMS election results, airing now at
ubyssey.ca/videos/
^|THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@ubyssey.cs
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Veronika Bondarenko
vbondarenko@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
culture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producer
Lu Zhang
video@ubyssey.es
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Matt Meuse
copy@ubyssey.es
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webmaster@ubyssey.es
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Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
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Danielle Tan
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
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Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
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Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
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LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official studentnews-
aaper of the University of Rritish Cn-
umbia. It is published
anclThursclaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written bythe
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please Include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
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editsubmis: >r length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
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will be published In the following Issue unless there Is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It Is agreed by all persons placing dis-
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aald for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponslble for _, ■ ■ angesorty-
aographlcal errors that do not lessen the value or the Impact of the ad.
Richard Sterndale-Bennett
Contributor
Tibet, Togo, Vanuatu — these
are just some ofthe places famed
anthropologist Wade Davis has
been to for his work. But come
fall 2014, the B.C. native will be
arriving home to start his first
full professorship at UBC.
Davis has spent much of his
life globe-hopping, travelling to
places forgotten, disregarded, or
ignored by much ofthe modern
world. Before he went around the
world, he first made the move to
Massachusetts to attend Harvard University. He arrived in
the city of Cambridge for school,
but it turns out he arrived two
weeks early.
"My mother had made a
mistake, and so I had to drag my
trunk through Cambridge until
I could find a church that would
take me in."
Wade credits serendipity for
most ofthe choices he's made,
including his choice of major
at Harvard.
"You had to declare your major
the next day, and I came out by
chance at the Peabody Museum
of Ethnology... and my eyes were
just filled with these images of
these dioramas of shaman and
strange outfits, all the colours
ofthe rainbow. And I ran into a
friend of mine on the street and I
said, 'Stewart, what are you going
to declare as your major tomorrow?' and he said, 'Anthropology,'
and I said, 'What's that?' 'Well,
you study Indians.' And I said,
Write
Shoot
Edit
Code
Drink
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
f
'Wow - that'll do.'"
Those humble beginnings
led to three Harvard degrees
(anthropology, biology and
ethnobotany) and possibly the
coolest gig in anthropology: being
National Geographic's explor-
er-in-residence. Since 1999, he's
been working with the National
Geographic Society to carry out
programs and fieldwork.
Even with all his success,
what's most obvious when meeting him is that he's an affable guy.
It's difficult to meet him and not
like him.
A big part of that is how he's
made a career out of areas in
between - between disciplines
as an ethnobotanist, between
islands of modernity as an explorer and researcher, and between
the academy and the public as a
popularizer of anthropological
research. In short, he's put a lot of
practice into bridging divides.
But he considers himself a
storyteller first. For Davis, storytelling is an important tool, one of
the many legitimate skill sets anthropologists should be allowed
by their peers to pursue.
"For the longest time, if you
spoke to the public, if you wrote
even a popular trade book, it
was almost an act of academic
suicide."
But that's changing. One reason he chose UBC was the support he has here for his approach.
In addition to an introductory
anthropology course, he'll be
working with graduate students
to develop their skill at engaging
PACKAGE
EXPRESS
You Ship. We Deliver.
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the public with anthropological
research, something he believes
has the potential to bring about
real change.
He's passionate about languages going extinct. "We're losing half of humanity's ecological,
social, spiritual, psychological
knowledge in a generation. And it
doesn't have to happen."
For Davis, the goal is to be
just one small part of a changing
world and help people make
informed choices about how to
direct the flow.
"You come to really recognize
as I have that despair is an insult
to the imagination, that pessimism is an indulgence."
Which is, of course, just one
more reason to like him. XI
ACCOLADESFORTHE
ANTHROPOLOGIST
Davis has written over 20
books, over 200 articles,
had his photos exhibited,
produced and hosted 18
documentary films and
has been a professional
speaker for 25 years
graphic explorers-in-res-
idence include Avatar
director James Cameron,
Sylvia Earle and Jane
Goodall
-2^
877.463.6446 // News
)RS WILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
URSDAY, FEBRUARY 6,20
TRANSLINK »
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER3THE UBYSSEY
The 99 B-Line, which runs along Broadway, is often over capacity at peak times.
Panel recommends Broadway rapid transit
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
At a presentation on Thursday, a
panel from the Washington D.C.-
based Urban Land Institute (ULI)
said an underground rapid transit
line should be built to improve
transportation along the Broadway
corridor, and that UBC should help
pay for it.
"The existing transit along the
Broadway corridor is essentially a
failure — it barely works," said Dick
Reynolds, one of five panel members at the presentation.
The ULI read 1,100 pages of
documentation on the subject and
spent three days in Vancouver
meeting with the city, TransLink
and residents before making their
recommendations.
"If the economic funding for this
line is put aside, if we look at simple
movement of people ... the smartest
thing to do would be to put the line
underground," said Alan Boniface,
chair of ULI BC, in an interview.
The panel was invited to do the
study by ULI BC.
Building an underground line is
predicted to cost up to $3 billion.
The panel also recommended
that major employers along the line
such as UBC and the Vancouver
Coastal Health Authority should
help pay for the system. According
to Boniface, UBC was invited to
discussions with the ULI, but did
not attend.
The 13-kilometre stretch between UBC and Commercial Drive
has been called the busiest bus
route in North America, and many
buses along it are over capacity
at peak hours. This is without
considering future growth, which
is a predicted increase of 1,000,000
people and 600,000 jobs in Metro
Vancouver by 2041.
The panel also recommended
that the city not rezone areas
because ofthe line. Residents in
the West Side, for example, were
opposed to increasing density in
the area.
"You guys do high-rises very
nicely, but you're sort of drunk on
high-rises," Reynolds said at the
presentation. "You don't need towers everywhere."
Finally, the ULI recommended
better collaboration and communication between stakeholders in
planning this line. Boniface said
that while construction ofthe
Canada Line was rushed for the
Olympics, there is time for a Broadway line to be done right.
"It would be useful to take that
time to have all the stakeholders
come together," said Boniface. "A
sober second thought, if you will,
that engages everyone."
Boniface said that although this
idea has been discussed for a few
years, some groups have not been
consulted to the degree they are
happy with. "If you want to make
this efficient, you need everybody
in the same room," Boniface said.
Boniface said the ULI will have
donated $50,000 in consulting
time by the time their full report is
released in six weeks.
UBC did not provide comment
by press time. XI
NEWS BRIEFS
AMS waives fees for former-
wards of the province
On Wednesday night, AMS
Council passed a motion to waive
student fees for former wards of
the province.
The code change will waive
all AMS fees for these students,
including the $91 core AMS fee,
the opt-out fees for services like
CiTR and the Bike Kitchen, $219.31
forthe health and dental plan and
$140 forthe U-Pass.
Former VP finance Joaquin
Acevedo brought this idea forward
in September after UBC decided to
waive tuition for these students.
Though the number of students
this motion will directly impact is
small, Acevedo said the effect for
those it does impact will be huge.
Study finds advertising opportunity in horror movies
A UBC study may lead to more product placement in horror movies.
The study, from the Sauder School
of Business, found that when people
watch horror movies alone, they may
be more likely to feel attachments to
brand names.
"People cope with fear by bonding
with other people. When watching a
scary movie, they look at each other
and say'Oh my God!'and their connection is enhanced," said Sauder
graduate Lea Dunn. "But, in the
absence of friends, our study shows
consumers will create heightened
emotional attachment with a brand
that happens to be on hand." xi
REAL ESTATE»
University
disputes rights to
Binning House
Danni Shanel
Contributor
UBC and the B.C. Land Conservancy are locked in a dispute over a
B.C. historic house.
Built in 1941 by Canadian artist
Bertram Charles Binning and
designated a national historic site
in 1998, the B.C. Binning House
has since been subject to an
ownership dispute between the
B.C. Land Conservancy and UBC.
Each party claims the right to
proceeds of a potential sale ofthe
property.
The Land Conservancy was
created in 1996 as a land trust
to preserve "certain lands with
ecological, agricultural or cultural
importance."
TLC works off of income
generated by private donations
and membership fees, as well as
corporate donations.
TLC acquired the Binning
House after the passing of Jessie
Binning, who received the property from her late husband. The
executors of Jessie Binning's will
turned to TLC in order to ensure
the house was preserved.
As part of a financial recovery
plan, TLC attempted to sell the
Binning House to art collector and
investor Bruno Wall for a reported
$1.6 million.
=HOTO DAVID ZEIBIN/FLICKR
The B.C Binning House was designated a national historic site in 1998.
UBC contested the sale, stating that if the house was sold, the
profits should be transferred to the
B.C. Binning Memorial Fellowship
Fund.
B.C. Binning founded the UBC
department of fine arts in 1955 and
served as its head until 1968.
According to UBC spokesperson
Lucie McNeill, Binning approached
UBC in 1978 to create the B.C.
Binning Memorial Fellowship for
fine arts students. She made 11
separate donations to the Binning
Fellowship Fund.
But the TLC claims that the
house was transferred to its care
after Binning's death, so UBC holds
no claim to the proceeds ofthe sale.
They took the issue to court,
and on Jan. 22,2014, B.C. Supreme
Court Justice Fitzpatrick issued a
judgment dismissing UBC's claim to
the house, and preventing the TLC's
attempted sale.
Justice Fitzpatrick noted that
the Binning House could not be
sold, and dismissed UBC's claim, as
"Jessie Binning stated that it was
her 'hope' that it 'will be preserved
for historical purposes.'"
The decision also said TLC's sale
ofthe property is in violation ofthe
Charitable Purposes Preservation
Act, which prohibits the sale of donated property to "support the charity in advancing any of its goals."
The sale may only be suspended
for a short time, however, as the
court said the TLC may file another
application to sell the house
"This is a complex judgment
and we will need time to review it
with our legal counsel to determine
our legal options going forward,"
McNeill said. "As the beneficiary
of charitable bequests, UBC has a
responsibility to our donors to ensure their final wishes are respected." a
DRINKING »
UBC mulls
changes to liquor
policy
PHOTO STEVEN DURFEE3THE UBYSSEY
The policy changes would make it easier
to serve alcohol at campus events.
Jovana Vranic
StaffWriter
UBC is considering amending its
liquor policy to make it easier to
serve drinks at campus events.
The university approved its
current liquor policy in 1998,
and last reviewed it in 2005. On
Feb. 4, the Board of Governors
discussed changes to the policy
that aim to align it with recently
announced changes to provincial
liquor regulations.
The goal of these amendments
will be to improve efficiency
approving events where alcohol
is to be served.
"The key changes are primarily in the area of streamlining,"
said Hubert Lai, university counsel. UBC plays host to roughly
430 events each year, which have
all previously required special
occasion licenses (SOLs).
"That's obviously a lot," said
Lai. "So, with the streamlining,
what we're trying to do is make
sure that when students or
faculty are trying to organize
events, if they don't really need
to have a special occasion license,
they don't get forced to jump
through the hoops necessary to
get one."
Under the revised policy,
small, invitation-only events not
open to the public will, in most
cases, become easier to organize. Certain events like this will
not need to apply for an SOL if
they meet a set of conditions,
including that there be no fee
for entry, entertainment, alcohol
or other services. These events
will still require venue approval
from the license exempt approval
authority, but hosts will be free
to serve alcohol to guests without
additional licensing.
Additionally, licenses will not
be required for catered events.
"As long as you're using a caterer
with [a] catering authorization,
you don't need to go and get your
own special occasion license,"
said Lai. "The caterer can just
take care ofthe alcohol [and]
all ofthe regulatory compliance
requirements associated with the
service of alcohol."
"I don't think it's a particularly exciting set of policy changes,
and I can imagine students who
look at this might be interested,"
said Lai. He said the changes
should make it easier for students
to host events with alcohol.
The final revision ofthe policy
is expected to take place in June
2014. a NEWS    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014
MENTAL HEALTH »
Complaints and constraints: the state of counselling at UBC
Sarah Bigam
News Editor
You're finally going to do this.
You walk into Brock Hall,
hoping no one sees you. You duck
into the frosted door in the corner
marked "UBC Counselling Services," and hope, again, that nobody
recognizes you.
"There's an enormous locking
cell door right when you walk in. It's
very intense," said Logan*, a first-
year Arts student who has been to
UBC Counselling Services six times
this year. "The immediate thought
is this is something I need to be
embarrassed about."
UBC Counselling Services
aims to provide free, confidential
counselling to UBC students. They
offer individual and group sessions,
and can provide documentation
of health concerns to Access and
Diversity and help students get academic concessions if necessary.
Last year, UBC Counselling Services saw 2,777 students. They also
weren't able to see 113.
"When a student isn't able to
get in, it's typically because of one
of two reasons," said Counselling
Services director Cheryl Washburn. "Either they have come in
the middle ofthe day and there's a
bit of a wait and they are not able
to wait at that point because they
have another commitment, or they
might come in at the very end ofthe
drop-in period and it's not urgent or
emergency."
Washburn said that regardless of
wait times, students in emergency
situations are seen day-of.
UBC Counselling Services is
underfunded, so wait times to see a
counselor can be long. Once inside,
students have also said their counsellors were unhelpful or seemed
apathetic.
Although UBC's strategic plan
places "a specific focus on mental
health," ofthe 13 students interviewed for this article, only five said
their experience with Counselling
Services was good overall.
LONG LINES
Wait times for a first appointment
at Counselling Services can range
from 15 minutes to several hours.
According to Washburn, wait times
are typically short in the mornings
but increase throughout the day.
"I always find it's difficult to
even make yourself walk in there,"
said Kristen* a kinesiology student.
"When I finally built up the courage
to do that, I was with my boyfriend
— they gave me an appointment for
about an hour and a half's time and
I had to stay there, but he wasn't
allowed to wait with me unless he
was going into the appointment.
"I thought that was pretty unnecessary as I was quite distressed
at the time and nervous about the
counselling appointment."
Kristen was eventually seen,
and said her experience with the
counsellor herself was good. But
some students, like Caroline*, are
discouraged by the wait and don't
come back.
"I was asked to wait three hours
for an appointment on a day when I
had classes," Caroline said. "I wasn't
allowed to come back later — I had
to sit and wait through my classes
or receive no appointment at all.
That to me seems unreasonable for a
service that is such a necessity for a
university campus.
"I walked away and never came
back. I still have received no help to
date. Part ofthe problem is that I felt
embarrassed — I was ashamed that
I needed to go to counselling and it
took a lot to go in the first place."
FILE PHOTO JOSH CURRAN3THE UBYSSEY
UBC students most frequently go to counselling because of depression, stress and anxiety.
Students like Caroline who
leave while they are waiting were
included in the 113 students turned
away between September 2012 and
August 2013. According to Washburn, all students who cannot get in
the first time are added to a priority
list if they choose to return another
day.
Counselling Services does not
track how many of this number
actually choose to reschedule, and
they do not follow up with students
to ensure they come back.
Washburn said that regardless of
lineups, emergency cases are seen
day-of through "backup emergency
slots" held for this purpose. She said
determining if a case is an emergency is based on the student's sense
of urgency.
"If they feel it's something that
can't wait until tomorrow then
we would regard that as an urgent
need."
MIXED FEELINGS
Seven ofthe students interviewed
for this article did not feel the services provided by their counsellor
were up to par.
Second-year international
student Victoria* attended UBC
counselling for four months last
term.
"Initially I was given a male
counselor who I didn't like," Victoria said. "He kept forgetting my
name and the details of my situation, which was very frustrating
as it was painful to keep repeating
my story and I felt like we were
making little progress."
This counsellor also pressured
her multiple times to report an incident she was involved in, which
she did not want to do. "It scared
and frustrated me and I think it
was unprofessional."
Hannah*, a third-year international student, was also
disappointed with the counselling
she received. "When I sought
counselling, I made it clear that I
was feeling depressed and suicidal,
and even explained that when I
felt out of control in daily situations, the only thing that would
calm me down would be imagining
the details and steps of my suicide.
"After half an hour of talking to
[the counsellor], she decided that
the solution to my problem was a
group workshop focused on time
management. It was so non-sequi-
tur I did not know how to react."
Washburn said students experiencing difficulties with their assigned counsellor are encouraged
to switch, which they can do by
notifying reception. "That's really
the most critical thing, because
if we know, we can help them
address that."
Both Hannah and Victoria
requested a switch and had a good
experience with their second counsellor, though Hannah returned six
months later.
"[Counselling Services] handled it
very well and promptly, and within
a few days I was seeing someone
new. My new counsellor was very
nice and respectful and paid a lot of
attention to detail, which meant I
never had to repeat myself," Victoria
said.
However, switching counsellors
has not helped everyone. One Arts
student, Eva*, said she had bad
experiences with multiple counsellors. "I was not actually treated,
from the start, like a whole human
being, but rather I was looked at as
a student with specific needs that
would fulfil my being a student," she
said. "It often felt like I was trying to
prove that I was depressed enough
to warrant help."
A GROUP SOLUTION?
Washburn said UBC Counselling
Services has tried to open up access
by running group counselling programs for students' most frequent
troubles, which are depression,
anxiety and stress.
"For certain concerns, group
counselling has been found to be at
least as if not more effective than
individual," Washburn said.
However, some students are
uncomfortable with the idea and
decide not to go.
"After a couple of months of
sessions they wanted to put me into
a group session for anxiety, but the
idea of being open and vulnerable
with a group of strangers that I'd
never met before scared me and,
ironically, made me incredibly anxious, so I elected to stop going," said
fourth-year Arts student Julie.
"When I told [my counsellor] that
I didn't feel comfortable in a group
session... she kind of brushed me off
and said that I should try it first and
if it really didn't work we'd reassess
the problem," said Hannah.
Both Hannah and Julie
stopped going to counselling after
the suggestion.
However, some students, like
Logan, found the program to
be helpful.
"At first I was a little skeptical
about being in a group session —
what it's going to look like, how
embarrassing is it goingto be... but
it gives you a chance to see [you're]
not the only one going through this,"
said Logan, who is part of a mood
management group for depression.
"I just wanted the help. You feel
a little bit like you're brushed off
[when a counsellor tells you to go],
but then you go and realize it isn't
like that."
LACK OF RESOURCES
UBC Counselling Services' problems appear to be caused mainly by
a lack of resources.
"We certainly do need more
resources in our centre," said
Washburn. "We would like to
be able to have more capacity to
provide followup counselling for
students."
Kristen, for example, said that
following her initial appointment,
she was only able to get an appointment for approximately half an hour
every two weeks. "I was having a
really tough time — ended up having
to go back home to the U.K. and pull
out of my courses — so this wasn't
nearly enough for the situation I
was in."
Counselling Services currently
employs nine full-time counsellors,
hired based on a national search
for registered clinical counsellors,
social workers and psychologists
who have experience dealing with
a student population and a broad
range of mental health issues.
UBC also has four masters
students completing practicums at
Counselling Services, and typically has four pre-doctoral and two
post-doctoral interns as well.
RENOVATIONS
Counselling Services is well aware
ofthe issues they face. Washburn
said she and her colleagues have
been able to increase their resources
by one or more full-time counsellors
per year for the past two years by
lobbying the university during the
budgeting process.
Counselling Services is funded
through the university's general
operating budget. Full-time counsellors are paid between $57,417 and
$130,146 annually.
Three years ago, Counselling
Services introduced a "rapid access
model" where most students are
seen in a quick initial appointment
by a full-time counsellor or intern.
This appointment is used to assess
the student's concerns and the
urgency of their situation.
From there, a student might be
referred to any ofthe counsellors,
interns or master's-level students,
depending on the assessment —
students with emergency concerns
such as suicidal thoughts will not be
seen by master's students. Students
also may be referred to a group program or outside psychiatry.
"Sometimes in the initial appointment the student themselves
makes a request and says they were
thinking of working with a male
or a female or some specific aspect
and we do our best to honour that
request," said Washburn.
Washburn said Counselling
Services is trying to maximize their
efficiency by tracking demand and
making more counsellors available
at times when more students are
coming in.
"That's always an estimate, and
that's always based on last year's
data," said Washburn. "[But] to
the degree that we have resources
available, we try to allocate them
as specifically as possible to the
level of demand, and we will always
continue to do that."
Counselling Services also runs
a survey twice a year to gather
students' opinions. "The vast
majority of feedback that we get
from our survey is very positive,"
said Washburn.
SILVER LININGS
Some students report mainly positive experiences with Counselling
Services. Spencer Keys credits UBC
Counselling with his success as
AMS president during the 2005-
2006 school year.
Keys went to weekly sessions for
almost a year during his term as
president to help him deal with procrastination related to depression,
anxiety and low self-esteem. Like
many others, he didn't get along
with the first counsellor he saw,
but did well with the second after
requesting a switch.
"I probably couldn't have done
that job without the support I
received," said Keys. "I definitely
wouldn't have turned myself around
academically or been able to embark
on a reasonably successful career."
Victoria said that despite initial
difficulties, her experience was
good overall.
"My counsellor provided me with
some activities and worksheets to
deal with my depression, but I felt
they were very basic, and in the end
I decided to see a medical doctor for
antidepressant medication. It is a
safe, positive space for talking about
problems but if, like me, you are impatient and want to be 'fixed,' it may
be a slow process," said Victoria.
However, the stories of others are
much more bittersweet.
"My opinion of UBC counselling
has been extremely mixed. I feel that
there are some staff... that recognize
the weight of their job and practice
extremely professional empathy,"
said Hannah. "But at the same time,
I believe the repercussions of my
first experience would have been
astronomical had I not had an outer
web of support. There are a lot of
students that are not so lucky to have
as diligent, patient and empathetic
friends and family as I do."
After finding counselling to be
unhelpful, Julie went home for
Christmas break to visit her family.
"I went back to exercising and
lessened my course load so I could
pull my GPA up from the sad state
term one had left it in," she said.
"However, I don't feel like these
positive changes in my lifestyle or
mood were attributed to my counselling experience. It came from
going home, seeing my family, and
regrouping with their support."
Julie and Kristen, who both
went home to recuperate from their
mental health concerns, are back at
UBC today.
Washburn encourages all students with any concerns about their
counselling experience to come
forward. "We have to know about
something in order to address it,"
she said. "We really value hearing
about students' experience if they're
feeling like they're not getting what
they need, and that helps us support
them to get the service that they
need." XI
*Names have been changed to protect sources' identities.
Counselling
BYTHE
NUMBERS
2,777 students seen between
September 2012 and August
2013
113 students not seen on
their first day during that
time
64 per cent of those students
were female
19.4 per cent were
international
8 female counsellors
currently employed
2 male counsellors currently
employed ■I   ■!■!■
*J^"
I I
GO
PLACES
y)
I II   jfi-
II   ■!■!■
WEB EXCLUSIVE:
ubyssey.ca/features
AND: 6    I    TRAVEL SUPPLEMENT    I    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11,2014
J*
19
tfi
f
BEST OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST
LOWER MAINLAND
MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR U-PASS
^^tudentshavea
^^ love-hate rela-
I ^^tionship with their
U-Pass. While the little
blue card brings free
rides on public transit,
those rides often mean
standing shoulder-to-shoulder on
a cramped bus with top 40 beats
emanating from an oblivious passenger's headphones. But those
moments typically occuron buses
going to and from UBC. Elsewhere
in the Lower Mainland, buses and
trains can offer more pleasant trips
to more exciting locations.
239 bus routes, fourtrains and
a ferry — they're all accessible at
no cost with a U-Pass. A lot can be
learned about not just Vancouver,
but many other locations around
the Lower Mainland as well, and
contrary to popularsentiment,
TransLink usually does a good
job of getting you there and back.
A couple of transfers might be
needed to access these locations,
butthatjustaddstothefun (and be
sure to angrily tweet at ©TransLink
if the bus doesn't show up).
O White Rock
It's become more of a tourist
destination overthe past
years, but White Rock still has a laid-
back oceanf ront sense surrounding
it. Its main feature is the pier that juts
out into the Pacific Ocean, offering
views ofthe United States in the
distance, but the beach — which
also features the famed white rock
— makes for a relaxing walk. A wide
range of restaurants line the waterfront strip, and after sunset there's a
bit of a nightlife on weekends.
480 Bridgeport Station ->351 White
Rock Ctr
(~1 hour 30 min.)
OBowen Island
Hike, kayak, bike, eat,
take photos of the
scenery and upload them to
Instagram. Bowen Island truly
offers a laid-back island lifestyle,
with a variety of local shops
greeting you right away in the
aptly named Snug Cove. Ashort
venture can take you up trails
of varying difficulty that offer
spectacularviews of Howe
Sound. Killarney Lake is another
secluded gem. There are also
shuttle buses that take you
around the island if you want to
explore more areas —just tell
the driver where you want to get
off, and wave it down when you
want to get on. Seriously.
44 Downtown ->250 Horseshoe
Bay (scenic route) or 257Horseshoe Bay (express) ->Ferry
(~ 2 hours 15 min., including ferry)
OFort Langley
When I visited Fort Langley,
the actor hired to play a mid-
1800s butter churnerwastelling
us about how the fort moved from
a fur trading post to the capital of
the newly created province of B.C.
Then her cell phone went off. That
anecdote doesn't really have much
significance, but the restored fur
trading post does provide a rare
look back into how B.C. came to
be. Outsideof the national historic
site, the entire city out in the Fraser
Valley features restored buildings
that provide a relaxing escape
from city life and truly makes you
feel like you've gone back to a
simplertime.
44 Downtown to W Georgia St. ->
Expo Line to Surrey Central Stn.
->502 Brookswood to Langley
Centre ->C62 Walnut Grove via Ft.
Langley to 96 Ave. at Glover Rd.
(~ 2 hours 20 min.)
O Deep Cove
Another North Shore
gem, Deep Cove is a hub
of outdoor recreation due to
its location. The nearby ocean,
forests and mountains provide
opportunities to kayak, hike and
bike, all the while taking in the
views of Burrard Inlet. Forthe non-
rec enthusiasts, the town prides
itself on preserving its heritage
and showcases theatre, art and
museums to complement the local
shops and restaurants in the quiet
community.
84 VCC-Clark to Cambie St. ->
Canada Line to Waterfront Stn. ->
211 Seymour to Panorama Dr. at
Naughton Ave.
(~1 hour 30 min.)
©Lynn Canyon
When you visit the
majestic forests of Lynn
Valley, you'll probably feel bad for
talking and ruining the ambiance.
Thesound ofthe rushing streams
provide a gentle soundtrack for
a walk through the trees on the
park's numerous trails, but can
also be an unsettling reminder of
what lies below when crossing
thesuspension bridge that hangs
50 metres above. The 30-Foot
Pool in the midst of the forest is
also one of B.C.'s premier spots
to cliff jump or enjoy a moment of j
serenity.
44 Downtown to Pender St. ->211
Seymour to Phibbs Exchange ->227 \
Lynn Valley Centre to Peters Rd. to
Duval Rd.
(~1 hour 40 min.)
OSteveston
Once you makeyourway
throughthehustleand
bustle of downtown Richmond,
you will find yourself in Steveston,
a historic village on the banks
of the Fraser River. Canneries
and over 600 fishing boats help
maintain the area's image of an
old-fashioned fishing village, while
the lengthy wooden boardwalk
helps you get a glimpse of it all.
Getting fish and chips here is also
mandatory — Pajo's offers some of
the best.
480 to Bridgeport Stn. ->Canada
Line outbound to Brighouse Stn. ->
407 Gilbert to Chatham St.
(-lhourlSmin.)^
—CJ Pentland
Ride the lightning
on the Bolt Bus
Greyhound is where you turn when flights seem like a month's rent flushed down the toilet. There is a very, very
small chance you will get beheaded, and the new express lines rarely stop — but there's an easier way. If you are
feeling cabin fever from too many extended stays at Irving, perhaps it's timeforyou to start planning a reading
week getaway. While buses seem less than ideal on vacation when your U-Pass is in hand every waking minute,
they really aren't so bad — especially if you would rather head to Portland or Seattle than Abbotsford or Kamloops.
Greyhound's newest offering is the Bolt Bus, introduced on the West Coast in 2012. Departing from Central
Station, the Bolt Bus heads to Bellingham, Seattle and Portland. It's the first-class of Greyhound buses at an
economy-class price. The Bolt Bus has even more legroom than your run-of-the-mill Greyhound, and you can find
yourself seated on leather rather than '80s-patterned upholstery. There is also Wi-Fi and power outlets in case you
can't completely escape from looming papers and midterms.
While a standard one-way fare for a Greyhound trip from Vancouver to Kelowna might cost you upwards of $78,
the Bolt Bus can cost you as little as $1 to your American destination. According to the FAQ on the company's
website, there is a $1 ticket on every bus which is chosen at random. So how do you snag that elusive ticket? Plan
early. The earlieryou book, the cheaper your trip will be. Schedules are usually released at least four weeks ahead
of time, so you are well on your way to planning a fun, budget-friendly reading break to the Evergreen or Beaver
State. Otherwise, a normal ticket runs in the $20 range. SALISHSEA
SEATTLE
EMERALD CITY
O
©
o
o
PORTLAND
CITY OF ROSES
O
o
o
o
o 8    I    TRAVEL SUPPLEMENT    I   TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11,2014
TALES OF TRAVEL 4*
CHRISTMAS IN PAKISTAN
■   PAKISTAN FACTS
Capi
al: Islamabad
Loca
tion: Southern Asia
Area
coun
796,095 km2 (2
try in the world
6th big
gest
Popi
lation: 182,490
721 (6t
h)
Offic
al languages: E
nglish,
Urdu
In the month that I was away, I visited the United Arab Emirates, Pakistan and
Oman. I'll focus on Pakistan, as it seemed to be the country foreigners are most
reluctant to visit.
My travels through the country began in Islamabad. The city is built on a grid
structure, just like Vancouver, but that's about the only similarity I could find. I found
this country to be one of extremes: extreme richness and extreme poverty, extreme
power and extreme weakness; high-end restaurants in rural towns; luxury automobiles
gliding alongside motorcycles with four helmet-free passengers riding them. Somehow
the two extremes coexisted perfectly. Everything that might seem out of place anywhere else worked to form a kaleidoscope of colours and sounds, which made a car ride
through the city seem like watching three different movies at the same time.
After Islamabad, I flew south to Lahore, the cultural hub ofthe country. In the city,
the trucks are decorated with hand-painted designs, people often travel on horse-driven carts, and the restaurants and cafes made me feel like I was back in Europe. While
there is a sharp division between the urban and the rural in most ofthe countries I
have visited, in Pakistan I found everything to coexist perfectly in the same space.
My last stop in the country was Karachi. I had the impression I was living in a movie
— even small shops and cafes had guards with huge rifles, while rickshaws crisscrossed
in between cars and pedestrians. An incredibly large and modern mall, famous for being home to the largest shopping bag in the world, towered over the scurrying streets;
every hour is rush hour in Karachi. As with every good Bollywood movie, my journey
ended with a wedding: bright, colourful and full of perfectly coordinated dances.
While flying back to Vancouver, I thought how this was the first Christmas season
I had spent as a "non-Christmas." December in Islamic countries is actually the height
of wedding season, and on Dec. 25 I was at the mehndi of my friend's cousin, one of
the wedding day celebrations held at the brides' house. Instead of singing carols, I was
dancing to Bollywood-inspired moves; instead of wearing an ugly sweater and jeans, I
had a glittery headpiece, khol-painted eyes and a long, formal Pakistani dress; instead
of decorating a tree with lights and ornaments, I was surrounded by brightly coloured
drapes and strings of fresh flowers. But what did bring Christmas back into December
was the affection and care I received from everyone whom I crossed paths with during
my journey, and the Middle Eastern tradition of offering endless gifts to guests.
Ever since I came back, all I've been reading is Rumi (in English for now), and all I
listen to are the Bollywood songs I'd hear on the radio in Pakistan. I would have never
thought I would incorporate my trip this much into my daily life. tJ
=HOTO COURTESY LINAZDRUL
Lina Zdruli is a fourth-year international relations major. She attended the International
Youth Conference in Dubai last December, when she also took the opportunity to travel
throughout the Middle East. Her journey inspired her to launch the Breaking Barriers
initiative at UBC, a live webinar series where a variety of entrepreneurs from across the
Middle East explain the role of institutions in their country while breaking down stereotypes.
1ANGHAISHAMBL
WCAN VERSUS CANA
XCHANGESTUDEN
Two days before leaving on an 18-day
school trip to China, a few friends
and I went out to do some last
minute shopping. We were scheduled to be
in Beijing for a few days at the end of our
journey, and we had heard awful things
about the air quality. After some convincing on behalf of my friend, I begrudgingly
bought a package of heavy-duty facemasks
at the Home Depot.
And I'm glad I did.
Shorty after we arrived in Shanghai,
a gust of wind from the north blew all of
Beijing's pollution to the south. While
people inBeijingwere enjoying blue
skies and great air quality, we woke up
one morning to realize the particulate
matter in Shanghai was above index. The
pollution was so bad that the air felt thick
and a layer of smog covered the city, from
street level to the top of some ofthe world's
tallest buildings.
I was glad I had bought my heavy-duty
face mask, but we soon found out they
weren't the best option for what some
people were calling the "airmageddon."
We had to buy these fancy face masks that
had a separate pouch for special filters.
But my face was so small that they didn't
feel very effective. Even worse, one of my
friends realized he had never inserted
=HOTO AURORATEJEIDA/THE UBYSSEY
B    SHANGHAI FACTS
Location: Yangtze River
De
tain
East China
Population: 23,710,000
(lar
gest in
the world)
Home to the world's bus
ies
container port
the filter, so he had been walking around
Shanghai with nothing but a piece of cloth
over his face.
Unfortunately, that day was our only
day off in Shanghai. We went to the Pu-
dong, but couldn't see any ofthe buildings
that make up Shanghai's famous skyline.
We couldn't even see two metres ahead of
us on the ferry across the river. We ended
up spending the rest ofthe day in a shopping mall, hoping they had some type of
air filtration system, which they probably
didn't.
Ironically, we never had to use those
face masks in Beijing at all. tJ
Aurora Tejeida is a second-year journalism student, and The Ubyssey's senior
culture writer. Last December, she visited
China as part ofthe UBC International
Reporting program.
If I've learned anything from my time
on exchange, it's that Canadians
are boring.
Perhaps boring doesn't cut it. Of no interest?
Canadians and our country seem to have
been overlooked on the world stage. Other
than the public travesties that are Justin
Bieber and Rob Ford, Canada is usually a
silent and accommodating country reduced
to cliches about hockey and maple syrup. I
myself don't mind the anonymity my country has; it's the same anonymity with which
I intended to blend into my peer group of
raucous, mostly American students.
Upon starting a conversation with
international students during my travels,
my country of birth provoked — well,
nothing. Glazed, vacant stares, or perhaps
a self pitying smile with a "Oh. Nice. Are
you from Toronto?" Stifling my instinct
to inform this clearly ignorant person
that Canada has at least three major cities
(bonus points for citing Calgary — or is
it Edmonton? — as the fourth) that all
self-respecting, informed people should be
aware of, I realize that I can't place their
accent. Is that German? I thought you were
from Austria. They speak German there
too, right?
Being a Canadian on exchange among
an overwhelmingly American exchange
student populace felt akin to being the
youngest child, disparagingly referred to
as "an accident" by their family. One feels
insignificant in the face of that talented
all-star older sibling whose every move is
documented with unbridled enthusiasm
and the always strong opinion of countless
people. The unashamedly favoured interest in the cultural and political movements
of our neighbour to the south was only
fueled by my responses to half-hearted
attempts to include me in the discussions,
which primarily consisted of, "Yeah, it's
pretty much the same in Canada."
That being said, I felt it important
to clarify to any confused parties that
I wasn't an American. "I realize we all
sound the same to you," I would say, "and
no one can distinguish any particular
feature of Canada apart from the fact that
we border the U.S., but I promise it's really
different." And what did this distinction
mean to me, ultimately? At first, I felt it
rightfully separated me from the anonymous mass of exchange students that seemed
to meld into one giant eye roll-inducing
response from our hosts: "Oh, they're
Americans." I soon realized, however,
that the only distinguishing feature of my
Canadian identity was that I was sort-of-
but-not-really American.
I also realized that, although I was so
eager to define myself by what I am not, it
is more fulfilling to appreciate the ways in
which people are similar. By putting aside
my need to differentiate myself, I allowed
myself to embrace being on a new adventure with people from all over the world
who were experiencing the same thing.
That unifying fact allowed me to create
lasting memories with beautiful people,
which I will always be grateful for. I came
to understand that what matters most to
people is not how you are different, but
rather, how you are the same, tl
Emma Warford is a fourth-year English
student. In the fall of2012, she participated
in UBC'S Go Global learning exchange program, where she travelled to Granada, Spain,
for a semester-long exchange. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014    |    TRAVEL SUPPLEMENT
A MISUNDERSTANDING IN GHANA
In addition to visiting a variety of great countries and having many adventures, I've
also had a full-time class schedule. This unique learning experience allowed me to
experience cultures not as an observer, but rather from the point of view of a member ofthe culture itself. In this way, I gained a deeper connection to countries, cultures,
current affairs and global issues.
One thing I learned by participating in these cultures is that it is not about what you
can give to others — it is about what they need from you. People from different cultures live their lives differently; don't compare them to Western culture, or your own
home country.
There is one experience that really stuck out to me on my travels, and you will soon
understand why.
On our first day in Ghana, some of my friends and I decided to spend a relaxed day on
the beach. However, even on this day, adventure found us.
On our way back to the ship, our taxi driver noticed we were running out of gas
and told us we had to stop at a gas station. We got off the highway and turned into an
abandoned and dirty looking gas station, only for taxis. As soon as we got there, about
20 men came to the car and started talking to us. We had no idea what was going on.
We locked the doors immediately; they were loud, and they were many. Since our windows were open, some of them reached inside the car and touched us, but we couldn't
really close the windows, and we were four people in the back seat so there was really
nowhere to go.
Our driver opened the trunk and suddenly it felt like people were crawling into the
car. Nothing made sense anymore. After some heated discussions, which we could not
understand, our taxi driver opened our doors and pulled us out ofthe car. I thought
that was our end! To our surprise, they just pushed us to the side and ignored us.
Later, we found out our taxi driver only opened the trunk in order to reach the tank,
and he wanted us out ofthe car because it was unsafe for us to be in the car while they
were filling up the tank. We also found out that all those men wanted to talk to us
because we were foreigners, and they were interested in hearing about our culture and
background. Man, we felt bad for the way we perceived the situation.
Meike Schieb is a fourth-year psychology student who attended the Semester at Sea
program in Spring2013. Participants in Semester at Sea travel to 12 countries around the
world on a ship while taking courses for credit.
ONE DAY IN MACEDONIA
CHELSEA SWEENEY
It is my second day in Skopje. The July humidity is heavy on the second floor ofthe
family-run hostel. The black nightgown and pajama shorts I am wearing cling to my
sweaty frame. There are beads of perspiration on my face and I wish for a fan as I wipe
my sweating hands onto the towel at the end ofthe bunk. An Austrian girl is sleeping outside on the balcony, but there is only room for one out there.
The Turkish man who helped me down from my top bunk the day before has suggested
an adventure today: hiking out in Matka Canyon to find a cave he knows of. He makes me
guess where he is from. I guess the Balkans.
Three other young women expressed interest in joining the adventure last night as Cem
played some lovely melody on a musical contraption that was not a guitar. The balcony
sleeper, on holiday from her social work program, is one of them. Then there is the 18-year-
old free-spirited German girl who wants to study theatre. And lastly, the wild haired
Finnish woman whose language, apparently, has more in common with Turkish than other
European etymology. Cem said so himself.
I am quiet on our bus ride out to Matka Canyon. We are an odd number. The bus driver
gives me change from a small wooden box on his dashboard. I now have funny coloured
notes and odd shaped coins rolling around in my zipped up purse. I had tossed the GPS
tracker into my bag before we left. The bag feels heavy on my perspiring shoulders. It has
been a pain remembering to charge the tracker at night, especially when somebody could
just walk off with it while I sleep. I am afraid to touch it and accidentally press the SOS
button, which would cost my dad a lot of money.
The bus ride to Matka is bumpy, and I discover that my hostel friends have each paid a
different fare for the same journey.
Cem gets a kick out of saying "lovely" in a breathy English accent. He has met quite a
few British tourists while working on cruise ships and this is their favourite expression. So
everything is "lovely" today.
We arrive at the end of a dusty road, having travelled 30 minutes from the capital. The
first thing I see is the St. Andrew's Monastery next to a tourist restaurant built into the hillside and right across from the boat rental jetty. The Treska River is an inviting glassy green.
We begin our hike next to the canyon, joining up with two Macedonian economics students
who speak English very well.
Twenty minutes into our hike, my pasty white skin is on fire. I have forgotten my sunscreen. I almost give up and follow the Macedonian students back to the restaurant where
they are meeting friends. But Cem produces sunscreen for all of us and insists in a fatherly
sort of way that we all put some on. He is the only one wearing a hat.
The path is dangerous with a steep drop into the river below. It would be nice to swim,
but there is no way of getting down to the river from up here. We are heading towards a
deep cave at the end ofthe trail.
After two hours of hiking in sandals and flip flops, the path abruptly stops. We speculate
that the cave is above us, but it's not, and we decide to try and swim instead. The trail has
ascended near enough to the river that we find a place to jump in. But unlike everyone else,
I have no bathing suit. I debate my situation. I am hot, sticky and the water is tantalizing.
But I have this fear of falling, and I did not want to appear a coward in front of my new
friends. So I strip down to my underwear and sports bra. The Austrian girl tries lending me
a spare pair of bottoms, but they are too big.
The German teenager dives in first, breaking to the surface gasping that it is freezing.
Cem jumps next, then the Finnish and Austrian
girls. They all quickly swim to the other side ofthe
river. I am the last to follow, mostly out of my fear.
In the end, I think I actually tripped on a root while
contemplating my jump, because suddenly I am
falling in head first. I break the surface, gasping as I
begin strong strokes to reach the other side quickly,
wheezing asthmatically all the while.
It is difficult not to give up halfway to the sunny
side. The water is excruciatingly cold. I can barely
pull myself up onto the rocks. Cem has pain in his
back and neck. We sit there warming up. Nobody
wants to swim to the other side to retrieve our things
or hike back for another two hours in this heat. Cem splashes us teasingly. My feet dangle in
the water. It must be 40-43 degrees out ofthe water, but my feet are numb. We discuss our
situation and agree to hail a river taxi and pay them to take us back to the tourist section
where the bus stop is, but no boats are to be seen or heard.
There is some sort of camp just down the river on our side that we saw during our hike.
The people there had called out to us, but it was not approachable through the bush, only by
swimming downstream. They have a boat.
Suddenly, we hear a water craft rumblingup the river. We look at each other excitedly.
Is it a taxi? We hear it stop at the camp near us. Through the brush, we can just about make
out the four men who have just arrived. We hear voices.
Cem bravely calls out to them in broken Macedonian, asking for a lift. They reply that
they have no room and my heart sinks. Then one of them adds in clear English, "But we'll
take the girls." tl
The above text is an excerpt from a longer article, which can be read in its entirety at ubyssey.
ca. Chelsea Sweeney graduated from the UBC archeaology program lastyear. She travelled to
Macedonia in 2012 as a part of her program.
MACEDONIA FACTS
Capital: Skopje
Location: Central Balkan Pe
insula in Southeast Europe
Area: 25,713 km2
Population: 2,022,547
Languages: Albanian, Turki
Roma, Serbian, Bosnian,
Aromanian EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
RUARY 11.2C
// Sports + Rec
HOCKEY»
T-Birds rally to keep playoff hopes alive
Complete effort powers 5-1 victory over CIS No. 10 Saskatchewan Huskies
Jack Hauen
StaffWriter
The UBC men's hockey team rallied
from a loss Friday night against the
University of Saskatchewan Huskies
to handily beat the same team the
next night 5-1.
It was a complete effort Saturday
night, something that's been missing
from the Thunderbirds for most of
the season. The goaltending was
more than stellar, the defence took
away chances with busy sticks and
the offence took over in the second
half.
At 10-14-2, UBC still sits next to
last in the Canada West standings,
but with a pair of wins and a Regina
loss in the final two games, they
would move into a playoff spot.
UBC will have to use this win as
a jumping-off point for a late-season
streak, especially since their fate is
no longer completely in their own
hands. All they can do at this point
is maximize their chances of playoff
contention with victories against
the University of Manitoba Bisons in
the last two games ofthe season.
The 'Birds have a history of
playing well against the Bisons,
but have lost both times they've
faced them this year. They were
outscored 6-3 and 6-4 in late November to cap off a five-game losing
streak. Those were, however, the
last two games before UBC began
its longest winning streak ofthe
season — six games from November
to January — so it's possible the
Thunderbirds will see Manitoba
as the team that gave them the jolt
needed to break their funk, and will
come at them with something to
prove for the rematch. The standout
player for UBC during those two
games may have been Neil Manning, who scored a pair of powerplay goals in the losing cause.
An excellent special teams night
gave the 'Birds a huge boost on
Saturday against the Huskies. The
deadly-looking powerplay went two
=HOTO ALVINTIAN/THE UBYSSEY
Anthony Bardaro and the UBC men's hockey team attacked the Saskatchewan net and came away with a crucial 5-1 win on Saturday.
for three, and the frantic but efficient penalty kill had a perfect night.
Head coach Milan Dragicevic
was pleased with his team's effort
on slanted ice. "We're getting confidence on the powerplay, and that's
a big deal, when that happens, good
things happen."
An explosive third period
from the 'Birds helped them blow
past the Huskies, although the
first half ofthe game seemed to
favour Saskatchewan.
Both teams came out ofthe gate
flying, UBC setting the pace in what
they knew was a desperation game.
Chances were aplenty on both ends,
but Thunderbird backup goaltender
Steven Stanford found himself the
target of most scoring opportunities.
On the first penalty ofthe game — a
slashing call against UBC's Nick
Buonassisi — the opening draw in
the Thunderbird zone produced an
incredible chance forthe Huskies.
Stanford stood on his head as he
stonewalled the first wrist shot in
tight, then sprawled legs up to take
away the rebound with a Martin
Brodeur-esque bicycle kick. The
crowd let out a sigh of disappointment after what looked like a sure
Saskatchewan goal, then a cheer
as the realization of Stanford's
brilliance dawned.
"I thought Stanford was great
tonight," said Dragicevic. "He was
calm, he was composed, he was a
vacuum in net."
The period ended the way it
began — largely end-to-end action
as the Thunderbirds took more
defensive risks, leading to more odd-
man rushes both ways. UBC clearly
felt the pressure ofthe looming
playoffs and needed to leave it all on
the ice.
After the Huskies scored in the
opening 10 seconds ofthe second
period, UBC decided to pick up the
pace. A beautiful kill on a Bardaro
interference call proved to be the
spark the home team needed, as
Greg Fraser popped in a rebound
going cross-crease.
UBC's powerplay struck next
four minutes later to give them the
lead. It only took 10 seconds for the
T-Birds to make Saskatchewan pay
for a hooking call. New addition and
former LA. Kings draft pick Geord-
ie Wudrick slammed in a one-timer
from captain Ben Schmidt.
Wudrick has helped the powerplay as of late, and is looking
extremely dangerous alongside
linemate and top Thunderbird
scorer Cole Wilson. Wudrick had
two goals and an assist in Saturday's
affair, the helper coming on Wilson's
4-1 marker. Every time they're on
the ice, the two seem to click. The
chemistry looks especially threatening considering Wudrick just joined
the team a matter of weeks ago.
Until Wudrick arrived, the
powerplay had been mediocre all
season. UBC currently sits 17th in
the CIS powerplay rankings with a
not-bad-but-not-great 17.6 per cent.
The penalty kill sits in a slightly better 12th position with a respectable
84.5 per cent. If the Thunderbirds
continue this trend, they stand a
good chance to make a difference
with special teams in the playoffs.
Wudrick's second powerplay
goal ofthe night gave UBC a bit
of insurance heading into the late
stages ofthe game. He then assisted
on Wilson's 4-1 marker, and Joe
Antilla drove the dagger deeper into
Saskatchewan with another goal
within a minute of Wilson's to give
UBC an impressive three goals in
five minutes.
Tensions boiled over with about
three minutes to go when a brouhaha erupted in the Thunderbird
zone after the whistle. No gloves
were dropped, but the donnybrook
was a veritable buffet of glove-eating
frustration. Six 10-minute misconducts were doled out, ejecting the
guilty lot for the remainder ofthe
game. Clearly, both teams were
emotionally invested until the end.
"You saw guys in the third
period when it was 4-1 go down and
block shots — it's nice to see," said
Dragicevic contentedly.
The steely coach looked optimistic going into the season's final
stretch. "You talk about playing
games that matter — next weekend
matters for us. We're confident.
If we play like we did tonight and
bring the same structure to our
game, we'll be successful against
anybody." XI
BASKETBALL»
T-Birds scorch UBC Okanagan Heat
Natalie Scadden
Sports + Rec Editor
The UBC Thunderbirds women's
basketball team extended their win
streak to a season-high eight games
with a weekend sweep ofthe UBC
Okanagan Heat.
Friday's game was never really
a contest. Led by Harleen Sidhu's
22 points on ll-of-16 shooting, UBC
was in command right from the
start. Firing on all cylinders, the
T-Birds were ahead by 18 points at
halftime and finished with an 83-57
victory. All but one UBC player contributed to the scoring, and the 34
bench points were a season high.
"We were probably feeling a little
bit more comfortable and a little
bit more willing to share the ball,"
said UBC head coach Deb Huband.
"I think you've got to do that, and
the more that happens, the more
your team grows in confidence and
chemistry."
The T-Birds were slower to start
on Saturday night. The game was
tied at 15 half way through the
second quarter before UBC went
on a 16 -3 run to finish the first half
with a 13-point advantage.
UBCO pulled to within five
points in the third quarter, but
again UBC responded with 10 unanswered points, capped by a deep
three from Cassandra Knievel with
the shot clock expiring.
The T-Birds were up 50-38
heading into the final frame, but
Claire Elliott scored a quick five
points for the Heat with a fast break
layup followed by a three, making it
a seven-point game with just under
nine minutes remaining.
But the best players seem to step
up their game when it matters most,
and that's exactly what Kris Young
did. The reigning Canada West
MVP scored nine of her 20 points in
the fourth quarter, guiding UBC to
its 15th victory ofthe season.
Huband wasn't exactly thrilled
with either win this weekend. "I
don't think we played consistently for 40 minutes," she said after
Friday's game. "We were really
inconsistent from minute to minute,
from sub to sub. I would've liked
to maintain our focus through our
roster regardless ofthe score and
the time."
With playoffs around the corner,
Huband hopes to see fewer lapses in
intensity. Her team has had things
relatively easy the past two weekends against UNBC and UBCO, who
have seven victories this season
PHOTO STEVEN RICHARDS/THE UBYSSEY
Kris Young scored 9 of her 20 points in the fourth quarter on Saturday night to guide
UBC to their eighth straightvictory.
combined. Next weekend, the last
ofthe regular season, they'll play a
home and home series with UVic
(14-6). Both teams have already
secured a playoff berth, but are now
seeking home advantage in the first
round.
UBC is currently tied with Fraser
Valley for the Pacific division lead,
while Victoria sits one game back.
The top two teams in the division
will host a quarterfinal matchup
in the first round of Canada West
playoffs. XI
Read the UBC men's
basketball recap online at
ubyssey.ca/sports.
BIRD
DROPPINGS
Women's basketball (15-5)
Friday vs. UBCO: 83-57 W
Saturday vs. UBCO: 68-55 W
Men's basketball (11-9)
Friday vs. UBCO: 69-58 W
Saturday vs. UBCO: 85-77 W
Women's hockey (20-6-2)
Friday @SASK: 2-1L
Saturday @SASK: 4-3 L
Men's hockey (10-14-2)
Fridayvs.SASK:3-lL
Saturdayvs.SASK:5-lW
Women's volleyball (18-4)
Friday® ALB: 3-2 L
Saturday® ALB: 3-1L
Men's volleyball (15-7)
Friday® ALB: 3-1W
Saturday® ALB: 3-1L //Opinions
Grading B.C.'s liquor law reforms
KIRSTEN AUBREY
Op-Ed
On Friday, the B.C. government
published a report outlining 73
proposed changes to our province's
liquor laws. Liquor laws have a profound impact on the ability to hold
live music events in our province.
The Safe Amplification Site Society,
a nonprofit dedicated to music for
people of all ages in Vancouver,
would like to respond to the five
recommendations that we feel most
affect all-ages music (note: two
more responses are included in the
online version of this article). Below,
we comment on each of these and
grade them, report-card style.
B.C.: "SS. The provincial government
should introduce a new licence class
and streamlined application process
for facilities (e.g., stadiums, arenas
and theatres) that charge a fee for an
event (e.g., a sporting event or play).
Minors should be permitted to stay
until the event ends."
Yes! We are very excited about this
recommendation, and sincerely
hope that all existing music venues
will switch to this new class of
licence, ditching their age-restricted
liquor primaries forever. The only
reason this is not an A+ is because
the examples given do not include
musical events. Assuming venues
that charge a fee for a musical event
will be given the same rights as
those which charge a fee for a play,
this could be a gamechanger. A.
B.C.: "34. Minors, if accompanied
by a parent or guardian, should be
permitted in certain liquor-primary
establishments, a. Government
should establish a reasonable time
(e.g., until 9p.m.) that respects both
the family's choice to include minors
in some events and the establishment's responsibility to ensure an
appropriate environment for all."
While this would be an improvement on the status quo, we do have
a few criticisms of this recommendation.
First, it is not always practical
for teenagers and parents to go
out together. Older teens may live
apart from their parents, while
some parents simply have different music taste. The goal is to
allow young people to safely and
legally experience cultural events
held in liquor-primary settings,
but this change only helps those
with parents or guardians who
are available to attend those same
events. We believe a chaperone
requirement may make sense for
those 16 and under, but not for 17-
and 18-year-olds.
Secondly, it is not specified
what "certain liquor-primary
establishments" means. Are they
talking about allowing teens in
the Best Western lobby bar, while
still banning them from important
concert venues like the Biltmore
and Astoria? We are disappointed
by the ambiguity here.
Additionally, the "reasonable
time" is also left vague. 9 p.m.
is given as an example, but it's
unclear whether that is the actual
proposed cut-off time for minors
inside liquor-primary establishments. We believe a 9 p.m. ending
is too early to allow for functional
all-ages events. An 11 p.m. cutoff
for minors would be more reasonable, and would allow for true
all-ages events where humans of
all ages can interact and enjoy the
same event together.
While recommendation 35
could certainly be improved upon,
this is a good start. Considering
the status quo is an F-, it's great
news that this recommendation is
a solid C.
B.C.: "48. Remove the regulation that
requires non-profit organizations to
apply for an SOL [special occasion
licence] for concerts and events. This
will allow promoters who actually
manage the event, to be responsible
to meet all requirements ofthe liquor
licence."
This proposal, alongwith recommendations 7b and 43-46, makes it
easier to acquire a special occasion
licence, which allows the sale of
alcohol at a temporary all-ages
event. While the SOL system is
definitely broken, and we certainly
appreciate any effort to improve
it, we believe there is something
missing here.
One ofthe biggest problems
with the existing SOL rules is
that they are based on a distinction between public and private
events. It's easy to license a "private" event where all guests are
invited or sold tickets in advance,
but harder to get a licence for a
"public" event that anyone can
walk into off the street. Size is
not important, so it's easier to
license a 500-person rock concert
for which everyone buys advance
tickets than a tiny piano recital
that anyone could walk into off the
street. This penalizes accessible
community events that don't have
the capacity for advance ticketing,
and encourages exclusive corporate events instead. We believe that
if there is going to be an "easy to
get" licence and a "harder to get"
licence, the distinction should
be based on the size ofthe event.
While we appreciate these efforts
to make all SOLs easier to get,
there is no recommendation to
abandon the public versus private
categorization, which is completely outdated and needs to be
eliminated. C+.
B.C.: "IS. Applicants and licensees
seeking a review ofLCLB [Liquor
Control and Licensing Branch] decisions should have access to a new and
separate decision-making body outside the licensing branch. The Ministry of Justice should review current
processes and determine how best to
provide independent decision-making
for those seeking appeal."
We hope the Ministry of Justice
follows through with this recommendation and creates a way for
people to appeal LCLB decisions. An
appeals process like this could have
saved Hoko's, which we believe was
unfairly targeted by LCLB enforcement officers back in 2009. A+.
B.C.: "37. Food-primary enterprises
that wish to fully transition away
from food service after a certain hour
(e.g., 9 p.m.) — if, for example, they
wanted to operate as a nightclub —
will be able to apply for a licence endorsement, allowing them to operate
like a liquor-primary licence during
those hours only. a. Minors would not
be allowed in the establishment after
that time."
The aforementioned Hoko's was
fined an unaffordable amount
because they were operating
contrary to their purpose — that
is, as a "community centre" (actual
quote from LCLB enforcement officers) instead of a restaurant. On
one hand, this recommendation
would legalize that business model, as restaurants would be able
to legally shift to being concert
venues after dinner time ends. On
the other hand, the recommendation states that minors would not
be allowed in the establishment
after that time. This is disappointing. We love restaurant venues
because they can legally allow
minors! This proposal seems to
remove that possibility. F.
Kirsten Aubrey is the publicist for
Safe Amplification Site Society, an
organization in Vancouver dedicated
to making music available to people of
all ages in Vancouver.
CSWllUWi
T ^ V
ILLUSTRATION JETHROAU3THE UBYSSEY
LAST WORDS//
COUNSELLING REALITY
CLASHES WITH
RHETORIC
Across society, mental health has
started to be taken more seriously in
recent years. At UBC, the last several years have seen topics related
to student's emotional well-being
raised to the fore, with events like
Thrive Week and AMS politicians
emphasizing the importance of student stress levels and the like.
It is disappointing, then, to learn
ofthe problems at UBC Counselling
Servies. Awareness campaigns and
societal recognition is only as good
as the services to back it up. The fact
that Counselling is underfunded
and, according to some students
interviewed by The Ubyssey, just
not very good, is discouraging to say
the least.
The question of provincial
funding for student mental health
services is complex. That said, if
UBC has established a baseline of
need for their counselling service, it
would be heartening to see that fully
funded.
Perhaps even more problematic
than the lack of funding is the revelation — bouncing around for quite
some time now on the anonymous
Facebook page UBC Confessions
— that many counsellors working for UBC are not very good at
their jobs. A bad counsellor can do
more damage than no counsellor
at all, and it seems like UBC is not
holdingtheir mental health services
employees accountable.
That should change immediately.
TO TRAVEL OR NOT?
If you're currently an undergraduate student at our fine school,
chances are you've probably
met someone during the course
of your studies who has either
gone abroad or participated in an
exchange program. If you haven't
already, you can read about a few
of them in our travel supplement.
When asked about their travels,
these poor students are often forced
to summarize them with cliches:
"It was life-changing." "It really
changed my perspective on things."
"I learned so much about other cultures." And so on. Such statements
rarely do justice to the significance
this journey may have had for the
individuals in question (that is, if it
did have any significance).
Yet the frequency with which
these sorts of platitudes about
travelling are mentioned, combined
with UBC's particular emphasis on
international learning initiatives,
has two effects: it ostracizes students who elect not to travel during
their degree, and it undermines
the actual value of travelling itself
by reducing it to a series of quaint
postcard anecdotes.
Contrary to popular university
discourse, you don't need to go
abroad to "find yourself," nor do
you need to build a hut in Burkina
Faso in order to make a meaningful
contribution to the betterment of
humanity. But as a society, and particularly at university, we insist —
tacitly or otherwise — that travellers
derive valuable conclusions about
life from their trip, and that these
conclusions be bracketed in the
terms enumerated above.
The dogmatic insistence on
travelling abroad is reinforced by
a notion particularly prominent at
UBC: that Vancouver is a "no-fun
city," and that to have a good time,
one needs to experience an entirely
different culture. Frankly, these are
fictions we use to justify laziness.
There is plenty to do in Vancouver,
provided you step off the beaten
path once in a while; and it's easy
enough to explore the incredible
beauty ofthe Lower Mainland, as
our supplement illustrates.
So, if you are going to travel, do
it on your own terms, not someone
else's. Don't travel because you feel
obligated to, or because you feel it's
the solution to life's problems. In
fact, you don't even need to justify
travelling at all; travel simply because you would like to.
UBC SHOULD CARE MORE
ABOUT ACADIA PARK
In late August, then-VP academic
Kiran Mahal presented the university with a 179-page report on the
needs of students living in Acadia
Park. Changes to the university's
land use plan designated part of
the student housing area to be
converted into marking housing
in 15 to 20 years, and although the
university claimed robust consultation with the community took
place, residents of Acadia Park said
that wasn't so.
The report essentially said UBC
should focus on developing Acadia
Park Student Family Housing as the
tight-knit community it is and make
sure it remains affordable.
After five months of no public
response, the university prepared
an 11-page response which took
some ofthe recommendations into
account — UBC will soon provide an
overview of its $16-million maintenance plan to address concerns
of buildings deteriorating, which is
good — but a lot ofthe university's
response to the recommendations is
"we appreciate you for saying that."
At a Board of Governors meeting
last Tuesday, student Board member
Matt Parson asked about the balance between market-price housing
and affordable student residences.
UBC President Stephen Toope said
it would be premature to give any
answer until Acadia Park's "neighbourhood plan" is developed, which
won't be for a few more years.
That's not good enough, and
the university must offer a more
comprehensive response to student
concerns soon. XI 12    I    GAMES    I    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11,2014
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3UZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USEDWITH PERMISSION.
23-More recent
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24-Playing marble
26-Echolocation
1-Influential person
27- Summon for active duty
6-Verne captain
29-Repasts
10-Bushy hairdo
31- Potpourri
14-Skylit lobbies
32-Inventor Nikola
15-Russian range
33-Scooby-
16-Put down
36-In spite of
17-Waterfall
40-Pigpen
18-Orange cover
41-Very much
19-Wishing won't make
42-        -friendly; not too technica
20-Hill insect
43-Garden figure
21-City on the Ruhr
44-Sleeveless cloak
LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
WITH A POSTGRAD
IN BUSINESS
CHOOSEYOUR
CERTIFICATE
46-"Olympia" painter
48- Old French expression meaning "goodbye"
49-Smalldrum
50-Surmise
52-Sleep stage
55- Composer Khachaturian
56- 'acte (intermission)
57- Seventh sign of the zodiac
59- Ricky's portrayer
60- Title bestowed upon the wife
of a raja
61-Varnish resin
62-Just I
63-To _~_ (perfectly)
64-Family car
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47- Demote
48-Eagle's home
49-1 did it!
50-Midge
51-Magazine founder Eric
53- Humourist Bombeck
54- Common street name
56-Memorable time
58-Land in la mer
3UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD. USED WITH PERMISSION.
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Have strong opinions about our games
page? Email printeditor@ubyssey.ca
WOODWARD'S
SFU'S VANCITY OFFICE OF
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Christian Parenti:
Rethinking the State in the
Context of Climate Crisis
Wednesday February 19,7pm
Free but RSVP required
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
Human Rights Watch
Traveling Film Festival
February 20-23,7pm, Free
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
2nd Annual Jim Green
Memorial Lecture: A Night of
Storytelling with Bob Williams
Thursday February 27,7 pm
Free but RSVP required
Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema
SFU'S GOLDCORP CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
149 W.HASTINGS ST.   SFUWOODWARDS.CA

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