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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1971

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'Management reaps profits,
fishermen without overtime'
By LAURENCE LEADER
Exploitation of Nova Scotia
fishermen was the concern of
Homer Stevens, president of the
United Fishermen and Allied
Workers Union, at a labor week
speech Wednesday noon.
Stevens told about 50 people
in the SUB ballroom that
fishermen and their management
are supposed to work together.
"But management are reaping
the profits and fishermen are
doing the work without overtime.
Co-adventuring went out with the
buffalo," he said.
Nova Scotia fishermen have
been fighting for almost a year
against courts, companies, and the
Canadian Labor Congress to get
representation in the union of
their choice.
Their seven-month strike which
ended earlier this year was the
climax of the fight.
Stevens said the strike occurred
because of "terrible conditions"
such as men being blacklisted
(prevented from working
anywhere) for up to 10 years.
He described the strong
conviction of the strikers to go
through with the strike despite
management's attempts to starve
them out.
"Forty-five picketers were
charged with contempt of court
when the picket line was
maintained against a court order,"
he said.
One man was sentenced to nine
months as an example for the
labor movement of Nova Scotia,
he said.
Fellow fishermen reacted to
the sentencing by appealing to
other    industries    to    strike    in
sympathy and a general strike
almost resulted, Stevens added.
Despite fishermen's refusal to
later join the Nova Scotia Meat
Cutters Union, their management
secretly signed the MCU contract,
Stevens said.
"Management fired 140
fishermen when they refused to
work under the union
agreement," he said.
Stevens concluded by saying
the fishermen's persistent
opposition to unjust conditions
"has laid the base for unionism
throughout North America."
Anglican minister Ron Parsons
said he was reverend for the parish
of the striking fishermen and was
the only member of the clergy to
support the strike.
He was fired for his support of
the strikers.
Parsons   complained   that   the
PARSONS AND STEVENS
... part of labor week
Parent sick
Due to illness, Madeline Parent,
labor organizer in Quebec and
Ontario, will not speak today.
Parent, who is known for her
25 years of labor activity
including the recent Texpack
stike in Brantford, Ont, has
pneumonia.
Her speech was to be part of
the Alma Mater Society special
events committee labor week.
Brian Sproule, special events
committee member, said he would
read the long telegram Parent
sent, in which she said the
Canadian labor struggle was an
integral part of the freeing of
Canadian economy from U.S.
domination in the SUB
auditorium at noon today.
purpose of the church "is in
conflict with the capitalist system
of screw your neighbor."
"The communist economic
system is more compatible with
Christianity," he said.
"It is not a screw your buddy
system."
Labor week activities continue
today with a meeting for campus
workers at 8 p.m. in the SUB art
gallery featuring folksinger Phil
Thomas, a slide show and
speakers.
At Friday noon in the SUB
auditorium a panel discussion on
the future of organized labor in
Canada will close labor week.
Folksinger Tom Hawken,
formerly of Barkerville Theatre,
will perform in a tribute to
Wobbly labor organizer Joe Hill
on the fifty-sixth anniversary of
his execution.
UVic head quits,
tenure under gun
Education minister Donald Brothers has
announced that his department plans to review the
question of tenure in B.C. universities, but the
announcement received little reaction at UBC.
UBC president Walter Gage said Wednesday he
"would just wait and see what they do," refusing
further comment.
"I just read it in the paper and I don't know
what   Brothers'   statement   means,"    said   Cyril
HUMAN GOVERNMENT was just the beginning. Pictured above is the Animal Government slate for AMS power spotsleftt
open by HG's departure. The Ubyssey admits the photo at top centre might be described as a bad picture of presidential
candidate Grant Burnyeat, but our photographers are notoriously underpaid. (Story, page 3.)
Belshaw, anthropology and sociology department
head.
"If I knew what he meant, I'd sound off," he
said.
Robert Jordan, English department head, also
had no comment.
"Brothers wants to tighten the present tenure
system by replacing it with one which will allow
universities to expel professors for political
reasons," said human government president Steve
Garrod.
The provincial government has no say in
university tenure policy but Brothers said his review
of the situation could result in revision of the
University Act.
Brothers' announcement came after University
of Victoria administration president Bruce Partridge
— the man with the mail order degrees — decided to
call it quits and search for a "new life".
Partridge announced his resignation Tuesday
night to more than 300 UVic faculty members. The
resignation was officially submitted to the
university's board of governors and accepted
Monday.
Partridge's resignation came after a year of
constant conflict with both students and faculty.
The conflict stemmed from the UVic
administration's refusal to renew the contracts of
several popular teachers at the university.
In April, the faculty supported a motion'of
non-confidence in Partridge. But Partridge said he
would not resign.
In his announcement Tuesday, Partridge said:
"It was not an easy decision, but I believe this is the
time to do it (resign)."
He said "one compelling factor was that in the
past month or so my wife and I have seen signs in
ourselves that we might be growing cynical or bitter."
See page 3: TIME Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 18, 1971
'Seize cha nces' - La bor MP
By SANDI SHREVE
Women are not taking their
place in society because they
spend too much of their nervous
energy questioning themselves, a
British Labor MP said at UBC
Wednesday.
Barbara Castle, a former
cabinet minister, told more than
500 persons in the old auditorium
it is difficult to argue for theories
claiming biological or innate
incapabilities of women in
"controlling men or getting their
own way", from historical
evidence such as the reign of
Queen Elizabeth 1.
The idea that a woman's job in
life is to sustain and comfort men
came to its height in the Victorian
era with people such as Tennyson
saying "he for God only, she for
God in him", Castle said.
"The suffragette movements of
the early decades of this century
displayed admirable physical and
moral courage of women.
"But now women do not rush
to seize what opportunities they
have obtained," she said.
She said since women got the
vote they have never held more
than 29 of 630 seats in the British
House of Commons. Despite the
great accessibility to local council
seats in Britain only 12 per cent
are held by women.
(Only one of 264 seats in the
Canadian parliament is held by a
woman.
(The B.C. legislature has the
highest  percentage of women in
CASTLE
. no silver platter
provincial legislatures. Five of the
55 seats are held by women.)
"Women have gained entry
into the professions but are
under-represented in all except
teaching and social work," said
Castle.
"I reject the favorite theme -
women are not of suitable
temperament to occupy positions
normally assumed to belong to
men.
"I think what women need
first is opportunity."
She cited her own experiences
as British transport and overseas
development minister and
secretary of state in facing and
overcoming male prejudice.
The means required to
overcome male prejudice in
"their" field proves if women
really are given the fullest
opportunity it must be given quite
deliberately," she said.
She suggested possible
beginnings to obtaining equal
opportunity in legislating an equal
opportunities act making
discrimination against women in
industry illegal.
"Only nominally do women
now have equality of
opportunity," said Castle.
"This could be made a greater
reality if women would dare to
trust in their own potentiality.
"It is no use for women to wait
for it to be granted to them on a
silver platter by the opposite sex
— the ruling class rarely
abdicates."
Whafs up, doc?
Feeling rotten? Got problems with your body?
This column, written by someone who knows,
attempts to provide information about aches and
pains common among students and dispel some
common myths. It is strictly informational and
doesn't attempt to prescribe or advise, except to say
when a doctor should be consulted.
Send questions and letters to What's Up, Doc?,
Room241-K, SUB, UBC.
Today's column talks about infectious
mo nonucleosis.
"Mono" is a disease of young people. Eighty
per cent of cases occur in people between 15 and
30.
T.he cause is unknown, although most doctors
suspect a virus. It has gotten a reputation as "the
kissing disease" because it tends to break out in
schools and army barracks, seemingly after a
weekend or holiday. However, it turns up in other
institutions, such as hospitals, and we all know
there's no hanky-panky in hospitals. There are also
sporadic cases, and it does not seem highly
contagious.
A typical case starts with a few days of the
poorlies. A sore throat appears and may become
quite painful. By the second week most sufferers get
a fever and swollen lymph glands in the neck and
armpit. Some get a rash which usually looks like
rubella measles; some get jaundice; some get swollen
eyelids or sore, tender gums; some get very ill with
high fever, headache and feeling generally crummy.
If you go to a doctor he or she will prod your
abdomen, feeling for your spleen, which is probably
enlarged. If keen, he will examine your blood for
the typical mono-nucleated white blood cells
(mononucleosis, get it?) and if really keen, will send
some off for special tests proving you indeed have
mono.
After three weeks or so you will start to get
better. However, you may be one of the few who
continues to have the poorlies, and/or swollen
lymph glands, for weeks or months.
It is possible to die of infectious mono, but this
is extremely rare. Complications are severe liver
damage, ruptured spleen (possibly caused by
too-vigorous prodding by your doctor, heh heh)
blood-clotting problems and damage to the nervous
system. However, most people get completely
better.
There is no treatment for infectious
mononucleosis. However, there are other conditions
which can mimic the symptoms, so if you think
you've got it, see a doctor.
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No. 607-509 Richards St., Van. 2, B.C. Thursday, November 18, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
2 roads emerge at second learn-in
Students again filled the Henry
Angus lounge Tuesday, for the
second time in two weeks, to talk
about the crisis in sociology at
UBC.
The two-hour discussion, titled
The Two Roads of Sociology, saw
sharp divisions of opinion about
w h at's happening in
contemporary social sciences, as
students and dissenting faculty
attempted to work their way
toward a collective position.
The Tuesday learn-in was the
latest in a series of events sparked
by the anthropology-sociology
tenure dispute which broke out
last month when the department's
promotion and tenure committee
narrowly recommended profs
Matthew Speier and Ron Silvers
for tenure, only to have their
decision undercut by department
head Cyril Belshaw.
Advertised as a debate about
'conventional' sociology versus
the 'new' sociology Speier and
Silvers are engaged in, most of the
discussion, however, centered
around the claim made by
members of the Union of Radical
Social Scientists that the real
nature of the two roads in the
social sciences had to do with
apologising for capitalism and
revolution.
While students and faculty
tussled with the questions,
Belshaw was busy shipping a letter
to anthrosoc undergraduate union
representatives telling them they
couldn't come to a department
meeting.
The undergrad union's Colin
Portnuff had written Belshaw
asking him when the next
department meeting would be
held and saying that students
planned to put forward a motion
asking the P and T committee to
reconsider the Speier-Silvers cases.
Belshaw, who two years ago
made a provision for undergrads
to have two representatives at
-department meetings, countered
with a claim that the union was
not a legitimate representative of
the students, and refused to tell
the union if and when a meeting
would be held. Students would
only be permitted to participate
if they could demonstrate their
legitimacy to Belshaw, his letter
said.
After the learn-in, anthrosoc
grad students and junior faculty
held their first joint meeting and
drafted plans to reiterate their
position, which is a request that
the P and T committee re-examine
the cases.
At    the    learn-in,    discussion
began with Matt Speier's
description of 'establishment'
sociology and its three
approaches: survey research, small
group experiments and armchair
theorizing.
"Survey research has sold out
to business, small group
experimenters have preferred the
neat and sterile environment of
the one-way mirror lab to the
messiness of real life," and the
armchair types have chosen "the
sanctity of their offices," Speier
said.
Speier then proposed an
alternative to this in which
sociologists "would go out into
the world and actually see what
people do." Speier's remarks were
supplemented by Ron Silvers who
insisted that the new approach
Speier outlined had a major effect
on teaching. "You have to ask
students," Silvers said, "what are
your concerns, your background,
your experiences? The instructor
is no longer the traditional leader
in the classroom."
URSS member Gillies
Malnarich said she didn't see
much difference between the two
roads described by Speier. While
agreeing with Speier and Silvers
about the nature of conventional
sociology, she claimed that "the
'new' sociology moves sideways
rather than forward. Both kinds
of sociology still work within the
highly competitive academic
corporation."
Malnarich and several other
URSS members offered an
alternative vision of what they
saw as the two roads. Malnarich
said, "There is bourgeois
anthropology, sociology,
economics, etc., and there is
collective radical social science."
She went on to emphasize the
difference between "the
fragmented view of the social
sciences as separate which
reinforces  individual  alienation"
and the radical insistence on social
science as an indivisible activity.
URSS members repeatedly
insisted throughout the discussion
that the work of social scientists
must be of direct use to oppressed
people, and claimed that most
social science done at UBC, both
new and old, was elitist.
David Mole, outgoing AMS
treasurer and a member of the
union, said: "There are indeed
two roads. You are either an
apologist for capitalism or else
you are a revolutionary. Our
concern is for social science to
serve revolutionary purposes."
PARTRIDGE ... in happier days
Time for new UVic leadership, says Partridge
From page 1
"Now its the time for the university to
seek new leadership, and for me and my
family to build a new life."
Students and faculty started growing
cynical and bitter in December, 1970 when
nine teachers were refused tenure, promotion
or re-appointment after receiving the support
of their departments. Five others who weren't
backed by their departments were also refused
tenure.
The Canadian Association of University
Teachers then sent a commission to
investigate the cases. UVic faculty and CAUT
requested that the cases be investigated by an
independent tribunal.
In the middle of the dispute, it was
discovered that two of Partridge's academic
degrees had been issued by Blackstone School
of Law, a Chicago mail order college.
(The school stopped awarding degrees in
1970 by order of the U.S. federal trade
commission.)
In May, faculty members rejected a
three-member independent tribunal set up to
investigate the dispute, saying the tribunal's
terms of reference were "completely
unacceptable" to the faculty association.
In April, CAUT passed a motion
censuring Partridge. The board of governors
expressed full confidence in Partridge despite
CAUT's action.
Five AMS posts acclaimed as slates bungle
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Nominations closed Wednesday with five of the seven
Alma Mater Society executive positions filled by
acclamation.
All are members of the Student's Coalition slate.
Candidates from two other complete slates were
declared ineligible or withdrew after irregularities were
found in their nomination forms.
"Both parties are composed of engineers and we
found the same signatures repeated on forms for the same
office for each of the two parties," returning officer
Sandy Kass said.
(Constitutionally, a person can sign only one
nomination form per candidate per office.)
Ten candidates for president, vice-president, secretary
internal and external affairs were declared ineligible.
"If  they'd   even   taken   a  cursory  glance   at   the
constitution they would have seen this rule spelled out in
very elementary language, but I guess they either didn't
look at it or didn't understand it," Kass said.
Four other candidates, running for the offices of
co-ordinator and treasurer voluntarily withdrew.
Their withdrawal simplifies a potentially complicated
situation.
Two other candidates running for the offices on the
Student's Coalition slate had the same signatures on their
forms as candidates from the other slates.
If the other candidates had not withdrawn, all those
running would have been declared ineligible and a new
nominating period would have had to be declared.
Because of this, the election would have been
postponed until December 2.
"These people at first said they wouldn't withdraw,
but later changed their minds. I'm glad they did — it saves
a hell of a lot of trouble," Kass said.
This means Rick Murray, applied science 2 is the new
co-ordinator and Dave Dick, arts 4 has been acclaimed
treasurer.
Also acclaimed were Derek Swain, recreation 3 as
vice-president; Adrian Belshaw, science 4 as external
affairs officer; and Michael Robinson, arts 4 as internal
affairs officer.
The office of president and secretary are still open to
contest.
Hilary Powell, arts 1 and the only woman member of
the Student's Coalition and Tom MacKinnon, law 3, an
independent candidate are running for secretary.
Steven Houser, arts 4; Allan Caplan, law 1; Til
Nawatzki, law 3; and David Sands, agriculture 3 who are
all independent candidates and Grant Burnyeat, law 2 and
head of the Student's Coalition are running for president.
The election will be held Nov. 24. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 18, 1971
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
Editorial number 26
Faster than a speeding
highways minister, stronger
than a PGE locomotive, able
to leap to God in a single
bound.
It's absurd, it's insane,
it's . . . Super Socred!
Disguised as dim-witted
education minister Donald
Brothers, our hero has just
announced that the
university tenure structure in
B.C. might need a little
investigation.
Good thinking, Super
Sock. But spare us, will you?
Your review is the last
thing this university needs.
And speaking of the
Socreds, a ray of hope
illuminates the multiversity.
Business in the
beer-swillers haven has shot
up following our report that
financial difficulties could
force the Pit to close.
And another piece of
good news.
Administration president
Walter Gage is joining the
ranks of the Order of
Canada, that big honor roll in
the sky.
In becoming an OCer,
Gage joins such notables as
timber     baron      H. R.
m ubyssh
NOVEMBER 18,1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR:  LESLIE PLOMMER
It was Mudvilte Nine day as the losers stepped up to the plate and
smashed it peace by peace. Paul Knox pulled the bat out of the nether
regions of his backside where David Bowerman had previously been seen
sneaking only to be surprised by club mascot Stan Persky who really
prefers mice hockey. As Sandy Kass caught flies and ate their wings lovely
Laurence Leader ran for the bucket but was reminded by little Lesley
Krueger that passing water is only done in football. Sandi Shreve and
Vaughn Palmer ate up the turf with their shenanigans but Gord Gibson and
Kent Spencer made them spit it out while Brett Garrett and Dave Phillips
grabbed the shenanigans from Garry Gruenke. Berton Woodward weepily
called the game on account of pain.
MacMillan, hockey player
Gordie Howe, newspaperwoman Ma Murray, Chief
Dan George, runner Harry
Jerome, and so on.
Who knows, with time the
OC may even come to
replace the gold watch.
Ah, but it's not all
happiness and light in the
ivory city.
Out of the seven-member
Students' Coalition slate that
now commands five AMS
executive posts, only one
person is a woman.
And what post is she
running for?
You guessed it. Secretary.
And last (and least)
there's the AMS byelection
itself, which has proved once
again that the capacity of the
woodwork is limitless.
All the three-time losers,
the secret power trippers
with their midnight fantasies
about becoming Liberal
politicians, the funny, crazy
letters-to-The-Ubyssey
writers.
We    said    we'd    remain
optimistic, and we will.
But it ain't easy.
Letters
Mr. President
Ladies and gentlemen, let me assure
you that I didn't really want to run
for council. I protested against my
nomination on the grounds that I
really had no ideas or leadership
ability. I had no desire to make any
significant changes in the bureaucratic
structure of our universities. In fact,
I was completely content to fritter
my time away within a secure
institutionalized Ivory Tower.
My backers immediately assured ma that
that doubts and fears of this nature
had never disqualified presidential
candidates in the past, and this
election was no exception. In,
fact, they went on to praise my
inherent inability to make the
decision to run on my own.
My promotion crew immediately went
went about collecting catchy slogans
like "socio-educational role, in your
heart you know he's right, etc." At
first, I was hesitant but the stakes
.certainly looked good - prestige, a
cushy job upon graduating, social
tete-a-tetes with the administration,
credibility with the uninitiated.
I figured why not?
In conclusion, I would like to say
that if you vote for me, you'H get
typical dynamic leadership, and
responsible legislation ■ - - you
poor bastards!
From the Gazette
Driver
I'd like to say a few words
about hitchhiking after reading
John Nolan's statement in The
Ubyssey (Friday, Nov. 5) that
"one person per car is not only
poor ecology, but also fucking
unfriendly."
It is true that one person per
car is not only poor ecology but
also poor economics. But is it
always unfriendly? As a driver
who usually gives people a ride, I
should like to point out that there
are often valid reasons (which
may be unknown to the
hitchhiker) why a driver does not
stop. For example:
—car is filled with cargo (but may
appear to be empty from the
outside);
—car  is  not  operating  properly
(not enough power);
—no    place    to    stop    without
creating a hazard;
—driver does not notice hitchhiker
(something on his mind);
-driver just had a bad experience
with a previous hitchhiker and
is not yet over it;
—driver   is   having   a   personal
discussion with a passenger and
does not want a third person in
the car;
—hitchhker   is   undesirable   (an
excuse    often    abused    but
occasionally justified);
—hitchhiker is unreasonable (e.g.,
he  has his two St. Bernards
with him);
—driver intends to stop or turn in
the next block.
Therefore, I appeal to
hitchhikers to think twice before
overtly expressing their disgust at
being passed by. After all, the
same driver might be going their
way the next day without an
excuse.
D. W. Malcolm,
Statistical centre,
Henry Angus building
Slavonics
For at least the last five years
some students have been making
approaches to the Slavonics
department of the arts faculty
about the introduction of a
Ukrainian language course.
Some of the students involved
were of Ukrainian origin; others
were not. Each year, from 10 to
50 students were prepared to take
the course if it was offered.
What we have in mind is a
Ukrainian course similar to the
introductory Russian 100 or
Polish 100 courses now being
offered. With this in mind we
have, over the years, talked with
almost everyone in the Slavonics
department, written briefs and
letters, signed petitions, held
formal meetings, discussed, argued
and even cried — and yet to our
exasperation no Ukrainian course
is forthcoming.
The- department advanced
various reasons why the course
couldn't be implemented "at this
time". Among these were lack of
funds, requisite committee
approvals, decreases in general
departmental enrolment,
problems of upsetting the
department's program balance and
certain "internal" problems that
hindered success.
Some of these problems have
been ironed out over the summer
— while others are still advanced
as reasons for why Ukrainian
cannot be offered.
We have tried to point out the
following things to the
department:
1. There has been a continuing
demand for the course for at least
the last five years.
2. We see that there are a
number of classrooms not being
used during various parts of the
day.
3. We can arrange for
textbooks through the bookstore
at no cost to the department.
4. Some years ago, senate
approved in principle of teaching
Ukrainian at this university.
In short, all that is needed is
accreditation. But at the moment,
prospects of getting the course
introduced don't look any better
than they did five years ago.
It would be easy for us to do
some name calling and scream
injustice, etc. But at present —
especially because of some recent
changes within the department —
we want to give it one more
chance. We hope the department
is responsible enough to take it.
Nonetheless, we just can't see
the course being introduced
without the support of the general
university community behind us.
For this reason we appeal to
students and faculty to help us in
applying pressure to the
department of Slavonic studies to
implement a Ukrainian 100 course
next year.
More specifically, we would
ask anyone who is willing to help,
to write a letter of support to the
Slavonics department.
Andrew Semotiuk,
Law 3
Library
Perhaps there are others out
there who are still as unwittingly
vulnerable as I was.
Let this letter be something to
fill your wallet with; I'm about
due to lose all the contents of
mine.
It's about losing library books
— a very costly enterprise. For
each book lost there's $$$ to pay
for late return fee, processing and
for the lost book itself. Let me
illustrate with figures from my.
recently received bill: (a) the
book,   $7;   (b) late   return   fee, Thursday, November 18, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
$4.50;   (c) processing,   $3.   The
total is $14.50.
I fell victim to this a,b,c, triple
take because I was ignorant
enough to hold off reporting my
book loss until I'd received my
final overdue notice. By then my
fee had amounted to the above —
a rather large lump to swallow
without choking.
I assume that there's a
substantial number of other
students who will also, at some
time during the year, find
themselves in a similar hole; let
this serve as a warning.
And for those who find library
books around the campus,
obviously abandoned, make a
rpoint of dropping these in any of
the library depots as soon as you
can.
Alison Inglis,
Agriculture 2
Garbage
I find it appalling that a very
large number of people,
(especially students) think that
litter is only that garbage which is
dropped on the outside of a
building.
The amount of garbage left on
tables, floors, shelves, etc., is
fantastic.
Does it really take that much
effort to deposit litter in the
nearest  receptical? Or is it just
that these people don't want to
put the janitors out of work?
Beiflg a janitor myself (and a
student) I assure you I would not
lose my job if people were more
helpful. And, of course, you know
how much nicer a room looks at
the beginning of a day than at the
end.
Unavoidable? No way. Just a
little common sense might help to
solve the problem.
L. Barry Jensen,
Commerce 1
More
An open letter to chief of
janitors:
I wonder if it is possible to
make a minor change that would
mean a lot to some of us students.
I would like to ask you to give
orders that the bulk garbage be
removed from lounges (such as
Buchanan lounge) around supper
time so that those of us who use
these areas for studying evenings
wouldn't have to put up with the
smell. (Never mind sweeping.)
This would be highly
appreciated.
Mike Dundas,
Arts 3
Plastic
These are just a few words in
exchange for a few I had recently
with a food services employee in
the SUB cafeteria.
To my dismay, I was informed
that the nicety of free extra hot
water for tea is no longer
available. If one wishes to have
another cup of tea, one has to pay
12 cents for the hot water!
Since when does it cost 12
cents to heat one cup of H 20?
Considering the fact that one is
re-using the original tea bag, I'm
certain the second cup of tea
needn't cost as much as the first.
I would also like to add a few
words about plastic cutlery. The
excuse food services gives for
using these non-biodegradable
utensils is that it can't afford to
replace stolen cutlery. I could
perhaps accept that argument if
food services was also unable to
replace plastic cutlery.
Why doesn't food services use
its imagination, and its old
dishwater, to sterilize the plastic
cutlery instead of throwing it
away? Plastic is recycleable in this
way, if the water temperature is
adjusted so the plastic isn't melted
in the process.
I consider it well worth the
food services people's time to
investigate this suggestion. They'd
be doing themselves a favor, as
well as me, in saving our world
from being polluted beyond the
point of no return.
Bobbie Wood,
Education 2
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Devious sources in this slimy island
republic report a creeping undergrowth of running noses insidiously
taking over exalted island moustaches.
"I think we should get right down to the tissues," spokesman
Scott Zee said. "Some say we blew it, but their threats are only
mucous to my ears. I think it's all very cilia."
Beautiful
clothes. .
for..
beautiful
people
UE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
7 76 Granville 687-2701
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121
ingmar bergman's
the passion of anna
ii
max von sydow liv ullmann
bibi andersson erland josephson
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Friday 19th & Saturday 20th 5&V
7:00 8(9:30 SUB
Sunday 21st - 7:00 THEATRE
Charlie Chaplin
FOUR FLIX
HEBB THEATRE
U.B.C.
SATURDAY. NOV. 20
7:30,9:15, 10:45 p.m.
50* Everyone
One Day Only
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
"The first entertainment film of the
Woodstock Nation, or the last film of the
Nixon Nation. Funny from beginning to
end, it's pure gold!" -village voice
brand
directed by Win Chamberlain, starring Taylor Mead,
Saljy Kirkland, Frank Cavi-
stani, Tally Brown and
Abbie Hoffman, Candy
Darling, Ultra Violet and
Sam Shepard
Plus a Lenny Bruce short
NOW SHOWING AT
THE OLD COLONIAL THEATRE
Show Times
7:45 & 10 p.m.
ADULTS $1.50
STUDENTS $1.00
601 Granville
688-9129
LTD.
CO-OPERATIVE INSURANCE SERVICES
100% CANADIAN OWNED
CHECK THESE EXTRA BENEFITS FROM
CO-OP INSURANCE
"Canada's Fastest Growing Major Auto Insurer'
COLLISION -
You save the deductible! If you have Collision or All Perils coverage and are involved in an accident
with another Co-op insured driver, the deductible clause in your policy is dropped. Damage to your
car is paid in full! No fuss. No worry about who's to blame . . . another good reason for insuring the
Co-op way.
IMPACT WITH ANIMALS OR BIRDS -
If both Collision and Comprehensive coverages are included in your policy, damage to your car from
impact with animals or birds is considered a comprehensive loss. You benefit from the lower
comprehensive deductible.
PREMIUM NOT INCREASED IF YOU HAVE AN ACCIDENT -
Provided you have held a permanent, valid operator's licence for three years, and no driver has had an
accident or traffic conviction during that period.
AUTOMATIC RENEWAL REMINDER -
Sent to you well in advance of expiry.
CO-OP INSURANCE is pleased to announce the opening of their new offices,
conveniently located for U.B.C. Students, Faculty and Staff at
2978 - W. Broadway at Carnarvon - 731-0437
YOUR REPRESENTATIVES ARE:
SPIROS DOUKAS, RES. PHONE: 879-1842 - ALAN KNIGHT, RES. PHONE: 731-8974 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 18, 1971
ill
Hot flashes
llillllliiillililillllllllllllllilllllllliitilllllllllllllil^
China expert
on change
Paul Lin, associate history prof
at McGill University, will speak at
a Vancouver Institute meeting
Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in
Buchanan 106.
Lin, who lived and worked in
China from 1969 to 1964, will
speak on the Dynamics of Change
in Contemporary China.
Lin taught at UBC before
escaping to McGill.
Baikel, back
Zoologist T. G. Northcote will
speak at noon today in the Bio
Sciences Building, room 2000.
The subject of Northcote's talk
is To Baikel and Back. His speech
is the third presentation in the
noon hour Travels With Zoologists
series.
Banners gene
Two orange banners with black
Indian designs painted on them
have been stolen from SUB. The
banners were borrowed from the
Museum of Anthropology and
used during Indian week.
If anyone happens to stumble
across the banners, return them to
the Special Events office in SUB
220. No questions will be asked.
If the banners are not returned,
the Special Events Committee will
have to replace them.
Lower archy
Placide Bazoche, a French
Roman Catholic priest, will speak
Friday at noon in SUB 211.
Bazoche, North American
secretary of the World Student
Christian Federation, will speak
on student movements in North
America.
Bazoche has some first-hand
insights from the lowerarchy.
state
Tom Durrie, former director of
Saturna Free School, will speak
on the declining state of eduction
Saturday at 8 p.m., in the
Unitarian Church, Forty-ninth
and Oak.
The need for teacher, student
and parent support for a more
meaningful education system and
the inefficiency of the school tax
system will be discussed.
Durrie, 41, quit his teaching
position   in   1967   to  direct  the
New School in Vancouver and
then the Saturna Free School. He
is currently developing private
alternate education projects in
B.C.
Growth
University of Wisconsin prof
Philip Lewis Jr. will speak today
at noon in the SUB ballroom.
Lewis, head of the landscape
architecture dept. in the school of
natural resources, will speak on A
Growth Strategy For The
Environmental 70s.
Morse training
Nurses' education will be the
topic of the annual Marion
Woodward Lecture Friday at 8
p.m. in the old auditorium.
Murial Uprichard, UBC school
of nursing director, will lecture on
the three different ways of nurse
training in hospital schools,
university schools and community
colleges.
Uprichard's main concern is
the problem of applying these
different education types to the
same work.
Admission to the lecture is
free.
Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting, noon. SUB 205.
NATIONAL FILM BOARD
Four free films, noon. International
House 400: Angel, Le Merle, The
World of One in Five and Bethune.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Discussion group with speakers, 7 to
il p.m.. SUB 213.
CINEMAWEST
Fiimof Shakespeare's Othello noon,
7:30 p.m., old auditorium.
ANGLICAN UNITED CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Carol Marx on Beliefs That Matter,
noon. SUB 211.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Meetinq. 3:30 p.m., SUB 111.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Huge Second World War battle to be
re-tought, noon, SUB 125.
BAHA'I CLUB
Rap session, noon, Buch. 230.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Len Sawatsky, noon, SUB 207-209.
8   p.m.,   Buch.
FRIDAY
CCF
Workshop, noon, SUB 215.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Community      organization
casework, noon, SUB 105-A.
CLASSICS CLUB
Classics   Club   play,
penthouse.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Film, Illegal Abortion in Canada,
noon, SUB 207-209.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Painter Kardos speaks on Histories
and  Urbanism,   noon,  Lasserre 105.
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Placide Bazoche, Quebec: A French
Nationalist    View,    noon,    in   SUB
211.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105-B.
MUSSOC
Meeting of people wanting to play
string instruments for Fiddler on
the Roof, noon, SUB 237.
SATURDAY
CANADIAN FRIENDS OF
CHINA ASSOCIATION
Rally    to    commemorate    Norman
Bethune,  7 p.m., Fisherman's Hall,
138 East Cordova Street.
NVC
Bowling party, 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
in the SUB bowling alley.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
"Outburst" dance with Fat Chance,
SUB ballroom, 8:30 p.m.
VOC
Skagit    Valley   to   Chilliwack   Lake
continuing     to     Sunday.     Also
introductory      ski      touring      at
Diamond Head.
MONDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French      conversation     classes     at
noon:      advanced,      Buch.      3205;
beginners,      3201.      All     welcome.
Continuing on Tuesday.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Bloody     third     battle     of     Pearl
Harbour continued into sixth week,
8 p.m. in SUB 207-209.
EL CIRCULO
Talk     by     Prof.     Bartroli,      noon,
International House 403.
#-
rl/iJ.
L
THE
TOWN
PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
DEAL IN GASTOWN
Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
Sound' of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6696
<£>6?
arsity Sports
4510 W. 10 Ave.   CeHtfeLtCJ.     224-6414
John Wurflinger
is a small independent
businessman who devotes special attention to
university students.
Before purchasing any
sporting equipment,
drop in to see John.
OPERATING   PRINCIPLES
Skiers will receive individual attention.
Skiers will receive honest professional advice on equipment
selection.
All lines carried will be of top quality in their price range.
Prices wil I be such as to offer outstand ing value.
All products will be backed by a personal guarantee.
Open Thursday & Friday till 9 PM.
WKmW^rmmi
 fflii^^ii^^^ft^^j^v.*'!;-:-"#iiF--; j^ei^; js^^4dN|i|iv;'lSfeiiP-
l^^g^l^^§l§ff^0^^ t  day; f§»3Sf.. additional
iti rtviHit* JltotoRUm if If tn ■ in. ffw ifwy fwfiun j)uf)ffi«ffnn
§§|||§§tl§|^
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
STROBES, BLACK LIGHTS, BUB-
ble Machines. 10% off rental to
UBC students.  736-0944.
Greetings
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED FUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 459 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
3:30 p.m.,   681-6840.
Lost & Found
13
14
15
Rides & Car Pools
Special Notices
-MORE PUN THAN AX AMS ELEC-
tion. cheaper than a SUB meal—
Tom Northcott in Concert. Thursday, Nov. 25 at 8:001 p.m. in Ballroom. Tickets $1 at AMS Business
office.	
MARATHON GESTALT WEEK-
end Nov. 26, 27, 28. For information phone Allan Cohen, 224-5445
or John Mate,  731-7971.	
WANT TO PLAY IN A CONCERT
band? Former high school musicians and anybody else who can
play, welcome. Phone Pete 684-
7750 or Cathie 939-0741.	
UBC BEAUTY SALON (NEAR
campus). Hair shaping, shag- cuts
at reasonable prices. 5736 Univer-
sity Blvd., 228-8942.	
TAI CHI CHUAN SELF-DEFENSE
health classes for men & women.
Bill Wong instructor. Phone 253-
9356.	
CUE SOCIAL FRIDAY. NOV. 26,
Faculty .Club, Salon B & C. Lunch
at 12 or dinner at 5:30. Reservation Dean of Women's office —
221-2415.
Travel Opportunities
IS
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
VW. EXCELLENT CONDITION —
completely overhauled. Good tires,
brakes, trans. Phone 738-6003 before 10 a.m. or 6-8 p.m. Not Sun-
days,	
69 TRGT6 + . 1 OWNER, GOOD
condit.. radio, offers, must sell,
call  736-6903.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Work Wanted 52
Automobiles—Repairs 24
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Photography
35
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or 736-4923.
utfje Hensf ant flutter
Yu.j       Camera*
3010 W.  BDWY. 736-7833
also  at  Denman   Place
GADGET BAG
SPECIAL
List $16.95
Our, regular price  $13.50
Special $10.95
PRINTING    YOUR   OWN
XMAS    CARDS?
We have the widest selection of
Agfa and Ilford papers at the
Best   Prices.
Scandals
37
KEENERS WANTED FOR AN
Outburst. Fat Chance!! . . . Play-
for it, Sat., Nov. 20, 8:30 p.m.,
SUB Ballroom. $1.50 worth of
action!	
FOR GUYS ONLY: RENO'S CLUB,
775 Homer, enter at rear. Monday-
Saturday, 9 p.m.-3 a.m. Sunday,
3 p.m.-11 p.m 683-1515.	
AQUA SOC. LARSEN DAY DIVE
and party Sunday at 10 a.m.. Nov.
21.
Scandals—Cont.
37
UNRIPOFF: SUB BALLROOM —
Thursday, Nov. 23 at 8:00 p.m.
Tom Northcott in Concert. Tic-
kets $1,00 at AMS Business office.
HOMOSEXUAL? WOULD YOU
like to find out about homosexuals? Box 6572. Station "G",
Vancouver 8. See Tween Classe*
Thursday.
Typing
40
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385   after   5   p.m.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced Typists. Mrs. Free-
man,   731-8096. ^
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m.  to 9 p.m. Quick service
on   short  essays.	
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC    TYPING.
|      My    home.     Essays,    Thesis,    etc.
Xeat,   accurate   worK.   Reasonable
Rates.  Phone 263-5317.	
TERM PAPERS, ETC. SPEEDILY
and efficiently typed. 35c page.
Call Yvonne at  738-6874.   (Kits).
TYPING — "ESSAYS, THESIS, Assignments, research papers. Fast
service. Near 41st & Marine Drive.
 266-5053.	
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745—Reasonable  Rates.
TYPING."ESSAYS, TERM PAPERS.
Theses,   Phone   224-7918.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
STUDENTS WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-tima in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen, 81 Howe St.,
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
APPLICATIONS REQUESTED FOR
Snack Bar help and Male Sports
Shop help. Please contact Ron
Johnson, UBC Thunderbird Winter
Sports   Centre.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
61
71
K O F L A C H SUPERSTAR, GOOD
cond. $40. Size 7, ladies. Also men's
Riachle Red Hots, good cond,, $135.
Phone 266-9033.	
BRAND NEW. NEVER USED —
Nikon FTN Photomic 50mm f-1.4
1 year warranty, leather case. $330.
733-0573 evenings.	
SKIS — TON! SAILER, 205 CM.
like new. .$55.00. Contact Murray.
Rm.   205,   Civil  Eng.  or 872-2785.
ROSSIGNOL STRATI) 102. 207 CM.
Relimshed. Ken Newington, 988-
6338   or   alter   five   at   688-2682.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS ROOMS WITHVlTCHEN
privileges, $60 month. 5745 Agronomy Road, behind village, drop
around tod,ay.	
MEN ONLY. BSMT. ROOM. NEAR
gates — private entrance. Phone,
facilities study—no cooking, sorry.
Ready now.  224-762:!,	
LARGE RM. IN 3-BDRM. HOUSE
14th & Burrard, Dec. 1st, $75. Prefer girl 22-2X yrs. 732-3470. Jacques
Room & Board
82
MONTHLY" MEAL PASSES — AT
the Deke House. S30.00 — Dinners
weekdays: $40.00—Dinners 7 days/
wk.: $20.00 Lunches 5 or 7 days/
wk. J55.00 Combined 7 day Lunch
& Dinners. 5765 Agronomy. 224-
9691.
Furnished Apts. 83
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE FUR-
nished basement suite. 1st & Alma
— $50 found, own room. 732-0883
nights.	
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE TWO
bdrm. apt. 1800 block W. Broadway — 10 min. bus to campus.
$67.50 plus half utilities. Phone
Ron. 731-0316.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
WELL BUILT 4-BDRM. VIEW
house over 1500 sq. ft., fire pi.,
carport, available for lease. Upper
2 rms. was rented. $110.00. 879-
8570.	
2 PEOPLE NEEDED TO SHARE
in communal house, own room. 9th
at Trimble. $108.00 per mth. 224-
1405.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Thursday, November 18, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Senate space priority goes
to commerce, engineering
WILLIAM
By SANDY KASS
The UBC senate approved a
committee report Wednesday on
proposed priorities for new
buildings and changes in academic
building space.
Approval of the senate
committee on academic building
needs report followed an almost
two hour debate on the accuracy
of criteria and methods used for
setting the priorities.
The report was originally
rejected by senate Sept. 15 for
"incompletely informing senate
on the criteria for the allocation
of funds."
Following a senate agenda
committee recommendation, the
report will be forwarded to
administration president Walter
Gage and the board of governors
for their consideration and
approval.
The report dismissed in one
paragraph a recommendation by
student senators Steve Garrod and
Art Smolensky that UBC stop all
building until it has a
comprehensive and coherent plan
for long-range plans for
development of education.
"There are urgent needs that
must be met now and we believe
that a good case can be made for
most of the nearly S40 million
worth of proposals for new
buildings brought to our
attention," the report stated.
The building priorities brought
to senate by the committee
constitute S12 million worth of
building needs for the next two
years.
"We must look to the
immediate problems at hand,"
committee member Richard Bibbs
told senate.
Topping the priority list was a
commerce and business
administration request for an
additional 85,000 square feet of
space.
In its brief to the committee,
the faculty said such space could
be provided by either building a
completely new structure or by
modifying and extending the
Henry Angus building.
The faculty currently shares
space in Angus with several
departments from the faculty of
arts.
The committee report did not
elaborate on how the commerce
request would be facilitated, but
recommended it to the
administration for further study.
Increases in student enrolment
and research projects, as well as
potential fire dangers in the
mechanical engineering building
sparked the committee's second
FIDDLE?
Mussoc needs string
musicians for the
orchestra of 'Fiddler On
The Roof. If you play
violin, viola or cello and
are    interested,  contact
KARL KOBYLANSKY
in the Music Dept.
or
leave your name with the
Mussoc off ice, SUB 237.
priority for a new building for the
applied science faculty.
The departments of mechanical
and civil engineering will share the
65,200 square feet of space the
new building will provide.
The committee's third priority
is a north wing to the biological
sciences complex.
The wing will provide
exclusively for undergraduate
laboratory and lecture space, the
report claims.
Fourth on the committee's
priority list is an
anthropology-sociology request
for 65,910 square feet of space
for departmental and student
studies offices, specialized
teaching   and   lab   facilities  and
Museum of Anthropology and
Archaeology labs.
The last priority on the
committee's list is a faculty of
education request for increased
grad student study space and an
enlarged curriculum laboratory.
Economics profs Gideon
Rosenbluth and Anthony Scott
criticized the committee's criteria
for setting priorities for being
"unclear and without direction"
while Garrod called the results of
the report "alienating to
students".
After approval by Gage and the
board of governors, the report will
go to the planning and
co-ordinating committee to work
out details of space allocations.
espeare
OTHELLO
with
Laurence Olivier & Maggie Smith
THURSDAY
NOV. 18
12:25 & 7:30
OLD AUDITORIUM 50*
a Cinema West presentation
£
THE SOUND OF THE 70'S
EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER * DOORS • CARLY SIMON • JAMES
TAYLOR • JETHRO TULL • BLACK SABBATH • JONI MITCHELL •
ATOMIC ROOSTER • BEE GEES * JIMI HENDRIX • DAVID CROSBY
• STEPHEN STILLS • LED ZEPPLIN * NEIL YOUNG • IRON BUTTERFLY
* ALLMAN BROTHERS * JOHN SEBASTION AND MANY MORE!
AT LOW PRICES!!
WARNER BROS.    *    REPRISE    *   ATLANTIC   *   ELECTRA
ATCO    *    COTILLION   •   VOGUE   *   EMBRYO   *   NON SUCH
MARKED $6.29 GORDON
LIGHTFOOT
"SUMMER
SIDE OF
LIFE"
Only
$Q38
"Cotton Jenny"
"Summer Side of Life"
'AQUALUNG'
Jethro Tull
'Up To Me'
'Aqualung'
Only
$038
MARKED $6.29
'MUD SLIDE SLIM'
lames Taylor
'You've Cot a
Friend'
'Mud Slide Slim'
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THE       UBYSSEY
nullum
Thursday, November 18, 1971
Clan dominate
Shrum Bowl
SIMON  FRASER  PLAYER (20) plays the part of an ostrich during pileup in
stopping UBC's Dune Kippen (32).
^ -garry gruenke photo
Saturday's game while
Pronghorns bow to 'Birds
By MIKE GIDORA
Lethbridge is a nice place to
visit. Especially if you're a
member of the UBC Thunderbird
basketball team. While the 'Birds
were being clobbered by SFU in
football action, the basketball
'Birds made a weekend visit to
Lethbridge and left with two
victories over the resident
Lethbridge Pronghorns.
Friday night guard Ron
Thorsen scored 24 points as he led
the 'Birds to a 94-63 win. Ahead
11 points, 41-30, at half-time,
UBC appeared to be on their way
to an easy victory.
But the Pronghorns stayed
with them and narrowed the point
spread to seven with 11 minutes
left in the game. It was at this
point that UBC switched from a
Hockey fall ends in death
Lawrence Corby, of 125 West
Tenth, died Sunday after
sustaining a fall while playing
hockey at the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Center.
Last Wednesday, Nov. 11, a
group of friends from Pittsburg
Paint rented ice at the Winter
Sports Center. Corby was skating
alone after a loose puck in the
opposition's end when he fell and
hit the back of his head on the
ice.
Five 'Birds
en BC team
UBC standoff Ray Banks was
selected as captain of the rugby
team to represent the province
against the touring Australian
"Wallaby" side.
Four other UBC men were
chosen (Bob Jackson, Eric
McAvity, Garth Hendrickson and
Spence McTavish) to play with
the B.C. team.
The UBC contingent composes
one-third of the team while no
other club placed more than two
men.
In rugby action over the
weekend the Birds and Braves had
a bye. The Totems lost 12-0 to
Richmond, the Tomahawks beat
Capilano* 12-3 and now head the
fourth division with a glorious
unbeaten (8-0) record. The Frosh,
one of the strongest Frosh teams
ever, won a 41-4 victory over
BCIT.
Today at noon, the Frosh and
Tomahawks will play to
determine which of them will
move up to the second division
after Christmas, when the Braves
will be in the inter-collegiate
league.
The Thunderbirds play
Capilanos on Saturday at 2:30
p.m. at Thunderbird Park.
Admission is free upon
presentation of AMS card.
Although stunned he was not
rendered unconscious. Later that
day, after nausea and vomiting,
Mrs. Corby took him to
Vancouver General Hospital.
X-rays were negative but his
condition steadily worsened.
Doctors operated Friday night
and found hemorraging
throughout the brain. Corby died
Sunday.
"He could have been saved by
four dollar headgear," said rink
manager Stan Floyd.
A spokesman for the coroner's
. office said a specialist is looking
into the death. A hairline fracture
on the front of the head, not
attributable to the fall, and a
record of headaches before the
fall, may infer a congenital
condition, the spokesman said.
Gymnasts win
The UBC gymnastics team
solidly defeated the University of
Victoria 76-20 in competition last
Saturday in Victoria.
Glen Butler was high scorer for
UBC, taking first place in the
floor exercises, pommel horse,
vaulting and parallel bars
competition. Butler also had the
top all-round score, followed
closely by Rob Smylie, also from
UBC.
Steve Chatton, from Victoria,
took first place in the other two
events, the high bar and the rings.
man-to-man to a zone press and
dominated the rest of the game.
Saturday the 'Birds came
within one point of reaching the
century mark, winning 99-75.
Again Thorsen was the leader, this
time scoring 32 points. Other top
performers were John Mills who
scored 13 points for the second
night in a row, and Stan Callegari,
Darryl Gjernes and Bob Phillips
who each collected 10 points.
Looking back at the weekend,
possibly the most gratifying
aspect was the 'Birds
out-rebounding their taller
opponents both nights, pulling
down 40 on Friday and 39
Saturday night. This should calm
many fears about the 'Birds'
height, or lack of it, and full
marks should be given to Mills and
Gjernes in this department.
The 'Birds play three league
games this week, today at noon
against Victoria and a pair of
weekend rematches with
Lethbridge.
All three games will be played
at War Memorial Gym.
By KENT SPENCER
Fumbles and interceptions
opened the 'Bird floodgates and
the points poured in Saturday in
the annual Shrum Bowl football
game.
The SFU Clansmen turned four
first-half interceptions and three
'Bird fumbles into a 21-0 halftime
lead, then rolled to a 42-0 win
over the UBC Thunderbirds.
Greg Warkentin, Dave Kaduhr,
Lothar Bartels and Bill McKay
scored six each for the Clan. Ross
Clarkson added 12 more, the
second on a 68 yard punt return
in the third quarter.
SFU scored twice in the last
1:46 of play to make it seem
worse than it really was.
SFU quarterback Dave Syme
completed 16 of 28 passes for 244
yards and three touchdowns. The
Clan   ran   up   440   yards   total
Intramurals
The men's intramural curling
bonspiel was a success Saturday.
After 16 hours of curling between
37 teams. Engineers 4 emerged as
victors over Fort Camp, 3-2 in the
A event final.
The Gear rink included Don
Morrison, Wayne Pledger, Brian
Saunders, and Curt Snook. The
Fort Camp team was comprised
of Roy Huston, Tom Hughes,
Grant MacDonald, and Rob Cam.
The B event was won by
Commerce 3 who beat Commerce
1 6-4. Totem Park 1 walloped
Totem Park 2 9-0 in the C event
final.
BASKETBALL RESULTS:
Division 1, Fort Camp 45 -
Recreation 41, Sigma Chi 16 -
SAM IS, Carey Hall 31 - Dekes
13, Architecture 28 ■ Union 26,
Beta 55 - Dentistry 19, Totem
Park 47 - Alpha Delts 24, Fort
Camp 48 - St. Andy's 25,
Recreation 40 • Architecture 9,
Totem Park 41 - Arts 32, Division
2, Hillel Club 31 - Forestry 8,
MBA 36 - VOC 25, Place Vanier
41 - Engineers 27, Dentistry 25 -
Forestry 21, MBA 51 - Arts 42,
Place Vanier 43 - Hillel Club 28,
Pharmacy 42 - VOC 22, Engineers
30 - Forestry 15, Fort Camp 33-
Commerce 23.
offense to the 'Birds 162.
SFU coach Lome Davies would
like to see the competition
continue.
"It was closer this year. This
isn't the only rivalry that is
lop-sided. So is the
Washington-Washington State
rivalry."
Davies doesn't think
scholarships at SFU make a very
big difference. "Only half of our
team is on scholarships," he said.
The 'Birds' final record for the
season, including exhibition
games, is three wins, seven losses.
Thunderettes
undefeated
The undefeated UBC
Thunderettes basketball team
rolled to its fourth straight
victory, beating the Vancouver
Eldorados 37-26.
After a scrappy first half that
ended 14-13 for UBC, the
Thunderettes took control using a
full court press to cut the
Eldorado attack.
Ball hawk, Terri McGovern,
again led the Thunderettes with
15 points. Wendy Grant had 9
points.
Friday night, the women host
the University of Lethbridge in
the start of WCIAA play starting
at 4 p.m. Linda McCullough and
Lynn Wells, both out with
injuries, should return for these
games.
The JV girls defeated the SFU
girls 35-31 in a see-saw battle.
Kathy Burdett and Susan Cawsey
each had 8 points. Vicky Williams
scored seven points and was
outstanding in grabbing 12
rebounds.
Great SPORTS Weekend
FREE — to UBC Students — FREE
BASKETBALL
Thursday noon — University of Victoria "Vikings".
Fri.-Sat, 8 p.m. — University of Lethbridge
"Pronghorns".
HOCKEY
Fri.-Sat.,    8
"Vikings".
p.m.    —    University   of   Victoria
SOCCER
Sat, 2 p.m. - Royal Military College.
Added attractions at soccer game — R.M.C. Pipes and Drums
Band, Advanced Gymnastic display at halftime.
HOCKEY CANADA
COLLEGIATE TOURNAMENT
Dec. 28-29
Students— $1.00
Tickets now on sale — athletic office and at
Thunderbird hockey games.
Gen, Admission — $2.00

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